Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Table of Contents

Letter from the Provost Memberships Academic Calendar Academic Class Schedule Final Examination Schedule General Information Purpose of Catalog Student Responsibility Notice of Nondiscrimination and Equal Access Directory Information Accreditation History Vision, Mission and Purpose Nature of the Institution The Christian Liberal Arts Program The Campus Plan Student Life Undergraduate Admissions Graduate Admissions International Student Admission Financial Services Academic Policies, Procedures, and Resources Academic Advising Academic Grievance Policy Academic Integrity Academic Load Academic Probation Academic Standing Academic Suspension Academic Warning Administrative Drop of a Student from a Course Americans with Disabilities Act Application for Degree Attendance Requirements Center for Global Initiatives in Education (CGIE) Challenge Examinations Classification of Undergraduate Students Commencement Course Numbers Course Validity Time Limitation Credit by Examination Cross-Listed Courses Dean’s List Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 1 Degree Plan Degrees with Distinction Dropping a Class Family Education Rights & Privacy Act (FERPA) Final Examinations Grade Appeal Process Health Professions Honors Program Human Subjects in Research Instructional Media Services Intellectual Property Internship Programs Learning Disability Accommodation Liberal Arts Core Curriculum Library Majors Military Service Credit Off-Campus Courses Pass-Fail Courses Pre-Law School Advisor Registration Procedure Repeated Courses Residency Requirement—Undergraduate ROTC Cross-Enrollment Program Army Navy Air Force Second Undergraduate Degrees Student Responsibility The Learning Center Transcripts Transfer Courses Transfer Orientation Transient Enrollment Undergraduate Enrollment in Graduate Courses Undergraduate Grading System and Grade Points Undergraduate Transfer Credit Withdrawal from University Enrollment Undergraduate Degree Program Baccalaureate Degrees Undergraduate Degree Requirements Proficiencies Majors, Degrees, Certification Programs Liberal Arts Core Requirements Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Business Administration Bachelor of General Studies Bachelor of Music Bachelor of Music Education

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 2 Bachelor of Arts - Music Major Bachelor of Science in Nursing Graduate Degree Program Graduate Program Policies Americans with Disabilities Act Graduate Academic Load Graduate Degree Application Graduate Degree Plan Graduate Grading System and Grade Points Graduate Residency Requirement Graduate Scholastic Standing Graduate Transfer Credit Learning Disability Accommodation Student Directory Information Time Limit on Length of Program Graduate Degree Programs Master of Accountancy Master of Arts in Biblical Languages Master of Arts in Christian Counseling Master of Arts in Philosophy Master of Arts in Psychology Master of Arts in Theological Studies Accelerated MATS Master of Business Administration Master of Education Master of Fine Arts Master of International Business Master of Liberal Arts Master of Science in Human Resources Management Master of Science in Management School of Business Undergraduate Programs Graduate Programs School of Christian Thought Undergraduate Programs Graduate Programs College of Education and Behavioral Sciences Undergraduate Programs Graduate Programs School of Fine Arts Undergraduate Programs Graduate Programs School of Humanities Undergraduate Programs Graduate Programs School of Nursing and Allied Health Undergraduate Programs College of Science and Mathematics Undergraduate Programs Pre-Professional Programs

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 3 Smith College of Liberal Arts Honors College Graduate Programs Course Descriptions Deans of the Academic Colleges and Schools University Faculty

Memberships

Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs Association of Graduate Liberal Studies Programs Association of Southern Baptist Colleges and Schools Association of Colleges and Universities Association of Texas Graduate Schools Board of Nursing for the State of Texas Conference of Southern Graduate Schools Council of Applied Master’s Programs in Psychology Council for Christian Colleges and Universities Independent Colleges and Universities of Texas National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities National Collegiate Athletic Association National Collegiate Honors Council National League for Nursing Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Southwest Commission on Religious Studies Texas Intercollegiate Press Texas Organization of Baccalaureate and Graduate Nursing Education Texas State Board for Educator Certification The College Board

This Catalog is neither a contract nor an offer to make a contract. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained herein, HBU reserves the right to make changes at any time with respect to course offerings, degree requirements, services provided or any other subject addressed in this publication. Information is provided solely for the convenience of our applicants, students, students’ families, faculty, and staff.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 4 Letter from the Provost

Jesus was confronted by a rich young man with hard questions. Jesus pointed out that his questions could only be answered if he “sold all he had,” gave it to the poor, and followed Jesus. In our culture, intelligence and education represent wealth.

College should be a time when you take those riches and place them in God’s hands. We will then be able to walk with God and find answers to our questions and develop even better questions as we continue our lives. Sadly, some of higher education has forgotten this high calling. The choice of a school like HBU is a move away from being a mere cog in the educational machine and a decision to prepare for a life of service.

The university trained should give back to those without our opportunities, but too often we think only of our personal peace and affluence. By contrast HBU follows the great tradition of Western universities in placing service to God and country at the center of a well ordered life. You have a chance to be trained by servant-leaders to become global change agents, not for our glory, but for the good of humankind.

Bring your questions this year to your classes. Discard easy inherited answers. Set yourself the task of following the argument, the Divine Logos of God, wherever He leads. We will all be transformed if you do.

This is my second year as provost and Iam excited to sell all my old ideas, my old wealth, and take up a new task following Jesus. I am excited by what can be at this place in this time.

Under the leadership of President Robert Sloan and the Trustees, supported by an outstanding assembly of faculty and staff, the University continues to renew its commitment to excellence in all facets of Christian higher education. To learn more about the University’s vision of Christian and academic excellence, I encourage you to read The Ten Pillars, HBU’s 12-year vision for growth and development. You may find it on the HBU website at http://www.hbu.edu/tenpillars.

This 2013-2014 Catalog for Houston Baptist University reflects our commitment to our heritage. It contains policies and procedures for the various divisions and departments of the University. The answers to many of your questions are found within its pages. Always be sure to consult with your faculty advisor as you use this catalog in progress toward graduation and a life of service beyond.

John Mark N. Reynolds Provost

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 5 Academic Calendar

The Academic Calendar includes only events that are of an academic nature, such as registration dates, add-drop dates, final examination schedule, etc.

May 27 Memorial Day Holiday May 31 Graduate/Undergraduate Registration for Summer/Fall 2013 Semesters

Summer, 2013 - JUNE FASTTERM 2013 (Part of the Summer 2013 Term) June 3 - 14 Two-Week June Fastterm Session (Monday-Friday) Prior to June 3 100% Refund for June Fastterm Classes dropped before June 4 June 3 6:00 pm: Last Date to Add/Last Date to Drop without a "W" for June Fastterm June 3 - 4 50% Refund for June Fastterm Classes dropped during this date period June 5 - 14 0% Refund for June Fastterm Classes dropped during this date period June 12 6:00 pm: Last Date to Drop with a "W" for June Fastterm June 14 Final Exams and End of June Fastterm June 18 Grades Posted for the June Fastterm July 11 Census Date for all Summer Sessions August 6 4:00 pm: Summer 2013 Candidate Grades Due in the Registrar's Office August 10 Summer Commencement August 12 4:00 pm: All Grades due in Registrar's Office

Summer, 2013 - ALL SUMMER SESSION Prior to June 3 100% Refund for All-Summer Classes dropped prior to June 3 June 3 Classes Begin: All Summer Session June 3 - August 8 All-Summer Session June 3 - 9 90% Refund for All-Summer Session Classes dropped during this date period June 5 6:00 pm: Last Date to Add for All-Summer Session June 10 - 16 75% Refund for All-Summer Session Classes dropped during this date period June 17 - 19 50% Refund for All-Summer Session Classes dropped during this date period June 18 Last date to drop without a "W" for the All-Summer Session June 20 - 0% Refund for All-Summer Session Classes dropped during this date August 8 period July 11 Census Date for all Summer Sessions July 23 Last date to drop with a "W" for the All-Summer Session August 6 4:00 pm: Summer 2013 Candidate Grades Due in the Registrar's Office

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 6 August 8 Final Examinations and End of All-Summer Session August 8 2:00 pm: School of Nursing/Allied Health Pinning Ceremony August 10 Summer Commencement August 12 4:00 pm: All Grades due in Registrar's Office August 16 Grades Posted for the All-Summer Session

Summer, 2013 - FIRST 5-WEEK SESSION (Monday-Thursday) Prior to June 3 100% Refund for First 5-Week Session dropped prior to June 3 June 3 - July 5 First 5-Week Session (Monday-Thursday) June 3 Classes Begin: First 5-Week Session June 3 - June 5 90% Refund for First 5-Week Session classes dropped during this date period June 5 6:00 pm: Last Date to Add for First 5-Week Session June 6 Last date to drop without a "W" for First 5-Week Session June 6 75% Refund for First 5-Week classes dropped on this date June 7 50% Refund for First 5-Week Classes dropped on this date June 8 - July 5 0% Refund for First 5-Week Classes dropped during this date period June 26 Last date to drop with a "W" for First 5-Week Session July 4 4th of July Holiday July 5 Final Examinations and End of First 5-Week Session July 11 Census Date for all Summer Sessions July 12 Grades Posted for the First 5-Week Summer Session August 6 4:00 pm: Summer 2013 Candidate Grades Due in the Registrar's Office August 10 Summer Commencement August 12 4:00 pm: All Grades due in Registrar's Office

Summer, 2013 - FIRST 4-WEEK SESSION (Monday-Friday) Prior to June 10 100% Refund for First 4-Week classes dropped prior to June 10 June 10 - July 5 First 4-Week Session June 10-12 90% Refund for First 4-Week classes dropped during this date period June 11 Last date to add for the First 4-Week Session 75% Refund for First 4-Week classes dropped on this date June 12 50% Refund for First 4-Week classes dropped on this date June 13 Last date to drop without a "W" for the First 4-Week session June 13 - July 5 0% Refund for First 4-Week classes dropped during this date period June 26 Last date to drop with a "W" for the First 4-Week session July 4 4th of July Holiday July 5 Final Examinations and End of First 4-Week Sessions July 11 Census Date for all Summer Sessions July 12 Grades Posted for the First 4-Week Summer Session August 6 4:00 pm: Summer 2013 Candidate Grades Due in the Registrar's Office

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 7 August 10 Summer Commencement August 12 4:00 pm: All Grades due in Registrar's Office

Summer, 2013 - SECOND 5-WEEK SESSION (Monday-Thursday) Prior to July 8 100% Refund for Second 5-Week Classes dropped prior to July 8 July 8 - August 8 Second 5-Week Session (Monday-Thursday) July 8 Classes Begin: Second 5-Week Session July 8 - 11 90% Refund for Second 5-Week Classes dropped during this date period July 10 6:00 pm: Last Date to Add for Second 5-Week Session July 11 Census Date for all Summer Sessions July 11 Last date to drop without a "W" for the Second 5-Week Session July 12 75% Refund for Second 5-Week Classes dropped on this date July 13 50% Refund for Second 5-Week Classes dropped on this date July 14 - August 8 0% Refund for Second 5-Week Classes dropped during this date period July 31 Last date to drop with a "W" for the Second 5-Week Session August 6 4:00 pm: Summer 2013 Candidate Grades Due in the Registrar's Office August 8 Final Examinations and End of Second 5-Week Session August 10 Summer Commencement August 12 4:00 pm: All Grades due in Registrar's Office August 16 Grades Posted for the Second 5-Week Summer Session

Summer, 2013 - SECOND 4-WEEK SESSION (Monday-Friday) Prior to July 8 100% Refund for Second 4-week classes dropped prior to July 8 July 8-August 2 Second 4-Week Session (Monday-Friday) July 8 Classes Begin: Second 4-Week Session July 9 Last Date to Add for Second 4-Week Session July 9-10 90% Refund for Second 4-Week classes dropped during this date period July 11 75% Refund for Second 4-Week classes dropped on this date July 11 Last date to drop without a "W" for the Second 4-Week session July 11 Census Date for all Summer Sessions July 12 50% Refund for Second 4-Week classes dropped on this date July 13-August 2 0% Refund for Second 4-Week classes dropped during this date period July 30 Last date to drop with a "W" for the Second 4-Week session August 2 Final Examinations and End of Second 4-Week Session August 6 4:00 pm: Summer 2013 Candidate Grades Due in the Registrar's Office August 10 Summer Commencement August 12 4:00 pm: All Grades due in Registrar's Office August 16 Grades Posted for the Second 4-Week Summer Session

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 8

Fall, 2013 - August 26 - December 14, 2013 August 16 New Faculty Orientation August 21 College/School meetings as scheduled by dean August 22 Student Move-In August 23 Registration August 24 First Day of Class for Saturday Classes Prior to August 26 100% Refund for Fall Classes dropped prior to August 26 August 26 Classes Begin August 26-Sept 3 90% Refund for Fall Classes Dropped during this date period August 30 6:00 pm: Last Date to Add for Fall 2013 September 2 Labor Day September 4-8 75% Refund for Fall Classes Dropped during this date period September 9-11 50% Refund for Classes Dropped during this date period September 11 Census Date/Last date to drop without a "W" Sept 12 - Dec 14 0% Refund for Classes Dropped during these dates November 1 Last date to drop with a "W" November 8 12:00 am-6:00 pm: Pre-Priority Registration for January 2014 Fastterm/Spring 2014/May 2014 Fastterm (Athletes/Hnrs Col) November 11 8:00 am: Priority Registration for January 2014 Fastterm/Spring 2014/May 2014 Fastterm Begins November 28 - 29 Thanksgiving Holiday December 6 Last Day of Class December 7 Final Exams for Saturday Classes December 9 Reading Day/ Faculty Professional Development Program December 10 6:00 pm: Priority Registration for Spring 2014 closes for end-of-term processing; Registration for the January 2014 and May 2014 Fastterms remain open December 10 4:00 pm: Candidate Grades Due to Registrar's Office December 10-13 Final Exams December 14 Fall Commencement December 16 4:00 pm: All Grades Due December 20 8:00 am: Priority Registration resumes for Spring 2014 Grades Posted for the Fall Semester

January Term - January 6 - 17, 2014 January 6 Classes Begin Prior to January 6 100% Refund for January Term Classes dropped before January 6 January 6 6:00 pm: Last Date to Add/Last Date to Drop without a "W" for January Term; Census Date January 6-7 50% Refund for January Term Classes dropped during this date period

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 9 January 15 6:00 pm: Last Date to Drop with a "W" January 8-17 0% Refund for January Term Classes dropped during this date period January 17 Final Exams and End of January Term January 21 4:00 pm: All Grades Due January 22 Grades Posted for the January Fastterm

Spring, 2014 - January 21 - May 17, 2014 January 17, 2014 Registration January 20 Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday Prior to Jan 21 100% Refund for Classes Dropped prior to January 21 January 21 Classes Begin January 21-27 90% Refund for Classes Dropped during this date period January 24 6:00 pm: Last Date to Add Jan 28-Feb 2 75% Refund for Classes Dropped during this date period February 3-5 50% Refund for Classes Dropped during this date period February 5 Census Date/Last day to drop without a "W" February 6-May 9 0% Refund for Classes Dropped during this date period March 10-14 Spring Break April 4 Last date to drop with a "W" April 11 12:00 AM-6:00 PM:Pre-Priority Registration (Summer/Fall 2014) (Athletes/Hnrs Col); Registration for the May 2014 Fastterm Continues April 14 8:00 am: Priority Registration for Summer/Fall 2014 Begins Registration for the May 2014 Fastterm Continues April 14-20 Holy Week April 18-20 Easter Holiday May 9 Last day of class May 10 Final Exams for Saturday Classes May 12 Reading Day/ Faculty Professional Development Program May 13-16 Final Exams May 14 6:00 pm: Priority Registration for Summer closes for end-of-term processing; Priority Registration for the May Fastterm 2014 and Fall 2014 Terms Continue May 14 4:00 pm: Candidate Grades Due to Registrar's Office May 17 Spring Commencement May 19 4:00 pm: All grades due May 23 8:00 am: Registration Resumes for Summer 2014 Grades Posted for the Spring 2014 Semester

May Fastterm, 2014 (Part of Spring 2014 Term) May 19-30 Two-Week May Term (Monday-Friday) Prior to May 19 100% Refund for May Fastterm Classes dropped prior to May 19

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 10 May 19 6:00 pm: Last Date to Add/Last Date to Drop without a "W" May 19-20 50% Refund for May Fastterm Classes dropped during this date period May 21-30 0% Refund for May Fastterm Classes dropped during this date period May 26 Memorial Day Holiday May 29 6:00 pm: Last Date to Drop with a "W" May 30 Final Exams and End of May Fastterm June 2 4:00 pm: All Grades Due June 3 Grades Posted for the May Fastterm

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 11 General Information

Purpose of Catalog

The purpose of this catalog is to provide a general description of the programs and activities offered at Houston Baptist University. The provisions of this catalog do not constitute a contract which may be accepted by students through registration and enrollment in the University.

Inasmuch as the educational process necessitates change, the University reserves the right to establish and revise without notice course offerings, requirements for graduation and degrees, curricula, schedules, charges for tuition and other fees, and all regulations affecting students. Changes will become effective when so designated by the administration and will apply to both prospective students and those already enrolled. The University further reserves the right to require a student to withdraw from the University for cause at any time.

This publication is intended for general information only and does not purport to contain all rules, regulations, and requirements governing HBU students.

Student Responsibility

All schools and colleges establish certain academic requirements that must be met before a degree is granted. Advisors, department chairs, and deans are available to help the student understand and meet these requirements. However, the student alone is responsible for fulfilling them. If, at the end of a student’s course of study, the requirements for graduation have not been satisfied, the degree will not be granted. For this reason, it is important for students to acquaint themselves with all academic requirements throughout their university career and to be responsible for completing all requirements within prescribed deadlines and time limits. The ultimate results of program offerings depend on the individual student and other factors outside the control of the University. Therefore, Houston Baptist University makes no claim or representation relating to the specific outcome of its program and degree offerings with regard to employment or qualification for employment, admission to or preparation for graduate or professional degree programs, or licensing for occupations or professions.

Notice of Nondiscrimination and Equal Access

Houston Baptist University complies with all applicable federal and state nondiscrimination laws, and does not engage in prohibited discrimination on the basis of race, color, nationality or ethnic origin, gender, age, or disability in either employment or the provisions of services. This nondiscrimination policy covers admission, access, and operation of University programs and activities. However, if a student requires special personal services or equipment, the student will be responsible for the associated expenses. This includes, but is not limited to, the expense of providing such things as medical technicians, personal tutors, and attendants.

The University is governed by an all Christian Board of Trustees and is affiliated with the Baptist General Convention of Texas. As a religious institution of higher education, Houston Baptist University is exempt from some provisions of certain civil rights laws, including some

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 12 provisions of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.

Directory Information

Houston Baptist University has designated the following student information as public or “directory information”: name, local and permanent addresses, telephone numbers, email addresses, date and place of birth, classification, major fields(s) of study, classification, dates of attendance, degrees, honors, and awards received, most recent educational institution attended, participation in officially recognized sports and activities, weight and height of athletes, and photographs. Pursuant to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), the University may, at its discretion, disclose such information for any purpose. However, any enrolled student may ask the University to withhold such information by filing a written request with the Registrar during the first full week of classes for any term. By doing so, a student may ensure that his/her directory information is not released to anyone other than officials with a legitimate educational need for the information. The University assumes that failure on the part of any student to specifically request the withholding of “directory information” indicates that the student approves of such disclosure.

Accreditation

Houston Baptist University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award the associate, baccalaureate, and master’s degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia, 30033- 4097, or call 404.679.4500 for questions about the accreditation of Houston Baptist University. For questions not related to accreditation, contact the University directly at Houston Baptist University, 7502 Fondren Road, Houston, TX, 77074, or call 281.649.3000.

HBU also holds membership in the Association of Texas Colleges and Universities and is approved by the Texas Education Agency (TEA) for the preparation of teachers for elementary and secondary schools at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Its undergraduate degree programs in nursing are accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) and the Texas Board of Nursing. The School of Business is nationally accredited by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs. The Master of Liberal Arts degree program is accredited by the Association of Graduate Liberal Studies Programs.

History: General

Houston Baptist College was created by action of the Baptist General Convention of Texas on November 15, 1960 culminating many years of work and study. The aim of the College founders was the establishment of a Christian college of the highest order in the city of Houston that stressed quality of life as well as quality of learning.

In 1952, the Union Baptist Association authorized a committee to study the possibility of locating a Baptist college in Houston. With the assistance and encouragement of the Education Commission of the Baptist General Convention of Texas, the committee conducted a survey in 1955. Acting upon information obtained with the endorsement of the Education Commission, the Association approved the concept of establishing a new college. In 1956, the Executive Board of

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 13 the Baptist General Convention of Texas approved a recommendation that Houston Baptists be given assurance that the Convention would support such a college when the College Committee of the Union Baptist Association had succeeded in acquiring both (1) a satisfactory site for a campus of at least one hundred acres, and (2) a minimum corpus of at least three million dollars. Of this sum, one and one-half million dollars would constitute a nucleus endowment fund; one and one-half million dollars would be designated for a physical plant. The Union Baptist Association accepted these conditions and endorsed the requirements set up by the state Baptist convention.

In 1957, a Houston land developer, Frank Sharp, offered to sell Union Baptist Association 390 acres in southwest Houston for the construction of a college. The Board of Governors of agreed to lend most of the money needed with the land as collateral. To complete the funding, twenty-five business men, since called “founders,” pledged to be responsible for $10,000 each. Therefore, by 1958, a campus site of 196 acres was acquired in southwest Houston, and, in 1960, the initial financial goal of repaying the loan was reached as a result of a campaign among the churches.

In 1960, the Baptist General Convention of Texas in its annual session at Lubbock, Texas elected the first Board of Trustees. This board in session in Houston, Texas on November 15, 1960 approved and signed the College charter. The next day, this charter was ratified and recorded with the Secretary of State in Austin. The way was then cleared to select administrative officers, develop a suitable physical plant, and design an appropriate academic program. Dr. W. H. Hinton began service as the first President of the College on July 1, 1962.

The College opened in September 1963 with a freshman class of 193 students, a cluster of new buildings, and a teaching staff of thirty faculty. A new class was added each year until the College attained a four-year program in 1966-67. By then, the full-time faculty had grown to fifty-four members, serving an enrollment of approximately nine hundred undergraduate students.

History: Degrees and Programs

Initially, the College offered only a Bachelor of Arts degree with academic courses in five divisions: Christianity, Fine Arts, Languages, Science and Mathematics, and Social Studies. The Board of Trustees, following the recommendation of the faculty and administration, authorized the establishment of the Division of Education and Psychology in 1964 and a Division of Business and Economics in 1966. With the opening of the Fall Semester of 1969, the College added a Division of Nursing, offering a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing.

In 1966, the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools recognized Houston Baptist College as an official candidate for accreditation. The highlight of the 1968-69 academic year was the granting of initial accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools on December 4, 1968. A visiting committee made a careful study of the College in March 1971 and upon its recommendation, the Commission on Colleges extended accreditation for ten years. This accreditation was reaffirmed in 1981, 1991 and 2001.

In 1965, the Texas Education Agency first approved Houston Baptist College for the training of certified teachers for elementary and secondary schools. During its first semester, representatives selected by the Texas Education Agency evaluated the teacher education program; approval of the program was continued.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 14 The baccalaureate degree program in nursing received accreditation by the National League for Nursing on April 21, 1972. In July 1972, all thirty-eight members of the first nursing class successfully completed the examination required and administered by the State Board of Nurse Examiners. An Associate Degree in Nursing was added in June 1983; this program graduated its first class in 1985. Admission to the Associate Degree in Nursing program was suspended June 2010.

A study abroad program began in 1967 with a group of English majors in residence at the Shakespeare Institute, Stratford-upon-Avon, England for the month of April. Study abroad continued with programs in Mexico, the Middle East, and Europe. Currently study abroad and academic exchange programs include the Smith College of General Studies’ interdisciplinary summer course on culture and human experience, the Business School’s annual international trip (BUSA 4301), the Houston Grampian Society’s Nursing Exchange Program with Robert Gordon University (in Aberdeen, Scotland), the Language Department’s Alliance Francaise de Houston Scholarship, and the School of Theology’s Summer Hebrew Ulpan at the University of Cambridge’s Centre for Modern Hebrew Studies. The MBA program includes an international study component for its graduate students.

History: Structure and Organization

In 1973, Houston Baptist College officially became Houston Baptist University following completion of a formal self-study for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, and approval by the Board of Trustees in November 1972. At the same time, degree programs were revised, making the Bachelor of Science option available to all graduates. The instructional divisions were completely reorganized into college units.

Five colleges headed by deans replaced the previous structure of eight divisions. The new structure consisted of the H. B. Smith College of General Studies and four upper-level colleges — the College of Business and Economics, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences, the College of Fine Arts and Humanities, and the College of Science and Health Professions. A sixth College was created in 1978 by separating the College of Fine Arts from the College of Humanities. The seventh college was created in 1991 by separating the College of Nursing and the College of Science and Mathematics. In 1995, a College of Arts and Humanities was again combined from the previously separate colleges. In 2007, the Honors College was formed and classes began in that program in fall 2008. In that same year, a Philosophy major was developed. A College of Continuing Studies was initiated in 2008; operations were suspended on May 31, 2010.

On June 1, 2009, the President determined, after consultation with the Provost, the Deans, and the Institutional and Strategic Planning Committee, to change the nomenclature of the Colleges to Schools and Colleges and to move some departments into other divisions in order to reflect best practices at universities and to better serve the mission of the university. The College of Education and Behavioral Sciences became the School of Education; Behavioral Sciences moved to the College of Arts and Humanities. The College of Business and Economics became the School of Business; the College of Nursing became the School of Nursing and Allied Health and brought in the Department of Kinesiology from the former College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

When the instructional areas were reorganized in 1973, the University adopted a quarter calendar

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 15 that permitted multiple admission opportunities annually. Semester hours were retained as the standard credit unit. An early admissions program also was established which enabled students to secure high school diplomas at the end of the freshman year of college matriculation. The quarter calendar was reviewed by the faculty and administration in 2006-07 and the decision was made to revert to the semester calendar in fall 2008.

History: Graduate Programs

Graduate studies began in 1977 with the initiation of the Master of Business Administration and the Master of Science in Nursing degrees. Graduate studies leading to the Master of Education began in 1979. The Master of Science in Management degree and the Master of Accountancy degree were added in 1980. The Master of Arts in Psychology was added in 1982. A traditional Master of Business Administration degree was introduced in 1981 that was offered both on campus and through an interactive television delivery system to corporate and educational sites within sixty miles of the campus. The Master of Liberal Arts degree was initiated in 1985. In 1993, new majors were added to the Master of Business Administration degree, and a Master of Arts in Pastoral Counseling and Psychology degree was created. This degree was phased out in 2002 and replaced with the Master of Arts in Christian Counseling program. In 1995, a Master of Science degree in Health Administration and a Master of Science degree in Nursing Practice were initiated. In 1996, the Master of Science in Management was re-instituted for those already holding an MBA degree. The Master of Arts in Theological Studies was added in 1997. In 1999, the Master of Science in Accountancy and Information Technology was initiated, and in 2000 it was merged into the Master of Accountancy. In 2009, the Master of Arts in Biblical Languages was initiated. In Spring 2010, the Master of Fine Arts was initiated. The Master of International Business held its first classes in Spring, 2012. The Master of Arts, Philosophy major was initiated in Fall 2012.

History: Physical Plant

The physical plant of the University has kept pace with development in other areas. When classes began in 1963, only the Brown Academic Quadrangle and the campus dormitories were completed. The Frank and Lucille Sharp Gymnasium and the Atwood Theology Building were completed in 1964. The Moody Library, the Holcombe Mall, and the Morris Columns were constructed in 1968-69. The McDermott Plaza was completed in 1971 as a gift from trustee Ethyl Loos McDermott. The Cullen Science Center and Mabee Teaching Theater opened in 1977 providing space for the College of Science and Health Professions. In addition, in early 1977, the Memorial Hospital System Central Unit was completed on a site purchased from the University adjacent to the academic campus. The Atwood II building was completed in 1983 as a joint project of Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary and the University. Moreover, in 1983, an addition to the bookstore was completed that was funded by the M. D. Anderson Foundation. In 1985, the University relocated its Math and Associate Degree in Nursing departments to new housing in the Cullen Nursing Center, and the Glasscock Gymnastics Center was completed. In 1989, a new wing was added to the Moody Library, virtually doubling its library space and providing a site for the University’s Museum of Architecture and Decorative Arts. In 1997, the Hinton Center was dedicated, marking completion of the largest academic facility on campus. The new visual campus landmark houses the colleges of Business and Economics and of Education and Behavioral Sciences as well as the Dillon Center conference facilities. In 1997, the University’s Dunham Family Bible in America Museum opened in Moody Library — the

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 16 largest collection of American Bibles on public display in the United States. A new campus apartment complex, Husky Village, was built adjacent to the University residence halls. The year 1998 marked the completion of the Baugh Center, named in honor of Eula Mae (Mrs. John) Baugh, which houses food service, recreational, counseling, study, and residential-support facilities. In the fall of 1999, the Memorial Hermann-HBU Wellness Center opened on the campus providing access to state of the art programs and facilities for the University’s students and employees. A new addition to the Women’s Residence College was constructed in 2000. And, in 2003, the Mabee Teaching Theater and the Glasscock Center were enhanced by a new lobby facility serving the conference capability of this complex. In 2007, the Joella and Stewart Morris Cultural Arts Center was dedicated. The Center provides an integrated, multi-purpose facility for the University campus. A 1200 seat theater features a full proscenium stage, a full orchestra pit, backstage shops, and full theatrical capability. An acoustical shell enhances music performances. The Belin Chapel and Recital Hall provides seating for 365 in a sophisticated acoustical environment. It represents the first a permanent site for worship on campus. It is used for music recitals, weddings, worship, and as an assembly space. Additionally, the Museum of American Architecture and Decorative Arts and the Dunham Bible Museum joined the Museum of Southern History in new facilities within the Morris Cultural Arts Center.† McNair Hall serves as the unifying link for the theater, chapel and museums as well as an appealing locale for receptions and banquets. The Williams Fountain and Lawrence Park crown the complex, enhance the Morgan Prayer Garden for meditation, reflection, and prayer, and provide attractive space for outdoor gatherings. In August 2008, the Lake House, a six story Residence College, opened providing over 350 beds supporting the University’s goal to become a more residential campus.† The University Academic Center, opened in August 2008 provides classrooms, offices for the Honors College and the College of Arts and Humanities, and an art gallery and studios for the Department of Art. The Looser Fountains in the Bettis Quadrangle were dedicated in 2011 honoring the 45 year HBU career of Vice President Emeritus Dr. Don Looser and his wife Elsa Jean.

History: Endowment Programs

Special endowment programs have further enriched the University. The University received three endowed chairs during the period 1971-1978 — the Herman Brown Chair of Business and Economics, the Robert H. Ray Chair of Humanities, and the John Bisagno Chair of Evangelism. In the same period, two endowed professorships were given — the Rex G. Baker Professorship in the College of Business and Economics and the Prince-Chavanne Professorship of Christian Business Ethics. The John S. Dunn Research Foundation funded the Dunn Endowed Professorship in Nursing in 1994 and a professorship for Clinical Excellence in Nursing in 2001. In 2005, the estate of former HBU employee Juanita Pool and her sister, Phyllis, funded the Juanita and Phyllis Pool Endowed Chair of Nursing. The Endowed Scholarship program was begun in 1971 increasing the endowment of the University and helping assure the recruitment of top academic students. More than 250 Endowed Scholarships have been funded through this program.

History: Leadership

In 1987, the University’s first president, Dr. W. H. Hinton was named University Chancellor. He served in that capacity until his retirement in 1991. Dr. Hinton’s successor, Dr.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 17 Edward Douglas Hodo, and his wife, Sadie, came to HBU from the University of Texas at San Antonio, where he had served as Dean of the College of Business. During the Hodo years, the University achieved a position of financial solidarity that greatly enhanced its integral strengths in other areas of its operations. In 1997, Dr. and Mrs. Hodo received the HBU Spirit of Excellence Award, the highest honor bestowed by the University. New academic programs were developed, and the physical plant was expanded to include the Hinton Center, the Baugh Center, the Husky Village Apartments, the Memorial Hermann-HBU Wellness Center, and the Glasscock Center. In 2006, construction began on the first phase of a new cultural arts center designed to include a chapel-recital hall, a theater, housing for the University museums, and an atrium gallery unifying each of the individual facilities. After 19 years of service, Dr. Hodo was named President Emeritus in July of 2006. Mr. Jack Carlson served as Interim President during August of 2006.

On September 1, 2006, Dr. Robert B. Sloan, Jr., and his wife, Sue, joined the University as its President and First Lady. Dr. Sloan had served as President and Chancellor of for over ten years. Under Dr. Sloan’s leadership, HBU has experienced growth and development in enrollment, in the academic curriculum, and in campus facilities. Former University professor Dr. Marilyn McAdams Sibley has written a history of the early years of the founding of the University, To Benefit a University: The Union Baptist Association College Property Committee, 1958-1975. A history of the University from its chartering in 1960 to its fiftieth anniversary, An Act of Providence, has been written by Dr. Don Looser, Vice President Emeritus. An archive of historical material has been assembled in the Moody Library as an extension of this research and writing project.

Vision

As envisioned by its founders and constituents, HBU is growing into a national metropolitan university that emphasizes the integration of faith and learning and a strong liberal arts foundation. HBU’s new vision document, The Ten Pillars: Faith and Reason in a Great City, may be found on the University’s website at www.hbu.edu/TenPillars.

Mission

The mission of Houston Baptist University is to provide a learning experience that instills in students a passion for academic, spiritual, and professional excellence as a result of our central confession, “Jesus Christ is Lord”.

Purpose

The University welcomes and extends its resources to those who strive for academic excellence. The faculty, staff, and administration are committed to providing a responsive and intellectually stimulating environment that:

• fosters spiritual maturity, strength of character, and moral virtues as the foundation for successful living; • develops professional behaviors and personal characteristics for life-long learning and service to God and to the community; • meets the changing needs of the community and society; and

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 18 • remains faithful to the “Nature of the Institution” statement, which is the Preamble to the By-Laws.

The University offers a broad range of programs and services committed to liberal arts education that are designed to promote the growth of the whole person. The undergraduate programs familiarize students with the principal bodies of knowledge, cultural viewpoints, belief systems, and aesthetic perspectives that affect them and their world. The graduate programs provide advanced educational opportunities to develop ethical and capable scholars and practitioners who can contribute to their academic disciplines and to society. The integration of scholarship, service, and spirituality essential to liberal arts education is nurtured in an environment of open inquiry.

The University enrolls men and women of diverse talents and abilities. Students are encouraged to think critically, to assess information from a Christian perspective, to arrive at informed and reasoned conclusions, and to become lifelong learners. The University prepares its graduates to enter the work force of the twenty-first century, to pursue advanced study, to assume leadership roles, and to be competitive in a global society.

The University faculty, staff and administrators promote learning, scholarship, creative endeavor, and service. These leaders are committed to the Preamble to the By-laws and to the fulfillment of the vision and mission of the University.

Nature of the Institution

The Preamble to the University By-Laws as stated below describes the distinctive nature of the institution.

HBU is a Christian liberal arts university dedicated to the development of moral character, the enrichment of spiritual lives, and the perpetuation of growth in Christian ideals. Founded under the providence of God and with the conviction that there is a need for a university in this community that will train the minds, develop the moral character and enrich the spiritual lives of all people who may come within the ambit of its influence, HBU shall stand as a witness for Jesus Christ expressed directly through its administration, faculty and students. To assure the perpetuation of these basic concepts of its founders, it is resolved that all those who become associated with HBU as a trustee, officer, member of the faculty or of the staff, and who perform work connected with the educational activities of the University, must believe in the divine inspiration of the Bible, both the Old Testament and New Testament, that man was directly created by God, the virgin birth of Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior, as the Son of God, that He died for the sins of all men and thereafter arose from the grave, that by repentance and the acceptance of and belief in Him, by the grace of God, the individual is saved from eternal damnation and receives eternal life in the presence of God; and it is further resolved that the ultimate teachings in this University shall never be inconsistent with the above principles. Amended by the Board of Trustees February 22, 1974

The Christian Liberal Arts Program Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 19 The undergraduate Christian Liberal Arts program cultivates wisdom through shared theological, cultural, intellectual, and scientific traditions, and encourages exploration of concepts and issues from broadened perspectives. The Christian Liberal Arts curriculum advances primary source reading, Classical studies, and Great Texts. The curriculum provides a strong foundation for engaging students in methods of discovery for various disciplines. The integration of faith and learning promotes students’ synthesis of relationships between different fields of study while encouraging them to appreciate and experience God’s truth.

The undergraduate Christian liberal arts program has at its foundation the conviction that all worthy vocations are built on a basis of service to God and mankind. The program encourages members of the learning community to seek wisdom, give voice to a Christian worldview, increase their awareness of self and society, enhance their capacity for critical and creative thought, and demonstrate civic responsibility and Christian service in a diverse society. The program fosters a spirit of inquiry and inspiration for lifelong learning.

The Christian Liberal Arts curriculum and the majors and programs offered through the colleges are designed to guide and instruct the next great faithful artists, musicians, authors, academics, business professionals, lawyers, doctors, nurses, teachers, scientists, and others – individuals who will understand the time we live in and understand God’s calling for their lives. We seek to produce the future leaders of the world who also live as servants in the kingdom of God.

The Campus Plan

The campus of HBU consists of 158 acres in southwest Houston bounded by the Southwest Freeway, Fondren Road, and Beechnut Street. The campus is designed as a complex of buildings surrounding a central mall that begins at the east with the Hinton Center and ends at the west with Sharp Gymnasium and the Glasscock Center. It is flanked by the Moody Library, the Cullen Nursing Center, the Cullen Science Center, the Mabee Teaching Theater, the M. D. Anderson Student Center, and the Stanley P. Brown Administrative Complex. Adjacent to the campus is the HBU-Memorial Herman Wellness Center for student and faculty use. Concentrically related to this complex are the complementary facilities for residence, athletics, and recreation. The campus master plan is being enhanced with the Morris Cultural Arts Center, the Belin Chapel, additional housing and recreational facilities, and an academic center.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 20 Student Life

See Student Handbook at hbu.edu/StudentHandbook

Admissions

See hbu.edu/Admissions

Graduate Admissions

See hbu.edu/Grad

Financial Aid

See hbu.edu/FinancialAid

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 21 Academic Policies, Procedures and Resources

Academic Advising

The advising process is designed to help the student make important decisions related to academic progress and career aspirations. All HBU students should become familiar with their advisor and the advising process.

During the freshmen and sophomore years, all students (except those in the College of Science and Mathematics) are assigned a Core Advisor, a faculty advisor who can help navigate the Liberal Arts Core Curriculum and counsel students on all academic matters, broad career and vocational interests, etc. Sometime during the sophomore year, students with declared majors will transfer to a Major Advisor, a faculty advisor who specializes in the student’s particular field of interest or allied field. The Major Advisor assists the student in planning major-specific educational and career goals. (Students in the College of Science and Mathematics work with a Major Advisor from the freshmen year forward.) Students may see advisors ("Core" or "Major," as assigned) to

§ discuss academic successes, failures, or other issues that may affect academic progress § select courses for each semester § consider a change of major or minor § file a degree plan § discuss educational and career goals, and § provide personal encouragement and support.

All advisees are expected to avail themselves of these mentoring services in order to graduate from HBU in a timely manner since the student is ultimately held responsible for fulfilling his or her degree plan requirements. Failure to utilize these advising services may result in graduation delays, insufficient progress toward completing a degree, and other possible complications.

Every HBU student MUST schedule a personal academic advising session each semester during his or her advisor’s office hours in advance of early registration. The advisee will receive a PIN (Personal Identification Number) at the conclusion of this visit, and once early registration for classes in the upcoming semester begins, the advisee will use this PIN to sign up on-line for his for her desired courses. All students are strongly encouraged to make these course schedule decisions with their assigned advisors in a judicious way. The PIN will allow "advised" students to change their course choices at any time during the open registration period without incurring any Add / Drop fees (see Fee Schedule).

Academic Grievance Policy

A student may file an academic grievance if he or she believes a grade was awarded improperly or for any academic grievance matter. The formal process is described below and must be followed by all parties in order to resolve a dispute. No one—student or faculty member—is permitted to ignore the process, follow it out of order, or appeal to authorities such as the President or Provost.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 22 1. The student should make an appointment with the faculty member in question to discuss the matter in person. The student is advised to keep his or her advisor apprised of the matter but this is not a requirement at this point. It is appropriate to try to resolve differences amicably and in person if at all possible before seeking to raise the matter to a higher level of authority than the classroom instructor. This is especially true at a Christian institution. If the student is concerned that a private meeting with the instructor will create antagonism, the student may skip to Step 2, but the student must make this concern known to the chair who controls Step 2 and explain in detail why he or she believes this to be the case.

2. If the student continues to dispute the grade after the face-to-face meeting, the student may bring the matter to the chair of the department in which the course is located. This step requires the student to make a written appeal to the chair. At this step, the student must provide his or her advisor with a copy of the appeal (and the instructor if Step 1 was omitted). The chair will review the student’s concern and consult with the classroom instructor, either individually or with both present. The chair will respond formally to the student and the instructor in writing of the chair’s recommendation and notify the dean of the action.

3. If the student is unsatisfied with the chair’s recommendation, the student may bring the matter to the dean of the college in which the department resides—again, in writing. The dean will review the written appeal and consult with the chair, the classroom instructor, the advisor and the student, either individually or in a group as the dean deems appropriate. If the student requests, and the dean agrees, a Standards Committee will be formed by the dean who will serve as chair of the committee. The membership of the committee is composed of all parties heretofore mentioned, as well as any other faculty members the dean deems appropriate; no students other than the student making the complaint should be involved in any way. The Standards Committee hears the presentation of both parties. No legal representation or any other parties are allowed. After hearing both sides and after deliberation, at which time some parties may be excused from the room, the Committee, through the dean serving as chair, will render a judgment as to what it advises should be done. The Committee has no coercive authority to force the change of a grade; the purpose of the process is to bring clarity to all sides and allow a thoughtful and informed response from the disputants. The hearing aspect of the Committee process serves to assure integrity in the assigning of grades to students by faculty. The hearing and the rendering of a judgment to advise is the end of the process and no appeals to change a grade should be made to the Provost or the President. If a student wishes to take the step of contacting the Provost (the President is not to be contacted in these matters), the Provost will make a judgment as to whether to accept the appeal. If the Provost does agree to hear the matter, he or she will only consider two allegations: 1) that the process itself is unfair; 2) that the student was not treated fairly in the process. The burden will be on the student to demonstrate with facts and evidence that the process or the treatment was unfair. To repeat, the Provost will not hear an appeal to change a grade. Depending on the Provost’s findings, the matter may be returned to the Standards Committee for further review.

4. Throughout this process, if a student wishes to ask an HBU faculty member or an HBU administrator to serve as an advisor, that is permissible, but both the student and the advisor must make this fact known to all parties involved in the academic grievance process. At no time should any HBU employee advise a student anonymously or write an

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 23 appeal document.

5. If a student questions any grade as recorded in the Registrar’s Office, the student has a period of one (1) year beginning with the end of the term in which the grade was awarded, or six (6) months after the degree is conferred (whichever comes sooner), to challenge the accuracy of the grade.

Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is valued at HBU and is at the very heart of the nature of the University as a Christian Liberal Arts Institution. It is the responsibility of all students, faculty and staff to demonstrate academic integrity. The Academic Integrity policy is designed to promote "the development of moral character, the enrichment of spiritual lives, and the perpetuation of growth in Christian ideals." (HBU Preamble). The Academic Integrity Committee is charged with the duty to provide instruction and learning resources that promote an understanding of academic integrity and support adherence to the Code for Academic Integrity.

The Academic Integrity Committee created a tutorial on Academic Integrity module that assists students in understanding means by which to adhere to appropriate standards of documentation and presentation and thus maintaining honesty in their own academic work and acknowledgement of the work of others. Students are required to complete this tutorial during the first term in which they are enrolled at HBU.

As a Christian university, HBU views any act of academic dishonesty as a violation of the University’s fundamental principles. Academic dishonesty occurs when a student submits the work or record of someone else as his own or when a student has special information for use in an evaluation activity that is not available to other students in the same activity.

It is the responsibility of the faculty member or academic administrative officer to establish clearly whether academic dishonesty has occurred. The faculty member will decide whether to assign a zero for the specific component of work involved or an "F" for the course in the case of an egregious violation. The faculty member shall report the incident to the Dean of the College or School. In the case of admissions testing or documentation, the student may be barred from admission by the University Admissions Committee. The student may appeal the action in the case of a classroom violation to the Dean of the College or School involved or to the Director of Admissions in the case of admissions testing or documentation violations.

A Standards Committee within each College or School will serve as a hearing committee to assure that the student receives a fair hearing in matters of grade appeal. The committee may take further action when academic dishonesty has occurred or may recommend further action to the Provost or a standing University committee, i.e. Academic Affairs or Admissions Committees. In the cases of serial violations, or academic dishonesty whose influence extends beyond the boundary of a single course, the President of the University, on the recommendation of the Provost, may suspend a student from the University for cause. In every case, however, the grade assigned in the course is determined by the instructor.

The instructor in every class will notify students of the policy regarding academic dishonesty at the beginning of each term. However, students are responsible for knowing and following these

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 24 policies in all cases. Inclusion in this Catalog is considered sufficient notice to all students of University policy and procedures in this matter. The student should be aware that suspension from the University or other administrative action may be taken in cases of academic dishonesty.

Academic Load

The minimum number of semester hours (125) required to complete an undergraduate degree at HBU suggests that a student must average approximately sixteen to seventeen (16-17) hours each semester to make normal progress toward degree completion in a four-year period. For the undergraduate programs, the minimum load for full-time enrollment is twelve (12) undergraduate semester hours with an allowed maximum of nineteen (19) semester hours; 6 hours is required for the student to be enrolled half-time for the semester. The normal course load per semester for undergraduate students is 15-18 semester hours. The faculty advisor and appropriate dean must approve credit hour overloads.

Schedules for more than 19 semester hours may only be permitted if one or more of the following criteria are met:

• The student has a 3.0 GPA (B average) on all courses completed and for the immediately preceding semester • The student has a 3.25 GPA for the preceding semester; or • The student is a last-term senior in good standing.

The privilege of taking more than 19 hours will not be allowed if grades drop with the overload. A desire to meet a specific graduation date is not, in itself, sufficient reason to request the privilege of a greater than normal load.

The maximum credit for any summer is fourteen (14) hours which must be earned in not more than four courses. Five full courses will not be permitted for any reason whether taken in residence or by transfer. Students may not earn credit for more than two courses for a maximum of seven (7) hours in any one term.

Academic Probation

Any student who has failed to earn the cumulative scholastic levels designated above and who is ineligible for Academic Warning will be placed on Academic Probation and removed from the list of degree candidates until the appropriate cumulative standing is attained. A student on Academic Probation must earn a 2.00 GPA standing in the current semester to be eligible to continue in enrollment beyond that semester. Removal from Academic Probation requires that the student meets the required scholastic levels as set forth in the "Scholastic Standing" section of this Catalog. Students on Academic Probation are not eligible to represent the University unless they receive a waiver from the Provost.

The University Admissions Review Board may consider transfer students who are eligible to return to their prior institutions but who fail to attain minimal University standards. To be considered, the student must submit a personal statement, and two (2) academic letters of

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 25 recommendation before the last Monday of the semester before the semester for which the student seeks admission. Any student so admitted will be admitted on Academic Probation and must attain good standing within one semester.

Notification of the action will be sent to the student and the faculty advisor and will be recorded on the student’s permanent transcript.

Academic Standing

The Registrar’s Office will maintain a cumulative record of the grade point standing of each student.

Regularly-Admitted Students are students have met or exceeded the minimum requirements for admission. Conditionally-admitted students are students who are admitted through the Admissions Review Board because they did not achieve the acceptable minimum requirements for regular admission and are subject to the "Conditional Admission Agreement".

In the first semester that any student fails to achieve the acceptable minimum GPA, he/she will be placed on academic warning. If the student fails to achieve the acceptable minimum GPA in his/her second semester, he/she will continue on academic warning for the ensuing semester. If the student fails to achieve the acceptable minimum GPA in his/her third semester at HBU, he/she will be placed on academic probation. Finally, if the student fails to achieve the acceptable minimum GPA in his/her fourth semester, he/she will be placed on academic suspension.

An undergraduate must attain the following acceptable minimum GPA:

0-28 hours 1.60

29-47 hours 1.75

48-66 hours 1.90

67 hours and above 2.00

The grade point average on which scholastic standing is based is determined by dividing the number of grade points earned at HBU by the number of semester hours attempted at HBU, with repeated courses considered only once in the cumulative calculation. A student who does not have a 2.00 cumulative standing may not be considered as a candidate for a degree. A student must maintain the cumulative academic standing specified for a classification to be eligible to represent the University, unless he or she receives a waiver from the Provost.

Academic Suspension Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 26 A student on academic probation who fails to attain a 2.0 GPA standing in the current semester will be suspended and may not apply for readmission until at least one (1) full semester has passed. A student who is suspended must submit a re-entry application at least one (1) month before the next semester begins. A personal statement of approximately 250 words and two letters of academic recommendation must support the student’s application for re-entry. After receipt of these documents by the Office of Admissions, an interview with the Director of Admissions will be scheduled. A student on first suspension will be readmitted at the Director’s discretion. If admission is denied, the student may appeal in writing to the Admissions Review Board. Students who are placed on academic suspension will be notified of that action in writing. The action will be recorded on the student’s permanent record.

A student who is suspended for a second time may not be readmitted until at least two semesters have passed. A student on second suspension must submit a re-entry application at least one month before the semester for which admission is requested begins. When reapplying after second suspension, the student must submit a personal statement of approximately 250 words in writing to the Admissions Review Board. Two (2) letters of academic recommendation must support the student’s application.

A student on second suspension is strongly encouraged to enroll in at least twelve (12) hours at another regionally-accredited institution during the two (2) semesters the student is sitting out. The student should achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 to improve their opportunity to be reinstated at HBU by the Admissions Review Board. Any course in which the student has earned a grade of "F" at HBU cannot be repeated at another institution for transfer credit at HBU. For the re-entry application to be processed, an official transcript must be sent directly from the institution to the Office of Admissions.

A student who is suspended for a third time is not eligible for readmission.

A student who is admitted after a suspension must earn a 2.0 GPA standing in the current semester to continue. Such a student will be readmitted on academic probation and will maintain that status until the required scholastic levels as set forth in the "Scholastic Standing" section of this Catalog are met.

Academic Warning

Academic warning applies to any student failing to maintain the acceptable minimum GPA at the end of their first or second semester. Notification of the action will be sent to the student and the faculty advisor and will be recorded on the student’s permanent transcript.

Administrative Drop of a Student from a Course

The Registrar may administratively drop a student from a course, via an Add/Drop form, with the approval of the instructor, the advisor, and the dean of the college or school in which the course is taught. The administrative withdrawal of a student from a course may occur only through the last day for dropping a course with a grade of "W," usually the first day of the eighth week of a Fall and Spring semesters, or All-Summer semester, and the 15th day of the First or

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 27 Second summer sessions. These dates are specified for each academic semester in the calendar at the beginning of this Catalog. A student may be withdrawn from a class for reasons including, but not limited to, the following:

1. If the prerequisites or co-requisites as listed in the current HBU Catalog for the course from which the student is being withdrawn have not been met. 2. If there are circumstances beyond the student’s control (serious illness, accident, etc.) that will involve excessive absences in the course from which the student is being withdrawn. 3. The student has not attended a class up to the census date, or other matters pertaining to financial aid and compliance with law.

Dropping or withdrawing from the University are serious matters and cannot be accomplished by email, phone calls, voice messages or purporting to have told someone at the University that the student is not returning or has chosen not to attend. Formal rules and documents must be fulfilled to drop or withdraw with the approval of the Registrar’s office required.

Americans with Disabilities Act

Houston Baptist University complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 regarding students with disabilities. Any student who needs learning accommodations should inform the professor immediately at the beginning of the semester that he/she will be requesting accommodations. In order to request and establish academic accommodations, the student should contact the Coordinator for Learning Disability Services at [email protected] to schedule an appointment to discuss and request academic accommodation services. Academic Accommodations must be applied for and written each semester. If academic accommodations are approved, a Letter of Accommodations will then be sent to the professor(s). Please refer to the website, www.hbu.edu/504 for all accommodation policies and procedures.

Application for Degree (Graduation)

Each student must file an application for graduation in the Registrar’s Office at least two (2) semesters before the date graduation is expected. The application for graduation will verify the name as it should appear on the diploma, the date the degree is expected, and the major fields of interest to be completed as a part of the degree requirements. The Registrar will perform an audit of the student’s degree requirements and notify the student and his or her advisor of the course work and other requirements the student still needs to complete.

Attendance Requirements

Attendance Requirements

Regular attendance in class is important for student success, and it is university policy that students must attend class. Faculty members are responsible for maintaining complete and

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 28 accurate attendance records for each student. Absences are recorded beginning from the first class session after the student has enrolled in the course. Professors are not obligated to allow students to make up work they miss due to unexcused absences. Any student who does not attend at least 75% of the scheduled class sessions will receive a grade of "F" for the course, regardless of his performance on other assessments such as tests, quizzes, papers, or projects. Professors may apply additional attendance policies as appropriate to individual courses. Likewise, the college or school may also apply additional attendance requirements as necessary. In either case, all applicable attendance policies will be stipulated in the course syllabus.

Excused Absence Policy

Students represent Houston Baptist University through participation in university sponsored or sanctioned activities such as the arts, music, and intercollegiate athletics. When the activity schedule occasionally conflicts with academic obligations, student-participants and their sponsors will follow a standard protocol to provide faculty members with prior, written notification of their administratively excused absences from classes. Faculty members will determine, in consultation with student-participants, how missed classes and assignments are made-up in a manner that fulfills academic obligations and accommodates the obligation of the student to participate in a university activity. Except for excused absences (see below), student- participants have the same responsibility with regard to class attendance and assignments as do all other students. Houston Baptist University is committed to the philosophy that academic events, artistic performances, and intercollegiate athletics are an important part of the institution’s mission to provide diverse educational opportunities to our students. The University recognizes that there may be occasions when, due to a scheduled event, a participating student must miss a class with an excused absence.

Definition of an Excused Absence

• This policy for University excused absences applies to participation as an athlete, manager, student trainer, student coach, or graduate assistant in NCAA intercollegiate competitions, or participation as a representative of Houston Baptist University at academic events and artistic performances approved by the Provost or designee. • Practice or rehearsal for any event is not eligible for consideration as an excused absence. • This policy excludes those academic endeavors that require the completion of a predetermined number of clock hours. Departmental practices and procedures of each college should be consistent with this policy as much as possible in order to be sure that the University serves student needs.

Activity Director or Head Coach Responsibilities

• Head Coaches or the faculty member in charge of a university activity shall inform instructors of dates which students will miss class due to an excused absence well in advance of the date of that anticipated absence. For activities such as athletic competitions where schedules are known prior to the start of a semester, coaches must provide instructors by the second week of each semester a written schedule showing days in which students expect to miss classes. For other university excused absences, the

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 29 faculty or staff member in charge must provide each instructor at the earliest possible time the dates that students will miss. • It must be understood that travel plans may change due to unforeseen circumstances. In each case, the head coach or director will make every effort to notify the instructor as soon as possible

Student Rights and Responsibilities

• Regular and punctual class attendance is essential. Do not miss class for other reasons. Be in class every day. • Make-up work for University-excused absences o It is the responsibility of the student to request from the instructor an opportunity to complete missed assignments, activities, labs, examinations or other course requirements in a timely manner. o The student should set up an appointment with the instructor to discuss an action plan designed to meet any missed course requirements during the time of the excused absence. The timing of this meeting should take place at the discretion of the instructor. o Students are responsible for all material covered in classes that they miss, even when their absences are excused, as defined above. o Missed classroom activities will be rescheduled at the discretion of the instructor. When possible, missed class work should be completed prior to leaving for an excused academic activity. • Students should be aware that excessive absences—whether excused or unexcused—may affect their ability to do well in their classes.

Faculty Responsibility

• Instructors are responsible for taking attendance and for providing students with an equitable way to make up missed work due to an absence excused by this policy. • Instructors should inform students in a timely manner of procedures to make up missed work, e.g., including the information in the course syllabus. • Instructors may not penalize students for absences excused by this policy.

Violation of Academic Conduct Regulations

• Falsifying information or documentation in order to obtain an excused absence is considered a violation of the Code of Student Conduct and Academic Conduct Regulations. • Sharing information about a make-up examination or quiz with other students is deemed a violation of the Code of Student Conduct and Academic Conduct Regulations. • Anyone found responsible for falsifying information or documentation in order to obtain an excused absence or sharing examination or quiz information may receive a course grade of zero, as determined by the course instructor, in addition to any sanction(s) imposed by the administration.

The HBU Athletic Affairs Committee has also developed an Administratively Approved Absence Form to be distributed to all professors of student-participants detailing absence information. This form comprises a list of times and dates when a student-participant will be

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 30 administratively excused from a class during that semester. It is developed by the Head Coach or sponsor and checked by the Athletic Director or Dean of the sponsor.

Center for Global Initiatives in Education (CGIE)

Study abroad activities are facilitated through the Center for Global Initiatives in Education. It supports existing HBU international travel programs as well as assists students pursuing other educational ventures overseas. Dozens of undergraduate and graduate students from across the academic spectrum trek around the globe each year to acquire cross-cultural skills and earn academic credit as they study, teach, tour, intern, volunteer, participate in institutional exchanges, and visit foreign destinations. "Going Global" to make our world "our campus" not only allows students to write their own learning and life-changing educational adventure stories, but also helps fulfill HBU’s Ten Pillars Vision and the University’s Mission statement.

Challenge Examinations

Challenge examinations are used to validate mastery of content (1) gained many years previously or (2) gained in part through co-curricular means. The University’s policy disallowing life experience credit prohibits this option from being open to students who can show no formal study of the content area at the college level. For those who have some formal college study plus independent study or gained expertise, the challenge exam presents a viable option. The Registrar’s Office is the coordinator of all activity in this respect.

After the exam has been taken, the student should secure a form from the Registrar’s Office for credit to be posted on their academic transcript.

Required scores for specific tests are stated in the current Catalog found on the website. A grade of "CR" is entered on the transcript of the student who achieves the required score and the appropriate number of semester hours of credit awarded. At the graduate level, credit does not apply to degree requirements but does allow program admission based on the fulfillment of prerequisites.

In the event that another testing vehicle is proposed other than those listed under the Advanced Placement heading in the current Catalog found on the website, the University Registrar will serve as the approval agent. Such a proposal should contain descriptive information as to the nature of the examination, grading standards, and comparability to the CLEP tests. The proposal should contain the signature of the program director and the appropriate dean before going to the University Registrar. Failure to meet necessary deadlines will not be considered justifiable grounds for substituting for the CLEP test.

Classification of Undergraduate Students

Freshman: Fewer than 32 semester hours of credit

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 31 Sophomore: At least 32 and not more than 63 semester hours

Junior: At least 64 semester hours and an approved degree plan on file with the Registrar

Senior: At least 96 semester hours and a 2.00 scholastic standing or above

Special: A student over 21 years of age, with demonstrated ability to do acceptable university work, but indicating by signed statement that he or she is not interested in following a degree program

Part-time Student: Undergraduates registered for fewer than twelve semester hours in a regular semester

Commencement

Commencement ceremonies are scheduled annually in August, December, and May. Degree recipients are encouraged to participate. Due to the limitations of the Dunham Theater, which holds 1200 persons, students will be limited in the number of their guests who can attend the ceremonies.

Course Numbers

Courses of instruction are numbered to indicate the level of the course and the number of semester hours to be earned. The first digit denotes the year in which the course is usually taken: 1 – freshman; 2 – sophomore; 3 – junior; 4 – senior; 5 – post-graduate or graduate; 6 – graduate. Undergraduate students may ordinarily not register for courses beginning with a 5 (See "Undergraduate Enrollment in Graduate Courses"); courses beginning with a 6 are reserved exclusively for graduate students. A student classified as a freshman (fewer than 32 semester hours of credit) is prohibited from enrolling in a 3000- or 4000-level course. The second digit indicates the semester hour value of the course. The third and fourth digits indicate the departmental sequencing of the course.

The student must designate at registration the system for recording the grade (alpha, pass-fail, or audit). This choice may not change after registration for that term is closed. A student who properly registers for a course on a pass-fail basis may, at the discretion of the instructor, be assigned a grade of "A" where the student’s performance merits that grade. See the "Pass-Fail Courses" section of this Catalog.

Courses listed on the same line in this HBU Catalog and having the same description are sequence courses. If the numbers are separated by a hyphen, both must be successfully completed before a student may receive credit in either. If a comma separates the numbers, it is strongly recommended that both be completed.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 32 Course Validity Time Limitation

Courses that have been taken within 10 years prior to the point of matriculation may apply to degree plans and count toward graduation requirements. Courses that were taken more than 10 years ago may be approved at the discretion of the Provost.

Credit by Examination

High school graduates with strong academic records who have completed college level work while in high school may receive course credit in appropriate fields-of-interest at HBU. To become eligible for this credit, an applicant must make a satisfactory score on the College Board Advanced Placement Examination for the subject in which credit is desired. Prospective students are encouraged to consult their high school counselors and arrange to take the Advanced Placement Examinations for which they are eligible in the spring before expected fall enrollment. These examinations are normally given once each year, usually in May. University credit is awarded for students scoring a 3, 4 or 5 on the examination. Complete information may be obtained by writing the College Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. See the chart of approved examinations on the following pages. CLEP credit is limited to students with 63 or fewer hours.

The subject examinations in this same program and other approved examinations are available to students who have developed special abilities and would like to demonstrate eligibility for additional credit.

Students may also receive credit by examination in French, German, or Spanish through the Modern Language Association Cooperative Foreign Language Examinations. Credit is given as follows:

Form MB 80th Percentile and above -- 12 hours of credit

Form MB 65th Percentile and above -- 6 hours of credit

Form LB 80th Percentile and above -- 6 hours of credit

Form LB 50th Percentile and above -- 3 hours of credit

Transfer credit will be awarded for course work in a foreign language not offered at HBU but taken at an accredited college or university. No life experience credit is awarded.

HBU students who earn IB examination credit will, subject to approval by the relevant departments, receive credit for individual higher level examinations on which they receive a score of 5, 6, or 7.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 33 All credit is posted only after the student has completed at least twelve (12) semester hours at HBU with a GPA of 2.0 or greater.

Credit by Examination Requirements

Credit Area Approved Examination Sem. Hrs. Equivalent HBU Required Credit Course STD. Score Accounting CLEP Subject: Financial Acct 3 hrs. cr. ACCT 2301 scaled score of 55 Biology College Board Achievement: 4 hrs. cr. BIOL 2454 560 Biology-Ecology College Board Achievement: 4 hrs. cr. BIOL 2454 560 Biology –Molecular

*CLEP Subject: Biology 4 hrs. cr. BIOL 2454 scaled score of 65 Advanced Placement: 4 hrs. cr. BIOL 1404 3 Biology Advanced Placement: 4 hrs. cr. BIOL 2454 4 or 5 Biology International Baccalaureate: 4 hrs. cr. BIOL 1404 4 Biology (non-science major) International Baccalaureate: 8 hrs. cr. BIOL 1404, 5, 6 or 7 Biology 2454 Chemistry College Board Achievement: 4 hrs. cr. CHEM 2415 560 Chemistry CLEP Subject: Chemistry 4 hrs. cr. CHEM 2415 scaled score of 62 Advanced Placement: 4 hrs. cr. CHEM 1404 3 Chemistry Chemistry 4 hrs. cr. CHEM 2415 4 or 5 International Baccalaureate: 4 hrs. cr. CHEM 1404 4 Chemistry (non-science major) International Baccalaureate: 8 hrs. cr. CHEM 1404, 5, 6, or 7 Chemistry 2415 Computer Advanced Placement: 3 hrs. cr. CISM 1321 4 Information Computer Science AB Systems International Baccalaureate: 3hrs. cr. CISM 1321 5 Computing Studies Economics CLEP Subject: Prin. Micro. 3 hrs. cr. ECON 2311 scaled score of 60 CLEP Subject: Prin. Macro. 3 hrs. cr. ECON 2312 scaled score of 62

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 34 Advanced Placement: 3 hrs. cr. ECON 2311 4 Microeconomics Macroeconomics 3 hrs. cr. ECON 2312 4 International Baccalaureate: 3 hrs. cr. ECON 2311 5 Economics Economics 3 hrs. cr. ECON 2312 5 English CLEP Subject: Freshman 3 hrs. cr. ENGL 1330 scaled score College Composition of 57 College Board Achievement – 3 hrs. cr. ENGL 1330 550 National: Engl. Comp. Advanced Placement: Lang & 3 hrs. cr. ENGL 1330 3 or higher Comp Advanced Placement: Lit & 6 hrs. cr. ENGL 1330, 4 or 5 Comp 2315, 2325 International Baccalaureate: 6 hrs. cr. ENGL 1330, 5, 6, or 7 English 2315, 2325 French Advanced Placement: 12 hrs. cr. FREN 1314, 3 Literature 1324, 2314, 2324 Language 9 hrs. cr. FREN 1314, 3 1324, 2314 Language 12 hrs. cr. FREN 1314, 4 or 5 1324, 2314, 2324 International Baccalaureate: 12 hrs. cr. FREN 1314, 5, 6, or 7 French 1324, 2314, 2324 CLEP Subject: Language 6 hrs. cr. FREN 1314, scaled score 1324 of 58 Language 12 hrs. cr. FREN 1314, scaled score 1324, 2314, of 68 2324 German Advanced Placement: 12 hrs. cr. GERM 1314, 3 Literature 1324, 2314, 2324 Language 9 hrs. cr. GERM 1314, 3 1324, 2314 Language 12 hrs. cr. GERM 1314, 4 or 5 1324, 2314, 2324 International Baccalaureate: 12 hrs. cr. GERM 1314, 5, 6, or 7 German 1324, 2314, 2324 CLEP Subject: Language 6 hrs. cr. GERM 1314, scaled score 1324 of 44 Language 12 hrs. cr. GERM 1314, scaled score 1324, 2314, of 52

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 35 2324 Government Advanced Placement: U.S. 3 hrs. cr. GOVT 2313 3 or higher Government and Politics Comparative Government 3 hrs. cr. Lower level 3 or higher and Politics GOVT elective CLEP Subject: American 3 hrs. cr. GOVT 2313 scaled score Government of 63 History CLEP Subject: U.S. History I: 3 hrs. cr. HIST 2313 scaled score Early Colonization to 1877 of 62 U.S. History II: 1865 to 3 hrs. cr. HIST 2323 scaled score present of 59 Social Science and History 3 hrs. cr. Lower level scaled score HIST elective of 59 Advanced Placement: U.S. 3 hrs. cr. HIST 2313 3 History U.S. History 6 hrs. cr. HIST 2313, 4 or 5 2323 World History 3 hrs. cr. HIST 2311 3 World History 6 hrs. cr. HIST 2311, 4 or 5 2312 European History 3 hrs. cr. HIST 2312 3 or higher International Baccalaureate: 3 hrs. cr. Lower level 5, 6, or 7 History HIST elective Mathematics College Board Achievement: 3 hrs. cr. MATH 1313 550 Math Level 1 College Board Achievement: 3 hrs. cr. MATH 1323 550 Math Level 2 CLEP Subject: Algebra 3 hrs. cr. MATH 1313 scaled score of 60 Calculus 4 hrs. cr. MATH 1451 scaled score of 61 Trigonometry 3 hrs. cr. MATH 1323 scaled score of 58 PreCalculus 3 hrs. cr. MATH 1434 scaled score of 58 Advanced Placement: 4 hrs. cr. MATH 1434 3 Calculus AB Calculus AB 8 hrs cr. MATH 1434, 4 or 5 1451 Calculus BC 4 hrs. cr. MATH 1451 3 Calculus BC 8 hrs. cr. MATH 1451, 4 or 5 1452 International Baccalaureate: 4 hrs. cr. MATH 1434 4 Mathematics (non-science major) International Baccalaureate: 8 hrs. cr. MATH 1434, 5, 6, or 7 Mathematics 2434 Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 36 Music International Baccalaureate: 3 hrs. cr. MUSI 2331 5 or higher Music Literature (Higher Level) Music Theory (Higher Level) 2 hrs. cr. MUSI 1322, 5 or higher 1122 Psychology Advanced Placement: 3 hrs. cr. PSYC 1313 4 or higher Psychology Advanced Placement: 3 hrs. cr. PSYC 2301 4 or higher Statistics Spanish Advanced Placement: 12 hrs. cr. SPAN 1314, 3 Literature 1324, 2314, 2324 Language 9 hrs. cr. SPAN 1314, 3 1324, 2314 Language 12 hrs. cr. SPAN 1314, 4 or 5 1324, 2314, 2324 CLEP Subject: Language 6 hrs. cr. SPAN 1314, scaled score 1324 of 55 Language 12 hrs. cr. SPAN 1314, scaled score 1324 of 66 International Baccalaureate: 12 hrs. cr. SPAN 1314, 5, 6 or 7 Spanish 1324, 2314, 2324

Note: On CLEP Subject Area tests, the required score is either the scaled score as stated above or, if not stated, is at the equivalent of a grade of "B". CLEP scores ordinarily may not be transferred from one institution to another. HBU does NOT adhere to or accept the American Council on Education recommended minimum scores.

Cross-Listed Courses

Courses that are cross-listed at both the graduate and the undergraduate level must have separate and specific written expectations for students in each category. Students receiving graduate credit will be required to complete work beyond that required of those receiving undergraduate credit. Higher levels of accomplishment and achievement will be expected of graduate students; these should be fully documented in the course syllabus. Differing criteria for grading may be utilized. Faculty will be expected to devote additional time and effort to the work of graduate students in such courses. Copies of the stated expectations for cross-listed courses shall be kept on file in the office of the Provost.

Dean’s List

In order to encourage excellence in undergraduate scholarship and give recognition to superior achievement, a Dean’s List is released each semester. Full-time undergraduate students Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 37 registered for a minimum of twelve (12) semester hours of alpha grade credit and maintaining a GPA at a level which, if continued, would make them eligible to graduate with honors (3.5 and above), are included on the Dean’s List.

Degree Plan

A degree plan may not be filed until all proficiency requirements have been met. Before an undergraduate student with 64 semester hours of credit can register, the student must have an approved degree plan on file. A transfer student who transfers more than fifty (50) semester hours must file a degree plan before the first day of the second semester in residence. A transfer student who expects to receive Veteran’s Administration benefits must file a degree plan before the initial registration. The degree plan is based on the HBU Catalog in effect at the time of the student’s initial enrollment in the University and will be valid for a period not to exceed seven (7) years from the date of initial enrollment. Students who fail to enroll in the University for consecutive fall and spring or spring and fall semesters must meet the requirements of the HBU Catalog in effect at the time they re-enroll in the University.

Degrees with Distinction

Honors at graduation are awarded to undergraduate baccalaureate students who have completed a minimum of 64 semester alpha-grade hours in residence at HBU and have earned an appropriate number of grade points to be eligible for the honors indicated. An average standing of 3.50 or higher entitles the student to graduate cum laude; 3.70 or higher magna cum laude; 3.90 or higher summa cum laude.

Dropping a Class

A student who ceases to attend class must follow the prescribed withdrawal procedure to protect his status and leave himself in the best possible position with respect to future registration at this or another university. Failure to do so will result in course failure(s), lower scholastic standing, and financial loss. Students contemplating dropping a class must see their advisor to complete the proper steps; the drop process is not complete until the forms are filed by the student and processed in the Office of the Registrar. A student may not drop a class after the published last day to drop.

Once a student registers for a class, the student will receive a grade for the class unless the drop process is completed through the Registrar’s Office. This includes students who may have never actually attended class or who may never have completed payment of tuition and fees.

Family Education Rights & Privacy Act (FERPA)

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 38 HBU is subject to the provisions of a federal law known as the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (also referred to as FERPA or the Buckley Amendment). This law affords students enrolled at HBU certain rights with respect to their education records.

These rights include:

• The right to inspect and review their education records within 45 days of the day the University receives a request for access. Students should submit to the HBU Registrar written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The Registrar will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the Registrar, he or she shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.

• The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes is inaccurate. Students may ask the University to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate. They should write the HBU official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate. If the University decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

• The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.

One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by HBU in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including University law enforcement personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom HBU has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. FERPA provides the University the ability to designate certain student information as "directory information." Directory information may be made available to any person without the student’s consent unless the student gives notice as provided for below. HBU has designated the following as directory information: o Student’s name o Local and permanent addresses o Telephone numbers o Email addresses o Date and place of birth o Major field(s) of study o Dates of attendance o Classification o Degrees, honors, and awards received o Most recent educational institution attended o Participation in officially recognized activities and sports

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 39 o Weight and height of members of athletic teams o Photographs

Any new or currently enrolled student who does not want the disclosure of directory information should notify the HBU Registrar in writing. Such notification must be received by the end of the first full week of classes for any term to ensure that the student’s directory information is not released, except to officials with legitimate educational purposes as authorized by FERPA.

The request to withhold directory information will remain in effect as long as the student continues to be enrolled or until the student files a written request with the HBU Registrar to discontinue the withholding. To continue nondisclosure of directory information after a student ceases to be enrolled, a written request for continuance must be filed with the HBU Registrar during the student’s last term of attendance.

If a student believes the University has failed to comply with the requirements of FERPA, he or she may file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is:

Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-4605

Complaints must be timely submitted, not later than 180 days from the date the student learns of the circumstances of the alleged violation; and must contain specific allegations of fact giving reasonable cause to believe that a violation has occurred, including: relevant dates, names and titles of those University officials and other third parties involved; a specific description of the education record about which the alleged violation occurred; a description of any contact with University officials regarding the matter, including dates of telephone calls, meetings and/or any correspondence between the student and HBU; the name and address of the University; and any additional evidence that would be helpful in reviewing the complaint.

Questions about the application of the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act should be directed to either the University Registrar or Legal Counsel.

Final Examinations

Final examinations are required in all undergraduate courses and must be taken when scheduled by the Office of the Provost. All exceptions to this rule require the filing of the Undergraduate/Graduate Exception form; students should see their advisor first who will seek approval from the Provost. Senior final examinations must be taken and the course grade reported at the time required by the Registrar’s Office for the processing of senior grades. The processing of senior grades includes a final audit of the student’s course work against his or her degree requirements to verify the student is eligible to receive the degree. Days for examinations are given in this Catalog. Each exam period, with the exception of the Summer term, is preceded by one study day on which no grade-determining activity may be conducted nor may be due. No University student events are scheduled Monday through Friday of final exam weeks.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 40

Grade Appeal Process

A student may file an academic grievance if he or she believes a grade was awarded improperly. The formal process is described in the "Academic Grievance" section of this Catalog.

Health Professions

Students interested in pursuing a career in a health professions (for example, medicine, dentistry, physical therapy, pharmacy) should considering talking with the advisors in the Health Professions program. These advisors can assist students in choosing graduate schools, the application process, recommendation letters, and personal statements.

Honors Programs

The Departmental Honors Program provides highly qualified and motivated students with the opportunity to develop additional expertise in their chosen majors through independent investigation. Students may apply for the program that have completed 64 hours, 32 of which must have been earned at HBU, with an overall GPA of 3.25 and 3.50 in the selected major or majors. Specific requirements are established by each academic department or college and approved by the Honors Council. Successful completion of Departmental Honors is indicated on both the transcript and diploma and is announced at graduation. Students interested in Departmental Honors should contact the appropriate college dean for additional information.

Human Subjects in Research

The Research and Development Committee protects the rights of human subjects in research projects proposed by faculty, staff, students, and/or outside persons. The University’s Research and Development Committee is responsible for reviewing all research proposals involving human subjects. Review applications may be obtained from the Committee Chair.

Instructional Media Services

The Instructional Media Services (IMS) mission is to provide the campus community with the highest quality of presentation technology, training, and support services in an effective and proactive environment.

The IMS offers traditional audiovisual equipment such as overhead, slide, and film projectors, TV/VCR units, PA Systems, flipcharts, and computer and video projection systems. The department duplicates audio cassette tapes, videotapes, CD’s, and DVD’s.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 41

Intellectual Property

Intellectual Property created solely for the purpose or satisfying a course requirement is owned by the student and not the University or the student’s professor.

Exceptions to this policy:

• The University becomes the owner of student work if the student assigns ownership rights of the intellectual property to the University in writing, or written assignment of such ownership rights to the University is made a condition for participation in a course. • The University owns the answers and questions on tests and examination, unless otherwise indicated by the course instructor. Tests and examinations include, but are not limited to, print, electronic and audio or visual formats. • If student research projects are funded by outside sponsors and if the sponsor requires ownership of the intellectual property produced by the student as a condition of sponsorship, the University will so advise the student before the student begins the project. The student will be required to sign a waiver prior to beginning the project.

Internship Programs

HBU offers internship opportunities under the direction of the various academic divisions in awareness of the value of practical experience in the learning process. Such external learning opportunities may be known as practicum, internship, preceptorship, clinical experience. Internship experience enables the student to apply classroom theory to actual situations and to develop problem-solving and decision-making skills. Access to such external learning opportunity is ordinarily restricted to advanced standing in the major, for example 15 hours or more. Supervision of such experiences is ordinarily restricted to full-time faculty members. Credit is available to both undergraduate and graduate students.

Credit is awarded based on clock hours of experience gained. One semester hour of credit may be awarded for each 30 clock-hours of internship experience up to a maximum of three semester hours each term. Ordinarily, ethical practice suggests that the student in the performance of internship responsibilities receives no pay. The Provost must approve formal agreements for group practica, internships and clinical experience. Legal review of formal memoranda of understanding governing group placement shall be secured from the Legal Counsel to the President.

Learning Disability Accommodation

Houston Baptist University complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 regarding students with disabilities. Any student who needs learning accommodations should inform the professor immediately at the beginning of the semester that he/she will be requesting accommodations. In order to request and establish academic accommodations, the student should contact the Coordinator for Learning Disability

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 42 Services at [email protected] to schedule an appointment to discuss and request academic accommodation services. Academic Accommodations must be applied for and written each semester. If academic accommodations are approved, a Letter of Accommodations will then be sent to the professor(s). Please refer to the website, www.hbu.edu/504 for all accommodation policies and procedures.

Liberal Arts Core Curriculum

The Liberal Arts Core Curriculum is the foundation unit in the academic organization of the undergraduate instructional program of HBU; it is required for success in every major and develops the knowledge and insight conducive to citizenship as well as leadership in a chosen profession.

Library

Moody Library is open 83 hours weekly and provides reference librarians and others to assist library users with their information needs. The library contains over 300,000 items, including 95,000 electronic books. It subscribes to about 1,000 paper and microform journals and over 60,000 electronic journals. The library’s catalog, links to all electronic content, including online indexes and other databases are available on the library’s home page.

Inside the library there are computers for student use and both quiet and collaborative study areas.

Majors

To graduate, a student must have completed at least one major field of study which will be recorded on the transcript, as well as any minors which have been completed.

Military Service Credit

The recommendations of the American Council on Education are used as a guide in determining eligible college credit for satisfactory completion of formally organized service school programs in the military. Courses taken through the United States Armed Forces Institute and other recognized military educational programs will be reviewed for possible credit when presented on official transcripts. All records of such training should be submitted as a part of the student’s initial admission data, with a request for allowance of credit so that advisors can avoid duplication of this work. Before any such credit may be recorded as a part of the student’s official record, however, the student must qualify as a resident student in good standing at this University. This may be done by completing a minimum of twelve (12) semester hours of standard residence courses with a 2.00 ("C" average) scholastic standing or above. No credit will be allowed on the basis of the General Education Development (GED) tests (college level).

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 43

Off-Campus Courses

Students contemplating concurrent or transient enrollment at any other college MUST secure prior approval in writing from the University Registrar at HBU, and the Dean of the College or School, in order for credits to be accepted in transfer. Students should seek counsel first from their advisor. Only alpha grade credit with a grade of "C" or better from regionally accredited institutions will be considered for transfer credit. Once a student has enrolled at HBU, no more than 18 semester hours total will be accepted for transfer credit. For the student seeking a baccalaureate degree, this work may NOT be taken at a two-year institution once the student has accumulated 64 semester hours of post-secondary credit. After completion of approved work elsewhere, an official transcript showing the approved work must be sent directly from the awarding institution to HBU Registrar’s Office. Failure to comply with this requirement may result in the denial of credit. The student risks the loss of credit by failure to adhere to these policies.

Pass-Fail Courses

HBU undergraduate students may register for one (1) elective course each semester on a pass-fail basis. Students must file the pass-fail course form in the Registrar’s Office. Such an option is offered to encourage students to broaden their educational contacts through participation in courses outside their major fields without fear of competition with students who have experience that is more extensive in the selected area. This option does not apply to courses required by the University for a degree except in the case of kinesiology. In addition, courses taken on this basis may not be used as a part of a major. The hours earned in pass-fail courses are counted in the total required for a degree but not for honors. A pass grade does not affect the computation of scholastic standing; however, a fail grade in a course affects scholarship standing in the same way as any other failing grade. Courses taken on this basis are counted as a part of the student load for the term, and the type of registration elected for any course may not be changed after the last date to register as posted in the class schedule. These courses are designated at registration by a "P/F" following the course number. A student who properly registers for a course on a pass- fail basis may, at the discretion of the instructor, be assigned a grade of "A" where the student’s performance merits that grade. The assignable grades are "A," "P," and "F." The pass-fail grade is not available for graduate courses.

Pre-Law School Advisor

Students preparing to enter law school must dedicate themselves to academic excellence in their undergraduate studies. Most law schools in the United States make admission decisions relying heavily on a candidate’s undergraduate grade point average and performance on the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT).

Pre-law students are encouraged to contact the University pre-law advisor via the Department of Government early in the course of their matriculation. Information is available on courses of study, law school admissions, career options, and LSAT preparation.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 44 In the spring semester of the junior year, the student should begin to prepare for the LSAT and compile the information required by the Law School Data Assembly Service (LSDAS). Information on the LSDAS can be found at the office of the pre-law advisor. Students are strongly discouraged from taking the LSAT without thorough preparation.

The pre-law advisor is Jodey Hinze (www.hbu.edu/JHinze).

Registration Procedure

Registration will be conducted as scheduled in the University Calendar for students in good standing and those approved for admission will be eligible to participate. Following proper procedures is not optional; failure to follow proper procedures may result in a student not being allowed to register for course and thus a delay in graduation. Individual student schedules will have been predetermined through prior advising and priority registration. To enroll in any class and be eligible for credit, students must have their advisor’s approval, and complete the registration procedure, including financial arrangements. A late registration fee will be charged those failing to complete registration by the designated day. Students must decide at registration the rubric desired for recording the credit in a cross-listed course and may not change this registration after the last day to register in a given semester.

Students who take advantage of priority registration are given a period of time to make changes in their schedule as they wish or need. After this period, however, a student-initiated change in schedule may involve the payment of a special fee and the approval of the change by the student’s advisor and the instructor of each class involved. A form for this purpose is provided online or by the Registrar’s Office.

Repeated Courses

Students may repeat courses that they have previously taken. For purposes of GPA calculation, courses taken at HBU which are repeated at HBU are calculated in the cumulative GPA as having been taken only one (1) time. The cumulative GPA is adjusted in the semester in which the course was repeated. The student may raise the cumulative GPA by this means. Students should be aware, however, that many graduate and professional schools and certifying agencies calculate GPA by averaging all grades earned in all registrations.

Residency Requirement - Undergraduate

If the degree being sought is 125 hours or more, the minimum undergraduate residence requirement for the baccalaureate degree is 36 semester hours (or at least 25% of the required hours, whichever is greater), including at least 12 semester hours of upper level courses in the major completed at HBU with a grade of "C" or better in each course. The residency requirement for a minor is a minimum of nine (9) hours of upper-level courses taken at Houston Baptist University with a grade of "C" or better in each course. The minimum undergraduate residence requirement for the associate degree is eighteen (18) semester hours. A student whose

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 45 undergraduate degree include 60 semester hours in residence at this University may be allowed to earn six (6) of the last 36 hours in another approved institution.

ROTC Cross-Enrollment Program

ROTC curricula are determined by the various branches of the United States Armed Forces. The individual detachments are responsible to their service for the content and quality of their programs.

Army

HBU students may participate in the Army Reserve Officers Training Corps unit at the University of Houston. The cross-enrollment program is an arrangement between the student and the Military Science Department at the University of Houston.

Academic credits are posted to the student’s transcript records at HBU. Underclassmen spend 3- 5 hours a week in class and leadership lab. The Army ROTC prepares selected college students for positions of responsibility in the active Army and its reserve components. It enables a student to earn a commission as an officer at the same time he earns an academic degree in a field of his choice. The ROTC program prepares the individual to pursue either a military or a civilian career. Tuition is charged for these courses at the current HBU undergraduate tuition rate. Two- and three-year ROTC scholarships are available. Veterans may enroll directly into the Advanced Course, and there is a two-year program for those students completing their second year of studies.

Interested students should contact the Army ROTC Unit (www.hbu.edu/ContactMSCI).

Navy

HBU students may participate in the Naval ROTC Unit at Rice University. The cross-enrollment program is an arrangement between the student and the Naval Science Department at Rice University.

Tuition is charged for these courses at the current HBU undergraduate tuition rate.

There are four NROTC Programs that lead to a commission in the regular or reserve components of the Navy or Marine Corps:

1. A four-year Scholarship Program leading to a commission in the regular Navy or Marine Corps provides all tuition, books, school fees, and uniforms plus $100 per month. 2. A four-year college program that leads to a commission in the Naval or Marine Corps Reserve provides all books and uniforms required for naval science courses. 3. A two-year Scholarship Program for juniors and seniors. 4. A two-year Nuclear Propulsion Candidate Scholarship Program which may lead to nuclear power training after graduation.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 46 Interested students should contact the Naval ROTC Unit (www.hbu.edu/ContactNAVA).

Air Force

HBU students may participate in the Air Force ROTC program at the University of Houston. The cross-enrollment program is an arrangement between the student and the Air Force Department at the University of Houston. The Air Force Reserve Officer Training (ROTC) program prepares men and women of character, commitment, and courage to assume leadership positions as commissioned officers in the active duty United States Air Force. Upon completion of the curriculum, students will have a thorough understanding of the core values, leadership, teamwork, and other requirements to be an effective officer in the world’s greatest Air Force. All courses and physical training sessions take place at the University of Houston. Flight orientation occurs at airports in the Houston metro area.

Course Credit: ROTC classes may be taken for elective credit toward any degree plan at Houston Baptist University. Freshman and sophomore level classes are open to all students. No military obligation is incurred as a result of enrollment in these courses. Junior and senior level courses are more restrictive and do require a military obligation. ROTC scholarship students also incur a military obligation.

AFROTC Scholarship Opportunities: Air Force ROTC offers various scholarship opportunities for students at Houston Baptist University:

1. In-College Scholarship Program (ICSP)—is a highly competitive scholarship program aimed primarily at college freshmen and sophomores in any major (students with a bachelor’s degree can compete to earn a master’s degree). The ICSP awards cover tuition capped at either $15,000 per year plus $900 per year for books or $9,000 per year plus $900 per year for books.

2. The Express Scholarship Program—is operated on a fully qualified basis: those who meet the qualifications are awarded the scholarship. Though the list of eligible college majors differs from year to year, the express scholarship pays up to $15,000 tuition per year and $900 for books. Recent majors which qualified for express scholarships included electrical engineering, environmental engineering, computer science, nursing, and strategic foreign languages. The processing of the scholarship award is completed at the local detachment.

Stipend: All AFROTC scholarship recipients and POC cadets receive a nontaxable monthly stipend. The annual stipend amount ranges from $3,000 per year to $4,500 per year depending on the recipient’s enrollment year.

For more information on the Air Force Science program, contact the Air Force Science Department at the University of Houston. (www.hbu.edu/ContactAFSC)

Second Undergraduate Degrees

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 47 A minimum of thirty-six (36) additional semester hours of undergraduate credit taken at HBU must be earned beyond the first degree in order for a second degree to be conferred. All requirements for the second degree must be met. Under no circumstance will the University confer the same degree title more than once. Additional majors, programs, certifications, licensure, and specializations may be noted on the transcript as deemed warranted by the University Registrar. Additional course work may also simply be considered post-baccalaureate work.

Student Responsibility

Each student is responsible for his or her progress toward graduation and completion of all degree requirements. Students are also responsible for a knowledge of and adherence to regulations governing registration, add/drop, withdrawal, degree plans, graduation requirements, and the payment of tuition and fees. Failure to act accordingly may result in F’s on transcripts or failure to graduate on time.

Academic Success Center

The Academic Success Center(ASC) provides services to all Houston Baptist University students. ASC promotes student success by providing academic tutoring services for students in all majors. ASC also supports the early alert program, implemented to assist at-risk students through the assortment of challenges facing college students. The Academic Success Center is located in the Hinton Center and can be found at hbu.edu/ASC.

Transcripts

Official scholastic records will be maintained in perpetuity for each student who registers for credit at HBU. These records are the joint property of the student and the University, and as such will be handled with care and confidentiality. Certified copies will be available to students and graduates. To obtain this service, the person whose record is involved completes and signs a Transcript Request form and files it with the Registrar’s Office. Students should allow up to five (5) working days for the request to be processed. Transcripts will not be released until satisfactory arrangements have been made regarding all financial and any other obligations to the University. Official records may not be removed from official University files.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 mandates that transcripts may not be released to anyone without the written consent of the student.

If a student questions any grade as recorded in the Registrar’s Office, the student has a period of one (1) year beginning with the end of the term in which the grade was awarded, or six (6) months after the degree is conferred (whichever comes sooner), to challenge the accuracy of the record. At the end of this period, the record becomes permanent.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 48 Transfer Courses

Students transferring to HBU from other institutions will have their transcripts evaluated by the Registrar’s Office upon acceptance to HBU. Once the evaluation has been completed, the Registrar’s Office will send a list of courses accepted by HBU. Contact the Office of Admissions for any questions. The Office of Admissions also has information regarding equivalent core requirement courses from other Texas institutions of higher education. This guide is helpful in course planning if presently attending another institution with the intention of transferring to HBU. See the Undergraduate Transfer Credit section of this Catalog for further information.

Transfer Orientation

Twice a year the Offices of Enrollment Management and Student Life offer an orientation program to new transfer students. This program will assist the student in becoming aware of HBU resources. Topics discussed will include academic advising and related issues, graduation requirements, spiritual life, campus safety, campus life, HBU traditions, as well as other campus resources. Time is also allotted to meet academic advisors from each academic college to ask questions regarding majors, programs, and degree requirements.

Transient Enrollment

Students contemplating concurrent or transient enrollment at any other college must secure prior approval in writing from the University Registrar at HBU, and the Dean of the College and School, in order for credits to be accepted in transfer. Only alpha-grade credit with a grade of "C" or better from regionally accredited institutions will be considered for transfer credit. For the student seeking a baccalaureate degree, this work may not be taken at a two-year institution once the student has accumulated 64 semester hours of post-secondary credit. No more than 18 credit hours may be taken at another institution once a student has matriculated to HBU. After completion of approved work at other institutions, an official transcript showing the approved work must be sent directly to HBU Records Office. Failure to comply with this requirement may result in the denial of credit. The combined course load at HBU and the concurrently enrolled institution may not total more than 19 semester hours. The student risks the loss of credit by failure to adhere to these policies.

Undergraduate Enrollment in Graduate Courses

In the final semester of undergraduate matriculation, the student may elect to take a graduate course with the authorization of the Registrar. The student must have at least a 2.75 GPA on all college work and must be completing the bachelor’s degree at the end of the semester. The student must meet all other standards for admission to a particular graduate program, including the approval of the department chair and the dean in the major field of study. In every case, the total number of hours taken in one (1) semester may not exceed twelve (12) semester hours, which includes no more than nine (9) semester hours of graduate courses.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 49

Undergraduate Grading System and Grade Points

To record the level of undergraduate student achievement and stimulate quality work, the University system of grading is expressed in letters and grade points as indicated below:

A for excellent work – 4 grade points per semester hour

B for above-average work – 3 grade points per semester hour

C for average work – 2 grade points per semester hour

CR for credit by examination. No hours attempted, no grade points

D for below-average work – 1 grade point per semester hour

I for incomplete work. Only the dean of a college or school may grant incompletes and only to students who have a major documented emergency in the last few days of a semester. Students with excessive absences, which will result in failing the course, will not be allowed to take the final exam nor be eligible to receive an incomplete. Receives 0 grade points and 0 semester hours and becomes an "F" if not completed by the end of the following semester. Summer is a bona fide semester so a grade of "I" issued during a Spring semester must be completed by the end of the last Summer session. Note to instructors: If an instructor does not have a grade because the student has failed to attend the course at all and/or has not properly dropped the course; has failed to complete sufficient work to pass the course; fails to attend a sufficient number of class sessions; fails to attend the final exam; and/or fails to contact the instructor to justify any of these circumstances, the instructor will record an "F."

F for unsatisfactory work – 0 grade points and hours completed, no credit

P for pass-fail courses – described in the "University Academic Policies" section

W for complete withdrawal from the University after the Census Date or for dropping a class after the Census Date. Withdrawal from the University or dropping a class after the last day to drop a class will not be approved and a grade of "F" is automatically recorded. Complete withdrawal from the University is described in the section titled "Withdrawal Procedure from University" under University Academic Policies

X for courses audited – no hours attempted, no hours earned, no grade points

Undergraduate Transfer Credit

A student otherwise eligible to transfer to HBU from another regionally accredited collegiate institution may expect to receive acceptance of his previous academic work as consistent with regulations which must be observed among colleges and universities. In general, an official transcript from a regionally accredited college or university is accepted and recorded as received, Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 50 and the courses completed used to the fullest extent possible to apply toward a degree. The transcript must be sent directly from the transfer institution to HBU. Credit is usually given at the same level at which the course was originally taken.

All foreign transcripts must be sent to an HBU approved evaluation service. The evaluation service must send an official report directly to HBU. The International Student page of HBU Website contains a list of current service providers.

In considering credit by transfer from other institutions, HBU places a premium on credits from regionally accredited institutions. However, HBU will also consider a request for transfer credit from institutions that are not regionally accredited. Applicants must submit transcripts from all institutions and indicate courses for which they wish to receive transfer credit—whether from accredited or non-accredited institutions. After an initial review upon admission to the university, the Office of Admissions will, in some cases, indicate to the student which courses he or she may request consideration for transfer credit; this is handled by the colleges and schools of HBU. Transfer credits from a non-accredited institution will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis; viable course work will receive either specific course credit or elective credit after evaluation, and only for courses in which the student earned a grade of "C" or higher.

A transfer student must meet the same scholastic standings as other full-time students. An undergraduate transfer student with fewer than 32 semester hours may be required to submit a high school transcript and scores on SAT or ACT tests. While HBU highly values the traditional university experience, online courses from a regionally accredited institution may be accepted; viable credit from online course work will receive either specific course credit or elective course credit. No course of any kind with a grade of "D" or "F" will be accepted by the University. No credit is granted for courses taken on a pass/fail or satisfactory basis except Kinesiology activity courses. Students must be in "good academic standing" - not currently on probation or suspension from another institution. Such documentation of good standing should come directly from the Registrar’s Office of the home college, not from the office of a dean of a college or other unofficial institutional representative.

Withdrawal from University Enrollment

A student who wants to withdraw from the University with a grade of "W" after the last date to drop with a "W" can only do so under the most extreme circumstances beyond the control of the student and with the approval of the Provost. See the cautionary statement in preceding section titled "Undergraduate Grading System and Grade Points" regarding failure to withdraw from classes once registered.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 51 Undergraduate Degree Program

Baccalaureate Degrees

Undergraduate Degree Requirements An approved undergraduate baccalaureate degree plan must be on file with the Registrar’s Office before students with 64 or more semester hours of credit can be cleared for registration. Each student is responsible for a knowledge of and adherence to regulations governing registration, withdrawal, degree plans, graduation requirements, and the payment of tuition and fees. Once a student begins a degree program at HBU, it is expected that the student will complete the degree requirements at HBU. The University reserves the right to refuse credits from other institutions toward completion of degree requirements at HBU for the student who has already begun a degree program. Students contemplating credits from another institution must see their advisor before permission can be secured from the University Registrar; such permission will be granted only in extreme circumstances. Under no circumstances may students transfer in more than 18 credit hours once they have matriculated at HBU. (See "Undergraduate Transfer Credit" and "Off Campus Requests" sections in this Catalog.)

Students seeking undergraduate baccalaureate degrees must complete the following requirements:

General Requirements and Policies

1. A minimum of 125 semester hours with no fewer than 30 semester hours of upper level courses. No more than four (4) semester hours in activity courses in kinesiology and not over four semester hours of other student activity courses will count toward the 125 hours requirement for any undergraduate degree. 2. Freshman Year Seminar, FYS 1100, is required of all students who enter with fewer than thirty-two (32) semester hours credit. 3. Residency Requirement: Once a student has entered a degree program at HBU, it is expected that all course work will be taken at HBU. The minimum undergraduate residence requirement is 36 semester hours, (or at least 25% of the required hours, whichever is greater) including at least 12 semester hours of upper level courses in the major completed at HBU. A minimum cumulative scholastic standing of 2.00 GPA ("C" average) must be attained. A grade of "C" or higher is required for all courses within each major. The residency requirement for a minor is a minimum of nine (9) hours of upper- level courses taken at Houston Baptist University with a grade of "C" or better in each course. 4. Credit by other than classroom-based instruction: Credit by correspondence courses or extension courses will not be counted toward a degree. A maximum of six (6) credit hours earned online can be awarded towards a degree. HBU does not award college credit for life experience. 5. Courses received in transfer with a grade of "D", "F", or "P" will not be counted toward a degree. 6. Community Life and Worship Program: Participation in the Community Life and Worship Program (CLW) is a graduation requirement for all degree-seeking undergraduate students. The HBU Student Handbook contains a complete description of the CLW credit system and number of credits needed to qualify for graduation. The

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 52 Community Life and Worship publication details the CLW events offered each semester and provides an overview of the CLW program. 7. Concurrent Enrollment: Once a student has entered a degree program at HBU, it is expected that all course work will be taken at HBU. Exceptions are rare and must receive prior approval of the University Registrar. Students must speak with their advisor about taking courses at other institutions. 8. Proficiencies: All undergraduate students must demonstrate proficiency in reading, mathematics, and computer use before the student files a degree plan. Students must demonstrate proficiency in written English by the end of the third term at HBU.

Proficiencies may be met in the following ways:

Written English: The written English proficiency may be met in several ways:

a. Completion of ENGL 1320 and ENGL 1330 at HBU with a grade of "C" or above b. Completion of ENGL 1320 and placement out of ENGL 1330 by Advanced Placement Exam or CLEP scores as outlined in this HBU Catalog. c. Receipt of transfer credit for courses equivalent to ENGL 1320 and 1330 d. Students must complete ENGL 1320 and 1330 proficiency by their third semester.

Reading: One of the following:

a. a SAT minimum verbal score of 550 b. an ACT minimum score of 22 on the Reading portion; c. a score of 17 or better on the Pre-THEA Exam; or d. a score of 230 or higher on the THEA Exam.

Mathematics: One of the following:

a. Math 1305, completed with a "C" or higher b. Math 1313, completed with a "C" or higher c. A higher level math course, completed with a "C" or higher

Computer Literacy: One of the following:

a. Passing of a computer Proficiency Exam purchased at the HBU Bookstore, and taken by student from their HBU Blackboard course. b. Completion of CISM 1321, with a "C" or higher c. Receipt of transfer credit for a course equivalent to CISM 1321.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 53 9. Major requirements are determined by the college or school in which the major resides. See the appropriate college or school section of this Catalog. However, each major must include a minimum of twelve (12) upper-level hours. 10. Undergraduate Degree Plan Declaration: Before 64 semester hours have been completed and once all proficiencies have been met, a student must see his or her advisor to complete and file an Undergraduate Degree Plan with the Registrar’s Office (only the Provost may provide a waiver for this requirement). Students who fail to follow this policy will not be considered as a candidate for a degree, nor will they be allowed to register. (See section on "Degree Plans" in this Catalog.) 11. Application for Graduation: A student must file a graduation application at least two (2) full semesters before anticipated date of graduation. Students need to see their advisor to begin this process. 12. Full-Time Status: The recommended full-time undergraduate student load is twelve to nineteen (12-19) hours each semester. Students who wish to take over nineteen (19) hours must seek permission from their faculty advisor and the appropriate college or school dean. 13. Majors, Degrees, and Certification Programs The following table details the majors, degrees, and certification or licensure programs offered by HBU.

Undergraduate Degrees, Majors, Minors, and Certifications College/ Degree Majors Minors Certification or Areas but not School s Licensure Programs Majors College of BA or Elementary Elementary (EC-6) EC-12 Education BS Elementary (EC-6) High School (8-12) EC-6 and with ESL (See majors for High School Behavioral Elementary (EC-6) content areas) (8-12) Sciences with Bilingual Middle Grades (4- Middle Grades Elementary (EC-6) 8) (See majors for (4-8) with All-Level content areas) Secondary (6- Special Educ EC-12 (See majors 12) Middle Grades (4- for content areas) Bilingual 8) Bilingual Education Education - English/Language (EC-6) (EC-6) Arts Supplemental ESL Supplemental - Math Special Education ESL (EC-6) - Science (EC-12) Special - Social Studies Education High School (7-12) (EC-12) - Composite Social Studies - English/Language Arts - History - Speech Communications All-Level (EC-12) - Art Physical Education

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 54 Spanish Psychology School of BA Speech Speech Teacher Certificati Humanities Communication Communicatio on (See College of English n Education and Government English Behavioral Great Texts Family Studies Sciences) History Government High School (7-12) Legal Studies Great Texts - Composite Social Sociology History Studies Spanish Latin American - English/Language Studies Arts Sociology - History Spanish - Speech Communications Middle Grades (4- 8) - English/Language Arts - Social Studies All-Level Spanish School of BA Biblical Languages Biblical - Apologetics Christian Christianity Languages Thought Philosophy Christianity Latin Philosophy

School of BA Art Art History Professional Theater Fine Arts BFA Church Music Art, Studio Writing BM Cinema and New Journalism and Specialization BME Media Arts Mass Journalism and Communicatio Teaching Mass ns Certification (See Communications Music College of Music Writing Education and Music Education Behavioral Music Performance Sciences) Music - All-Level Art Theory/Compositi - Al-Level Music on Teacher Writing

School of BBA Accounting General Business Economics Business Finance Economics International Finance Business International Management Business Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 55 Marketing Management Marketing

School of BSN Nursing RN Nursing BS Kinesiology Kinesiology Kinesiology with and Allied Kinesiology with Athletic Training Health Teacher Teacher Certification Certification (See Wellness College of Management Education and Athletic Training Behavioral Sciences) Physical Education (EC-12)

College of BS Biology Biology Teaching Pre-Health Science and Biochemistry- Chemistry Certification (See Professions Mathematic Molecular Biology Mathematics College of Pre- s Chemistry Physics Education and Engineering Mathematics Behavioral Physics Sciences) High School (8-12) - Composite Science - Life Science - Mathematical Studies - Physical Science Middle Grades (4- 8) - Composite Science - Mathematical Studies Bachelor of BA Interdisciplinary Concentration Liberal Arts Studies s: - Humanities - General Math and Science - Business

14. Liberal Arts Core Curriculum

Bachelor of Arts (BA) "*"Course must be completed with a "C" or higher to meet proficiency. "^" Course must be taken at HBU unless transferred to HBU before Fall 2011.

COURSES Hrs *ENGL 1320^ & 1330 Wisdom I & II 6

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 56 ENGL 2315 & 2325 Great Works I & II ^I OR II 6 CHRI 1313 & 1323 Old & New Testaments 6 CHRI 2373 Christian Theology & Tradition 3 Natural Science and Lab BIOL, CHEM, PHYS 4 *MATH 1305 Math for Critical Thinking OR MATH 3 1313College Algebra PHIL 1313^ Introduction to Philosophy 3 PHIL 1310 Logic 3 HIST 2311^ & 2312^ Western Civ I & II 6 HIST 2313 & 2323 U.S. History I & II 6 ECON 2310^ History of Economic Thought 3 GOVT 2313 American and Texas Government I 3 GOVT 2320^ Political Thought 3 Foreign Language 6 ART 2343 Art Appreciation 3 MUSI 1331 Music Appreciation 3 Total Hours in Liberal Arts Core: 67

Does not include FYS 1100 Freshman Year Experience if needed.

Bachelor of Science (BS) "*"Course must be completed with a "C" or higher to meet proficiency. "^" Course must be taken at HBU unless transferred to HBU before Fall 2011.

COURSES Hrs *ENGL 1320^ & 1330 Wisdom I & II 6 ENGL 2315 OR 2325 Great Works I & II 3 CHRI 1313 & 1323 Old & New Testaments 6 CHRI 2373^ Christian Theology & Tradition 3 Natural Science and Lab BIOL, CHEM, PHYS 4 *MATH 1305 Math for Critical Thinking 3 OR MATH 1313College Algebra PSCY 1313 Introduction to Psychology 3 OR SOCI 1313 Introduction to Sociology PHIL 1313^ Introduction to Philosophy 3 PHIL 1310 Logic 3 HIST 2311^ & 2312^ Western Civ I & II 6 HIST 2313 & 2323 U.S. History I & II 6 ECON 2310^ History of Economic Thought 3 GOVT 2313 American and Texas Government I 3 GOVT 2320^ Political Thought 3 ART 2343 Art Appreciation OR MUSI 1331 Music 3 Appreciation Total Hours in Liberal Arts Core: 58

Does not include FYS 1100 Freshman Year Experience if needed.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 57 For specific requirements of all other degrees, please see the information in the respective colleges or schools.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 58 Graduate Degree Program

Program Policies

Americans with Disabilities Act

HBU provides equal access to all University educational programs to every qualified student. However, if any student requires special personal services or equipment, the student will be responsible for the expenses thereof. This policy includes the expense of providing personal tutors, personal attendants, medical technicians, and so forth. The office of the Director of Academic Advising will assist such students in communicating with the proper community or governmental agency to secure any available financial assistance to meet their needs.

Graduate Academic Load

A graduate student who is enrolled for nine or more graduate semester hours during the semester is considered to be a full-time student. Twelve semester hours is the maximum load per semester during the fall and spring semesters with nine hours the preferred average maximum. Graduate students enrolled in particular programs of study must meet the particular enrollment requirements of that specific degree program for each semester of enrollment. During the summer session only, a graduate student with a minimum GPA of 3.25 will be allowed to register for a maximum of twelve (12) semester hours provided that no more than seven hours be undertaken in a five-week summer term. Two courses per term may be allowed with permission. Overloads must be approved by the faculty advisors and college/school deans.

Graduate Degree Application (Graduation)

Each student must pay a graduation fee and must file for graduation at least two semesters prior to the date graduation is expected. The Application for Graduation will verify the name as it should appear on the diploma, the date the degree is expected, and the major fields of interest to be completed as a part of the degree requirements. The Registrar will perform an audit of the student’s degree requirements and notify the student and her or her advisor of the course work and other requirements the student still needs to complete.

Graduate Degree Plan

A signed degree plan should be filed with the Registrar soon after the 12-day roll of their first semester.

Graduate Grading System and Grade Points

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 59 Each graduate student will receive grades at the end of each semester of enrollment. The system of grading is as follows:

Grade Grade Points

A (93 and above) 4.00 A– (90 – 92) 3.67 B+ (87 – 89) 3.33 B (83 – 86) 3.00 B– (80 – 82) 2.67 C+ (77 – 79) 2.33 C (73 – 76) 2.00 C– (70 – 72) 1.67 I F (69 and below) 0.00 W

Candidates must achieve a 3.0 average in order to graduate. After each grading period, the University Registrar will review the current and cumulative grade average for each student. Those students whose performance does not meet graduation standards will be placed on academic probation or academic suspension.

Graduate Residency Requirement

Students who have earned a first masters degree from a regionally accredited institution who wish to pursue a second graduate degree in a related or collateral field at HBU may do so by applying for admission to the Graduate School. With the exception of students pursuing a second graduate degree in business, students must complete at least thirty (30) hours of course work in the degree program at HBU. The School of Business requires 30 semester hours for the second graduate degree. Specific requirements are established by the faculty of the College or School offering the degree program so that duplicate course work is avoided while fulfilling the requirements for the degree.

Graduate Scholastic Standing

Every graduate student enrolled in graduate programs is required to maintain a high level of performance and to comply fully with policies of the University. Students who are admitted to a degree program with stipulations are subject to compliance with those requirements. Failure to fulfill the conditions stipulated at the time of admission will result in suspension from the University. If a graduate student’s cumulative grade point average falls below 3.0, the student will be placed on academic probation. A 3.0 average is the minimum requirement of the University for graduate students; individual academic programs may impose a higher grade point average for continuance in specific programs. Probationary status can be removed only when the cumulative GPA reaches the minimum of 3.0. Each student placed on academic probation must achieve a minimum 3.0 GPA during the student’s current enrollment or he or she will be Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 60 suspended and will not be allowed to apply for readmission until at least one full semester has passed. Readmission is not guaranteed after a student has been suspended. When reapplying after suspension, the student must schedule an interview with the Dean of the college in which the degree resides. A student on first suspension will be readmitted at the Dean’s discretion. If admission is denied, the student may appeal the decision in writing to the university’s Graduate Admission Committee. Two letters of academic recommendation must support the student’s appeal. A student who is suspended for a second time is not eligible for readmission.

Graduate Transfer Credit

There is no guaranteed transfer of credit toward a graduate degree; however, in certain programs, work completed in residence at another accredited institution may, on the recommendation of the Program Director, be accepted by the University Registrar as credit toward a graduate degree. The University will not recognize hours achieved either entirely or partially on the basis of life experience. No correspondence or extension credit will be accepted. No more than six semester hours of graduate credit will be allowed in transfer from another college or university and the application for transfer courses should be made within two weeks of matriculation. (See "Graduate Admissions" section.) English language courses are ordinarily not accepted from institutions in countries where English is not the primary language.

Learning Disability Accommodation

Please refer to the Undergraduate section on this topic.

Student Directory Information

Please see "Family Education Rights and Privacy Act" section.

Time Limit on Length of Program

Required courses are scheduled for the convenience of the student. Using a combination of available offerings, a typical student will be able to earn the graduate degree within the span of twenty-four or fewer months. A student may have five years after first enrollment to complete all requirements for the graduate degree. However, specific degree programs may require shorter periods of study.

Graduate Degree Programs

See program descriptions and requirements in the respective College or School section of this catalog.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 61 School of Business

Houston Baptist University is nationally accredited by The Accreditation Council of Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). The School of Business offers the following degree programs: Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA), Master of Accountancy (MACCT), Master of Business Administration (MBA), Master of International Business (MIB), Master of Science in Human Resources Management (MS-HRM), and Master of Science in Management (MS- MGMT).

Undergraduate Programs

The School of Business offers an undergraduate degree program leading to the Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA).

A student who chooses a major within the School of Business is studying for a Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree. The student may choose from the following majors: Accounting, Economics, Finance, International Business, Management, or Marketing.

Information Technology Policy

Students taking courses offered in the School of Business will be expected to use e-mail, the university’s intranet system, the World Wide Web, as well as word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation software. Details of these requirements change from time to time, and current statements are available on the undergraduate and graduate web sites as well as from program or departmental offices.

School of Business Exit Exam Policy

All graduates from the School of Business must complete the School of Business Exit Exam. The School of Business will administer the exit exam to all graduating seniors with at least one major in the School of Business. The School of Business Exit Exam is normally taken in the last semester prior to graduation. In order to graduate, all School of Business students must sit for and pass this exam. A passing score is at least 70 percent on the exam. Students who do not pass the exit exam will be given one opportunity during the graduating semester to re-take and pass the exit exam. If the exit exam is not passed, graduation will be delayed, and students may be asked to take additional course work to demonstrate their proficiency in business administration.

Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA)

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 62 The Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree is available only to students who major in the School of Business. Every undergraduate seeking the BBA degree must complete a major in an academic area – Accounting, Economics, Finance, International Business, Management, or Marketing. This degree option is designed to prepare candidates for careers as professionals, entrepreneurs or for continued study towards graduate education.

The Business Administration core (required for all BBA students) consists of the business core requirements necessary for the study and practice of all business principles.

Major/Minor Options

Students pursuing a BBA will choose a major from the following departments:

Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance

Accounting

The undergraduate major in Accounting is designed to prepare students for careers in public accounting, industry, or government as professional accountants. Emphasis is placed on accumulating, communicating and analyzing financial data to determine its relevance for effective management and to make better business decisions.

Accounting Major Requirements PDF

Economics

The undergraduate major in Economics is designed to prepare students for careers in business or government or to serve as the foundation for further professional study at the graduate level. Emphasis is placed on the fundamental theories that govern the free enterprise system and on developing those professional skills required for the analysis and planning of business activity.

Economics Major Requirments PDF

Economics Minor Requirments PDF

Finance

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 63 The undergraduate major in Finance is designed to prepare students for a career in financial management, banking, financial planning, and investment management. This major recognizes that financial decisions and financial management are critical to the success of the enterprise.

Finance Major Requirements PDF

Finance Minor Requirements PDF

Department of Management, Marketing And Business

General Business

There is no major in General Business. However, a minor in General Business is offered.

General Business Minor Requirements PDF

International Business

The undergraduate major in International Business provides students with a solid foundation in business concepts, along with key international skills to prepare the student for a career in the global business environment.

International Business Major Requirements PDF

International Business Minor Requirements PDF

Marketing

The undergraduate major in Marketing is designed to prepare students for a career in marketing and provides the background necessary for subsequent advancement to higher-level marketing positions. Marketing majors work for many different types of companies such as advertising and PR firms, marketing research firms, non-profit organizations, retailing, or service firms.

Marketing Major Requirements PDF

Marketing Minor Requirements PDF

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 64

Management

The undergraduate major in management is designed to provide students with an understanding of key business concepts and technologies, along with principles and procedures to manage resources for globally competitive business organizations.

Management Major Requirements PDF

Management Minor Requirements PDF

Graduate Programs

Master of Accountancy

The Master of Accountancy is designed specifically for the accounting major in the School of Business at Houston Baptist University who intends to sit for the CPA Examination upon completion of degree requirements. Upon completion of degree requirements, the student is awarded both the BBA and the MACCT. If the MACCT is not completed, graduate courses will be accepted to satisfy the corresponding BBA Accounting degree requirements.

To apply for the MACCT program, students must have already completed 90 semester hours with an overall QPA of 3.0, including both HBU and transferred courses, and have taken the GMAT. Of the 90 hours, 24 must have been completed at HBU, and nine of them must be upper-level courses. In order to be admitted to the program, a student must have completed all of the following courses outlined in the follwoing PDF:

Master of Accountancy Requirements PDF

Master of Business Administration (MBA)

The MBA Program is structured to develop the knowledge and skills vital for all aspects of management. The program offers an intensive curriculum with focus on globalization, ethics and leadership. This curriculum is also uniquely innovative and flexible. The MBA program requires 33 hours of core courses. If a student does not have an undergraduate BBA degree, there is an additional 16 hours of leveling courses.

Master of Business Administration Requirements PDF

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 65 Master of International Business (MIB)

The MIB provides students with the specialized knowledge that is needed in global companies— cross-cultural communications, international law, international finance, global economics, and many other disciplines. This is a lock-step program, with no electives. The program length is 36-52 hours, depending on the student’s undergraduate degree.

Master of International Business Requirements PDF

Master of Science in Human Resources Management (MS-HRM)

The Master of Science in Human Resources Management (MS-HRM) is designed to provide students with the latest and most useful knowledge and skills needed by successful human resources professionals. To ensure currency, the faculty contains an effective mix of highly successful practitioners and those with a rigorous academic background. This is a lock-step program, with no electives.

Master of Science in Human Resources Management Requirments PDF

Master of Science in Management (MS-MGMT)

The Master of Science in Management is reserved for the individual who already holds the MBA degree and wishes to expand his or her skill and knowledge base. The degree consists of thirty hours (ten courses) of graduate work selected from the current MBA course offerings. Course selections are made in consultation with the Associate Dean for Graduate Business Programs.

Master of Science in Management Requirements PDF

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 66 School of Christian Thought

The School of Christian Thought offers undergraduate and graduate degree programs in apologetics, biblical languages, philosophy and theology. The mission of the School of Christian Thought is to serve and equip the Church; to provide students with foundational knowledge in philosophy, theology, and apologetics through reading and engagement with the ideas and languages of classic and biblical texts; to challenge students to display sound reasoning, to communicate clearly, and to demonstrate effective research skills; and to foster both intellectual and spiritual growth as students and faculty alike seek to glorify God in all things.

Undergraduate Programs

Department of Philosophy

Philosophy is an underlying element of every field of study and permeates all aspects of culture and society, including matters of faith. As a result, the history of philosophy is a necessary context for understanding contemporary problems and issues. HBU’s philosophy courses are designed to help students explore the contribution of philosophy to Christian thought, and to consider Christian perspectives on philosophy. In addition, the study of philosophy helps students develop critical skills for use in all areas of life. HBU is committed to enhancing student’s abilities as they aim toward excellence. Whether one engages in Christian ministry or seeks some other professional vocation, a well-developed mind and the capacity for clear and cogent expression are essential components for effective service. The study of philosophy, tempered by a Christian worldview, aids in this goal.

Philosophy Major Requirements PDF

Philosophy Minor Requirements PDF

Department of Theology

HBU is committed to providing liberal arts undergraduate education dedicated to the view that Christian ideals and principles provide the perspective, goals, and values most essential in higher education. The implementation of this view is the responsibility of the entire University staff, but it is the province of the Department of Theology to offer the specific courses that enable students to gain an intelligent and meaningful acquaintance with the Christian religion and with the writings of the Old and New Testaments.

Nine (9) semester hours in Christianity are required for graduation in any major. These are basic courses designed for all college students and not for church vocations students alone. In addition to its support of the core curriculum, the Department of Theology offers majors in Biblical Languages and Christianity.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 67 Biblical Languages

The mission of the Department of Theology is to provide students with a foundation in the classical theological disciplines, facilitate intellectual and spiritual growth, and equip individuals in skills essential to Christian ministry. To accomplish this mission the Department of Theology offers two majors: one in Christianity; the other in Biblical Languages. These courses of study help students achieve an intelligent and meaningful understanding of the Christian faith, its history and its practices. They are appropriate for men and women who plan to enter a vocation in Christian ministry; they are also appropriate for individuals who desire to serve in active lay ministry. Many students who complete a major in Christianity or Biblical Languages may wish to continue their studies either in our Master of Arts in Biblical Languages program or our Master of Arts in Theological Studies program.

Biblical Languages Major Requirements PDF

Biblical Languages Minor Requirements PDF

Christianity

Anyone wanting to understand God’s work in the world will enjoy pursuing a Christianity major or minor in the Department of Theology. This degree is especially appropriate for those wanting to serve the body of Christ as a minister in a church, a missionary, someone in parachurch ministry, or whatever setting God calls you. We value our Baptist heritage, but our faculty and students are broadly evangelical, drawing from a variety of traditions and denominations. Thus, we welcome anyone who would wish to study with us.

Our broad program focusing on Biblical Studies, Theology, and Practical Ministry will give you a foundation for a variety of ministries and will prepare for graduate studies such as our Master of Arts in Theological Studies (MATS) or an MDiv. The main strength and focus of our department is the study of the Bible. You will gain a strong grasp of the Old and New Testament and will learn to interpret the Scriptures for yourself, even studying them in Greek and Hebrew. Along with the study of the Bible, we give you a strong foundation in theological disciplines so that you can understand how Christian theology addresses the questions of modern culture and how your theology fits within the variety of Christian traditions and denominations over the past two millennia. In all our classes we integrate discussion about how to apply the Bible in the church, but we focus specifically on these issues in a variety of Practical Ministry classes. Since God has gifted each of you in different ways, we help you explore your gifting and the needs of the church, so you can ably share God’s love with a broken world. There are a number of different Christianity minors in the Department of Theology, each with a different emphasis. There are minors in Biblical Studies, Christian Studies, Practical Theology or Theology.

Christianity Major Requirements PDF Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 68

Christian Biblical Studies Minor Requirements PDF

Christian Christian Studies Minor Requirements PDF

Christian Practical Theology Minor Requirements PDF

Christian Theology Minor Requirements PDF

Graduate Programs

Master of Arts in Apologetics

The mission of the Master of Arts program is to develop students who are capable of serving their community and the Church successfully in a variety of vocations, including academic, parachurch, and ecclesiastical professions. The Master of Arts degree is intended to provide students with interdisciplinary training in apologetics so that they understand and engage with contemporary worldviews and culture in order to transform the world for Christ, as academics, as apologists, and as followers of Christ.

The MA in Apologetics would consist of 36 hours (consistent with many other humanities programs). The curriculum is built around core courses with a limited elective component in order to provide a focused program in which the various core components support each other for an overall comprehensive education. A requirement for the entire program is that students demonstrate a basic knowledge and understanding of the fundamentals of classical apologetics by the end of their first two semesters, either by successfully completing PHIL 5300, Fundamentals of Apologetics, or by passing a competency exam on the material.

Master of Arts in Apologetics Program Requirements PDF

Master of Arts in Biblical Languages

The Master of Arts in Biblical Languages (MABL) offers a concentrated and intensive program of study in biblical languages for students having an undergraduate major in biblical languages or having completed at least six semester hours of Greek and six semester hours of Hebrew (“Advanced Standing” Program – 30 hours of course work), and also for those without an undergraduate major in biblical languages or at least six semester hours of Greek and six semester hours of Hebrew (“Entering Standing” Program – 42 hours of course work).

Master of Arts in Biblical Languages Program Requirements PDF

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 69 Master of Arts in Philosophy

To earn the Master of Arts degree in Philosophy, a student must complete the following course work with no grades less than “C”.

Master of Arts in Philosophy Program Requirements PDF

Certificate in Apologetics Program Requirements PDF

Master of Arts in Theological Studies

The HBU Master of Arts in Theological Studies (MATS) is designed to meet the needs of those planning to enter vocational or bi-vocational church ministry, of those already engaged in vocational or bi-vocational church ministry, and of those church members who wish to enhance their voluntary ministry in the church. The program is designed to enable the graduate student or graduate of this program to greater effectiveness and accomplishment in service through vocational church ministry. The MATS is also designed to enable graduates to continue in additional graduate study or to develop programs of continuing education for personal growth in ministry. Students will study intensively in the four major areas of theological studies: biblical, historical/theological, philosophical, and practical studies.

The Academic Program

The MATS program is a seminar based program. The professor/instructor who leads the seminar will expect students to participate in extensive reading, writing, and discussion concerning the subject matter of a course. Consequently, courses are not lecture based but the professor/instructor will give input as needed to enhance the instructive force of the seminar approach to the course subject matter.

Students who have an undergraduate degree in religion, biblical studies, or Christianity, where undergraduate courses taken covered the prerequisite areas of study, will be granted advanced standing upon their acceptance into the program, and will have thirty-six (36) hours remaining to earn the MATS degree. Where their undergraduate study lacks a subject area, students will be required to take the MATS level core courses. Other students will be required to take CHRI 5300. In completing the 36 hour program, all students should take six hours of biblical studies (3 hours of Old Testament and 3 hours of New Testament), six hours of theology, and three hours of philosophy.

The student will be responsible for critical essays on the major works in subject categories, ongoing evaluations by the professor/instructor on knowledge in subject categories, a major paper, and a final exam. A course in which the student received less than a “C–” will not count toward completion of the degree. The grading scale will be the University grading scale as described in this Catalog.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 70 To earn a Master of Arts in Theological Studies, 36 semester hours are required.

Master of Arts in Theologocal Studies Program Requirements PDF

The Accelerated MATS Degree

The Department of Theology offers undergraduate Christianity majors an opportunity to enter an Accelerated MATS degree program. By entering this track as an undergraduate, a student may earn a MATS degree with one year of graduate studies after earning the BA or BS degree. Students may apply for the program at the beginning of their first semester in their junior year. (See “Christianity Major” for a complete description of the Accelerated MATS degree.)

Accellerated Master of Arts in Theologocal Studies Program Requirements PDF

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 71 College of Education and Behavioral Sciences

The College of Education and Behavioral Sciences offers undergraduate, graduate and post baccalaureate programs for educators and prospective educators. Using multiple teaching methods which address a variety of learning styles, its rigorous programs emphasize active, meaningful, field-based, student-centered and technology-rich learning. Assessment utilizes challenging criteria that are reliable, valid, clear, fair and performance-based. The Center for the Preparation of Professional Educators (CPPE), which is housed in the SOE provides a number of different functions and services for students in the Educator Preparation Program (TEP). The CPPE portion of the COEBS website provides details about those functions and services: http://hbu.edu/CPPE

Undergraduate Programs in the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences

The undergraduate programs in the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences fulfill the mission of the University by preparing truly professional teachers for public and private early childhood, elementary, middle and high schools based on a liberal arts foundation. Each program leads to state teacher certification, meets state, regional, and national professional standards, and is accredited by the Texas Education Agency (TEA).

Each program requires coursework in academic foundations (the Liberal Arts Core), a teaching field, and professional teacher education. All of the requirements were cooperatively developed by HBU faculty and the School of Education Advisory Council. The Advisory Council includes the members of the University’s Teacher Education Committee (education as well as arts and sciences professors), practicing professionals (teachers, administrators, regional service representatives, etc.), alumni and community members.

NOTE: The State of Texas through the Texas Education Agency (TEA), not the University, certifies teachers. Individuals desiring to teach in accredited public and private schools in Texas must be certified through TEA. TEA frequently changes certification levels and requirements. In order to meet new TEA guidelines, the University may change requirements described in this Catalog. Students should check with the School of Education office to verify current requirements.

Teacher Certification Options

• Elementary: Early Childhood through Grade Six (EC-6) Certifications o Elementary: EC-6 Generalist o Elementary: EC-6 with Bilingual Certification o Elementary: EC-6 with All-Level Special Education Certification • Middle Grades: Grades 4-8 Certifications o Composite Social Studies with Grades 4-8 Certification o Composite Science with 4-8 Certification o English/Language Arts with Grades 4-8 Certification o Mathematics/Mathematical Studies with Grades 4-8 Certification • High School: Grades 7-12 Certifications o Composite Science with Grades 7-12 Certification o Composite Social Studies with Grades 7-12 Certification o English/Language Arts with Grades 7-12 Certification o History with Grades 7-12 Certification Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 72 o Life Science with Grades 7-12 Certification o Mathematics/Mathematical Studies with Grades 7-12 Certification o Physical Science with Grades 7-12 Certification o Speech Communication with Grades 7-12 Certification • All-Level: Early Childhood (EC) – Grade 12 Certifications o Art with EC- Grade 12 Certification o Music with EC- Grade 12 Certification (See School of Music) o Physical Education/Kinesiology with EC- Grade 12 Certification o Spanish with EC- Grade 12 Certification • Supplemental Certifications o English as a Second Language (ESL) o Special Education

Coursework Requirements for Early Childhood through Grade Six (EC-Grade 6) Certification Area

Early Childhood through Grade Six (EC-Grade 6) Generalist Certification This certification permits one to teach all subjects in general education classrooms from early childhood through grade six. Undergraduate students seeking this certification complete the Elementary Education (EC-6) with ESL major. This major includes English as a Second Language (ESL) coursework sufficient to sit for supplemental ESL certification as well as gifted education coursework.

Elementary Education (EC-6) with ESL Requirements PDF

Elementary Education (EC-Grade 6) with Bilingual Certification This certification permits one to teach all subjects in bilingual classrooms from early childhood through grade six. Undergraduate students seeking this certification complete the Elementary Education (EC-6) with Bilingual Certification major. Students learn to help children develop first and second language proficiency and to teach content material in a bilingual (English and Spanish) context. In order to begin this program, students must already be proficient in Spanish. They must demonstrate competency in reading, writing, speaking and listening in Spanish.

Elementary Education (EC-6) with Bilingual Certification Requirements PDF

Elementary Education (EC-Grade 6) with All-Level (EC-Grade 12) Special Education Certification This certification permits one to teach all subjects in a “regular” education classroom from early childhood through grade six as well as special education (life skills, resource, PPCD, etc.) at those levels.. It also permits one to teach Life Skills in middle school and high school as well as special education for any subject one is certified to teach at those levels. To simultaneously acquire EC-6 and All-Level Special Education certification, students complete the Elementary Education (EC-6) and All-Level Special Education major.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 73 Elementary Education (EC-6) with Special Ed Certification Requirements PDF

Middle Grades Certification (Grades 4-8) This leads to grades four through eight (4-8) teacher certification in a chosen teaching field. In the undergraduate program, it requires completion of one of the teaching field majors listed below. Each of these majors includes content area and professional education course work. The coursework requirements for each program can be accessed through the link listed under the program title.

• Composite Science with 4-8 Certification Composite Science (4-8) Teacher Certification Requirements PDF

• Composite Social Studies with 4-8 Certification Composite Social Studies (4-8) Teacher Certification Requirements PDF

• English/Language Arts with 4-8 Certification English/Language Arts & Reading (4-8) Teacher Certification Requirements PDF

• Mathematical Studies with 4-8 Certification Mathematical Studies (4-8) Teacher Certification Requirements PDF

High School Certification (Grades 7 - 12) This leads to grades seven through twelve (7-12) teacher certification in a chosen teaching field. In the undergraduate program, it requires completion of one of the teaching field majors listed below. Each of these majors includes content area and professional education course work. The coursework requirements for each program can be accessed through the link listed under the program title.

• Composite Science with Grades 7-12 Certification Composite Science (7-12) Teacher Certification Requirements PDF

• Composite Social Studies with Grades 7-12 Certification Composite Social Studies (7-12) Teacher Certification Requirements PDF

• English/Language Arts with Grades 7-12 Certification English/Language Arts (7-12) Teacher Certification Requirements PDF

• History with Grades 7-12 Certification History (7-12) Teacher Certification Requirements PDF

• Life Science with Grades 7-12 Certification Life Science (7-12) Teacher Certification Requirements PDF

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 74 • Mathematical Studies with Grades 7-12 Certification Mathematical Studies (7-12) Teacher Certification Requirements PDF

• Physical Science with Grades 7-12 Certification Physical Science (7-12) Teacher Certification Requirements PDF

• Speech Communication with Grades 7-12 Certification Speech Communications (7-12) Teacher Certification Requirements PDF

All-Level Certification (EC – Grade 12) This leads to early childhood through grade twelve teacher certification in a chosen teaching field. In the undergraduate program, it requires completion of one of the teaching field majors listed below. Each of these majors includes content area and professional education course work. The coursework requirements for each program can be accessed through the link listed under the program title.

• Art with EC- Grade 12 Certification All Level Art Teacher Certification Requirements PDF

• Music with EC- Grade 12 Certification (See School of Music)

• Physical Education/Kinesiology with EC- Grade 12 Certification Kinesiology All-Level Teacher Certification Requirements PDF

• Spanish with EC- Grade 12 Certification Spanish (EC-12) with Teacher Certification Requirements PDF

Supplemental Certifications A supplemental certificate is an additional certification area that is added to another certification. It requires passage of the state’s supplemental certification exam for that area. HBU offers coursework that can prepare students for two different supplemental certification exams: ESL and Special Education.

English as a Second Language (ESL) This is available as a supplemental certification area that may be added to any teaching certificate. The coursework for this area of expertise (EDBI 4304 Second Language Acquisition and EDBI 4305 Methods of Teaching ESL) is included in all undergraduate EC-6 programs and some other undergraduate programs. Any education student may take these two courses then sit for the ESL supplemental exam.

Special Education This is available as a supplemental certification area that may be added to any certificate. In the undergraduate program, EC-12 Special Education Certification may be obtained simultaneously with the EC-6 certification by completing the Elementary Education (EC-6) with All-Level Special Education major. Other students may prepare to add supplemental special education certification to their certificates by completing EDSP 4301, 4311, 4319, 4325, 4352 and

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 75 4353. Many of these are already included in their degree requirements. The special education supplemental certification applies only to the level(s) and subject(s) one is already certified to teach.

Policies and Procedures for Undergraduate Teacher Education Program

Required Pre-Program Coursework Students should take EDUC 2320: Learning and Development and EDUC 2330: Foundations of American Educational Thought during their freshman year or during their first semester at HBU if transferring from another institution. These courses are prerequisites for admission to the Teacher Preparation Program (TEP). Students must earn a “C” or higher in each course in order to be admitted to the TEP.

Admission to the Undergraduate Teacher Education Program

A. Applicants must complete an application and receive approval prior to beginning the program. Undergraduates begin the program during the Fall and Spring semesters.

1. Applications should be submitted by the deadlines posted on the CPPE portion of the COEBS website: http://hbu.edu/CPPE 2. Students receive written confirmation of their admission status (including an explanation of requirements that still need to be met if admission is denied). 3. Program admission allows students to register for professional education classes: those with the EDBI, EDEC, EDUC, EDRE, EDSP and INDC rubrics.

B. Program admission requires the following:

1. A completed application on file in the School of Education posted on the CPPE portion of the COEBS website: http://hbu.edu/CPPE 2. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75 (based on all university/college coursework ever attempted). 3. Demonstration of basic skill proficiency in critical thinking, oral communication, reading, writing, and math. a. Critical thinking and reading proficiency demonstrated by a reading score of 260 or higher on the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test. b. Writing proficiency demonstrated through writing samples on the application and a passing THEA writing score of 220 or higher. c. Math proficiency demonstrated by a THEA math score of 235 or higher. d. Oral language proficiency demonstrated through a “C” or better in an oral communication course, a signed Speech Competency Form completed by an HBU professor or an interview. If possible oral communication problems are noted in the admissions interview, successful completion of an additional oral language screening assessment may be required. 4. Completion of least 45 semester hours of university coursework prior to beginning the program, but not prior to the interview. 5. A successful interview conducted by School of Education faculty that demonstrates the following dispositions: a. A genuine desire to enter and follow a career in teaching.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 76 b. A personal and social orientation which shows promise of contributing to success in the teaching profession. c. A physical and mental fitness which indicates potential classroom leadership. 6. For bilingual education certification students, successful completion of a Spanish language proficiency assessment that includes listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students who do not meet minimums standards on this assessment must successfully complete prescribed course work and/or other prescribed learning experiences in each area where the minimum standard was not achieved.

NOTE: Application for a state criminal history review and documented criminal clearance is required prior to beginning fieldwork during preprogram and program courses, just prior to student teaching and again for state licensure.

Retention in the Program The following conditions are necessary for retention in the program.

A. Maintenance of the 2.75 cumulative grade point average B. A “B” or better in EDUC 4301 or 4311. This is needed to take additional courses in the professional education course sequence and for this course to serve as a prerequisite for other courses. C. Continued demonstration of the dispositions that qualified the student for admission to the program. If students fail to demonstrate an acceptable level of performance on one or more professional educator standards (which include knowledge, skills and dispositions) during any class or field experience, a report is filed in the School of Education office (a PMID: Progress Monitoring & Intervention Documentation form). If two reports occur, a conference is held in which difficulties are identified and means for improvement are explored. [Sometimes specific interventions will be required.] A third report results in a committee hearing to review difficulties and means for improvement and to determine conditions for continuance in the program.

State Certification Exams

A. To receive state certification, prospective teachers must successfully complete the required state certification exams in both pedagogy and content areas. Bilingual certification also requires passage of the Bilingual Target Language Proficiency Test (BTLPT). High school certification in Spanish requires successful completion of the Languages Other than English (LOTE) Spanish test. B. HBU teacher education students are not allowed to take certification exams without authorization from the Center for the Preparation of Professional Educators (CPPE). To gain approval to take a state exam, students must first pass the practice exam (representative test) administered by HBU which is offered multiple times each semester. Intensive review for these practice exams and the certification exams is provided in EDUC 4100. The CPPE section of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences website contains the application form and calendar for practice exams as well as additional procedures related to state certification exams: http://hbu.edu/CPPE

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 77

Student Teaching

1. Requirements Student teaching is among the final requirements in HBU undergraduate teacher preparation programs. It must be done during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In addition to working in an assigned classroom or classrooms all semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day, it requires attendance at EDUC 4400 Student Teaching Seminar one afternoon each week. 2. Admission Admission to student teaching is not automatic upon completion of required courses. It is contingent upon application and acceptance based on having met the following criteria: 1. Admission to the Teacher Education Program (TEP) and satisfaction of all requirements for retention in the TEP. 2. A completed “Application for Student Teaching” form on file in the CPPE Office by the posted deadline from the CPPE portion of the COEBS website: http://hbu.edu/CPPE 3. A degree plan and application to graduate on file in the registrar’s office. 4. Completion of at least 96 semester hours with: a. A cumulative GPA of 2.75 or higher. b. At least 21 semester hours in the teaching field with no grade lower than “C” and a teaching field GPA of 2.75 or higher. c. A grade of “B” or higher in EDUC 4301 or 4311. d. Successful completion of all education courses specified on the degree plan except student teaching and the student teaching seminar with a grade of “C” or higher (“B” or higher for EDUC 4301/4311) and an education GPA of 2.75 or higher. 5. Successful completion of the HBU administered PPR and appropriate content area certification exam practice tests. 6. Fitness for teaching as judged by performance in the classroom and in field experiences. 7. If seeking Bilingual Education or Spanish certification, a passing score on the appropriate language proficiency assessment.

Actual Certification Teaching certificates are issued by the State of Texas, not the University. They are not automatically conferred upon graduation. In order for undergraduate students to receive state teacher certification, they must:

• Successfully complete all program requirements, including a professional portfolio. • Successfully complete appropriate examination(s) required by the State for the certification of teachers in both pedagogy and teaching field(s). • Not have any holds on their accounts. • Graduate. • Be formally recommended for certification by HBU. • Apply for certification online at the TEA website: www.tea.state.tx.us.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 78

Graduate Study in the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences

HBU’s vision is framed by Ten Pillars that include embracing the challenge of Christian graduate education. Consistent with this tenant, the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences emphasizes graduate study. The HBU graduate programs prepare students for teaching careers in public and private schools in Texas, extend the classroom pedagogical skills of teachers, and develop leaders in school administration, counseling and educational diagnosis. Both Master of Education (MEd) degree programs and Post Baccalaureate programs requiring graduate coursework are offered. Six of the MEd programs lead to initial teacher certification in the state of Texas. Others offer the possibility of adding professional certifications or simply expanding existing expertise.

Graduate Programs in the School of Education

MEd Programs that Lead to Initial Teacher Certification HBU offers the following six graduate Curriculum and Instruction programs in which students can simultaneously earn an MEd and Texas teacher certification. Each program leads to state certification in different grades and/or subjects.

Curriculum and Instruction with EC-6 Generalist Certification This option leads to both the MEd degree in Curriculum and Instruction and state EC-6 Generalist certification. The student must meet all admission, retention, and certification requirements for teacher education.

MED (EC - 6) Generalist Certification

Curriculum and Instruction with Middle Grades Certification in English Language Arts and Reading This option leads to both the MEd degree in Curriculum and Instruction and middle grades (4-8) certification in English Language Arts and Reading. The student must meet all admission, retention, and certification requirements for teacher education and have a certification plan completed by the certification officer.

MED Curriculum and Instruction (English L/A and Reading Certification, 4-8) Requirement PDF

Curriculum and Instruction with Middle Grades Certification in Math, Science, or Social Studies This option leads to both the MEd degree in Curriculum and Instruction and middle grades (4-8) certification in math, science or social studies. The student must meet all admission, retention, and certification requirements for teacher education and have a certification plan completed by the certification officer.

MED Curriculum and Instruction (Certification in Mathematics, Sciences, or Social Studies, 4-8) Requirements PDF

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 79 Curriculum and Instruction with High School Certification Grades 7-12 This option leads to both the MEd degree in Curriculum and Instruction and high school certification (grades 7-12). The student must meet all admission, retention, and certification requirements for teacher education and have a certification plan completed by the certification officer.

MED Curriculum and Instruction (7-12) Certification Requirement PDF

Additional course work (undergraduate or graduate) in the teaching field may be required and is determined on an individual basis by the certification officer and documented in a certification plan. Certification also requires student teaching or an approved equivalent and successful completion of content area and pedagogy and professional responsibility (PPR) state certification exams.

Curriculum and Instruction with All-Level Teacher Certification This option leads to both the MEd degree in Curriculum and Instruction and all-level Texas teacher certification in art, physical education, or music. The student must meet all admission, retention, and certification requirements for teacher education and have a certification plan completed by the certification officer.

MED Curriculum and Instruction (Certification in All- Level Art, Spanish, Music, or Physical Ed) Requirement PDF

Curriculum and Instruction with Certification in EC-6 Generalist and Special Education (EC-12) This option leads to both the MEd degree in Curriculum and Instruction and certification in Special Education (EC-12) and EC-6 Generalist. This certification permits one to teach all subjects in a “regular” education classroom from childhood through grade six as well as special education (life skills, resource, PPCD, etc.) at those levels. It also permits one to teach Life Skills in Middle School and High School as well as special education for any subject one is certification to teach at these levels.

MED Curriculum and Instruction Certification in EC-6 and Special Education (EC-12)

MEd Curriculum and Instruction Programs that do not Lead to Initial Teacher Certification The following programs provide additional professional expertise and/or professional certifications (Principal, School Counselor, Educational, Diagnostician, Master Technology Teacher and Reading Specialist). The professional certifications each have specific requirements in addition to course work including state certification exams and provision of school/district service records to document teaching experience.

Curriculum and Instruction The MEd in Curriculum and Instruction provides expertise related to curriculum content and instructional methodology. It allows individual students the opportunity to acquire expertise without the requirement of teacher certification. It also provides certified teachers the ability to increase their professional knowledge and skills and add supplemental certifications and Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 80 specializations. Each Curriculum and Instruction program requires a core of courses.

MED in Curriculum and Instruction Requirement PDF

Curriculum and Instruction with a Specialization in Instructional Technology Students may obtain the Specialization in Instructional Technology by completing the requirements for the MEd degree in Curriculum and Instruction with a Specialization in Instructional Technology or by completing the twenty-seven (27) hours of instructional technology course work included in the degree if they already possess a graduate degree. This does not lead to initial certification, and students do not have to be certified teachers to complete this degree program, but if seeking the additional Master Technology Teacher certification offered by the state, they must have completed 3 years of teaching as a certified teacher.

MED Curriculum and Instruction (Specialization in Instructional Technology) Requirement PDF

If a student already has an MEd and would like to be eligible to take the Master Technology Teacher exam, the following course work would serve as a deficiency plan.

Instructional Technology Specialization without MEd: 24 Hours EDAD 5319 Internet Resource 3 EDAD 5320 Systems Thinking: Theory and Application 3 EDUC 5302 Multimedia Instructional Strategies 3 EDUC 5305 Technology Enhanced Instructional Design 3 EDUC 5306 Educational Applications of Technology 3 EDUC 6307 Design of Print Based Media 3 EDUC 6308 Distance Learning 3 EDUC 6330 Teaching Methodology for the Professional 3

Bilingual Education This degree program is designed for already certified teachers who wish to enhance their knowledge and skills in the bilingual classroom. It also permits students who possess valid Texas teacher certification in an area other than bilingual education to add a supplemental bilingual certification. To gain admission to the Bilingual Education program, the prospective student must achieve the prerequisite scores on proficiency tests in English and in Spanish.

MED in Bilingual Education Requirements PDF [Upon approval of the advisor, students who already possess Texas Bilingual Education Teacher Certification may, through presentation of appropriate undergraduate equivalent courses, substitute other graduate courses for required courses in the Bilingual MEd Program.]

Supplemental Certification in Bilingual Education Students possessing valid Texas teacher certification in an area other than bilingual education may add a supplemental bilingual certification without completing the MEd in Bilingual

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 81 Education. A student seeking supplemental certification should contact the Department of Special Populations for individual advising.

Counselor Education The school counselor today is a vital member of the educational team on each campus. They help students in the areas of academic achievement, psychological and social development, and college/career development. For a person to be certified as a school counselor, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) requires that the student have two (2) years of successful teaching in an accredited school (as a certified teacher), earn an MEd degree, be recommended by an accredited program, and successfully complete the required state certification exam. Admission to the program requires the student to be a certified teacher or demonstrate progress towards certification. The requirements for this major include a 350-clock hour practicum which must be satisfactorily completed in an accredited, university-approved school. Students who are teaching full time may require more than one semester to complete the 350 hours of internship. Students who do not complete all 350 hours in EDSP 6191, they may register for additional semesters of Counseling Practicum with permission of the Dean of the College of Education Behavioral Sciences.

MED in Counselor Education Requirement PDF

Educational Administration The Educational Administration program prepares graduate students for positions as principals or assistant principals in elementary, middle or high schools and for such district-wide administrative positions as program directorships and supervisor or coordinator positions. To earn the Texas Standard Principal Certificate, the student must complete the thirty-seven (37) semester hours detailed through the following link, earn the MEd degree, have a valid Texas teaching certificate, have completed two (2) years of successful teaching in an accredited school, and successfully complete the certification examination required by the Texas Education Agency (TEA).

MED Administration Requirement PDF

Educational Diagnostician The Educational Diagnostician program prepares students for professional certification by the state. Educational Diagnosticians administer individual standardized test batteries to determine eligibility of students for areas of exceptionality. Prior to admission to the Educational Diagnostician certification, an individual must hold:

• a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution of higher education that at the time of attendance was accredited or otherwise approved by an accrediting organization recognized by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, and • a valid classroom teaching certificate.

To earn professional certification as an Educational Diagnostician, the student must successfully complete the forty-two (42) graduate hours listed at the following link and earn the MEd degree.

MED Diagnostician Requirement PDF Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 82

Reading Education The campus reading specialist serves as a resource to students, parents and teachers. They will learn leadership and communication skills as well as methods for improving the reading ability of students with a variety of different needs. To earn the Texas Professional Certificate as a Reading Specialist, a student must have a valid Texas teaching certificate, three years of successful teaching experience in an accredited elementary or secondary school, and a passing score on the appropriate state certification examination.

MED in Reading Specialist Certification Requirement PDF

Policies and Procedures for College of Education and Behavioral Sciences Graduate Programs

Admission Requirements While some programs have additional admission requirements, a cumulative undergraduate GPA of 2.75 or higher on a four-point scale or a 3.0 or higher on the last 60 hours of undergraduate work is required for all School of Education graduate programs. Provisional admittance is sometimes possible. It requires that students complete six semester hours during their first semester with a GPA of 3.5 or higher in order to obtain full program admission and continue taking classes.

Steps in Completing an MEd Degree Students have five years after first enrollment to complete all requirements for the graduate degree. As students progress through the program, they should do the following:

• Complete all required coursework with grades of “C” or higher while maintaining a 3.0 GPA • File a degree plan by the time they complete 12 hours • File for candidacy when they complete 18 hours • Successfully complete the written comprehensive exam after completion of a minimum of 24 hours and two MEd core course • Apply to graduate two semesters before graduation

Graduate Academic Load During any semester, a graduate student must enroll in nine or more semester hours of graduate coursework to be considered a full-time student. Twelve semester hours is the maximum allowed load per semester during the fall and spring semesters with nine hours preferred. During the summer session only, a graduate student with a minimum GPA of 3.25 may register for a maximum of fourteen (14) semester hours, provided that no more than seven hours be undertaken in a four or five-week summer term. Overloads must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor and the college dean.

Graduate Grading Scale Each course requires rigorous assessments of the course objectives. The same grading scale is used in all HBU graduate courses: 94 -100=A; 90-93=A-; 87-89=B+; 83-86=B; 80-82=B-; 77- 79=C+; 73-76=C; 70-72=C-; 69 and below=F. In order for a student to receive credit for a course, the grade earner must be a “C” or higher. If a grade of “C-“ or lower is earned, the Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 83 course cannot be applied to meet degree requirements.

Graduate Scholastic Standing If a student’s cumulative grade point average falls below 3.0, the student will be placed on academic probation. Probationary status can be removed only when the cumulative GPA reaches the minimum of 3.0. Each student placed on academic probation must achieve a minimum 3.0 GPA during the student’s next semester of work or he/she will be suspended and will not be allowed to apply for readmission until at least one full semester has passed. Students will then complete an application for Readmission and submit it to the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences. The procedure for Readmission can be found on this link. http://www.hbu.edu/Choosing-HBU/Academics/Registrar/Readmission-Process.aspx

Graduate Transfer Credit There is no guaranteed transfer of credit toward a graduate degree; however, on the recommendation of the Program Director, up to a maximum of six hours of appropriate course work may be allowed in transfer from another appropriately accredited college or university.

School of Education Graduate Comprehensive Examination In order to earn an MEd, graduate students must successfully complete a written comprehensive exam. To be eligible to take the Comprehensive Exam a candidate must have completed a minimum of 24 hours of coursework which applies toward the degree including at least two of the MEd core courses. This culminating assessment measures mastery of course objectives as well as capacity to think globally regarding educational theory and practice. The rigor of the comprehensive assessment demands students evaluate, analyze, and synthesize all learning experiences in the program.

Additional Policies and Procedures for Graduate Initial Teacher Certification Programs

Admission to Initial Graduate Teacher Certification Programs To be eligible for the HBU MEd Teacher Certification program, a student must have a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited university. If an EC-6 certification is desired, the student needs to have 6 hours of undergraduate coursework in each the following areas: English, Math, Science, and Social Studies. This also applies to Special Education applicants wanting to work in EC-6 schools. Applicants for all other certification areas need a minimum of 24 hours in the desired content area. Special Education applicants wanting to teach in 7-12 schools must be certified in the content area as well as special education.

If applicants want to be admitted to a certain certification area but do not have the required content area hours, they may take additional coursework to qualify or take a Pre Admission Content Test(PACT) from the state of Texas to qualify to enter the program.

Applicants must:

• Complete online forms for Graduate Admission being sure to select the MEd initial certification. • Submit official transcripts from all universities and colleges attended. All non-U.S. transcripts need to be evaluated by Spantran or Global Evaluators to be accepted. A minimum GPA of 2.75 is required by the state of Texas for all prospective teachers. • Successfully interview with School of Education faculty.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 84

Clinical Teaching

1. Requirements Clinical teaching is among the final requirements in HBU graduate teacher preparation programs. It must be done during one of the last two semesters prior to graduation. In addition to working in an assigned classroom or classrooms all semester from Monday through Friday for the entire school day, clinical teachers attend a seminar one afternoon each week. Beyond the course (with seminar) required for clinical teaching, no more than 3 additional semester hours of coursework may be taken during the clinical teaching semester without approval by the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

2. Admission Admission to clinical teaching is not automatic upon completion of required courses. It is contingent upon application and acceptance based on having met the following criteria: 1. Admission to the Teacher Education Program (TEP) and satisfaction of all requirements for retention in the graduate TEP program. 2. A completed “Application for Clinical Teaching” form on file in the CPPE Office by the posted deadlin from the CPPE portion of the COEBS website: http://hbu.edu/CPPE 3. A degree plan and application to graduate on file in the registrar’s office 4. A grade of “B” or better in EDUC 6302 or 6312 5. Successful completion of all courses on the degree plan or permission of the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences 6. Fitness for teaching as judged by performance in the classroom and in field experiences. 7. Successful completion of the HBU administered PPR and content area certification exam practice tests 8. If seeking Bilingual Education or Spanish certification, a passing score on the appropriate language proficiency assessment.

State Certification Exams To receive state certification, prospective teachers must successfully complete the required state certification exams in both pedagogy and content areas. Bilingual students must also pass the Bilingual Target Language Proficiency Test (BTLPT). High school certification in Spanish requires successful completion of the Spanish Languages Other and English (LOTE) test.

HBU initial certification graduate students are not allowed to take these exams without authorization from the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences. To gain approval to take a state exam, students must first pass the practice exam (representative test) administered by HBU multiple times each semester. The CPPE (Center for the Professional Preparation in Education) section of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences website contains the calendar for the practice exams and the application form. http://hbu.edu/CPPE

Exams reviews are regularly provided by the CPPE Director.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 85

Post Baccalaureate Teacher Certification Program

Houston Baptist University’s Post Baccalaureate Teacher Certification Program is an alternate route to attaining initial teacher certification in Texas. The HBU Post Baccalaureate program has been approved by the Texas Education Agency (TEA) as complying with the U. S. Department of Education’s rules concerning criteria for an acceptable alternative route to certification program under the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act. The program provides the opportunity for a student with a Bachelor’s degree who meets all requirements for admission to the HBU ‘s Post Baccalaureate program to be employed as a full-time teacher in area school districts while completing the required coursework for the Post Baccalaureate program while being considered “highly qualified” in accordance with applicable federal law.

Once the student has completed the 21 hours of required coursework, the student may apply those hours toward the requirements of an HBU Master’s Degree in Curriculum & Instruction. Each M. Ed. degree requires a minimum of 36 hours.

Post Baccalaureate Teacher Certification Program Areas Students in the Post Baccalaureate program may select one of the following certification areas:

EARLY CHILDHOOD – GRADE 6 GRADES 7-12 EC-6 Generalist English, Language Arts, & Reading, 7-12 EC-6 Bilingual Generalist Mathematics 7-12 Social Studies Composite, 7-12 History 7-12 Life Science, 7-12 Science Composite 7-12

GRADES 4-8 GRADES EC-12 English, Language Arts, & Reading, 4-8 Special Education EC-12 Mathematics, 4-8 Physical Education EC-12 Science Composite, 4-8 Art EC-12 Social Studies 4-8 Music EC-12 Spanish EC-12

Course Work Requirements for Each Certification Area

EC-6 Generalist Certification

EDUC 5306: Educational Applications of Technology EDRE 5310: Reading for Pre-Adolescents EDSP 5302: Survey of Exceptional Children EDUC 5360: Math for Pre-Adolescents EDUC 6302: Elementary School Curriculum and Instruction

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 86 EDUC 6304: Children, Adolescents, and Learning EDUC 5101: Internship I EDUC 5201: Internship II

EC-6 Bilingual Generalist Certification

EDUC 6302: Elementary School Curriculum and Instruction EDUC 6304: Children, Adolescents and Learning 12 credit hours of selected EDBI course work EDUC 5101: Internship I EDUC 5201: Internship II

Grades 4-8 Certification

EDRE 5330: Content Area Reading EDSP 5302: Survey of Exceptional Children EDUC 6301: Classroom Management EDUC 6312: Secondary School Curriculum and Instruction EDUC 6304: Children, Adolescents, and Learning EDUC 5320: Teaching Methodology for Secondary Teachers EDUC 5101: Internship I EDUC 5201: Internship II

Grades 7-12 Certification

EDRE 5330: Content Area Reading EDSP 5302: Survey of Exceptional Children EDUC 6301: Classroom Management EDUC 6312: Secondary School Curriculum and Instruction EDUC 6304: Children, Adolescents, and Learning EDUC 5320: Teaching Methodology for Secondary Teachers EDUC 5101: Internship I EDUC 5201: Internship II

EC-Grade 12 Special Education Certification

EDRE 5310: Reading for Pre-Adolescents EDSP 5302: Survey of Exceptional Children EDSP 5311: Diagnostic & Prescriptive Teaching for Exceptional Children EDSP 5319: Teaching Strategies in Special Education EDUC 6302: Elementary School C & I EDUC 6304: Children, Adolescents, and Learning EDUC 5101: Internship I EDUC 5201: Internship II

EC-Grade 12 Art, Music, Physical Education &/or Spanish Certification

EDRE 5330: Content Area Reading EDSP 5302: Survey of Exceptional Children EDUC 6301: Classroom Management

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 87 EDUC 5320: Teaching Methodology for Secondary Teachers EDUC 6302: Elementary School C & I EDUC 6304: Children, Adolescents, and Learning EDUC 5101: Internship I EDUC 5201: Internship II

Policies and Procedures for Initial Teacher Certification

Required Pre-program Course Work To be eligible for the HBU Post Baccalaureate Teacher Certification program, a student must have a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited university. If an EC-6 certification is desired, the student needs to have 6 hours of undergraduate course work in each the following areas: English, Math, Science, and Social Studies. This also applies to Special Education applicants wanting to work in EC-6 schools. Applicants for all other certification areas need a minimum of 12 hours in the desired certification area. Special Education applicants wanting to teach in 7-12 schools would also need to meet this qualification.

If applicants want to be admitted to a certain certification area but do not have the required content hours of coursework, they may qualify for the program by completing additional content area coursework or taking a Pre Admission Content Test (PACT) from the state of Texas to qualify to enter the program. Additional information may be found at this link. http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index2.aspx?id=2147489526&menu_id=2147483671

Admission to the Program Program admission requires students to do the following

• Complete online forms for Graduate Admission being sure to select the Post Baccalaureate option. • Submit official transcripts from all universities and colleges attended documenting a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 based on all classes ever attempted. All non-U.S. transcripts need to be evaluated by Spantran or Global Evaluators to be accepted.. • Complete a Teacher Education Program application • Successfully interview with School of Education professors • Have a certification plan written.

Retention in the Program Students in the Post Baccalaureate with Certification Program are enrolled in graduate course work. Students are required to maintain a high level of performance and to comply fully with policies of the University. If a student’s cumulative grade point average falls below 3.0, the student will be placed on academic probation. Probationary status can be removed only when the cumulative GPA reaches the minimum of 3.0. Each student placed on academic probation must achieve a minimum 3.0 GPA during the student’s next semester of work or he/she will be suspended and will not be allowed to apply for readmission until at least one full semester has passed. Students will then complete an application for Readmission and submit it to the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences. The procedure for Readmission can be found on this

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 88 link. http://www.hbu.edu/Choosing-HBU/Academics/Registrar/Readmission-Process.aspx

State Certification Exams A student is not employable by a school district, charter school, or accredited private school until he or she has taken and passed the appropriate content area certification exam. Students must score 80% or higher on an HBU administered practice exam to qualify for approval by HBU to take a state exam. Review sessions and on-line modules assist students in achieving the required score. Certification exams are scheduled online through the Texas Education Agency (TEA).

Approval for Internship/Employment An Internship is one of the final requirements for earning Standard Certification through the Post Baccalaureate Teacher Certification Program. The Internship is a job with full teacher salary and benefits at a school district, charter school, or accredited private school.

Candidates admitted to the program will be eligible for Probationary certification and the Internship once they have completed at least two courses, participated in a minimum of 30 hours of Fieldwork, passed the Content Area TExES exam in their certification area, and are offered a job as a teacher by a school district, charter school, or accredited private school. It is the student’s responsibility to secure the job although HBU will assist with Job Fairs as well as with Fieldwork placements in districts. A letter stating the student’s eligibility for employment will be generated by the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

Standard Teacher Certification Students will be recommended for Standard Certification when they have

• completed the required coursework for their certification area • passed the EC-12 Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities (PPR) exam • successfully completed the Internship year • applied online through TEAL for standard certification in their certification area • has no Holds on their account at HBU

School of Psychology

The School of Psychology (SOP) offers both undergraduate and graduate programs. The curriculum is designed to introduce the student to basic understandings in the scientific, systematic study of behavior and mental processes of organisms, including humans. The bachelor’s degree with a major in psychology does not prepare the graduate for immediate placement as a professional psychologist. Consequently, students who wish to become professional psychologists must be prepared to do graduate study. Flexible course offerings at the upper level make psychology an excellent companion major to many disciplines.

Undergraduate Psychology The undergraduate psychology program fulfills the mission of the University by preparing students for many different career fields through teaching interpersonal, analytical, and critical- thinking skills that will be required in any professional environment. Students who major in psychology can expect a balanced curriculum that includes a required introductory course,

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 89 methodology courses, advanced content courses and an integrating capstone experience. Students who minor in psychology can expect to take core courses that are foundational to each discipline. Furthermore, the elective offerings within the psychology minor allow students to tailor their learning in a way that best complements their chosen major. By providing multiple settings for learning: classroom, computer laboratory, informal and formal contacts with faculty and peers, field placement, externships and co-curricular activities (e.g. Psi Chi honor society), the undergraduate psychology program produces graduates who think scientifically, speak and write well, and respect and appreciate others.

Psychology Major Requirements PDF

Graduate Programs in Psychology

Master of Arts in Christian Counseling To earn the Master of Arts in Christian Counseling degree, a student must complete the course requirements as outlined in the following degree plan with no grades less than "C".

1. Students must be fully admitted to the program or have departmental approval prior to taking any course work. 2. The student must be admitted to candidacy in order to receive the MACC. 3. The student must complete a minimum of forty-nine (49) graduate hours. These courses must have been completed with a GPA of 3.00 on a four-point scale with no grade less than “C” and with eighteen (18) semester hours at the 6000-level. 4. The student must demonstrate satisfactory completion of a comprehensive oral examination. 5. The student must satisfactorily complete practicum work as judged by ratings of site supervisor(s) and by faculty supervisor(s). 6. The student must receive the recommendation of the Department of Leadership & Counseling.

Master of Arts in Christian Counseling Requirements PDF

Additional Information: The coursework provided meets the academic requirements for licensure as a Licensed Professional Counselor in the state of Texas. Students complete a practicum, consisting of a minimum of 450 clock hours in a University-approved counseling setting under the supervision of a licensed psychologist or licensed professional counselor-supervisor (LPC-S), as part of the degree plan. Before becoming a LPC, graduates also need to pass the National Counselor Exam, Texas Jurisprudence Exam, apply to the Texas State Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors, and complete a 3000 hour internship under the supervision of an LPC-S.

Master of Psychology – General (MAP-General) The M.A. in General Psychology does not provide training that leads to licensure and therefore, does not lead to independent practice. To earn the Master of Arts degree in Psychology - General, a student must complete the course work as outlined in the following degree plan with no grades less than "C".

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 90 MAP-General 36 hour degree program PSYC 5310 Ethical and Professional Issues in Psychology and Counseling 3 PSYC 5312 Psychological Perspectives on Marriage, the Family and Children 3 PSYC 5330 Psychology of Learning 3 PSYC 5332 Social Psychology or PSYC 5360 Cultural Psychology 3 PSYC 5353 Physiological Psychology 3 PSYC 6301 Principles of Human Development 3 PSYC 6302 Measurement and Appraisal 3 PSYC 6310 Clinical Psychopathology 3 PSYC 6320 Research Techniques and Procedures 3 PSYC 6324 Research Seminar 3 PSYC Elective 3 Total Hours 36

1. The student must have an official degree plan on file with the Office of the Registrar 2. The student must be fully admitted to the program or have departmental approval prior to taking any course work. 3. The student must be admitted to candidacy (achieving at least 18 credit hours with a minimum GPA of 3.0) in order to receive the MAP. 4. The student must complete a minimum of thirty-six (36) graduate hours. These courses must have been completed with a quality point average of 3.00 on a four-point scale with no grade less than “C” and with fifteen (15) semester hours at the 6000-level. 5. The student must receive the recommendation of the Department of Psychology based upon satisfactory completion of a comprehensive oral examination. 6. The student must complete a Written Comprehensive Examination (i.e. the ETS Major Field Test in Psychology)

Master of Arts in Psychology – Licensed Professional Counselor (MAP-LPC)

MAP-Licensed Professional Counselor 49 hour degree program PSYC 5310 Ethical and Professional issues in Psychology 3 PSYC 5312 Psychology Perspectives on Marriage, the Family, and Children 3 PSYC 5313 Methods and Techniques in Counseling 3 PSYC 5323 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy 3 PSYC 5330 Psychology of Learning 3 PSYC 5332 Social Psychology 3 PSYC 5353 Physiological Psychology 3 PSYC 6301Principles of Human Development 3 PSYC 6302 Measurement and Appraisal 3 PSYC 6305 Individual Psychological Evaluation 3 PSYC 6306 Career Information and Career Counseling 3

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 91 PSYC 6308 Methods of Group Process 3 PSYC 6310 Clinical Psychopathology 3 PSYC 6320 Research Techniques and Procedures 3 PSYC 6324 Seminar in Research 3 PSYC 6343 Personality Assessment 3 PSYC 6191Practicum in Counseling Psychology 3 Total Hours 49

1. Students must be fully admitted to the program or have departmental approval prior to taking any course work. 2. The student must be admitted to candidacy in order to receive the MACC. 3. The student must complete a minimum of forty-nine (49) graduate hours. These courses must have been completed with a GPA of 3.00 on a four-point scale with no grade less than “C” and with eighteen (18) semester hours at the 6000-level. 4. The student must demonstrate satisfactory completion of a comprehensive oral examination. 5. The student must satisfactorily complete practicum work as judged by ratings of site supervisor(s) and by faculty supervisor(s). 6. The student must receive the recommendation of the Department of Leadership & Counseling.

Additional Information: Current academic requirements for applicants to the Texas State Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors for licensure as a Professional Counselor and to the Texas State Board of Examiners of Psychologists for licensure as a Psychological Associate may be satisfied in this program.

Students complete a practicum, consisting of a minimum of 450 clock hours in a University- approved counseling setting under the supervision of a licensed psychologist or licensed professional counselor-supervisor (LPC-S), as part of the degree plan. Before becoming a LPC, graduates also need to pass the National Counselor Exam, Texas Jurisprudence Exam, apply to the Texas State Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors, and complete a 3000 hour internship under the supervision of an LPC-S. Before becoming a LPA, graduates also need to pass the Exam for the Professional Practice of Psychology, the Texas Jurisprudence Exam, and apply to the Texas State Board of Examiners of Psychologists.

Master of Arts in Psychology – Licensed Specialist in School Psychology (MAP-LSSP) The Master of Arts in Psychology- LSSP program prepares students for licensure as a Specialist in School Psychology (LSSP) and as a Psychological Associate (LPA) under the guidelines of the Texas State Board of Examiners of Psychologists (TSBEP). The MAP-LSSP program also meets the requirement for licensure as a Professional Counselor (LPC) under the guidelines of the Texas State Board of Examiners of Professional Counselors (TSBEPC).

Program Requirements

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 92 To earn the MAP-LSSP degree, a student must complete the following coursework as outlined in the following degree plan:

MAP-Licensed Specialist in School Psychology 60 hour degree program PSYC 5310 Ethical and Professional Issues in Psychology and Counseling 3 PSYC 5312 Psychological Perspectives on Marriage, the Family and Children 3 PSYC 5313 Methods and Techniques in Counseling 3 PSYC 5323 Theories of Counseling 3 PSYC 5330 Psychology of Learning 3 EDSP 6344 Educational Appraisal of Individuals with Exceptionalities 3 PSYC 5353 Physiological Psychology 3 PSYC 6301 Principles of Human Development 3 PSYC 6302 Measurement and Appraisal 3 PSYC 6305 Individual Psychological Evaluation 3 PSYC 6306 Career Development and Counseling 3 PSYC 6308 Methods of Group Process 3 PSYC 6310 Clinical Psychopathology 3 PSYC 6320 Research Techniques and Procedures 3 PSYC 6324 Research Seminar 3 PSYC 6343 Personality Assessment 3 PSYC 6191 Practicum in Counseling Psychology 1 PSYC 6101 Licensed Specialist in School Psychology Internship 1 PSYC 6102 Licensed Specialist in School Psychology Internship 1 PSYC 5360 Cultural Psychology 3 EDUC 6301 Classroom Management 3 EDUC 6312 Secondary School Curriculum 3 Total Hours 60

1. The student must have an official degree plan on file with the Office of the Registrar 2. The student must complete at least 60 hours as prescribed in the program. The required courses must be completed with a GPA of 3.0 or higher on a 4-point scale with no grade less than “C” 3. The student must receive the recommendation of his or her major department based upon satisfactory completion of the following: 1. An oral comprehensive examination (there may be a written component) 2. 450 hour practicum 3. 1200 hour internship

Degree Requirements for Graduation

The student must:

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 93 1. Transfer no more than 6 semester hours from another institution 2. Not earn a grade below “C” or fall below an overall GPA of 3.00 3. Have a degree plan on file with the Office of the Registrar 4. Achieve candidacy status (i.e. achieving 33 credit hours or more) 5. Complete the Practicum 6. Complete the Comprehensive Oral Examination 7. Complete the Internship 8. Receive a recommendation from the Psychology Department of the College of Education and Behavioral Science

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 94 School of Fine Arts

The School of Fine Arts is founded on the belief that our God is the great Artist. We worship God when we create art from the patterns he created. Whether these artistic expressions are literary, dramatic, musical, visual, or even in the field of New Media, we understand that we were made to create in imitation of our creator.

The School of Fine Arts believes that Art is integral to the living of a full life. Towards that end, we offer courses and degrees in visual arts, music, creative writing, theater, and new media. Furthermore, our degree in Journalism and Mass Communications prepares students to tell honest stories explore the new world of contemporary, multi-media journalism.

Undergraduate Programs

Department of Visual Arts

HBU offers a Bachelor of Fine Arts and a degree with a major in art. The art program is designed to help the student develop a personal, critical attitude toward his/her life situation through creative involvement. The beginner is offered a variety of courses that provide technical training, historical background and professional competence while maintaining the dignity of individual opinion and direction. These studies are designed to generate interest and promote understanding of art, which comes in part through analysis of creative works of past and present. A Senior Seminar provides an opportunity for the student’s area of specialization to be the central theme in a final project.

The School of Art offers instruction in five basic studio areas: Drawing, Painting, Ceramics, Sculpture, and Printmaking. The members of the art faculty bring a wealth of professional experience to their studios and their students. Students in the studio areas have the unique opportunity of receiving feedback in both individual and group critique sessions. The goal of the art faculty is to nurture and encourage students of all levels of experience in finding their visual voices and developing their own visual language.

Advanced Placement

Advanced Placement (AP) in Art may be awarded for incoming students provided that the following criteria are met:

1. The student arranges for official AP scores to be sent from high school to the HBU Registrar’s Office. 2. The student presents the AP portfolio compiled through the high school art program to the HBU Art Faculty for evaluation. 3. The student receives written approval from the School of Art Director to accept the scores and portfolio in lieu of a lower level art course(s).

Each evaluation will be made on a case-by-case basis. No more than six (6) semester hours may be awarded for AP credit.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 95 Special Requirements

Art majors are required to participate in annual student exhibitions and other exhibits, programs, and lectures. The University reserves the right to retain permanently one (1) work from each student in each class. The art faculty will decide the disposition of these works. Other works may be held temporarily for use in specific exhibitions. These will be available to owners no later than two (2) years after the lending date.

Student Exhibition Experiences

Art majors must participate in at least one (1) approved exhibition during both junior and senior years. These opportunities must be approved by the department chair and mentored by a member of the Art faculty. Art majors are also expected to participate in the organization and presentation of the annual Student Art Exhibition (Spring Semester).

Exit Exam in Art

The exit exam in Art is presented in the form of a formal portfolio review juried by a committee of Art faculty. The review is offered in the final week of Fall and Spring Semesters, and should be scheduled by the student in the semester of graduation.

Art

This plan allows the student to have a major in art and another unrelated discipline. An Art major with an unrelated major has a studio emphasis for the production of art.

Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree

In college art in America, the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Studio is the top undergraduate offering and is considered the professional degree.

The BFA, Bachelor of Fine Arts, is an excellent choice of degrees for those wishing to attend graduate school for a Master of Fine Arts.

BFA Art Major Requirements PDF

Studio Art Major Requirements PDF

Studio Art Minor Requirements PDF

Art History Minor Requirements PDF

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 96 Department of Journalism and Mass Communication, Creative Writing, and Theater

Journalism and Mass Communication

Journalism & Mass Communication offers a unique curriculum combining Houston Baptist University’s strong liberal arts foundation with cutting edge media skills in communication technology. We are now training tomorrow’s leaders in journalism and mass media.

The instruction merges traditional media practices with the latest in wireless broadband multimedia. Critical thinking, visual communication, writing, interviewing, and multi-platform content distribution are emphasized throughout the curriculum and will prepare you for a career in the heart of the information age.

The courses evenly balance skills subjects in writing, reporting, audio-video production, and Internet multimedia, with critical thinking subjects like media and society, law and ethics, and new communication technologies. Discussions focus on local applications as well as the latest trends around the world. You’ll be prepared for careers as on-air reporter, editor/writer, producer, radio-TV journalist, social media coordinator, media consultant, and related positions.

There are a number of ways for students to get involved in campus media-related activities. You can write or help produce The Collegian, HBU’s award-winning campus newspaper, or work with any number of online media currently being produced by HBU.

Your professors are respected leaders in their fields and recognized for their contributions to teaching, service, and published research. They continue to gain regional, national, and global prominence for their work in journalism and mass media.

We believe this is one of the most exciting times and places to be involved in journalism and mass communication education. We invite you to join us and be a part of it!

Journalism and Mass Communication Portfolio

All majors must successfully complete a professional quality portfolio, which will be judged by the full-time Journalism and Mass Communication faculty, in order to graduate. A more detailed description and deadlines for submission are available in the Department of Communication and Rhetoric.

Journalism and Mass Communication Internships

Internships in Journalism and Mass Communication (JMC 4373, 4374, 4375) provide students with the opportunity to gain experience in the media related fields. The department places students at the local, state, and national level. Students must complete at least two internships. Prior to the semester in which the student will do an internship, the students must 1) apply and receive permission of instructor during the semester prior to the beginning of the course, 2) submit a professional resume, 3) submit goals and objectives for the internship, and 4) arrange for an internship with the help of the instructor.

Journalism and Mass Communication Opportunities on Campus

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 97 In order to prepare for future entry level jobs in mass communication, students are encouraged to participate in one or more of the following areas: student newspaper, student yearbook, and HBU broadcast journalism.

Departmental Honors in Journalism and Mass Communication

Completing the honors program in Journalism and Mass Communication permits students to enrich their educational experience and to receive academic recognition for electing the additional challenging course work. To qualify for the honors program the students must have complete 64 semester hours for credit (at least 32 hours at HBU); have completed JMC 1313, JMC 1324, JMC 2303, and JMC 3314; have a least a cumulative 3.25 GPA and a 3.5 GPA for journalism and mass communication; have a desire to pursue further studies in the subject; have good research skills and the ability to complete self-directed work; and be accepted by the departmental honors committee. To complete the program students must maintain a cumulative 3.25 GPA and a 3.5 GPA for journalism and mass communication classes; complete contract work at HBU in two 3000 and/or 4000 level journalism and mass communication classes; and complete HONR 4399 Honors Thesis and the oral thesis defense. Upon successful completion of the program, the student’s bound Honors Thesis will be placed in the HBU library and the honors program will be noted on the student’s transcript.

Journalism and Mass Communications Major Requirements PDF

Journalism and Mass Comunications Minor Requirements PDF

Writing

The Creative Writing program prepares students to explore the creative potential of the written word. Like J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis, we understand the act of writing as an act of sub- creation in which the writer worships God the artist in the writing of original work. Students take intensive writing workshops in poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and playwriting with well published writers in these fields. Furthermore, through this program students connect with the rich opportunities the writing community of Houston offers such as publication experiences, professional writing internships, writing conferences, and readings from world famous writers. A Major and a Minor are offered.

Writing Minor Requirements PDF

Writing Major Requirements PDF

Cinema and New Media Arts

The Cinema & New Media Arts major provides a challenging creative environment for students

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 98 to develop their artistic abilities and prepare for future work in multimedia production. Taking advantage of developing technology, the curriculum is uniquely focused on new opportunities available to filmmakers and media producers in the twenty-first century. The major offers students ample opportunities for practical, hands-on experience coupled with mentorship from experienced faculty members. All of this is designed to prepare students for a variety of pursuits, from small-budget independent work to large studio productions and everything in-between.

The major requires a total of 52 credit hours, which are divided into three basic categories: Artistic Training, Practical Application, and Media Studies. These three types of classes ensure that students are well-trained in their craft, have ample time to exercise and sharpen their talents, and are historically grounded in a rich artistic foundation.

While two and three-year tracks are available, the major is ideally taken over four years. As freshmen, students are given an introduction to the medium as well as an overview of art, aesthetics, collaboration, and core cinematic principles. Sophomore year, students begin to specialize with training in specific disciplines. Junior year is focused on practical application, experience, and apprenticeships in the students’ chosen disciplines. Finally senior year, students complete a two-semester-long capstone experience to prepare for work after college.

Cinema and New Media Arts Major Requirements PDF

Department of Music

Houston Baptist University’s School of Music is committed to offering a world class music education where student artists expand their creative gifts, and ultimately contribute their talents to the Western classical music heritage. Designed to provide a broad aesthetic experience for both the music major and the general student, the program introduces undergraduates to the fine arts along with the theories that underlie them, and offers opportunities for creative involvement and enrichment in various ensembles. With the campus’ location so near Houston’s cultural center, students also regularly enjoy outstanding artists, lecturers, theater, and other renowned musical performances.

The music curricula provide the specialization and depth of study necessary for performance (voice, piano, organ, band instruments), theory-composition, sacred music, or teacher certification. Qualified non-majors may enroll in music electives and participate in one of the performing ensembles. Students who wish to major in music must apply for acceptance to a degree program that leads to a Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Music, a Bachelor of Music (BM) (performance—voice, piano, organ, theory-composition, or church music), or a Bachelor of Music Education (BME) (teacher certification).

Entrance Exams in Music

Freshmen and Transfer Students

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 99

A. Incoming freshman, transfer students, and other currently enrolled students who wish to major in music must audition (demonstrate their talent for performance) for the faculty in their major applied area before being admitted to the school. Three or four auditions are held each year between January and August.

B. Also at the audition, incoming freshman, transfer students, and other currently enrolled students who wish to major in music must pass a music theory placement exam in order to be fully admitted to the School of Music. Those who do not pass this exam will be required to enroll in a Fundamentals of Music Theory course (MUSI 0222). Students granted “conditional” admission will only be allowed to enroll in certain music courses. Please refer to the current School of Music Handbook for further details.

Applied Music

Individual instruction is offered in voice, piano, organ, guitar, all band instruments, and composition. All students electing applied music for credit will be required to take a jury examination at the end of each semester. Please refer to the current School of Music Handbook for more specific information.

Music majors must be registered for applied music in their area of concentration until they pass the Sophomore Review (MUSI 0003) and meet any recital requirements (MUSI 3090 Performance Recital and / or MUSI 4090 Senior Recital).

All lower level applied music courses (lessons) will carry an MUSI 11XX or 12XX number and all upper level applied music courses (lessons) will carry an MUSI 31XX or 32XX number. Please refer to the current School of Music Handbook for further details.

Music Ensembles

Any approved student who meets the audition requirements may participate in an ensemble. Music majors must participate in Schola Cantorum (MUSI 2111), University Singers (MUSI 1113), Opera Workshop Ensemble (MUSI 1119), Chamber Music Ensemble (MUSI 2112), Band (MUSI 1111) or Guitar Ensemble (MUSI 1114) each semester in residence. Keyboard majors are required to participate in one ensemble and will be assigned accompanying duties.

Choral Activities: Music majors with an emphasis in voice must participate in Schola Cantorum (MUSI 2111), University Singers (MUSI 1113), or Opera Workshop Ensemble (MUSI 1119) each semester.

Instrumental Activities: Music majors with an emphasis in instrumental music must participate in the Chamber Music Ensemble (MUSI 2112), Band (MUSI 1111), the Guitar Ensemble (MUSI 1114) or, with permission, select another ensemble each semester.

All music scholarship students must enroll in an ensemble, earn a passing grade, and remain registered as full-time students for each semester they attend Houston Baptist University. Approved non-music majors assigned to an ensemble by the Director of the School of Music must enroll in that ensemble, earn a passing grade, and remain registered full-time each semester

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 100 in order to maintain their music grant-in-aid / scholarship. Please refer to the current School of Music Handbook for further details.

Keyboard Proficiency

All music majors must be enrolled in keyboard studies until the minimum requirements for keyboard proficiency (MUSI 0002) as set forth in the current School of Music Handbook have been met and the examination has been passed. In certain instances, students who have passed a keyboard proficiency examination may be permitted to waive further keyboard studies. This examination shall be administered regularly at the end of each semester and at other times as required. The keyboard proficiency examination must be completed before student teaching, internship, or presentation of senior recital. Please refer to the current School of Music Handbook for further details.

Sophomore Review Examination

The purpose of the Sophomore Review (MUSI 0003) is to assess the progress made by each music major during his or her first two years of study. Students will enroll in MUSI 0003 at the end of the fourth semester (after earning about 60 semester hours of applicable music credit toward their degree) and be concurrently enrolled in MUSI 2323 Theory IV and MUSI 2123 Theory IV Lab. Transfer students with 60 hours or more of transfer credit must take the Sophomore Review Examination at the end of their first semester after being admitted to the School of Music. It consists of four parts: 1) A well-written essay re: choice of major and career path; 2) A student performance in a SoM Forum; 3) An interview with Sophomore Review Committee; 4) The Cumulative Theory Exam (covering Theory I, II, III, IV). Each student will have a maximum of two attempts to pass all sections of Sophomore Review (pass / fail grade). As the required “gateway” course to all upper level (MUSI 3000 and 4000) courses, failure to pass all four parts of MUSI 0003 after two attempts will require the student to consider an alternative major degree program with the only option of a minor in music. Please refer to the current School of Music Handbook for further details.

Jury Examinations In Music

Every student enrolled in a private applied music course will be required to take a jury examination at the end of each semester of study. The jury will consist of the members of the faculty in the student’s major field of performance. Please refer to the current School of Music Handbook for further details.

Student Forum And Concert Attendance Requirement

All music majors enrolled as full-time students (12 or more credit hours) must register for and pass seven semesters of MUSI 0001, Forum Recital Attendance. Please refer to the current School of Music Handbook for further details.

Student Recital Requirements

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 101

The Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Music students are not required to perform a recital. The Bachelor in Music Education (BME) students are required to perform one recital of 30 minutes duration (MUSI 3090). All other Bachelor of Music students are required to perform both performance (MUSI 3090) and senior (MUSI 4090) recitals. Please refer to the current School of Music Handbook for further details.

Music Minor Requirements PDF

Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Music Requirements PDF

Bachelor of Music (BM) - Organ Performance - Requirements PDF

Bachelor of Music (BM) - Piano Performance - Requirements PDF

Bachelor of Music (BM) - Vocal Performance - Requirements PDF

Bachelor of Music (BM) - Church Music - Requirements PDF

Bachelor of Music (BM) - Theory / Composition - Requirements PDF

Bachelor of Music Education (BME) Requirements PDF

Graduate Programs

Master of Fine Arts in Studio Arts

In recent years Houston Baptist University is experiencing a marvelous resurrection of a liberal arts focus and a subsequent growth in the fine arts. Since 2006, the HBU School of Art has enjoyed a flurry of creative research activity and meteoric growth while the leadership at HBU has supported a significant increase in resources for the School of Art. The new director of the School of Art, Mr. Michael Collins, a well recognized artist and teacher has shepherded the transformation of HBU’s fledgling Department of Art into a world-class School of Art. We also have a new Artist-in-Residence program for our finest full-time faculty, and our Visiting Artist program allows exceptional artists to work in our studios, interact with and teach our students, and form a creative synergy in the School of Art

The Artist-In-Residency program in the School of Art currently has three Artists in Residence, Michael Collins, Jim Edwards and James Busby. In addition the program has a fine Gallery directed and curated by Jim Edwards, former co curator of the Pop Exhibition at the Menil Museum and well known expert on Art of the American West and specifically Texas Art. Our lead senior faculty in the SOA is well recognized as award winning all participating in large Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 102 numbers of invitational museum and top gallery exhibitions around the world. This experience in both the studio and also teaching excellence in the studio classroom favorably places our new MFA program as an excellent Christian alternative to larger programs in our nation, which have lost the focus of quality in many of the traditional areas of studio research.

Our MFA program offers focused study in Painting, Drawing, Printmaking, Ceramics, Sculpture and also is supported by graduate classes in Gallery and Museum Practices. The learning objectives and outcomes for the Master of Fine Arts student include the student’s acquisition of graduate-level technical proficiency in their studio disciplines. Additionally, the MFA student will obtain expertise about the contemporary art world, eras of art history and about gallery and museum practices. Outcomes will include the ability to understand the creative process, develop their own artistic styles, and create art that is reflective of social and spiritual enlightenment.

Each graduate accepted is offered a studio space on campus and the chance at teaching assistantships as well as full scholarships for study in the MFA program. With both BFA and MFA programs the School of Art at HBU is housed in a very impressive new state of the Art 44,000 square foot facility, which possesses fully equipped labs in printmaking, painting, drawing, ceramics, and sculpture as well as working studios for its full time art faculty. This fusion of artist’s faculty members making art on campus fosters a closer creative community and an opportunity for graduates to fully engage their faculty team.

Accepted graduates in the MFA program will be offered creative and teaching assistantship opportunities in Germany where our university participates in the Artz Net Werk project in Hilmsen Germany. Graduates will have professional exhibition opportunities in Germany allowing them to have this unprecedented opportunity to create and exhibit their work in Europe while in the MFA program. Our fine Visiting Artist for sculpture and ceramics Hans Molzberger is a well known Germany artist aids in our creative activities in Germany. These opportunities for summer working and teaching abroad is yet another unique feature of our MFA program. The professional relationships, which this direct process of cultural emersion provides often opens new thinking and creative growth for professional and student artists alike harder to witness in may MFA programs.

In the final analysis our Christian philosophic base along with our on campus lead fine art graduate faculty marks the new MFA program at HBU as a special environment for any MFA applicant seeking a critical and caring environment to complete their professional fine art training. Our creative and sharing environment between faculty and student alike along with our study and exhibition abroad program in Germany offers a unique possibility for developing the Professional skills needed for any artist seeking a life in the professional Fine Arts realm. Please see our on line examples of our fine graduate art faculty on the School of Art website.

The Program:

The HBU Master of Fine Arts (MFA) is a Christian-based, two-year studio program with specialization in the areas of two-dimensional studies (painting, drawing, printmaking) and three-dimensional studies (sculpture, ceramics). The program is housed in a brand new, world- class building with 5 state of the art classroom lab spaces and 18 student studios. The MFA is a terminal degree and the primary goal of graduate education in the visual arts is professional excellence!

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 103 Master of Fine Arts in Studio Arts Program Requirements PDF

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 104 School of Humanities

The Humanities consists of subjects like history, government, literature, law, languages, communications, and the study of cultures and society. These subjects teach more than just dates, terminology, and theory. These courses are designed to get you thinking about how we live our lives, the ethical and moral dilemmas we face, and the importance of good decision-making.

The study of history, for example, allows you to examine why some leaders and nations flourish while others do not. The study of law allows you, in a safe environment, to tempt others with legal and ethical dilemmas. The study of government confronts you with fundamental questions about freedom, equality, and order. Literature invites you to consider the human experience through stories and poetry, tragedies and comedies. Family Studies allows you to understand the changing dynamics of the modern family. Communications gives you the skills to be an advocate and agent of change. Throughout all of these courses, you’ll read from the greatest thinkers and writers on the subjects, from ancient times to modern.

Majoring in the Humanities gives you both a great education and a transforming experience. Your critical thinking skills will be sharpened. Your writing and speaking skills will be enhanced. You will learn to articulate complex theories and ideas, debate them in class, and discuss them with classmates. You will learn how to confront, discuss, and resolve difficult ethical, moral, and social dilemmas. Learning a second language like Spanish broadens your ability to work with others and makes you a more attractive job candidate. Our Humanities programs prepare you for a career in a variety of fields because we emphasize the skills that employers want.

In short, our Humanities programs are a great way to make the most of your college experience while also preparing for success after graduation.

Undergraduate Programs

Department of English and Modern Languages

English Language and Literature

The most powerful tool we have is language. English majors at Houston Baptist University focus on exploring both the artistry of words as well as developing the tools for critical thinking and writing. Whether it be a Shakespearean tragedy or a corporate report, those studying English can interpret the world around them and translate their thoughts into clear language, preparing them for the workplace, graduate study, and a trajectory of lifelong learning. Our graduates enter the fields of teaching, law, professional writing, creative writing, and business as they take their ability to interpret language with them into artistic, professional, and personal endeavors. Beginning with a concentration on poetry, drama and prose, and including courses in the Great Texts as well as American and British literature, English majors master both the classics and contemporary works while developing their skills in oral and written communication.

English Minor Requirements PDF

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 105

English Major Requirements PDF

Honors Program in English

Completing the honors program in English permits English majors to enrich their educational experience and to receive academic recognition for electing the additional challenging course work. To qualify for the honors program in English, students must have completed 64 semester hours for credit (at least 32 hours at HBU); have completed ENGL 1313, 1323, 2353, 3313, 3323, 3331, and 3332; have at least a cumulative 3.25 GPA and a 3.5 GPA for English classes; have a desire to deepen knowledge and appreciation of literature; and have good study and research skills and the ability to complete self-directed work and be accepted by the department honors committee. To complete the program, students must maintain a cumulative 3.25 GPA and a 3.5 GPA for English classes; complete contract work at HBU in two of the following courses: ENGL 3373, 4311, 4313-4319, 4323-4325, 4392 and 4393; and complete HONR 4399 Honors Thesis and the oral thesis defense. Upon successful completion of the program, the student’s bound Honors Thesis will be placed in the HBU library and the honors program will be noted on the student’s transcript.

Spanish

The course offerings in Spanish are designed to enable students to develop proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading, writing, and culture; to appreciate literature written in Spanish; and to use Spanish in their professional and leisure activities.

To be certified to teach Spanish, candidates must achieve proficiency to pass the Texas TexES Exam (reading, writing and culture) and the TOPT (speaking) with a rating of Advanced.

Spanish Minor Requirements PDF

Spanish Major Requirements PDF

Internship in Spanish

The internship, SPAN 4385, 4386, 4387 Work Internship in Spanish, offers outstanding majors in Spanish the opportunity to use their oral and written proficiency in a supervised setting in (a) business or consulates, (b) health care, or (c) education or church work for 40 hours per credit hour for one semester. Pre-requisites: SPAN 3314 and 3324 or the equivalent. Admission to the program will be determined by the Department Intern Selection Committee. Each applicant must be of good academic standing, be classified as a junior or senior, be working toward a degree in Spanish at Houston Baptist University and have at least a 3.0 QPA in Spanish. Interested students must take an oral proficiency test with a member of the Spanish faculty and receive a score of Intermediate High or higher. Students must also submit an application to the Department Intern Selection Committee at least one semester in advance of the scheduled internship. If accepted by the committee, the applicant must also be interviewed and accepted by the Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 106 supervisor in the internship setting.

Honors Program in Spanish

Completing the honors program in Spanish permits Spanish majors to enrich their educational experience and to receive academic recognition for electing the additional challenging course work. To qualify for the honors program in Spanish, students must have completed 64 semester hours for credit (at least 32 hours at HBU); have completed SPAN 1314, 1324, 2314, 2324, 3314, and 3324; have at least a cumulative 3.25 GPA and a 3.5 GPA for Spanish classes; have a desire to deepen knowledge and appreciation of literature; have good study and research skills and the ability to complete self-directed work; and be accepted by the department honors committee. To complete the program, students must maintain a cumulative 3.25 GPA and a 3.5 GPA for Spanish classes; complete contract work at HBU in two of the following courses: SPAN 4305, 4306, 4307, 4313, 4343, 4344, 4392 and 4393; and complete HONR 4399 Honors Thesis and oral thesis defense. Upon successful completion of the program, the student’s bound Honors Thesis will be placed in the HBU library and the honors program will be noted on the student’s transcript.

Department of History

History

Studying the past provides students with a better understanding of the present. Examining the major events, movements, and personalities that have helped shape the modern era enriches a student’s worldview, promotes cultural literacy, and produces enlightened citizenship. Probing and interacting with history also assists students in developing analytic and reasoning skills and in building their written and oral communication competencies. The history major prepares students for careers in law, education, business, Christian ministry, government, and archival and museum vocations.

Before enrolling in HIST 4392 Independent Research Projects and Directed history majors must have successfully completed at least five upper level history courses (15 hours, HIST 3000 or 4000 level), or receive special permission from the instructor.

Information about student membership in Phi Alpha Theta (the Alpha Lambda Zeta chapter), a professional history honor society, and the criteria used for the history Honors Program is available from the department.

History majors interested in pursuing internship credit for work related to their field of study should contact the department chair. A maximum of three (3) internship credit hours will be counted toward the major.

Students interested in teaching certification programs related to history should see the School of Education section of this catalog.

History Minor Requirements PDF

History Major Requirements PDF

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 107

Great Texts

The Great Texts program is designed for students who enjoy learning within a variety of disciplines in the humanities, and it is an ideal option for those preparing for teaching or graduate studies in the humanities. The program emphasizes critical thinking and analysis of significant literary, historical, and classical texts. Each major or minor in Great Texts completes the Shakespeare, Classical Mythology, and Great Texts in History courses. Students may also choose from a wide selection of courses in English, History, Classics, Government, Foreign Languages, Philosophy, Art, and Sociology, and have the option of choosing a concentration in Classical Studies, Medieval & Renaissance Studies, or Modern & Contemporary Studies. Please contact the program coordinator for further information.

Great Text Major Requirements PDF

Latin

Latin is an integral part of the study of History, Government, Philosophy, and Christianity and enable students in these and other disciplines to develop their training, skill, and understanding in reading texts integral to their academic work. The course offerings in Latin are designed to enable students to develop proficiency in understanding the Latin language, in reading Latin literature, and in appreciating classical and medieval civilization.

Latin Minor Requirements PDF

Department of Law and Society

Family Studies (Minor)

The Family Studies program is designed to provide students with a fundamental understanding of the essential dimensions of family life. Students will study the theories, contexts, and processes used to understand the dynamics of family interaction related to communication, sexuality, childhood, economics, and family roles. The family studies minor will advance church and community involvement that maintains and strengthens home and family as the fundamental unit of society. This type of academic learning mixed with direct application strengthens home and family as the fundamental unit of society.

Family Studies Minor Requirements PDF

Government (Major and Minor)

The government program focuses on theories of government, political institutions, government Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 108 processes, and political behavior. Students are offered courses in political theory, U.S. foreign policy, national politics, American government, public policy, international relations, and law.

The study of government assists students in developing reasoning and analytic skills and builds competencies in written and oral communication. The Government major prepares students for careers in law, business, public service, education, journalism, or any other field that requires strong analytic and communication skills. The major also increases political awareness and promotes active citzenship and political participation.

Government majors interested in pursuing internship credit for work related to their field of study should contact the department chair. Only three (3) hours of internship credit will be counted toward the major.

Government Minor Requirements PDF

Government Major Requirements PDF

Latin American Studies

The minor in Latin American Studies is designed for students who have interests in the Latin American region, to better prepare them for graduate studies, for careers in international business with operations in Latin America, in politics, for work in ministries that serve individuals from the region, and other vocations. The Latin American Studies minor provides experience in interdisciplinary inquiry through a curriculum that emphasizes area-specific knowledge of political, economic, and historical movements, as well as linguistic understanding of the language of these movements.

Latin American Studies Minor Requirements PDF

Legal Studies (Major)

The Legal Studies program is designed to prepare students for law school or other similar graduate education by providing a solid background in politics, philosophy, economics, and history. The program draws from several disciplies in the Humanities (Government, History, and Speech Communications) and other areas as well (Economics, Business, and Philosophy). Students in this major are introduced to topics that will help them plan for careers in law, such as business law, criminal law, and trial law. The program emphasizes our nation's founding principles, a reliance of the rule of law, and a belief in natural law as the foundation for American jurisprudence. The Legal Studies major presents a rigorous educational program that provides the fundamentals for success in graduate or law school and the practice of law while upholding ethics and values consistent with the mission of the School of Humanities and the University.

Legal Studies Major Requirements PDF

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 109

Sociology (Minor)

The Sociology Minor is a course of study in the field of sociology that provides a background in culture, social interaction, and social institutions. Students will learn the context of social change and theoretical explanations for social experience. Sociology is a valuable liberal arts minor for students planning careers in criminology, social psychology, public administration, gerontology, ministry and market research.

Sociology Minor Requirements PDF

Speech Communication (Minor)

The focus of the curriculum of the Speech Communication minor is to develop the argumentation and advocacy skills that are necessary for participation in a democratic society. Since ancient Greek and Roman times, public speaking has been taught both as the foundation of a liberal arts education and as an essential skill of democratic citizenship.

The speech minor is designed for students interested in argumentation and advocacy. The Department of Law and Society features a competitive mock trial team which provides students the opportunity to hone critical thinking and persuasive skills in a competitive atmosphere. Weekly practices prepare the team for local, state, and national competition.

Please direct all questions to the chair of the Department of Law and Society.

Speech Communication Minor Requirements PDF

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 110 School of Nursing and Allied Health

The School of Nursing and Allied Health provides professional learning experiences in kinesiology and nursing. The School’s mission contributes to the University’s mission by providing academic, spiritual, and professional excellence to prepare nurses and allied health professionals for professional service in the health care community.

Undergraduate Majors in Kinesiology

Kinesiology

The kinesiology curriculum is designed to introduce the student to basic understandings and skills in the areas of human movement and wellness. It fosters the total development of the individual: physically, mentally, and socially. An undergraduate student may elect to major in Kinesiology: Specialization in Teacher Education (which leads to all-level teacher certification), Kinesiology: Specialization in Wellness Management (which does not lead to teacher certification), or Kinesiology: Athletic Training (which does not lead to teacher certification). The degree plan for Kinesiology: Specialization in Teacher Education is located in this Catalog in the School of Education section

Kinesiology: Specialization in Wellness Management Major Requirements PDF

Kinesiology: Athletic Training Major Requirements PDF

Criteria for Admission:

1. Unconditional acceptance to HBU via Enrollment Services. 2. Completion of an athletic training internship program application with references, and interview with the athletic training staff. 3. Acceptance to HBU Athletic Training Internship Program before filing a degree plan for KINE: Athletic Training. 4. A minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA on a 4.0 scale for all high school and college work. 5. Completion of all HBU Proficiencies: Writing, Math, Reading, and Computer. 6. Contingent upon satisfactory grades, evaluation of technical standards and the interview outcomes, students will be offered an appointment in the Athletic Training Internship Program based on the number of available openings per year. Those students receiving notification of acceptance into the HBU Athletic Training Internship Program will then begin his/her three year Student Athletic Training Internships. Students not accepted into the program may re-apply the following year.

Clinical Practicum Prerequisites:

Documentation of the following requirements is mandatory before the student can begin clinical observation.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 111 1. Completion of blood borne pathogen training. 2. HIPAA Training 3. CPR/AED Certification 4. Proof of immunizations (required to enter HBU by all students). The hepatitis B (HBV) 3-shot series is a highly recommended immunization for health care settings.

Selection of students for the athletic training internship program is limited; therefore, it is extremely competitive and the acceptance into the program is not guaranteed just by meeting minimum criteria.

Undergraduate Program in Nursing

Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing

The Nursing faculty developed an innovative curriculum for the undergraduate nursing programs that are designed to prepare nurses who function well within the acute care setting and in specialty and community settings. The outcomes result from the inclusion of the Texas Board of Nursing (2010) Differentiated Entry Level Competencies, the number of clinical hours required, faculty supervision of clinical experiences, and limited observational experiences. The nursing program is organized in a curriculum framework that addresses seven dimensions of health for promoting fullness in living. The logical sequencing of the curriculum includes:

• Studies in a Christian Liberal Arts Core Curriculum. • Prerequisites for scientific and behavioral science foundations for the study of nursing: Chemistry, Microbiology, Anatomy & Physiology, Psychology, Human Growth and Development, and Statistics. • Development of basic knowledge, skills and values in nursing (Perspectives on the Health Care Delivery Systems, Health Assessment, Art & Science of Nursing). The focus initially is broad and inclusive of communities, groups, families and the individual. • The focus becomes narrow with growth in understanding major concepts in nursing with application of this understanding to Individuals and Families in courses on Care of Individuals with acute, chronic, and critical illnesses, and Specialty Care which includes Care of Families with Mental Health Problems, Childbearing Families, and Families with Children. • The BSN level is developed in a) community health, b) pathophysiology, and c) research. • Concurrently with studies in nursing, studies continue to develop in the core studies of Christianity (9 hours required for BSN). • The liberal arts curriculum requires demonstration of competence in reading English, writing English, math, and functional use of computer technology. The BSN students broaden their liberal arts core with studies in humanities, and fine arts. • The graduating courses broaden to care of groups of people and families. The core Capstone course includes studies in Nursing Management and Health Care Administration.

The goal of the School of Nursing and Allied Health is to educate nurses to create health care delivery systems to meet the needs of individuals, families and groups in society. Health care focuses on health promotion and disease prevention, as well as community-based care. The

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 112 curriculum reflects this focus and includes opportunities for service-based learning. All courses required for the BSN degree are offered at HBU.

Applicants to the nursing program are to meet entrance requirements of Houston Baptist University and are to manifest positive qualities of health, character and personality with the potential to develop good professional character. Objective criteria (HESI Admission Assessment scores for grammar, reading comprehension, math, and anatomy & physiology; and grade point averages, science grade point average, completion of all pre-requisites towards the degree; and hours taken at HBU), are used to rank candidates for selection for entry into the program, depending on the number of eligible candidates and availability of faculty and clinical experiences. Standardized exams are given at checkpoints throughout the curriculum and a comprehensive exam is administered at the end of the undergraduate programs. The exams are used as measures of retention and competence to enhance students’ ability to take the RN licensure exam. Failure to demonstrate retention or competence on the specified exams requires remediation. Remedial study and retesting to demonstrate retention and competence may result in delays for graduation.

Houston Baptist University’s School of Nursing and Allied Health offers a rigorous nursing curriculum that includes academic and clinical performance requirements. To be awarded a Bachelor’s Degree in Nursing, the student must successfully complete both elements of the program. Students who receive a nursing degree from Houston Baptist University will have been exposed to the skills and knowledge necessary to pass the RN licensure exam and perform the clinical tasks typically expected of registered nurses. The Houston Baptist University School of Nursing and Allied Health does not guarantee that each person admitted to its nursing program will pass all elements of the program, or that those graduated from the program will be able to pass the licensure exam and/or secure employment as a nurse. Attaining these goals depends on the degree to which the student diligently applies him or herself to the studies, and on the economic forces influencing the health care industry. Neither of these factors is within the control of the Houston Baptist University School of Nursing and Allied Health.

The nursing programs are accredited by the following agencies:

Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing, Inc. (ACEN)) 3343 Peachtree Road, NE, Suite 850 Atlanta, Georgia 30326

Telephone: (404) 975-5000 Fax: (404) 975-5020

Website: www.acenursing.org

Texas Board of Nursing, 333 Guadalupe #3-460 Austin, TX 78701

Telephone: (512) 305-7400 Website: www.bon.state.tx.us

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 113 NOTE: RN licenses are issued by the Texas Board of Nursing, not the University. The Board of Nursing may refuse to admit a person to the R.N. licensure examination if the person has been convicted of any felony or a misdemeanor involving moral turpitude, or to any individual with lack of fitness or good character to practice nursing by any reason of physical or mental illness, intemperate use of alcohol or drugs, or unprofessional or dishonorable conduct which is likely to deceive, defraud, or injure patients or the public. Under its procedures, the Board is required to conduct a background check of these areas.

An individual enrolled or planning to enroll in the nursing education program who has reason to believe he or she may be ineligible for the R.N. license, may petition the Texas Board of Nursing for a declaratory order as to the person’s eligibility. Neither the University nor its faculty can answer this question for a person. The Board of Nursing may be reached at: Texas Board of Nursing, 333 Guadalupe #3-460, Austin, TX 78701, (512) 305-7400 website: www.bon.state.tx.us.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)

The BSN program prepares graduates to promote health and healing through direct care and management and coordination of care for individuals, families, groups, and communities. There is a core curriculum required of all undergraduate nursing students. The program prepares graduates to take the examination for Registered Nurse (R.N.) licensure offered by the Texas Board of Nursing.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Major Requirements PDF

Admission Procedures and Polices for the Baccalaureate Degree in Nursing

To be considered for admission to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree program, applicants are required to have:

• Been accepted to HBU through the general undergraduate admission process. • Met the minimum 3.0 GPA cumulative, in Science, and HBU • Transcripts that reflect no more than two grades of "D" or "F" in the required science courses, or more than one grade of "D" or "F" in a nursing course (if more, not eligible for admission) • Attended the Nursing Information Session. • Completed the HESI entrance exam based on two (2) attempts only to achieve the 80% score on each sub-section (Reading Comprehension, Grammar, Math), and the Anatomy & Physiology sub-section (no minimum score required). • Completed all nursing prerequisite courses (see above) with grade of "C" or better. • Completed all HBU Proficiencies: Writing, Math, Reading, and Computer. • Been selected for program entry through the candidate ranking process. • A clear criminal background check and no evidence of drug or alcohol use/abuse.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 114 Progression in the Program

To progress to the nursing courses involving direct patient care, students are required to have:

• An overall GPA of 2.5 or higher. • No grade less than a "C" in the nursing courses. • Satisfactory performance on the Math Proficiency Exam for Nurses. • Transcripts that reflect no more than two grades of "D" or "F" in the required science courses, or no more than one grade of D" or "F" in a nursing course. • Demonstrated proficiency in the required competencies at the Novice Level, Advanced Beginner, and Graduating Level Curriculum Checkpoints by passing an examination, demonstrating safe practice and critical thinking while performing nursing skills, and providing a portfolio at Novice and Graduate levels. • A clear criminal background check and no evidence of drug or alcohol use/abuse. • Completed hospital orientation modules, including any specific orientation requirements for assigned clinical agency. • Current CPR for health care providers, including newborn, infant, pediatrics and adult, and AED training. • Updated required immunizations. • Updated annual tuberculosis screening. • A current statement of good health.

Graduation

Candidates eligible for graduation with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree are required to:

• Complete a minimum of 127 semester hours for the baccalaureate degree in nursing with a GPA of 2.5 or higher. • Have earned the prescribed number of points in the Nursing Student Association and demonstrated competence as required for the curriculum checkpoints. • Apply to take the State Board Examination for RN licensure. • Complete all general requirements for graduation as outlined in the Catalog.

BSN Challenge Program For LVN, RN, Generic Transfer or Re-Entry Students

The challenge program for the Bachelor’s Degree Nursing Programs is designed to give LVNs, RNs, Generic Transfer (students from other BSN nursing programs in good standing), or returning students, a chance to document their knowledge base and nursing skills in specified courses of the BSN curriculum.

The Challenge Process

The challenge process evaluates the student’s knowledge base, skills, and clinical abilities to validate and document prior knowledge and competence in nursing. It is not designed to teach those students who have learning needs in those areas.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 115 Unsuccessful Challenge

• Theory Students who do not score a minimum of 75% on the "challenge" exam will be required to enroll in the course. The challenge will be considered a 1st nursing course failure. If students do not have a grade of "C" or above after taking the course, then the student is no longer eligible to continue in the nursing program. • Clinical All other challenge activities (clinical evaluation, written care plans, research papers, and written assignments) must be completed at or above the 75% level as well.

Eligibility Requirements:

• Have an unencumbered license to practice as a Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN) or Registered Nurse (RN) from the Texas Board of Nursing or be eligible to return to the nursing program at HBU or the school from which the student transferred. • Have a minimum of six (6) months of professional experience as a LVN or RN; • Have an advising session with the Dean or designated advisor. The requirements for the degree completion will be viewed at this advising session. • Give evidence of current CPR and AED training for health care provider, health insurance and completed physical exam within 3 months prior to entry or re-entry into the Nursing Program. • Meet all eligibility requirements for the BSN program as required for the degree. • Have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above and > 80% on the HESI Admission Assessment (A2) in Reading Comprehension, Grammar, Math and Anatomy & Physiology. • Demonstrate strength in science courses and potential for success in the BSN program. Students whose transcripts reflect more than two (2) grades of "D" or "F" in the required science courses or more than one (1) grade below a "C" in a nursing course are not eligible to be admitted or continue in the nursing program. • Pass with a grade of 90% or higher the Math for Nurses test offered by the School of Nursing and Allied Health. • Meet the Writing, Math, Reading, and Computer proficiency requirements for the University. • For the generic transfer and re-entry nursing students, successful completion of the background check process with the Board of Nursing is required. • All transfer and re-entry students must be admitted/re-admitted to the University and the BSN program. • All transfer students are required to have letters of good standing from the deans/directors of all previously attended nursing programs submitted directly to the Dean of the School of Nursing and Allied Health.

Graduation Requirements In addition to meeting the university and nursing program requirements for graduation, LVN, RN, generic transfer or re-entry student must meet the following criteria:

• Complete the Graduating Level Curriculum checkpoints. • Attain the Nursing Student Association (NSA) required points.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 116

Summary Students must be successful in both theory and clinical portions of the challenges to receive credit for the course. Otherwise, the student will need to enroll in the course.

Preparation for the Challenge

• Purchase textbooks and course materials for the course. • Obtain a course syllabus from the faculty. • Read the School of Nursing and Allied Health Student Handbook. The challenge student is subject to all policies outlined in the School of Nursing and Allied Health Student Handbook. The Student Handbook will be received during the new student orientation conducted for all entering students into the program.

LVN to BSN

Challenge Process

The student will be:

• Allowed to challenge NURS 3404 Care of Individuals I and NURS 3424 Care of Individuals II. • Evaluated on an individual basis for eligibility to challenge specialty courses.

RN to BSN

The purpose of the RN to BSN (Advanced Standing) program is to allow a registered nurse in the state of Texas who is a graduate of an accredited associate degree or diploma nursing program to attain a baccalaureate degree in nursing (BSN) by building on previous knowledge, skills, and experiences. The philosophy, curriculum framework, objectives, and the progression and graduation requirements for the RN to BSN Program are the same as for the non-RN students in the BSN program.

RN Credits

To receive credit for courses required for the BSN curriculum the RN’s transcripts will be evaluated for course equivalencies. RNs may receive credit based on transcript and/or course syllabi evaluation and validation of prior knowledge through a challenge process and/or the HESI Exit Comprehensive Examination. The processes for validating prior knowledge of nursing are described below.

• Graduates of accredited Associate Degree or Diploma nursing programs must meet eligibility requirements for the RN to BSN Program. • File a degree plan with the Registrar.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 117 • Take the HESI Comprehensive Examination prior to enrolling in nursing courses and attain a score of at least 900 on the exam. Upon passing the HESI Comprehensive Examination, the RN will receive credit for the following courses: o NURS 2222 Perspectives on the Health Care System – 2 semester hours o NURS 2323 Health Assessment – 3 semester hours o NURS 2404 Art and Science of Nursing -- 4 semester hours o NURS 3404, 3424 Care of Individuals I and II – 8 semester hours o NURS 4414 Care of Families with Mental Health Problems – 4 semester hours o NURS 4434 Care of Childbearing Families – 4 semester hours o NURS 4444 Care of Families with Children – 4 semester hours Subtotal of hours credited 25 hours

• If an RN does not achieve a score of 900 on the HESI Exit Comprehensive Exam, the scores of 900 or above on the Specialty Scales (Medical-Surgical, Pediatric, Maternity, Psychiatric, and Geriatric Nursing), may be considered for credit for courses corresponding to the specialty tested. RNs will be required to enroll and complete courses for which no credit is awarded based on the HESI Exit Comprehensive Exam.

• Rationale for the HESI Exit Exam Score The score of 900 on the HESI Exit Comprehensive Examination is consistent with the performance of generic BSN students who have successfully passed through the curriculum by attaining scores of 75% or above on exam averages and final exams, assignments and clinical performance criteria and thus have passed nursing courses with grades of "C" or above. BSN students must attain a score of 900 on the HESI Exit Comprehensive exam to be allowed to graduate from the program.

Summary of Credits

• Credit hours awarded based on a challenge process 25 hours. • Prerequisite and General Education course requirements 70 hours. • BSN course requirements 21-25 hours. • Upper division hours taken 21-25 hours. • Total Hours required for the BSN degree 127 hours.

Graduation Requirements

• Submit a passing Graduating Level Curriculum Checkpoint portfolio. • Candidates for the BSN are expected to have earned a prescribed number of points in the Nursing Student Association (NSA).

Generic Transfer of Re-Entry Nursing

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 118 The challenge program is designed to give previous HBU nursing students or transfer students a chance to document their knowledge base and nursing skills in specified courses of the BSN curriculum.

HBU nursing students or transfer students will be allowed to challenge those nursing courses for which they have grades of "C" or above.

The Challenge Process

To be approved for the Challenge Program, the following steps need to be completed:

1. Be admitted/re-admitted to the University and to the BSN program. 2. Submit to the Dean the course descriptions and course syllabi for those courses to be challenged. 3. Upon the Dean’s approval, the student may then proceed with the Challenge Program for each of the courses for which there is transcripted credit.

Graduation Requirements In addition to meeting the university and nursing program requirements for graduation, the generic transfer or re-entry student must meet the following criteria:

• Complete the curriculum checkpoints. • Attain the Nursing Student Association (NSA) required points.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 119 College of Science and Mathematics

The College of Science and Mathematics offers a B.S. degree with options of majors in biology, biochemistry-molecular biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics. B.S. degree options for majors for students pursuing teacher certification are composite science, life science, mathematical studies, and physical science.

The College of Science and Mathematics faculty members are deeply committed to undergraduate teaching and research. One-on-one interactions with faculty members are the norm in this college. Research opportunities with faculty are available to undergraduates. Students are also encouraged to participate in summer internships and research programs at other universities and research institutions. Undergraduate Programs

Department of Biology

Major in Biology

The Biology Department at Houston Baptist University emphasizes the biomedical/biotechnology area of biology. HBU Biology is especially strong in Cell and Molecular Biology, Microbiology, and Animal Systems. The program, taught by faculty with earned Doctorates, prepares students for a wide variety of careers including health professions, graduate school, nursing, education, and industry.

Graduates of HBU Biology have become Ph.D.s, physicians, dentists, biotechnicians, researchers, teachers, and other interesting professions. They work in the fields of allied health, quality control, ecology, animal and plant science, consulting, lab management, forensics, and related sales areas.

HBU Biology prepares students for their careers by offering biology courses with an academically rigorous, contemporary curriculum. HBU Biology faculty serve as mentors to enable students to develop professional attitudes required for success and service.

HBU Biology provides mentoring and experiences that enable students to grow in a Christian environment that integrates the principles of biological sciences with their faith.

Departmental honors are available in Biology.

Biology Major Requirements PDF

Biology Minor Requirements PDF

Major in Biochemistry-Molecular Biology

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 120 The College of Science and Mathematics provides the interdisciplinary training necessary to prepare students for success in careers in the biological and biochemical sciences. HBU faculty from Biology, Chemistry, Math and Physics teach and mentor in this major. The Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (BCMB) major incorporates the training needed for students to compete for spaces in medical school, dental school and graduate programs in the biological and biochemical sciences, in addition to entry-level employment in biomedical research at academic institutions and in the biotechnology industry.

Departmental honors are available in BCMB.

Biochemestry-Molecular Biology Major Requirements PDF

Department of Chemistry

Major in Chemistry

The chemistry major includes courses in biochemistry as well as general, inorganic, organic, analytical, and physical chemistry. Calculus I and II and two courses in calculus-based physics are also required. The curriculum provides laboratory experiences and includes a senior research project. Internships and additional undergraduate research opportunities, outside of course requirements, are available to qualified chemistry majors. Chemistry graduates commonly pursue graduate school, industrial employment, and further study in various health professions.

Chemistry Major Requirements PDF

Chemistry Minor Requirements PDF

Department of Mathematics & Physics

Major in Mathematics

The mathematics major combines course work in both pure and applied mathematics with computer applications. It is designed to prepare students for graduate study or for careers in business, government, and industry. Mathematics courses are also offered to support other programs, including business, chemistry, education, engineering, the health professions, and physics.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 121 Mathematics graduates often find employment with companies in technological fields such as computer science, engineering, statistics, and actuarial science, but are also highly-valued by employers in non-technological fields because of their proven problem-solving abilities. A mathematics degree also provides a solid foundation for students who wish to pursue further studies.

Departmental honors are available in Mathematics.

Mathematics Minor Requirements PDF

Mathematics Major w/Applied Math Track Requirements PDF

Mathematics Major w/Pure Math Track Requirements PDF

Mathematics Major w/Pure and Applied Math Track Requirements PDF

Major in Physics

The physics program at HBU provides a firm foundation in the theoretical and experimental aspects of physics. In addition, the physics program offers courses for non-science majors: Physics for the Liberal Arts Mind; Astronomy and the Universe; Physics of Sound. Currently, the faculty is involved in theoretical, experimental, and applied physics research. Areas of research include biophysics, supersymmetry, and methods of teaching physics.

Physics Major Requirements PDF

Physics Minor Requirements PDF

Teacher Certification (See College of Education and Behavioral Sciences)

The Colleges of Science and Mathematics and Education and Behavioral Sciences cooperatively offer teacher certification in the following areas:

• 4-8 Composite Science • 4-8 Math Studies • 8-12 Composite Science • 8-12 Life Science • 8-12 Math Studies • 8-12 Physical Science

Pre-Professional Programs Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 122 The College of Science and Mathematics also offers (in addition to advising for HBU degree requirements) specialized advising for students planning to continue their education after obtaining a degree from HBU by attending medical, dental, optometry, pharmacy, physical therapy, physician assistant, or an engineering school. The requirements as listed below are frequently updated by maintaining close contact with all professional schools. However, professional schools are continually modifying their curriculum, so students should consult with the the health professions and/or the director of the pre-engineering program for the most current requirements for a post-baccalaureate program.

Pre-Engineering Program

The pre-engineering program is designed to allow students to complete an engineering degree after one or two years of full-time study at HBU and approximately three or four years of full- time study at an engineering school. The exact time required will depend on the school and the field of engineering chosen. The program allows students to take all, or nearly all, of their math and science courses and some of their general elective courses at HBU before transferring. The courses recommended below are intended to provide the student with a strong background regardless of which engineering school or field of engineering he or she chooses. Most, but not all, of these courses are required by many engineering schools and for many fields of engineering. Students may, at their discretion, substitute other courses for those recommended. The program director in engineering will provide students with advice and assistance in selecting courses, but it is the responsibility of all students to check with the university that they plan to attend after leaving HBU to verify that the courses taken at HBU will satisfy that school’s requirements.

Recommended Program of Study First Year FYS 11001 CHEM 2415, 2416 ENGL 1320, 1330 GOVT 23132 HIST 2313, 23232 MATH 14343, 1451 or MATH 1451, 1452

Second Year MATH 1452 (if not taken in first year) MATH 2423, 2451, 3333, 3364, 3404 PHYS 2413, 2423 Other General Electives4

Notes: 1Required by HBU for all beginning freshmen or transfer students with fewer than 15 semester hours credit. 2GOVT 2313, HIST 2313, and 2323 are recommended in part because six hours of American history and six hours of American and Texas government are required by all state universities in Texas. 3This course may be omitted by students who make a satisfactory score on the Calculus Placement Test (CPT). Those students should take MATH 1451 and 1452 during their first year. On the other hand, students with deficiencies in their mathematical background may need to take Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 123 MATH 1313 and/or MATH 1323 before taking MATH 1434. 4The following courses satisfy degree requirements at many engineering schools and are recommended for students who want to take additional general elective courses at HBU before transferring, but it is the responsibility of all students to check with the university that they plan to attend after leaving HBU to verify that the courses taken at HBU will satisfy that school’s requirements: PSYC 1313 or SOCI 1313, ECON 2311 or 2312, COMM 1323, WRIT 3345, and ART 2343

Pre-Medical / Pre-Dental Program

The pre-medical/pre-dental program is open to all HBU students interested in a career in medicine or dentistry. The program is not a major, rather it is a series of classes and activities designed to prepare students for entry into these schools. The course work, shown in the table below, consists of the pre-requisite courses required by the majority of the public medical and dental schools in Texas. These courses must be completed prior to entry. Some professional schools, especially private schools, may have slightly different requirements. Activities in the program include membership and participation in the appropriate pre-professional student organization (Alpha Epsilon Delta, pre-professional honor society and the Pre-Dental Society), trips to medical and dental schools, and workshops offered by the Health Professions Office. Students should check the bulletin board on the second floor of the Cullen Science building for information about scheduled activities. Students are also encouraged to seek shadowing opportunities with area health care professionals and to perform community service as individuals or in conjunction with AED and PDS.

Entry into a health professions school is a competitive process. Successful students are encouraged to fulfill all course pre-requisites during their first 2.5 years, take the MCAT/DAT during their junior year, and apply to medical/dental school the early summer after their junior year. Students must also acquire a letter(s) of evaluation as part of their application package.

The letter(s) can be in either of two forms:

• The first form is the Composite Letter of Evaluation Package. This type is the one preferred by the professional schools. This package contains comments by the science faculty, advisors, and evaluations performed by the Applicant Evaluation Committee. In order to obtain this letter, a student must: 1. Complete 30 semester hours at HBU, of which 16 are science courses 2. Complete 13 of the 14 pre-requisite courses listed in the table below. If 13 classes have not been completed, the student will be referred to the Medical Professions Advisory Committee, for evaluation and comments to be included in the Evaluation Package. 3. Register with the Health Professions Office (room S219) to indicate their intention to apply to medical/dental school. This registration should occur between January 15 and March 1 of the application year. 4. Attend a 30 minute scheduled interview with the Applicant Evaluation. Committee during the spring semester prior to application. In addition to these requirements, students are highly encouraged to attend the series of 3 workshops designed to acquaint students with the on-line Texas Medical and Dental Application Service, the format of a successful personal statement, and the

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 124 expectations of the medical school faculty at the interview.

• The second form is the Individual Evaluation Letter Package. This type can be used in lieu of the Composite Package, if the student cannot attend the interview/ workshops or register in advance, as required above. This package consists of two individual recommendation letters from faculty members, a cover letter by the Health Professions Office and may also include a letter from a health care professional. To obtain this letter, a student must: 1. Complete 24 semester hours at HBU, of which 16 are science courses 2. Register with the Health Professions Office and turn in the two recommendation letters, obtained from professors in your major. We recommend that you include at least one science professor. Students must realize that it often takes several weeks before an Evaluation Package of any type can be mailed to the various schools. Students applying to more than 10 schools, will be charged for mailing costs. The Health Professions Office does not include transcripts. Transcripts must be ordered by the student from the Office of the Registrar and sent directly as instructed in the application.

Pre-Medical and Pre-Dental prerequisite courses may change at any time without notice to Houston Baptist University. Some of the listed courses may have prerequisite requirements.

Medical and Dental School Requirements BIOL 2454 General Biology I BIOL 2455 General Biology II BIOL 3301 Cellular and Molecular Biology Four advanced hours (3000-4000) of Biology including Lab CHEM 2415 General Chemistry I CHEM 2416 General Chemistry II CHEM 3131 Organic Chemistry Laboratory CHEM 3313 Organic Chemistry I CHEM 3132 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory CHEM 3333 Organic Chemistry II (CHEM 4373 Biochemistry – required by some medical and dental schools) MATH 3401 Introductory Statistics for the Life Sciences PHYS 1416 General Physics I OR PHYS 2413 Principles of Physics I (if required for major) PHYS 1417 General Physics II OR PHYS 2423 Principles of Physics II (if required for major) PSYC 1313 General Psychology & SOC 1313 Principles of Sociology are

recommended in order to prepare for the MCAT beginning in 2015

Pre-Chiropractic Program, Texas Chiropractic College

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 125 This is a guide to the required courses for admission to Texas Chiropractic courses. Some of the listed courses may have prerequisite requirements. It is the student’s responsibility to check often with Texas Chiropractic College for any updates as these requirements may change without notice to HBU. For other entrance requirements, students should contact Texas Chiropractic College.

Science and Math Core BIOL 2454 General Biology I BIOL 2455 General Biology II CHEM 2415 General Chemistry I CHEM 2416 General Chemistry II CHEM 3131 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory CHEM 3132 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory CHEM 3313 Organic Chemistry I CHEM 3333 Organic Chemistry II *PHYS 1416 General Physics I & PHYS 2417 General Physics II OR PHYS 1416 General Physics I & *MATH 3401 Introduction to Statistics ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II PSYC 1313 General Psychology CISM 1321 OR demonstrated proficiency 15 hours of humanities or Social Science courses

Pre-Optometry Program

This is a guide to the most frequently required courses. Not all courses will be required by all optometry schools. Pre-optometry prequisite courses may change at any time without notice to Houston Baptist University. Some of the listed courses may have prerequisite requirements. It is the student’s responsibility to check often with the professional school for any updates. Students are encouraged to participate in the activities of our Pre-Optometry Professional Society (POPS).

Optometry School Requirements BIOL 2454 General Biology I BIOL 2455 General Biology II BIOL 3301 Cellular and Molecular Biology BIOL 3414 Microbiology BIOL 3454 General Physiology BIOL 3456 Advanced Human Anatomy CHEM 2415 General Chemistry I CHEM 2416 General Chemistry II CHEM 3131 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory CHEM 3132 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory CHEM 3313 Organic Chemistry I CHEM 3333 Organic Chemistry II CHEM 4373 Biochemistry MATH 1434 Precalculus Mathematics MATH 1451 Calculus I Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 126 PHYS 1416 General Physics I OR PHYS 2413 Principles of Physics I PHYS 1417 General Physics II OR PHYS 2423 Principles of Physics II PSYC 1313 General Psychology PSYC 2301 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences OR MATH

3401 Introductory Statistics for the Life Sciences

Pre-Pharmacy Program

Students who plan to enter the field of pharmacy may complete the prerequisite courses at Houston Baptist University before applying for admission to a school of pharmacy.

This is a guide to the most frequently required courses. Not all courses will be required by all pharmacy schools. Pre-Pharmacy prequisite courses may change at any time without notice to Houston Baptist University. Some of the listed courses may have prerequisite requirements. It is the student’s responsibility to check often with the professional school for any updates.

Pharmacy School Requirements BIOL 2454 General Biology I BIOL 2455 General Biology II BIOL 3301 Cellular and Molecular Biology BIOL 3414 Microbiology BIOL 3444 Genetics BIOL 3454 General Physiology BIOL 3456 Advanced Human Anatomy CHEM 2415 General Chemistry I CHEM 2416 General Chemistry II CHEM 3131 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory CHEM 3132 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory CHEM 3313 Organic Chemistry I CHEM 3333 Organic Chemistry II ECON 2311 Microeconomics or ECOM 2312 Macroeconomics ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II ENGL 2315 Great Works of Literature I HIST 2313 U.S. History to 1877 HIST 2323 U.S. History from 1877 MATH 1434 Precalculus MATH 1451 Calculus I PHYS 1416 General Physics I OR PHYS 2413 Principles of Physics I PHYS 1417 General Physics II OR PHYS 2423 Principles of Physics II GOVT 1313 Introduction to Government GOVT 2313 American and Texas Government PSYC 1313 General Psychology PSYC 2301 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences OR MATH

3401 Introductory Statistics for the Life Sciences COMM 1323 Rhetoric and Public Speaking Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 127 Fine Arts: 3 hours

Pre-Physical Therapy Program

This is a guide to the most frequently required courses. Not all courses will be required by all physical therapy schools. Pre-Physical Therapy prequisite courses may change at any time without notice to Houston Baptist University. Some of the listed courses may have prerequisite requirements. It is the student’s responsibility to check often with the professional school for any updates.

Since programs vary in entrance requirements, students should confirm the specific admission requirements for each school. The requirements below are representative of most programs.

Physical Therapy School Requirements BIOL 2241 Medical Terminology BIOL 2454 General Biology I BIOL 2455 General Biology II BIOL 3301 Cellular and Molecular Biology BIOL 3454 General Physiology BIOL 3456 Advanced Human Anatomy CHEM 2415 General Chemistry I CHEM 2416 General Chemistry II COMM 1323 Rhetoric and Public Speaking ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II MATH Varies by school PHYS 1416 General Physics I OR PHYS 2413 Principles of Physics I PHYS 1417 General Physics II OR PHYS 2423 Principles of Physics II PSYC 1313 General Psychology PSYC 2301 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences OR MATH

3401 Introductory Statistics for the Life Sciences PSYC 2364 Abnormal Psychology OR PSYC 3313 Human Growth and

Development SOCI 1313 Principles of Sociology WRIT 3345 Technical Writing

Pre-Physician Assistant Program

Students who plan to enter the field of Physician Assistant may complete the prerequisite courses at Houston Baptist University before applying for admission to a Physician Assistant program.

This is a guide to the most frequently required courses. Not all courses will be required by all physician assistant schools. Pre-Physician Assistant prequisite courses may change at any time without notice to Houston Baptist University. Some of the listed courses may have prerequisite Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 128 requirements. It is the student’s responsibility to check often with the professional school for any updates.

Physician Assistant School Requirements BIOL 2241 Medical Terminology-Recommended BIOL 2454 General Biology I BIOL 2455 General Biology II BIOL 3301 Cellular and Molecular Biology BIOL 3335 Nutrition BIOL 3414 Microbiology BIOL 3444 Genetics BIOL 3454 General Physiology BIOL 3456 Advanced Human Anatomy OR BIOL 3464 Comparative

Vertebrate Anatomy BIOL 4464 Immunology CHEM 2415 General Chemistry I CHEM 2416 General Chemistry II CHEM 3131 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I CHEM 3313 Organic Chemistry I ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I MATH 1313 College Algebra PSYC 1313 General Psychology PSYC 2301 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences or MATH

3401 Introductory Statistics for the Life Sciences PSYC 2364 Abnormal Psychology OR PSYC 3313 Human Growth and

Development

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 129 Smith College of Liberal Arts

Undergraduate Programs

The Honors College

Admission to the Honors College is by application only. There are no minimum SAT, ACT, or GPA requirements to apply to the Honors College, but students who have been admitted to the Honors College in recent years have had an average SAT score of 1280 (which is equivalent to an average ACT score of 29) and an average high school GPA of 3.6. (The SAT score includes only the critical reading and mathematics scores.) Because the ideal Honors College candidate is a well rounded individual who excels in a diversity of fields, strong applications to the Honors College usually include two letters of recommendation (one academic, one character) and evidence of leadership experience and service to the church and community.

The mission of the HBU Honors College is to provide students with an interdisciplinary curriculum rooted in the Christian faith that cultivates knowledge, character, and wisdom by examining the great works of Western civilization and exploring timeless questions.

The Honors College provides a unique general education core curriculum in the liberal arts, social and natural sciences for exceptional undergraduates. It fosters curiosity and creativity, challenges students to grow intellectually, socially and spiritually, and inspires life-long learning.

Students in the Honors College examine the great works of Western civilization and hone their reading, writing and critical thinking skills through spirited discussions with their peers and distinguished faculty. Some courses are taught by a team of professors so that students learn from various perspectives and recognize the interconnectedness of all knowledge.

Only students accepted into the Honors College may take Honors College courses. The Honors Scholars do not take the complete complement of Liberal Arts Core Curriculum courses since the Honors College curriculum meets the general education requirements of the University. In addition, students must complete the University mandated competencies (see below). The Honors curriculum does not constitute a major but does provide the foundation courses for any undergraduate degree offered by the University.

Honors College classes are taught in a seminar setting and are structured to include co-curricular activities including symposia, roundtables, undergraduate research, service learning projects, and broad exposure to cultural and learning opportunities in Houston and beyond. Honors Scholars are encouraged to participate in additional learning experiences including study abroad programs, the national honors college convention, and others.

Honors College students are required to complete the Honors Core (43 hours) plus all university mandated competencies. Students who leave the Honors College prior to completing the Honors core will be required to meet the Liberal Arts Core Curriculum requirements not met by analogous courses in the Honors College core curriculum. The Liberal Arts Core Curriculum courses do not meet the Honors College core requirements and may not be substituted for Honors classes.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 130 Honors College Requirements PDF

Bachelors of General Studies (BGS)

The Bachelor of General Studies degree is a degree completion program designed to help meet personal goals. This degree is reserved for students within 45 hours of graduation who are not seeking licensure or certification. Applicants for the BGS degree should be aware that the degree may not be appropriate for admission to graduate or professional schools.

Required Courses Christianity 1313, 1323, 3373 9 English 1320, 1330 6 Mathematics 1305 or higher level course 3 (depending on concentration) Science with laboratory 4-8 Social and Behavioral Sciences 6-9 requirements Humanities and Fine Arts requirements 15 Option A OR Option B

Electives to complete degree requirements including FYS 1100, if required Total required: 125

Program Requirements: Option A or B Option A: Academic Major (See Note 8 under Undergraduate Degree Programs) = 24-36 Second area of study = 18

Option B: Concentrations Program Requirement Two academic concentrations of 24 sem. Hrs. each minimum 48

• Concentration I - Communications. Courses to be drawn from Communication, English, Languages, Communication and Rhetoric, and Journalism/Mass Communication • Concentration II - Humanities & Social Sciences. Courses to be drawn from Christianity, Geography, History, Philosophy, and Government

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 131 • Concentration III - Behavioral Sciences. Courses to be drawn from *Criminal Justice, **Education, Kinesiology, **Nursing, Psychology, Sociology and *Social Work • Concentration IV - Business Administration. Courses to be drawn from Accounting, Business Administration, International Business, Economics, Finance, Management, and Marketing

NOTE: A minimum of 125 semester hours is required for the degree, 30 of which must be at the upper level. A minimum cumulative scholastic standing of 2.00, with no grade below "C" in courses completed in the concentrations, is required. Institutional recommendations for certification, licensure, or professional school admission (e.g. medical school, etc.) cannot be given with this degree. A minimum of 36 semester hours must be taken in residence at HBU, including at least 18 semester hours of upper level courses, 6 hours in each concentration, or 12 upper level courses in residence for the major in Option A. * Currently, the University does not offer work in these fields; therefore, only transfer credit in these areas is applicable. ** Credit for education or nursing courses previously taken will not lead to educational certification or nursing licensure. For certification or licensure, other degree options must be elected.

Bachelor of Arts, Interdisciplinary Studies Major

The Interdisciplinary Studies program is designed to offer students the opportunity to form a course of study across disciplines. There is a long and fruitful history of scholars exploring multiple areas in support of their projects. The interdisciplinary degree is suited for students whose academic or personal goals require that they take courses from a number of different disciplines across the university and who are best served by not majoring in any particular field. The classes taken are ones that are offered by the existing academic units on campus. There are no classes that are only Interdisciplinary Studies classes and there is no Interdisciplinary Studies department. Students should work closely with their advisor in determining whether or not this degree is right for them and for determining what classes will best suit their goals.

Bachelor of Arts, Interdisciplinary Studies Major Requirements PDF

Bachelor of Arts, Managerial Studies Major

The Managerial Studies program is designed to offer students the opportunity to maximize the benefit of attending a University with a strong liberal arts focus, while simultaneously gaining marketable skills in the business disciplines. The BA in Managerial Studies includes a Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 132 “concentration” requirement (Management; Marketing; or International Business) that infuses the market value of a business major into the broad liberal arts preparation of a Bachelor of Arts degree.

Bachelor of Arts, Managerial Studies with Management Concentration Requirements PDF Bachelor of Arts, Managerial Studies with International Business Concentration Requirement PDF Bachelor of Arts, Managerial Studies with Marketing Concentration Requirement PDF

Graduate Programs

Masters of Liberal Arts

The Master of Liberal Arts (MLA) offers students an interdisciplinary panorama of knowledge in art, literature, history, culture, and science. The MLA is designed for those who have completed their undergraduate education but who wish to continue intellectual enrichment in a formal academic environment. A thesis option is available.

Students in the MLA program represent a variety of educational backgrounds and ages. The degree is of particular interest to those in areas such as education, business, law, medicine, and engineering who desire a high level inquiry into the liberal arts. Classes meet once each week in the evening. A selection of courses from the various liberal arts is offered each semester.

Students who have completed a MLA degree at a regionally accredited university are eligible to receive complete a postgraduate Certificate upon the completion of an additional thirty (30) hours of course work in the MLA program. Applicants who did not complete their MLA degrees at HBU must complete a graduate application for admission and submit official transcripts of all previous college work.

Masters in Liberal Arts Program Requirements PDF

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 133

Course Descriptions

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 134 Accounting (ACCT) Course Descriptions

ACCT 2301 Principles of Accounting I An introduction to the identification and analysis of business transactions and the financial accounting information system that captures them. Included is the flow of activities within the system culminating in the four basic financial statements of a for-profit business. Emphasis is placed on the use of these financial statements to make business credit and investment decisions.

ACCT 2303 Principles of Accounting II Prerequisite: ACCT 2301 An introductory course designed for managers throughout the organization and the tools they use in performing the planning and controlling of operations. Students will be introduced to: internal use reporting developed from the accounting information system; budgeting; determining product costs; and analyzing costs as to function and behavior. Interesting questions are discussed such as: How does a manager use accounting goals to motivate employees? How does a marketing department determine price? How does an organization determine what data to capture in the accounting information system?

ACCT 3303 Cost Accounting Prerequisites: ACCT 2301, 2303; ECON 2311; BUSA 2311; WRIT 3310 An in-depth study of the accounting tools managers use in performing the planning and controlling of operations. Students will develop and analyze internal reports for service as well as manufacturing companies; determine how the cost of a product is determined under several cost flow systems; allocate the costs of support departments; prepare detailed variances and interpret the results.

ACCT 3304 Individual Income Taxes Prerequisites: ACCT 2301, 2303; ECON 2311; BUSA 2311 Current federal revenue acts affecting individual tax returns; procedures for computing the income tax liability of individuals. Practice in solving typical problems and in the preparation of tax returns.

ACCT 3311 Intermediate Accounting I Prerequisites: ACCT 2303; CISM 1321 or Computer Proficiency Exam; ECON 2311; BUSA 2311 An intensive study of financial accounting theory and generally accepted accounting principles related to income determination, the financial position, and cash flows of profit-oriented business enterprises. The courses must be taken in sequence.

ACCT 3312 Intermediate Accounting II Prerequisite: ACCT 3311 An intensive study of financial accounting theory and generally accepted accounting principles related to income determination, the financial position, and cash flows of profit-oriented business enterprises. The courses must be taken in sequence.

ACCT 3311, 3312, 3313 Intermediate Accounting I, II, and III Prerequisites: ACCT 2301, 2303; CISM 1321; ECON 2301, 2302; BUSA 2311, 2320 An intensive study of financial accounting theory and generally accepted accounting principles related to income determination, the financial position, and cash flows of profit-oriented business enterprises. The courses must be taken in sequence. Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 135

ACCT 3317 Accounting Information Systems Prerequisite: ACCT 3312 An active, hands-on class that equips the accounting with both knowledge and skills to evaluate and create an accounting information system; work with a relational data base; evaluate and implement control systems; and assess and implement an accounting reporting system. Also included are current uses of technology in accounting utilizing several software applications.

ACCT 4181, 4281, 4381 Special Topics Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean of the School of Business Directed study of a minimum of thirty clock hours for each hour of credit. Provides an opportunity for accounting majors to conduct detailed investigations of selected accounting problems.

ACCT 4181, 4281, 4381 Special Topics Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean of the School of Business Directed study of a minimum of thirty clock hours for each hour of credit. Provides an opportunity for accounting majors to conduct detailed investigations of selected accounting problems.

ACCT 4301 Advanced Accounting Prerequisite: ACCT 3312 Study and application of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) to specialized problems in mergers and acquisitions; consolidated financial reporting; partnership accounting; foreign currency transactions; foreign currency translation and remeasurements for reporting purposes. Study of GAAP for government and nonprofit entities, fund accounting and reporting practices.

ACCT 4302 Auditing Prerequisite: ACCT 3312; WRIT 3310 Standards and procedures in making audits and examinations of the accounting records of business enterprises; preparation of work papers; the content and forms of qualified and unqualified auditor¿s opinions; types of audits; ethics of the profession.

ACCT 4306 Government and Nonprofit Accounting Prerequisites: ACCT 2301, 2303 Application of financial accounting principles to governmental entities and nonprofit organizations; entails a detailed study of fund accounting and reporting practices. Requires proficiency in Microsoft® Excel.

ACCT 4314, Taxation for Corporations and Other Entities Prerequisite: ACCT 3304 Federal income tax determination for corporations and the impact of decisions on the corporation and shareholders; tax issues relating to S corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts. Tax research is a substantial component of the course, representing one-third of the course content.

ACCT 4322 Advanced Auditing Issues Prerequisite: ACCT 4302 Corporate governance issues and the impact on the auditing profession and accounting disclosures, additional attestation requirements from auditors, other non-attestation engagements,

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 136 internal audit and audit committees, compliance and government audit, and legal liability of accounts. The course includes a substantial research and writing component representing two- thirds of the course content.

ACCT 4336 Financial Statement Analysis and Valuation PREREQS: ACCT 3311, MIS 2332, FINA 3320 Study and application of analytical tools and techniques for analyzing corporate financial statements and related information. Financial statement analysis enables the user to assess the operating, investing, and financing activities of the corporation in an industry context to make inferences regarding historical success as well as prospective profitability and cash flows.

ACCT 4181, 4281, 4381 Special Topics Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean of the School of Business Directed study of a minimum of thirty clock hours for each hour of credit. Provides an opportunity for accounting majors to conduct detailed investigations of selected accounting problems.

ACCT 5260, Accounting Principles This course covers the basics of accounting information. Students will examine financial statements to determine what is communicated to stakeholders. This knowledge will help gain decision-making and problem-solving abilities that are needed outside the classroom. The course introduces both financial accounting and managerial accounting to provide an overall perspective about the introductory accounting topics and presentation so that they can become effective users of accounting information. Graduate Business programs only.

ACCT 5302 Auditing Prerequisite: The study of standards and procedures in making audits and examinations of the accounting records of business enterprises; preparation of work papers; the content and forms of qualified and unqualified auditor's opinions; types of audits; audit objectives, audit risk, materiality, and ethics of the profession.

ACCT 5311 Advanced Accounting Prerequisite: None Study and application of various methods under generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) to specialized problems in mergers and acquisitions; consolidated financial reporting; partnership accounting; foreign currency transactions; foreign currency translations, derivatives, hedge accounting and remeasurements for reporting purposes. This course provides an introduction to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

ACCT 5314, Taxation for Corporations and Other Entities Prerequisite: None The study of federal income tax issues pertinent to various business entities and their owners. Consideration is given to how federal tax law affects the formation and operation of Corporations, Partnerships, and S Corporations. Distributions to owners and the liquidation of these entities are also covered. Tax research is a substantial component of the course representing one-third of the course content.

ACCT 5322 Advanced Auditing Issues Prerequisite: ACCT 5302

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 137 Corporate governance issues and the impact on the auditing profession and accounting disclosures, additional attestation requirements from auditors, other non-attestation engagements, internal audit and audit committees, compliance and government audit, and legal liability of accounts.

ACCT 5360 Survey of Accounting This course covers the basics of what accounting information is, what it means, and how it is used. Students will examine financial statements and determine what they do and do not communicate. This knowledge will help gain decision-making and problem-solving abilities that are needed outside the classroom. The course introduces both financial and managerial accounting to provide an overall perspective about the introductory accounting topics and presentation. The course is also intended to help students learn how to become effective users of accounting information. As such, the course provides a balance between the preparer and the user points of view. The course includes coverage of legal and ethical issues facing accountants as well as highlighting international accounting differences. This course must be taken within the first 12 semester hours in the program. Graduate Business programs only.

ACCT 5361, Survey of Accounting for HRM This is a survey course on basic financial and managerial concepts. Students will be introduced to the basic external financial statements and how they are used by creditors, investors, and outside parties. Students will apply current managerial accounting procedures such as identifying types of cost, the use of cost-volume-profit analysis, cost allocation and performance evaluation, and budgeting techniques. MS-HRM Program only.

ACCT 5381 SPECIAL TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Business.

ACCT 6191, Special Topics Prerequisite: Approval of the dean of the School of Business topics not included in other courses or not emphasized there may be offered in a 1, 2, or 3 semester-hour course. Graduating accounting only.

ACCT 6281, Special Topics Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean of the School of Business Topics not included in other courses or not emphasized there may be offered in a 1, 2, or 3 semester-hour course.

ACCT 6313, International Accounting Issues As global corporations span national boundaries, they must interact with many different accounting practices and systems. This course deals with a wide variety of international accounting issues, including, but not limited to, the different types of accounting standards in the Americas, Asia, and Europe; issues of reporting and disclosure; issues of foreign translation when considering financial statements; issues of standardizing and harmonizing financial reporting; issues of managerial planning and control; and ethical issues of international accounting. Graduate Business programs only.

ACCT 6352, Accounting for Managers The course covers accounting application and information relevant to managers in the current corporate environment. It includes analyzing corporate financial statements to assess the

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 138 operating, investing, and financing activities of the corporation in an industry context; internal accounting topics like C-V-P analysis; decision-making and budgeting. Topics relevant to a public company like the IPO process and SEC filings will also be covered. The course includes coverage of legal and ethical issues facing accountants as well as highlighting international accounting differences. Graduate Business Programs only.

ACCT 6381, Special Topics Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean of the School of Business Topics not included in other courses or not emphasized there may be offered in a 1, 2, or 3- semester-hour course. Graduate accounting only.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 139 Armed Force Science (AFSC) Course Descriptions

AFSC 1201 FOUNDATIONS OF THE USAF I For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Air Force ROTC at Univeristy of Houston.

AFSC 1202 FOUNDATIONS OF THE USAF II For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Air Force ROTC at Univeristy of Houston.

AFSC 2201 EVOLUTION OF AIR POWER I For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Air Force ROTC at Univeristy of Houston.

AFSC 2202 EVOLUTION OF AIR POWER II For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Air Force ROTC at Univeristy of Houston.

AFSC 3301 AIR FORCE LEADERSHIP I For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Air Force ROTC at Univeristy of Houston.

AFSC 3302 AIR FORCE LEADERSHIP II For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Air Force ROTC at Univeristy of Houston.

AFSC 3801 FIELD TRAINING For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Air Force ROTC at Univeristy of Houston.

AFSC 4301 NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS I For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Air Force ROTC at Univeristy of Houston.

AFSC 4302 NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS II For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Air Force ROTC at Univeristy of Houston.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 140 Apologetics (APOL) Course Descriptions

APOL 3301 Worldview Apologetics: Testing Everything with C.S. Lewis & Francis Schaeffer PREREQ: Junior/Senior Standing or Instructor's Approval The course begins with a focused, in-depth reading of Lewis and Schaeffer. Then it examines thinkers who serve as models of how to extend and apply, or revise and modify, their apologetics arguments, and may include works by Nancy Pearcey, Alvin Plantinga, Herman Dooyeweerd, J. Richard Pearcey, Albert Wolters, Mark Noll, George Marsden, Gene Edward Veith, and many others, enriched by shorter readings such as articles, book excerpts, and primary source documents.

APOL 3302 Worldview Apologetics: Surviving and Thriving at the University PREREQ: Junior/Senior Standing or Instructor's Approval This course provides students with tools to analyze the prevailing secular theories across a variety of fields, to think critically about underlying assumptions, and to argue persuasively for a credible Christian perspective. The course gives a worldview introduction to several subject areas, which may include math, english, science, business, political philosophy, the arts & humanities. Readings include books specific to each of the subject areas, enriched by shorter readings such as articles, book excerpts, and primary source documents.

APOL 3381 SPEC TOPIC/INDEPENDENT STUDY For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Christian Thought.

APOL 5281 INDEPENDENT STUDY/SPEC TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Christian Thought.

APOL 5310, Apologetics Research and Writing A practical course to develop effective research and writing skills for graduate-level academic work. The course will cover topics such as developing an effective writing and revising process; using primary and secondary source materials; writing abstracts, book reviews, conference presentations, and research papers; and clarity and precision of language.

APOL 5320 Philosophy of Religion: Faith & Reason This course will deal with basic issues in philosophy of religion, such as: theistic arguments, the problem of evil, the relationship between faith and reason, miracles, and life after death. Also offered as PHIL 5320.

APOL 5330, Ancient Philosophy and Culture Christianity was shaped by Jewish, Roman, and Greek cultural forces. This class will examine the Classical heritage of the Faith. Class will survey ancient philosophy, theater, and poetry. Course will survey texts such as Theogony, Odyssey, Bacchae, Frogs, Republic, Aeneid, and Metamorphosis to examine the rooots of contemporary Western Christian faith.

APOL 5340 Medieval Philosophy & Culture A survey of the ideas, cultural developments, and literature of Medieval Europe, from the Fall of Rome to the beginning of the Renaissance. The course will cover topics such as the medieval Christian contribution to science, philosophy, art, and education; the rise of Islam and the Christian response; and the integration of faith and reason as expressed in medieval literature, art, Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 141 and philosophy.

APOL 5350 Modern & Post-Modern Culture A survey and evaluation of ideas and cultural developments from the 16th Century to the present, focusing especially on the Enlightenment project and the apologetic challenges and opportunities presented by its failure.

APOL 5360 Film, the Visual Arts, and Apologetics An exploration of the potential of film and visual art for use in apologetics, focusing on the principles of interpreting artworks, especially with regard to discerning the worldviews embodied in particular artworks and using artworks to foster dialogue on apologetics issues.

APOL 5370, C. S. Lewis and Imaginative Apologetics C. S. Lewis is the most influential public apologist of the 20th century, and his influence continues to grow. This course wil explore Lewis's thought as expressed in his fiction, poetry, apologetics, and/or academic works, and assess his contribution to the work of imaginative apologetics.

APOL 5380 Mere Christian Theology and Apologetics Implications An examination of the rational coherence of core Christian doctrines, including the Trinity, the Incarnation, and the Resurrection. Other topics may include Christian Exclusivism, Substitutionary Atonement, Heaven and Hell, etc.

APOL 5381 SPEC TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Christian Thought.

APOL 6310 Apologetics Communication A practical course designed to develop techniques used in interpersonal, group, public, social media and other mass communication settings. The focus will be on developing individual ability to communicate Christian thought for effective engagement with culture.

APOL 6320 Science and Faith This course will explore the history of the relationsip between science and religion, including the alleged hostility between the two. It will examine various accounts of the compatibility between the two and ways they can be understood as mutually enriching. Other topics in the philosophy of science and how they interact with theism may be considered. Also offered as PHIL 6320.

APOL 6330 World Religions A course exploring world religions and the Christian response to them. Particular emphasis will be on the way in which one can engage participants in non-Christian religions and communicate Christian thought in various cultures.

APOL 6340 Eastern Philosophy and Culture A course exploring Eastern philosophy and culture and the Christian response to them. Particular emphasis will be on the way in which one can engage participants in non-Christian religions and communicate Christian thought in various cultures.

APOL 6370 Literature and Apologetics An exploration of the use of literature in apologetics, focusing on the theory and application of

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 142 imagination as a mode of knowing and of communicating truth. Theoretical perspectives will include the work of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, J.R.R. Tolkien, and Malcolm Guite; other texts will include a range of literary and popular poetry and fiction, both Christian and non-Christian.

APOL 6380 Scripture and Apologetics Implications A survey and evaluation of contemporary methods of biblical criticism and their implications for the authority of scripture, the historical reliability of scriptural narratives, and the doctrine of inspiration.

APOL 6390 Thesis This course, which should be taken in the final semester of the program as a culminating project, focuses on independent research and writing to produce a thesis. The course is designed for students who intend to go on to a doctoral program or do academic research and publication in the field of apologetics.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 143 Biblical Aramaic (ARAM) Course Descriptions

ARAM 4310 Biblical Aramaic Prerequisite: HEBR 2312, 2322, and HEBR 3311 An introduction to the vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of biblical Aramaic designed to give the students the skills necessary for translation and interpretation of the Aramaic portions of the Bible.

ARAM 5310 Biblical Aramaic Prerequisite: HEBR 5301, 5302, and 6301 An introduction to the vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of biblical Aramaic designed to give the students the skills necessary for translation and interpretation of the Aramaic portions of the Bible.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 144 ART (ART) Course Descriptions

ART 1303 Art Methods and Materials An introductory course concerned with basic art techniques and materials. The student will become acquainted with processes and the materials of painting, drawing, printing, sculpture, and ceramics.

ART 1313 Design I In this introductory course, the student makes a thorough study of the principles and elements of design and visual devices that make up a work of art. By means of two and three-dimensional problems, students make personal application of these concepts.

ART 1323, Design II In this more advanced course, the student continues with a thorough study of the principles and elements of design and visual devices that make up a work of art. By means of two and three- dimensional problems, students make personal application of these concepts.

ART 2181 SPECIAL TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Fine Arts.

ART 2343 Art Appreciation This course provides a comparative analysis of various modes of expression in all of the visual arts through description and evaluation. Emphasis is made upon historical movements, language, media, and stylistic identity. The survey is designed to prompt the student to see art as a personal experience and to respond more sensitively to the visual arts in a cultural context.

ART 2371 Introduction to Applied Arts Prerequisite(s): ART 1313, 1323, preferred but not required. Applied Arts procedures in fiber arts, paper-making / book arts, mosaic, metal-working, and experimental forms will be researched to give the student a broad understanding of the possibilities of applied arts in terms of functional media.

ART 2372 Water Media - Painting I Prerequisite(s): None During this course students will be introduced to the use and development of water media techniques, both transparent and opaque. These courses will serve as preparatory for upper level painting classes both advanced and experimental.

ART 2380 Printmaking I: Basic Prerequisite(s): None This course begins a series of introductory experiences to printmaking procedures in relief, intaglio, lithography, serigraphy, and experimental forms. The course will introduce the student to a broad understanding of the possibilities of the printmaking media. Individual solutions are encouraged after basic technical procedure has been learned.

ART 2381 SPECIAL TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Fine Arts.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 145 ART 2382 Printmaking I: Intermediate Prerequisite(s): None This course continues the series of introductory experiences to printmaking procedures in relief, intaglio, lithography, serigraphy, and experimental forms. The course will continue to introduce the student to a broad understanding of the possibilities of the printmaking media. Individual solutions are encouraged after basic technical procedure has been learned.

ART 2383 Printmaking I: Advanced Prerequisite(s): None This course concludes the series of introductory experiences to printmaking procedures in relief, intaglio, lithography, serigraphy, and experimental forms. The course will complete the introduction of the student to a broad understanding of the possibilities of the printmaking media. Individual solutions are encouraged after basic technical procedure has been learned.

ART 2384 Sculpture I: Basic Prerequisite(s): None In this course emphasis is placed on beginning a basic understanding of three-dimensional design problems and an initial exploration of various media in a variety of approaches including additive, subtractive, manipulative, and casting techniques.

ART 2385 Sculpture I: Intermediate Prerequisite(s): None In this course emphasis is placed on continuing to develop a basic understanding of three- dimensional design problems and an initial exploration of various media in a variety of approaches including additive, subtractive, manipulative, and casting techniques.

ART 2386 Sculpture I: Applied Prerequisite(s): None In this course emphasis is placed on completing a basic understanding of three-dimensional design problems and an initial exploration of various media in a variety of approaches including additive, subtractive, manipulative, and casting techniques.

ART 2387, Life Drawing I: Basic Prerequisites: ART 2394 (2232) This figure drawing class is a basic introduction to the following techniques, skills, and knowledge: gesture drawing, contour, cross contour, flash pose, memory drawing, descriptive poses, moving action, modeled drawing, descriptive poses, quick contour, extended contour, the long composition, studies of body parts, water color studies, oil studies.

ART 2391 Ceramics I: Basic Prerequisite(s): None In this introductory course, students work with hand-built and wheel-thrown techniques of forming pottery. Experimentation with glaze formulation, glazing, firing and the search for a form language that expresses the individual are emphasized.

ART 2392 Ceramics I: Intermediate Prerequisite(s): None In this second level introductory course, students continue their work with hand-built and wheel- thrown techniques of forming pottery. Experimentation with glaze formulation, glazing, firing and the search for a form language that expresses the individual are emphasized.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 146

ART 2393 Ceramics I: Advanced Prerequisite(s): None In this third introductory course, students continue their work with hand-built and wheel-thrown techniques of forming pottery. Experimentation with glaze formulation, glazing, firing and the search for a form language that expresses the individual are emphasized.

ART 2394 Drawing I: Basic Prerequisite(s): None This course introduces students to basic exercises using various drawing media and subject matter with emphasis on the human figure. Anatomical rendering, contour and value drawing are studies that will be utilized in the student's ultimate development toward a personal approach to drawing.

ART 2395 Drawing I: Intermediate Prerequisite(s): None This course continues to introduce students to basic exercises using various drawing media and subject matter with emphasis on the human figure. Anatomical rendering, contour and value drawing are studies that will be utilized in the student's ultimate development toward a personal approach to drawing.

ART 2396 Drawing I: Advanced This course completes students' introduction to basic exercises using various drawing media and subject matter with emphasis on the human figure. Anatomical rendering, contour and value drawing are studies that will be utilized in the student's ultimate development toward a personal approach to drawing.

ART 2397 Painting I: Basic Prerequisite(s): None This introduction to studio experiences course is based on problems designed to acquaint the student with the possibilities of various painting media and approaches to painting. Students are encouraged to explore and develop a personal direction for their work.

ART 2398 Painting I: Intermediate Prerequisite(s): None An introduction to studio experiences continues in this course. It is based on problems designed to acquaint the student with the possibilities of various painting media and approaches to painting. Students are encouraged to explore and develop a personal direction for their work.

ART 2399 Painting I: Advanced Prerequisite(s): None An introduction to studio experiences concludes in this course. It is based on problems designed to acquaint the student with the possibilities of various painting media and approaches to painting. Students are encouraged to explore and develop a personal direction for their work.

ART 3305 Art for the Secondary School Prerequisite: Admission to the HBU teacher education program This course involves the production of art using media adn processes considered appropriate for middle school and senior high school art programs. Emphasis is placed on combining technique, exploration of media and interrelation of art appreciation with art activities.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 147

ART 3310 Art for Pre-Adolescents Prerequisite: Admission to the HBU Teacher Education Program. This course adds a concentrated focus on art education to an overview of fine arts history and education (including art, music and theatre). It explores the philosophy of preschool and elementary pedagogy based upon Discipline-based Art Education (DBAE) and Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills standards. Practical applications for integrating the arts into a cross- curriculum program are emphasized. Also offered as INDC 3310.

ART 3315 Cultural Craft for the Pre-Adolescent Student Prerequisite: Admission to the HBU Teacher Education Program. This course combines a basic multicultural study of classical and traditional craft and creative problems in three-dimensional media for teaching in the pre-adolescent (EC-6) classroom. (Offered also as INDC 3315.)

ART 3316 Cultural Craft for the Adolescent Student Prerequisite: Admission to the HBU Teacher Education Program. This course encourages expanded multicultural appreciation of classical and traditional craft and includes practical experience and preparation for teaching a variety of fiber arts, printmaking, bookbinding, mosaic and three-dimensional design in the adolescent (6-8 and 9-12) classroom.(Offered also as INDC 3316.)

ART 3330, Gallery and Museum Practices Prerequisite: None The course allows students a hands-on participation of fine arts gallery management and a formal study of museum operations. Students study major art facilities in Houston and collectively organize an art exhibition as part of their course of study. May be taken by art and non-art majors (with approval by the professor and art department chair).

ART 3331, Gallery and Museum Practices Prerequisite: None The course allows students a hands-on participation of fine arts gallery management and a formal study of museum operations. Students study major art facilities in Houston and collectively organize an art exhibition as part of their course of study. May be taken by art and non-art majors (with approval by the professor and art department chair).

ART 3332, Gallery and Museum Practices Prerequisite: None The course allows students a hands-on participation of fine arts gallery management and a formal study of museum operations. Students study major art facilities in Houston and collectively organize an art exhibition as part of their course of study. May be taken by art and non-art majors (with approval by the professor and art department chair).

ART 3335, Color Theory Prerequisites: None An introductory course concerned with basic art techniques and materials of the study of color. The student will becme acquainted with processes and the materials of understanding and applying color theory. The course will first develop the vocabulary of color followed by the construction of the color wheel and other significant color structure formations. A major part of the course will be dedicated to the studio application of painting, drawing and design color

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 148 applications by the students. The course will include the following applications of color studies: vocabulary of color, theories of color, applying color theory, color wheels, naming colors, three attributes of color, mixing of color, moving from theory to practice, using value of color, using intensity of color, using harmony of color, color in nature, symbolism of color, and creating a personal palette of color.

ART 3353 History of Art: Prehistoric through Gothic Painting, sculpture and architecture are reflections of man¿s thinking (social, religious, and political) and the means through which he has sought to satisfy needs common to man of every age. The unique contribution made by each culture toward our art heritage is stressed along with influences of one culture on another.

ART 3355 Experimental Drawing Prerequisite(s): ART 2394 or 2395 or 2396 Directed study of a miniimum of thirty clock hours for each hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected based on student interest and need. Open to Art majors only.

ART 3363 History of Art: Renaissance through Modern Beginning with the sixteenth century, this study traces the development of modern art forms. Stylization, social factors, and important innovations that shape the destiny of man and his arts will be considered.

ART 3370 Printmaking II: Basic Prerequisites: ART 2380 or 2382 or 2383 This course begins a more refined experience of learning printmaking procedures in relief, intaglio, lithgraphy, serigraphy, and experimental forms. The course will give the student a more developed understanding of the possibilities of the printmaking media. Individual solutions are encouraged after basic technical procedure has been learned.

Art 3371 Applied Art: Fiber Arts I Prerequisites: ART 1313, 1323 Fiber Arts introduces students to natural textiles and the culturally driven techniques traditionally used to design, decorate and construct functional forms pertaining to fiber. Techniques in dyeing, printing, wax resist and bleaching will be explored, as well as procedures in assembling and embellishing.

Art 3372 Water Media - Painting II Prerequisites: None During this course students will have an intermediate experience in the use and development of water media techniques, both transparent and opaque. These courses will serve as preparatory for upper level painting classes both advanced and experimental.

ART 3373 History of Modern Art This course is an overview of the development of the visual arts during the latter part of the nineteenth through the entire twentieth century. Beginning with the Post-Impressionist movement in Europe and continuing through the multitude of `isms¿ of the twentieth century, the study will progress to the present day Avant Garde ideas of the art world. Modern art masters such as Matisse, Picasso, Duchamp, Pollock, and Rothko will be a focus of the course. Movements such as Cubism, Abstract Expressionism, Dadiasm, Pop Art, and Avant Gardism will be presented as each flows through the entirety of the modern movement.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 149

Art 3374 Printmaking II: Intermediate Prerequisites: ART 2380 or 2382 or 2383 This course continues a more refined experience of learning printmaking procedures in relief, intaglio, lithography, serigraphy, and experimental forms. The course will give the student a more developed understanding of the possibilities of the printmaking media. Individual solutions are encouraged after basic technical procedure has been learned.

ART 3375, Art of the Renaissance Prerequisite: None Michelangelo, Leonardo, and Raphael created art in one of the most fascinating historical and artistic periods in Western culture, the High Renaissance. From debunking the Da Vinci code to treature hunting for Bruegel's proverbs, this course not only focuses on some of the world's greatest achievements in art and the individuals responsible for making them, it sets the stage for art in Western culture for centuries to come.

Art 3376 Printmaking II: Advanced Prerequisites: ART 2380 or 2382 or 2383 This course concludes a more refined experience of learning printmaking procedures in relief, intaglio, lithography, serigraphy, and experimental forms. The course will give the student a more developed understanding of the possibilities of the printmaking media. Individual solutions are encouraged after basic technical procedure has been learned.

ART 3380, American Art Prerequisite: None From New York to Los Angeles, from Native America to Jackson Pollock, this course traverses the US geographically, philosophically and socially in search of major influences on and developments in American Art. Students will explore art made outside the European canon and develop an awareness and appreciation for the American heritage in artistic production.

ART 3381 SPECIAL TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Fine Arts.

ART 3383, European Heritage in Art History This course will occur during art study in Europe such as Artis Study abroad in Florence. Students will be based in Florence where they will attend daily walking lectures at most of the churches, museums and galleries of Florence. On site lectures will be held five or more days a week and will vary each day depending on the site visited. Renaissance is the major area studied through students electing a side trip to Germany during the month stay in Florence will also encounter contemporary art. During this study abroad semester students will record detailed journal notes from each daily lecture.

Art 3384 Sculpture II: Basics Prerequisites: ART 2384 or 2385 or 2386 In this course emphasis is placed on beginning a refined understanding of many three- dimensional design problems and continuing to explore various media in a variety of approaches including additive, subtractive, manipulative, and casting techniques.

ART 3385, Experimental Drawing

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 150 Prerquisite: ART 2232 or 2242 or 2252 Directed study of a minimum of thirty clock hours for each hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected based on student interest and need. Open to art majors only.

Art 3386 Sculpture II: Intermediate Prerequisites: ART 2384 or 2385 or 2386 In this course emphasis is placed on continuing to develop a refined understanding of many three-dimensional design problems and continuing to explore various media in a variety of approaches including additive, subtractive, manipulative, and casting techniques.

ART 3387, Life Drawing II: Basic Prerequisites: ART 1303, 1313 This figure drawing class introduces a more developed experience of the following techniques, skills, and knowledge: Gesture drawing, contour, cross contour, flash pose, memory drawing, descriptive poses, moving action, modeled drawing, descriptive poses, quick contour, extended contour, the long composition, studies of body parts, water color studies, oil studies.

ART 3388, Life Drawing II: Refined Prerequisite(s): ART 1303 and ART 1313. This figure drawing class continues with a more developed experience of the following techniques, skills and knowledge: Gesture drawing, contour, cross contour, flash pose, memory drawing, descriptive poses, moving action, modeled drawing, descriptive poses, quick contour, extended contour, the long composition, studies of body parts, water color studies, and oil studies.

ART 3389, Sculpture II: Applied Prerequisite(s): ART 2384 or 2385 or 2386 In this course, emphasis is placed on accomplishing a refined understanding of many three- dimensional design problems and continuing to explore various media in a variety of approaches including additive, subtractive, manipulative, and casting techniques.

ART 3391, Ceramics II: Basic Prerequisite(s): ART 2391 or 2392 or 2393 In this refined skills level course, students begin to mature in their work with hand-built and wheel-thrown techniques of forming pottery. Experimentation with glaze formulation, glazing, firing, and the search for a form language that expresses the individual are emphasized.

ART 3392, Ceramics II: Intermediate Prerequisite(s): ART 2391 or 2392 or 2393. In this second refined skills level course, students continue to mature in their work with hand- built and wheel-thrown techniques of forming pottery. Experimentation continues with glaze formulation, glazing, firing, and the search for a form language that expresses the individual are emphasized.

ART 3393, Ceramics II: Advanced Prerequisite(s): ART 2391, 2392, or 2393 In this third refined skills level course, students continue to mature in their work with hand-built and wheel-thrown techniques of forming pottery. Experimentation continues with glaze formulation, glazing, firing, and the search for a form language that expresses the individual are emphasized.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 151 ART 3394, Drawing II: Basic Prerequisite(s): ART 2394 or 2395 or 2396 This course introduces students to a more refined series of drawing exercises using various media and subject matter with emphasis on the human figure. Anatomical rendering, contour and value drawing are studies that will be utilized in the student's ultimate development toward a personal approach to drawing.

ART 3395, Drawing II: Intermediate Prerequisite(s): ART 2394 or 2395 or 2396 This course continues to guide students through a series of refined drawing exercises using various media and subject matter with emphasis on the human figure. Anatomical rendering, contour and value drawing are studies that will be utilized in the student's ultimate development toward a personal approach to drawing.

ART 3396, Drawing II: Advanced Prerequisite(s): ART 2394 or 2395 or 2396 This course completes the refined series of drawing exercise using various media and subject matter with emphasis on the human figure. anatomical rendering, contour and value drawing are studies that will be utilized in the student's ultimate development toward a personal approach to drawing.

ART 3397, Painting II: Basic Prerequisite(s): ART 2397 or 2398 or 2399 This course begins a series of more refined studio experiences. It is based on problems designed to acquaint the student with the possibilities of various painting media and approaches to painting. Students are encouraged to explore and develop a personal direction for their work.

ART 3398, Painting II: Intermediate Prerequisite(s): ART 2397 or 2398 or 2399 This course continues a series of more refined studio experiences. It is based on problems designed to acquaint the student with the possibilities of various painting media and approaches to painting. Students are encouraged to explore and develop a personal direction for their work.

ART 3399, Painting II: Advanced Prerequisite(s): ART 2397 or 2398 or 2399 This course concludes a series of more refined studio experiences. It is based on problems designed to acquaint the student with the possibilities of various painting media and approaches to painting. Students are encouraged to explore and develop a personal direction for their work.

ART 4181 Special Topics Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and the Dean of the College. Directed study of a minimum of thirty clock hours of credit. Topics and projects are selected based on student interest and need. Open to Art majors only.

ART 4381 Special Topics Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and the Dean of the College. Directed study of a minimum of thirty clock hours of credit. Topics and projects are selected based on student interest and need. Open to Art majors only.

ART 4392, Senior Seminar: Studio

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 152 Prerequisite: See Senior Seminar note in Undergraduate Degree Requirements in the HBU Catalog. This course provides a format for the production of a body of art works in a studio setting. The student will go through a process in which s/h presents a written document presenting the proposal for the body of works, the process by which the works are to be made or produced, and the aesthetic ideas which are the basis of the works. Part of the research includes meeting with the entire Art faculty for the purpose of enriching the possibilities for the chosen media. The final grade will be determined by a jury of the entire Art faculty.

ART 4461, Apprenticeship I: Advanced Studio Prerequisite: Advanced Studio Art (Ceramics, Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture, or Water Media) course at either the 3000 or 4000 level. The HBU Art Apprenticeship Program is an art studio concentration for individual art students who are accepted on an individual basis to do academic work in an apprentice capacity with one of the artist-in-residence members of the faculty. The students will be accepted into the program by invitation from the department chairman upon a review of the student's portfolio and academic records by the department's artists-in-residence. Upon acceptance into the program, the student will work toward individual semester hours designed as Apprenticeship credit hours.

ART 4462, Apprenticeship II: Advanced Studio Prerequisite: Advanced Studio Art (Ceramics, Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture, or Water Media) course at either the 3000 or 4000 level. The HBU Art Apprenticeship Program is an art studio concentration for individual art students who are accepted on an individual basis to do academic work in an apprentice capacity with one of the artist-in-residence members of the faculty. The students will be accepted into the program by invitation from the department chairman upon a review of the student's portfolio and academic records by the department's artists-in-residence. Upon acceptance into the program, the student will work toward individual semester hours designed as Apprenticeship credit hours.

ART 4463, Apprenticeship III: Advanced Studio Prerequisite: Advanced Studio Art (Ceramics, Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture, or Water Media) course at either the 3000 or 4000 level. The HBU Art Apprenticeship Program is an art studio concentration for individual art students who are accepted on an individual basis to do academic work in an apprentice capacity with one of the artist-in-residence members of the faculty. The students will be accepted into the program by invitation from the department chairman upon a review of the student's portfolio and academic records by the department's artists-in-residence. Upon acceptance into the program, the student will work toward individual semester hours designed as Apprenticeship credit hours.

ART 4464, Experimental Painting Prerequisite: (ART 2397 or 2398 or 2399) and (ART 3397 or 3398 or 3399). Directed study of a minimum of thirty hours for each hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected based on student interest and need. Open to Art majors only.

ART 4471, Applied Art: Fiber Arts II Prerequisite: ART 1313, 1323 Students will complete an introductory experience of natural textiles and the culturally driven techniques traditionally used to design, decorate and construct functional forms pertaining to fiber. Techniques in dyeing, printing, wax resist and bleaching will be explored, as well as procedures in assembling and embellishing. Further development of experimental forms will be

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 153 studied to encourage students to expand their awareness of the vast potential of fiber arts and the impact upon community culture.

ART 4472, Water Media - Painting III Prerequisite(s): None During this course, students will have an advanced experience in the use and development of water media techniques, both transparent and opaque. These courses will serve as preparatory for upper-level painting classes--both advanced and experimental.

ART 4480, Printmaking III: Basic Prerequisite(s): None This course begins the final more complex series of printmaking learning experiences. Students in this course will start to apply more highly developed printmaking procedures in relief, intaglio, lithography, serigraphy, and experimental forms. The course will give the student a more sophisticated understanding of the possibilities of the printmaking media. Individual solutions are encouraged after basic technical procedure has been learned.

ART 4482, Printmaking III: Intermediate Prerequisite(s): ART 3370 or 3374 or 3376 This course continues the final more complex series of printmaking learning experiences. Students in this course will apply more highly developed printmaking procedures in relief, intaglio, lithography, serigraphy, and experimental forms. The course will give the student a more sophisticated understanding of the possibilities of the printmaking media. Individual solutions are encouraged after basic technical procedure has been learned.

ART 4483, Printmaking III: Advanced Prerequisite(s): None This course completes the final more complex series of printmaking learning experiences. Students in this course will apply more highly developed printmaking procedures in relief, intaglio, lithography, serigraphy, and experimental forms. The course will give the student a more sophisticated understanding of the possibilities of the printmaking media. Individual solutions are encouraged after basic technical procedure has been learned.

ART 4484, Sculpture III: Basics Prerequisite(s): None In this course, students begin to develop a more advanced understanding of the many three- dimensional design problems associated with sculpture. Students will continue their exploration of various media in a variety of approaches including additive, subtractive, manipulative, and casting techniques.

ART 4485, Sculpture III: Intermediate Prerequisite(s): ART 3384 or 3386 or 3389 In this course, students continue to develop a more advanced understanding of the many three- dimensional design problems associated with sculpture. Students will continue their exploration of various media in a variety of approaches including additive, subtractive, manipulative, and casting techniques.

ART 4486, Sculpture III: Advanced Prerequisite(s): None In this course, students complete a more advanced understanding of the many three-dimensional

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 154 design problems associated with sculpture. Students will continue their exploration of various media in a variety of approaches including additive, subtractive, manipulative, and casting techniques.

ART 4487, Life Drawing III: Basic Prerequisites: ART 1303, 1313 This figure drawing introduces students to an advanced experience with the following techniques, skills, and knowledge: Gesture drawing, contour, cross contour, flash pose, memory drawing, descriptive poses, moving action, modeled drawing, descriptive poses, quick contour, extended contour, the long composition, studies of body parts, water color studies, oil studies.

ART 4488, Life Drawing III: Refined Prerequisite(s): ART 1303, 1313 This figure drawing class completes the advanced experience with the following techniques, skills, and knowledge: Gesture drawing, contour, cross contour, flash pose, memory drawing, descriptive poses, moving action, modeled drawing, descriptive poses, quick contour, extended contour, the long composition, studies of body parts, water color studies, oil studies.

ART 4491, Ceramics III: Basic Prerequisite(s): None In this first advanced course, students begin to produce more complex work with hand-built and wheel-thrown techniques of forming pottery. Experimentation continues with glaze formulation, glazing, firing and search for a form language that expresses the individual are emphasized.

ART 4492, Ceramics III: Intermediate Prerequisite(s): ART 3391 or 3392 or 3393 In this second advanced course, students carry on with more complex work using hand-built and wheel-thrown techniques of forming pottery. Experimentation continues with glaze formulation, glazing, firing, and the search for a form language that expresses the individual are emphasized.

ART 4493, Ceramics III: Advanced Prerequisite(s): None In this third advanced course, students complete complex work with hand-built and wheel- thrown techniques of forming pottery. Experimentation concludes with glaze formulations, glazing, firing, and the search for a form language that expresses the individual are emphasized.

ART 4494, Drawing III: Basic Prerequisite(s): None This course begins the final series of drawing courses. This course introduces students to more complex exercises using various drawing media and subject matter with emphasis on the human figure. Anatomical rendering, contour and value drawing are studies that will be utilized in the student's ultimate development toward a personal approach to drawing.

ART 4495, Drawing III: Intermediate Prerequisite(s): ART 3394 or 3395 or 3396 This course continues the final series of drawing courses. Students in this course will work on more complex drawing exercises using various media and subject matter with emphasis on the human figure. Anatomical rendering, contour and value drawing are studies that will be utilized in the student's ultimate development toward a personal approach to drawing.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 155 ART 4496, Drawing III: Advanced Prerequisite(s): None This course completes the final series of drawing courses. Students in this course will continue to work on complex drawing exercises using various drawing media and subject matter with emphasis on the human figure. Anatomical rendering, contour and value drawing are studies that will be utilized in the student's ultimate development toward a personal approach to drawing.

ART 4497, Painting III: Basic Prerequisite(s): None This course begins the more complex series of studio experiences based on problems designed to acquaint the student with the possibilities of various painting media and approaches to painting. Students are encouraged to explore and develop a personal direction for their work.

ART 4498, Painting III: Intermediate Prerequisite(s): ART 3397 or 3398 or 3399 This course continues the more complex series of studio experiences based on problems designed to acquaint the student with the possibilities of various painting media and approaches to painting. Students are encouraged to explore and develop a personal direction for their work.

ART 4499, Painting III: Advanced Prerequisite(s): None This course concludes the more complex series of studio experiences based on problems designed to acquaint the student with the possibilities of various painting media and approaches to painting. Students are encouraged to explore and develop a personal direction for their work.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 156 Biochemistry - Molecular Biology (BCMB) Course Descriptions

BCMB 3414 Microbiology Prerequisite: BIOL 2454, 2455, and 3301 This course is a general survey of the microorganisms and includes the morphology, physiology, and control of the organisms most important to humans. The microbiology of soil, food, water, and disease will be considered. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. (Also offered as BIOL 3414.)

BCMB 4111 Bioanalytical Methods Prerequisites: twenty hours of biology at 2000 and above level, CHEM 2415, 2416, 3131, 3132, 3313, 3333, and completion of or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 4373. This course is senior level course which exposes students to the principles and experimental techniques underlying common bioanalytical methods such as cell fractionation, radiolabeling, protein purification, protein and DNA sequencing, immunochemistry, and spectrophotometry, all of which are widely used in research pertaining to the biological and biochemical sciences.

BCMB 4181, 4281, 4381, 4481 Special Topics Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, and 3301 Topics are selected on basis of students¿ needs and academic qualifications of staff. This will include such topics as microbial techniques, membrane biology, enzymology, etc. Laboratory may or may not be included. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

BCMB 4272, Integrating Biological Concepts Prerequisite(s): Biology Core courses (BIOL 2454, 2455, 3301, 3414, and 3444) This course will integrate the knowledge, theories, and skills expected of a Biologist. Topics will encompass and reinforce the material found in the courses of the Biology Core.

BCMB 4281 Special Topics Prerequisites: BIOL 2473, 2474, and 2475. Topics are selected on basis on students' needs anda academic qualifications of staff. Htis will include such topics as microbial techniques, membrane biology, enzymoloyg, etc. Laboratory may or may not be included. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

BCMB 4291 SENIOR SEMINAR For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Science and Mathematics.

BCMB 4292 Bioinformatics Prerequisite: Note 9 under Undergraduate Degree Requirements; 80 Hours, 19 hours in biology at 2000 and above level, including at least one course from the following: BIOL 3414, 4424, 4444, or 4464. This course is designed to provide the advanced Biochemistry/Molecular Biology (BCMB) undergraduate student with the ability to use search engines commonly employed in the study of genomics and proteonomics. Students will learn to interpret, compare, and analyze sequence information and associate genetic and protein sequences with three dimensional structures.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 157 Search engines including BLAST, ENTREZ, and OMIM and sequence management software such as CLUSTALW will be introduced in instructor-led tutorials and will be reinforced with homework assignments that require their use. Ultimately students will use these tools in a research project. They will present their result to their peers in the form of an oral presentation of a scientific poster.

BCMB 4294 Cell Culture Techniques Prerequisites: Note 9 under Undergraduate Degree Requirements; 19 hours in biology, including at least one course from the following BCMB 3414, 4424, 4444, or 4464 This course will introduce students to the sterile techniques routinely used in the research laboratory. Techniques will include those for both bacterial and mammalian cells.

BCMB 4297, Research in Biochemistry/Molecular Biology Prerequisite: BIOl 3414, 3444 Laboratory research is offered for a student majoring in Biochemistry/Molecular biology. At the conclusion of the research, a written paper will be presented to the student's seminar advisor and an oral presentation of the results will be presented. (Also offered as BIOL 4297.)

BCMB 4324 Advanced Cell Biology Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, 3301, and 3444 This course provides an in-depth study of selected dynamic processes that occur in living cells. Topics include DNA regulation and expression of genes; DNA repair; protein synthesis and function; protein sorting; vesicular traffic; cell signaling; and control of cell division. (Also offered as BIOL 4324.)

BCMB 4363 Medical Microbiology Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, 3301, and 3414 A study of microbial organisms that cause disease in humans. The characteristics of each pathogen are discussed along with its pathogenesis and pathology. (Also offered as BIOL 4363.)

BCMB 4375 Cancer Biology Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, 3301, and 3414 This course examines the development of cancer at the cellular and molecular levels. Topics covered include tumor suppressors, oncogenes, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, telomerase, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Cancer prevention, screen, diagnosis, and treatment will also be introduced.

BCMB 4181, 4281, 4381, 4481 Special Topics Prerequisites: BIOL 2473, 2474, and 2475 Topics are selected on basis of students¿ needs and academic qualifications of staff. This will include such topics as microbial techniques, membrane biology, enzymology, etc. Laboratory may or may not be included. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

BCMB 4424 Molecular Biology Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, 3301, and 3444 This course presents recent developments in biotechnology and genetic engineering. Topics included are recombinant DNA; DNA cloning; DNA sequencing; polymerase chain reaction; monoclonal antibodies; genetic engineering of plants and animals; and the human genome project. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. (Also offered as

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 158 BIOL 4424.)

BCMB 4444 Virology Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, 3301, and 3444 This course is an introduction to the principles of animal virology. The classification and replicative cycles of viruses are compared to their pathogenic mechanisms. Viral oncogenes and modern anti-viral chemotherapy and immunization are discussed. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. (Also offered as BIOL 4444.)

BCMB 4464 Immunology Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, 3301, and 3444 This course is an introductory study of the biological and clinical approaches to immunology. Discussions center on the mechanisms responsible for various clinical syndromes as well as basic immunological phenomena such as antibody diversity, T cell receptor diversity, antigen presentation, signaling across cellular receptors, and cell activation. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. (Also offered as BIOL 4464.)

BCMB 4181, 4281, 4381, 4481 Special Topics Prerequisites: BIOL 2473, 2474, and 2475 Topics are selected on basis of students¿ needs and academic qualifications of staff. This will include such topics as microbial techniques, membrane biology, enzymology, etc. Laboratory may or may not be included. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 159 Biology (BIOL) Course Descriptions

BIOL 1404 Introductory Biology This course is a general survey of biology including the study of plants, animals, ecology, and some marine biology. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. This course cannot be applied toward a biology major.

BIOL 1414 Introductory Microbiology A general introduction of microbiology with emphasis placed on public health. Various disease- causing agents are discussed. Procedures used in disinfection and sterilization are demonstrated with consideration given to infection control. Includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. This course cannot be counted for credit toward biology major.

BIOL 2181, 2281, 2381, 2481 Special Topics Topics are selected based on student needs and the academic qualifications of staff.

BIOL 2214 Medical Terminology This course provides the student a comprehensive study of medical terminology including word roots, combining forms, prefixes and suffixes. Students build and analyze thousands of medical terms and in the process study the structure and functions of human body systems and diseases. This course cannot be counted for credit toward the biology major.

BIOL 2181, 2281, 2381, 2481 Special Topics Topics are selected based on student needs and the academic qualifications of staff.

BIOL 2181, 2281, 2381, 2481 Special Topics Topics are selected based on student needs and the academic qualifications of staff.

BIOL 2404 Human Anatomy and Physiology I The course deals with the anatomical description and functions of the systems of the human body. Emphasis is placed upon the interrelationship between structure and function with maintenance and homeostasis being the unifying principle. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

BIOL 2414 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Prerequisite: BIOL 2404 The course deals with the anatomical description and functions of the systems of the human body. Emphasis is placed upon the interrelationship between structure and function with maintenance and homeostasis being the unifying principle. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

BIOL 2454 General Biology I Prerequisite: SAT composite 1040 or ACT composite 22 or 12 hrs college coursework This course is required of all biology majors. Topics include cell structure and function, biological diversity, plant biology, and ecology. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

BIOL 2455 General Biology II Prerequisite: BIOL 2454 This course is required of all biology majors. Topics include animal tissues and organ systems, Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 160 animal structure and function, life processes, biological diversity and the theory of evolution. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

BIOL 2181, 2281, 2381, 2481 Special Topics Topics are selected based on student needs and the academic qualifications of staff.

BIOL 3181 SPEC TOPIC/INDEPENDENT STUDY For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Science and Mathematics.

BIOL 3301, Cellular and Molecular Biology Prerequistes: BIOL 2454, 2455 and CHEM 2415 This course is required of all biology majors. Topics include biological chemistry, cellular structure and function, energy transformations, DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis.

BIOL 3335 Nutrition and Metabolism Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 3301 and either BIOL 2455 or BIOL 2404, 2414 Nutrition and Metabolism is designed to acquaint the student with the role of nutrients in health, the physiology of the gastrointestinal tract, and the importance of nutrition in preventive and curative medicine.

BIOL 3381 SPECIAL TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Science and Mathematics.

BIOL 3404 Environmental Science This course is a study of the interrelationships of the natural world and the interactions or organisms with their environment. Analysis of populations, both natural and human, in their communities and the impact of the physical factors will be explored. Current environmental issues will also be discussed. Sampling techniques and field studies will be emphasized. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. This course cannot be counted for credit toward the biology major.

BIOL 3414 Microbiology Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, and 3301 This course is a general survey of the microorganisms and includes the morphology, physiology, and control of the organisms most important to humans. The microbiology of soil, food, water, and disease will be considered. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. (Also offered as BCMB 3414.)

BIOL 3433 Pathophysiology Prerequisites: BIOL 2404, 2414 or BIOL 2454, 2455, 3301 A general study of structure and function of human cells including the basic cellular requirements for life. The importance of fluid distribution, fluid volume and fluid balance along with abnormal deviations will be covered. The student will obtain an understanding of the pathology of the cardiovascular system, nervous system, endocrine system, digestive system, excretory system, and musculo-skeletal system. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

BIOL 3434 Ecology and Field Biology

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 161 Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 3301 and BIOL 2455 or BIOL 2404, 2414 This course studies ecological concepts concerning ecosystems from a population, interspecific and community perspective. Sampling techniques and field studies will be emphasized. Analysis of populations in their communities will be explored. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

BIOL 3444 Genetics Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 3301, and BIOL 2455 or BIOL 2404, 2414 This course deals with the molecular and chromosomal basis of inheritance. Topics include Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, population genetics, and molecular genetics. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

BIOL 3454 General Physiology Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, and 3301. This course deals with the function of selected organ systems in vertebrates with the major emphasis on humans. Mechanisms of kidney function, circulation, respiration, nerve transmission, muscular contraction, endocrine function, and digestion are discussed in detail. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

BIOL 3456 Advanced Human Anatomy Prerequisite: BIOL 2455, 3301 This is an advanced study of the anatomical structure of the human body. Body structure will be studied by organ systems and will involve a balance between gross anatomical study and histology. Form-function relationships will be emphasized. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

BIOL 4181, 4281, 4381, 4481 Special Topics Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, and 3301 Topics are selected on basis of students¿ needs and academic qualifications of staff. This will include such topics as advanced physiology, diet, diseases, cellular physiology, cancer biology, biotechniques, cytogenetics, pharmacology, etc. Laboratory may or may not be included. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

Biol 4272, Integrating the Concepts in Biology Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, 3301, 3414, and 3444 This course will integrate the knowledge, theories, and skills expected of a biologist. Topics will encompass and reinforce the material found in the courses of the Biology Core.

BIOL 4181, 4281, 4381, 4481 Special Topics Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, and 3301 Topics are selected on basis of students¿ needs and academic qualifications of staff. This will include such topics as advanced physiology, diet, diseases, cellular physiology, cancer biology, biotechniques, cytogenetics, pharmacology, etc. Laboratory may or may not be included. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

BIOL 4297 Research in Biology Prerequisite: BIOL 3414, 3444 Laboratory research is offered for a student majoring in Biology. At the conclusion of the

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 162 research, a written paper will be presented to the student's seminar advisor and an oral presentation of the results will be presented.

BIOL 4324 Advanced Cell Biology Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, 3301, and 3444 This course provides an in-depth study of selected dynamic processes that occur in living cells. Topics include DNA regulation and expression of genes; DNA repair; protein synthesis and function; protein sorting; vesicular traffic; cell signaling; and control of cell division. (Also offered as BCMB 4324.)

BIOL 4325 Endocrinology Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, and 3301 This course provides students with a working knowledge of endocrinology. Topics include the historical development of endocrinology; structure and function of the major hormone groups; models for cell signaling; how hormones influence metabolism; and diseases caused by abnormalities of the endocrine system.

BIOL 4363 Medical Microbiology Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, 3301, and 3414 A study of microbial organisms that cause disease in humans. The characteristics of each pathogen are discussed along with its pathogenesis and pathology. (Also offered as BCMB 4363.)

BIOL 4375 Cancer Biology Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, 3301, and 3414 This course examines the development of cancer at the cellular and molecular levels. Topics covered include tumor suppressors, oncogenes, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, telomerase, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Cancer prevention, screen, diagnosis, and treatment will also be introduced.

BIOL 4181, 4281, 4381, 4481 Special Topics Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, and 3301 Topics are selected on basis of students¿ needs and academic qualifications of staff. This will include such topics as advanced physiology, diet, diseases, cellular physiology, cancer biology, biotechniques, cytogenetics, pharmacology, etc. Laboratory may or may not be included. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

BIOL 4423 Histology Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, and 3301 A study of the fine structure of normal human tissue is the principle area of consideration in this course. Tissue techniques will be included in order to afford an appreciation of the types of preparations used in the laboratory. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

BIOL 4424 Molecular Biology Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, 3301, and 3444 This course presents recent developments in biotechnology and genetic engineering. Topics included are recombinant DNA; DNA cloning; DNA sequencing; polymerase chain reaction; monoclonal antibodies; genetic engineering of plants and animals; and the human genome

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 163 project. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. (Also offered as BCMB 4424.)

BIOL 4425 Drug Action Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, and 3301 This course presents the basic concepts and principles of pharmacology as related to the anatomy and physiology of certain body systems. Specific topics include principles of drug receptors; pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics; the actions of cholinoceptor-activating, cholinesterase-blocking, and cholinesterase-inhibiting drugs; adrenoceptor-activating and adrenoceptor-blocking drugs; and antihypertensive, antidepressant, and chemotherapeutic drugs. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

BIOL 4433 Embryology Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, and 3301 This is a study of the normally developing human from conception through birth. Common congenital defects are briefly discussed. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

BIOL 4443 Neuroscience Prerequisites: BIOL 2473, 2474, and 2475 This course surveys the organization and functioning of the human nervous system. Action potentials and synaptic transmissions are emphasized. Sensory systems and movement are also considered along with new models that illustrate the function of memory systems. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

BIOL 4444 Virology Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, 3301, and 3444 This course is an introduction to the principles of animal virology. The classification and replicative cycles of viruses are compared to their pathogenic mechanisms. Viral oncogenes and modern anti-viral chemotherapy and immunization are discussed. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory. (Also offered as BCMB 4444.)

BIOL 4464 Immunology Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, 3301, and 3444 This course is an introductory study of the biological and clinical approaches to immunology. Discussions center on the mechanisms responsible for various clinical syndromes as well as basic immunological phenomena such as antibody diversity, T cell receptor diversity, antigen presentation, signaling across cellular receptors, and cell activation. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory. (Also offered as BCMB 4464.)

BIOL 4181, 4281, 4381, 4481 Special Topics Prerequisites: BIOL 2454, 2455, and 3301 Topics are selected on basis of students¿ needs and academic qualifications of staff. This will include such topics as advanced physiology, diet, diseases, cellular physiology, cancer biology, biotechniques, cytogenetics, pharmacology, etc. Laboratory may or may not be included. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 164 Business Administration (BUSA) Course Descriptions

BUSA 1305, The World of Business Prerequisite(s): None A foundations course that emphasizes decision making in an ever-changing world economy. The focus is on building a foundation for key success factors and life skills, including professionalism, communications, global and cultural awareness, team-based decision making, critical thinking, technological competence, and business language. Some emphasis is placed on career guidance, including an appreciation for the functional areas of business.BUSA 1305 is required by all BBA majors and BA-Managerial Studies majors. The course is to be taken by Business majors in their first semester, or within the first 12 hours of matriculating into the School of Business. The course may be taken by non-Business majors who have earned less than 90 credit hours.

BUSA 2301, Business Math Prerequisite: MATH 1313 or higher. This course covers selected topics of one- and multi-variable calculus with applications in business and economics. It will provide business students with the appropriate conceptual and computational mathematical background for future business study and economic analysis.

BUSA 2311 Quantitative Methods I Prerequisites: MATH 1313 or higher and Computer Proficiency Computation of statistical measures and applications to business including averages, dispersion, statistical inferences, linear regression and correlation.

BUSA 2320 Legal Environment of Business A study of the legal environment of business, the role of law in society, the judicial process, and government regulation. Emphases are given to the law of contracts, torts, intellectual property, as well as employment law dealing with discrimination and its relation to human resources.

BUSA 3320 Business Ethics The goal of the Business Ethics class is to prepare students for success in global business. This will be achieved by helping students develop and apply a framework for identifying the ethical implications ¿ personal, corporate, and social ¿ of the various business practices they will encounter in an international market. A balance will be given to universal issues raised when adopting an ethical system and the particular issues involved in applying the ethical system to business issues. Main topics include: philosophical and cultural foundations of Business Ethics, applying ethical principles in the market place, and how to set up and carry out an effective Business Ethics program in an organization. The particular human resources issues of diversity, whistle blowing, recruiting and hiring, and compensation will be discussed as part of the application of ethical principles.

BUSA 3330, Career Development Strategies Prerequisite: Completion of 64 hours This course is designed to introduce students to the principles, methods, and practices of achieving career goals with emphasis on the exploration of career opportunities and paths, identification of strengths, resume development, cover letter composition, interviewing, networking, professional image, employment law (including workplace harassment and workplace privacy), financial security benefits and health care benefits, and the use of technology in achieving career goals. Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 165

BUSA 4301 International Business This course combines classroom work with international travel and provides the student with direct contact with managers operating in other countries. An international trip is scheduled at the end of the course. Class time will cover basic principles of global business and cross-cultural interaction. It will particularly emphasize cultural and historical differences in the countries the students will visit and how those differences produce different managerial styles and contrasting business practices. In addition, students will do through research, preparation, and presentations on the specific companies they are scheduled to visit. There are no prerequisites for this course. However, students whose advisors wish to allow this course to substitute for one of the required senior seminars must meet the prerequisites for the senior seminars - 80 or more total hours including a minimum of 15 hours in business - in order to receive credit. This class may not be taken in the semester a student intends to graduate.

BUSA 4320 Business Law Prerequisite: BUSA 2320 Study of the uniform commercial code applied to commercial documents. Introduction to creditors' rights and bankruptcy, agency and employment, business organizations, and property law.

BUSA 4340 Internship Prerequisites: See the School of Business Internship Coordinator for current prerequisite information The course is an integrating field experience by which students learn actual business practices by undertaking responsible roles in an organization. The students develop interpersonal skills while acquiring practical knowledge in their disciplines. The students are exposed to various work roles and career choices.

BUSA 4399, Global Business Strategy Prerequisites: FINA 3320, MGMT 3302, MKTG 3301, and completion of 90 semester hours Global Business Strategy is a capstone course in business designed to integrate concepts and knowledge from a broad range of core business courses. The course considers the increasingly global context in which firms operate and develops a strategic view of the firm through a variety of management tools, models, and current debates. The capstone experience encourages significant group-based work through use of case studies and a computer simulation with global participants.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 166 Chemistry (CHEM) Course Descriptions

CHEM 1404 Introductory Chemistry This course discusses some of the fundamental concepts in inorganic, organic, and biological chemistry, and explores their social and medicinal relevance. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. This course cannot be applied toward a chemistry major.

CHEM 1411, Chemistry of Our World Prerequisite: None This course introduces the physical environment of our world with emphasis on scientific laws. Students study the forces of nature and apply scientific principles. Topics include rocks, minerals, the chemical composition of the earth, glaciers, the hydrologic cycle, salt water salinity, as well as selected topics from seismology, cartograpy, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy. The course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. This course does not count toward the chemistry major or minor.

CHEM 2181 Special Topics Topics are selected on basis of students¿ need and academic qualifications of staff. Laboratory may not be included.

CHEM 2281 Special Topics Topics are selected on basis of students¿ need and academic qualifications of staff. Laboratory may not be included.

CHEM 2381 Special Topics Topics are selected on basis of students¿ need and academic qualifications of staff. Laboratory may not be included.

CHEM 2415 General Chemistry I Prerequisites: MATH 1313 or higher OR 560 SAT Math OR 26 ACT Math OR CHEM 1404 or appropriate math placement score for MATH 1323, 1434, or 1451 This course is for science majors. It is an introduction to chemical reactions, the mole concept, properties and states of matter, atomic structure, periodic properties, chemical bonding and molecular structure. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

CHEM 2416 General Chemistry II Prerequisite: CHEM 2415 This is a continuation of CHEM 2415 with an emphasis on chemical equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and kinetics. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions that are devoted to qualitative analysis.

CHEM 2423 Quantitative Analysis Prerequisite: CHEM 2416 This course is a continuation and extension of CHEM 2415 and 2416 into the study of the basic principles of analytical chemistry, which include stoichiometry, and homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory work that includes both volumetric and gravimetric analysis as well as an introduction to instrumental analysis.

CHEM 2481 Special Topics Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 167 Topics are selected on basis of students¿ need and academic qualifications of staff. Laboratory may not be included.

CHEM 3313 Organic Chemistry I Prerequisite: CHEM 2416 This is the first lecture course in organic chemistry for science majors. It begins a survey of the structure, reactivity, reactions, reaction mechanisms, and synthesis of compounds containing carbon.

CHEM 3333 Organic Chemistry II Prerequisite: CHEM 3313 This is the second lecture course in organic chemistry for science majors. It continues the survey of the structure, reactivity, reactions, reaction mechanisms, and synthesis of compounds containing carbon that was begun in CHEM 3313.

CHEM 3351, Inorganic Chemistry Prerequisites: CHEM 2415 and 2416 This course provides a survey of the chemistry of the main group elements, transition metals, and organometallic compounds in the context of periodic law.

CHEM 3443 Modern Analytical Techniques Prerequisites: CHEM 2423; CHEM 3132 or 4262; and PHYS 2423 This is an introduction to the basic concepts of applied analytical chemistry. It includes an introduction to instrumentation as applied to routine chemical analysis, including spectroscopy, chromatography and electrochemical methods. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

CHEM 4181 Special Topics Topics are selected on basis on students¿ need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

CHEM 4190, The Professional Chemist Prerequisites: Completion of thirty semester hours of chemistry courses. Discussion of topics from the current chemical literature and the ethical behavior expected of chemists.

CHEM 4191, Senior Research Project Prerequisites: Completion of thirty semester hours of chemistry courses. Students conduct a laboratory research project, write a research report, and give an oral presentation to the class.

CHEM 4281 Special Topics Topics are selected on basis on students¿ need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

CHEM 4291 Senior Seminar: Topic Research Project Prerequisites: Note 9 under Undergraduate Degree Requirements; completion or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 4290

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 168 A topic of current research interest in chemistry will be offered each quarter. Each student enrolled in 4291 will select one aspect of this topic for an in-depth study of the significant literature. All students will meet each week with faculty for instruction, guidance and exploration of the topic. A written senior research paper is required.

CHEM 4324, Physical Chemistry II Prerequisite: CHEM 4414 This course is a survey of the fundamental aspects of thermodynamics including the First and Second Laws as well as Gibbs and Helmholtz Energy and their applications. Acids and bases, basic quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, photochemistry reactions, and macromolecules are also discussed. A working knowledge of calculus is necessary.

CHEM 4351, Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Prerequisites: CHEM 3131, 3132, 3313, 3333, 3351 This course is an introduction to the structure, bonding, and reactivity of organotransition metal compounds. The focus is on physical organometallic chemistry, with an emphasis on the mechanisms of organometallic transformations and methods for their elucidation. The fundamental reaction types of organotransition metal complexes will be covered including: oxidative addition/reductive elimination, migratory insertion, attack on coordinated ligands, and the reactivity of metallocycles, carbenes, and carbynes. Some applications of organotransition metal complexes in catalysis and in organic chemistry will be featured.

CHEM 4361, Advanced Organic Chemistry Prerequisites: CHEM 3131, 3132, 3313, and 3313 Study of advanced topics in organic chemistry.

CHEM 4373 Biochemistry Prerequisite: CHEM 3333 This course is a study of the more important principles of biochemistry, with emphasis placed on the physical and chemical properties of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins, the three major components of the living organism.

CHEM 4374, Biochemistry II Prerequisites: CHEM 4373 This course is a study of the principles of gene expression, replication, and metabolic pathways. Emphasis is placed on replication, transcription, translation and carbohydrate metabolism. Additional topics will include the citric acid cycle, lipid metabolism, electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation.

CHEM 4381 Special Topics Topics are selected on basis on students¿ need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

CHEM 4414 Introductory Physical Chemistry Prerequisites: CHEM 2423, PHYS 2413, 2423, MATH 1452 A survey of the fundamental principles which govern chemical phenomena. Emphasis is placed on gases, basic thermodynamics, solutions, chemical equilibria, phase equilibria, chemical kinetics and electrochemical phenomena. A working knowledge of basic calculus is necessary. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 169

CHEM 4481 Special Topics Topics are selected on basis on students¿ need and academic qualifications of staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of work for each hour credit must be included. Laboratory may or may not be included.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 170 Christianity (CHRI) Course Descriptions

CHRI 1313 Old Testament Prerequisite for all Christianity courses except 1323 and 1333. A course designed to introduce the student to the Old Testament and to provide an understanding of the history, institutions, and theological insights of the Hebrew people. Required for graduation.

CHRI 1323 New Testament Prerequisite for all Christianity courses except 1313 and 1333. A course designed to introduce the student to the New Testament and to an appreciative understanding of the life and teachings of Jesus, the early Christian movement, and the doctrinal concepts and ethical ideals of Christianity. Required for graduation.

CHRI 2311 Hermeneutics Prerequisites: CHRI 1313, 1323. A course designed to introduce students to the basic issues, methods, and history of Biblical interpretation. The course will also explore the application of hermeneutical principles to a selected contemporary topic. (Offered also as PHIL 2311.)

CHRI 2373, Christian Theology and Tradition Prerequisites: CHRI 1313; CHRI 1323 A course designed to introduce the student to Christian beliefs on the Old Testament and the New Testament. Beliefs of scholars who have had a significant impact on Christian thought will also be considered. This course can be used to fulfill the nine hour Christianity requirement on Smith College degree plans. This course is a required course for degree plans using the Liberal Arts Core Curriculum.

CHRI 3301 Old Testament Theology Prerequisites: CHRI 1313, 1323. A course designed to investigate the theology of the Old Testament and to survey selected secondary literature on Old Testament themes.

CHRI 3302 New Testament Theology Prerequisites: CHRI 1313, 1323. A course designed to investigate the theology of the New Testament and to survey selected secondary literature on New Testament themes.

CHRI 3303, Spiritual Formation Prerequisites: CHRI 1313 and 1323 A study of the perspectives and practices by which Christians become formed in the image of Christ through participation in faith communities. The course will review historic approaches to spiritual formation and encourage personal and congregational disciplines that strengthen faithful living.

CHRI 3311, Hermeneutics Prerequisites: CHRI 1313, 1323 A course designed to introduce students to the basic issues, methods, and history of Biblical interpretation. The course will also explore the application of hermeneutical principles to a selected contemporary topic. (Offered also as PHIL 3311.) Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 171

CHRI 3314 History of Christianity Prerequisites: CHRI 1313, 1323. A course designed to introduce Christianity in its historical development.

CHRI 3325, The Christian Vocation Prerequisites: CHRI 1313, 1323, 2333 This course includes a study of the occupational field of church vocations with emphasis upon the church vocation worker's personal and ministerial identity, ministerial ethics, Baptist denominational history and polity, and the development of basic skills common to ministry. It incorporates the use of professional ministers from a variety of specialization areas who serve as resource personnel and role models for the aspiring church vocation student.

CHRI 3333 Jesus and His Teachings Prerequisites: CHRI 1313, 1323. An intensive study of the life and teachings of Jesus.

CHRI 3336 Christian Leadership Prerequisites: CHRI 1313, 1323 This course reviews theories and literature concerning leadership from a Christian perspective. Students will study the theological and ecclesiological objectives of Christian leadership, the spirtual preparation required of leaders and core practices for leading faithfully and effectively.

CHRI 3344 Paul and His Letters Prerequisites: CHRI 1313, 1323. A study of the apostle Paul and his contribution to the progress of early Christianity based upon the book of Acts and the epistles attributed to Paul.

CHRI 3345 The General Letters PREREQS: CHRI 1313, 1323 A study of the non-Pauline letters of the New Testament (James, 1-2 Peter, 1-3 John, Jude), examining their rhetorical style, contextual meaning, and contribution to Christian theology.

CHRI 3346 Psalms PREREQS: CHRI 1313, 1323 This course is designed to study the book of Psalms. The study will address the origin, content, setting, literary forms, overall structure and theology of the book. Attention may also be given to important role the book has played in Christian history, liturgy, and spirituality.

CHRI 3353 Homiletics Prerequisites: CHRI 1313, 1323. A basic course to introduce the student to the principles of preaching and other ministerial speaking. Attention is given to various types of sermons and their preparation and delivery.

CHRI 3363 Evangelism Prerequisites: CHRI 1313, 1323. A general study of the theology and methods of evangelism, including practical preparation and application for a life-style evangelism.

CHRI 3370 Palestinian Archaeology

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 172 Prerequisites: CHRI 1313, 1323. A field-based experience in the archaeology of Palestine through readings, lectures, travel to excavated sites, and participation in the excavation of a selected site.

CHRI 3381 SPECIAL TOPICS/IND STUDY For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Christian Thought.

CHRI 4181 Special Topics Prerequisites: CHRI 1313, 1323. Guided research involving special projects relating to Christianity and its mission to the world.

CHRI 4281 Special Topics Prerequisites: CHRI 1313, 1323. Guided research involving special projects relating to Christianity and its mission to the world.

CHRI 4293 Senior Seminar Prerequisite: Completion of 80 semester hours; 15 of which must be in the major. Overall GPA of 2.0 or higher.. Directed studies in selected areas of the student's special interests, including opportunities for independent research.

CHRI 4335 Systematic Theology Prerequisites: CHRI 1313; 1323; and (2333 or 2343 or 2353 or 2363). A course designed to study the historical, biblical, and systematic approaches to Christian theology.

CHRI 4343 Old Testament Prophets Prerequisites: CHRI 1313, 1323. A study of the prophetic movement in Israel and the writings of the canonical prophets.

CHRI 4344 The Gospel of John PREREQS: CHRI 1313, 1323 A study of the historical setting, literary features, and theological themes of the Gospel of John.

CHRI 4345 Christian Ethics Prerequisites: CHRI 1313 and 1323 This course provides a comprehensive study of Christian ethics including biblical and theological foundations, historical developments, and contemporary issues of moral concern. The central role of faith communities in moral development and the importance of church engagement with culture will be emphasized.

CHRI 4346 Hebrews PREREQS: CHRI 1313, 1323 A study of the historical setting, literary features, and theological themes of the letter to the Hebrews.

CHRI 4347 Amos, Hosea PREREQS: CHRI 1313, 1323 A study of the historical setting, literary features, and theological themes of Amos and Hosea,

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 173 with a focus on the message to the original hearers and the message to modern readers.

CHRI 4348 Isaiah PREREQS: CHRI 1313, 1323 A study of the historical setting, literary features, and theological themes of Isaiah, with a focus on the message to the original hearers and the message to modern readers.

CHRI 4349 Luke-Acts PREREQS: CHRI 1313, 1323 A study of the historical setting, literary features, and theological themes of Luke's two volume work: the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles.

CHRI 4350 The Corinthian Letters PREREQS: CHRI 1313, 1323 This course is designed to introduce students to the New Testament texts of 1 & 2 Corinthians and to guide them towards an appreciative understanding of the material and cultural context of ancient Roman Corinth; the patterns of social life and conflict among early Christians in Corinth; the ethical, social, and theological ideals of Paul; and the place of the Corinthian correspondence in the ongoing life and literature of early Christianity.

CHRI 4351 Apostolic Fathers PREREQS: CHRI 1313, 1323 This course is designed to introduce students to the corpus of early Christian texts commonly called the Apostolic Fathers; to guide them towards an appreciative understanding of the material, cultural, social, and theological context of the Roman world within which these texts were written; and to situate the Apostolic Fathers in the wider life and literature of early Christianity.

CHRI 4352 Jeremiah PREREQS: CHRI 1313, 1323 A study of the historical setting, literary and rhetorical features, and theological themes of the prophetic writings of Jeremiah.

CHRI 4354 Exodus PREREQS: CHRI 1313, 1323 A study of the historical setting, literary and rhetorical features, and theological themes of the book of Exodus.

CHRI 4355 Trinitarianism PREREQS: CHRI 1313, 1323 This course addresses the importance of the Trinity for Christian theology. Aspects explored will be the revelation of God as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, the development of this doctrine, and the relevance and influence this theology has on the life and worship of the church.

CHRI 4356 Luther, Calvin, and the Reformation PREREQS: CHRI 1313, 1323 This course explores the theological, historical, and social impact of the Protestant Reformation in the life of the Church. A particular focus will be the writings and influence of key figures such as Martin Luther and John Calvin.

CHRI 4363 Philosophy of Religion

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 174 Prerequisites: CHRI 1313, 1323, and PHIL 1313. A critical examination of the nature and validity of religious experience and the place of religion in human life. Consideration is given to religious problems such as the existence and nature of God, the source of religious knowledge, the nature of man, the origin and nature of evil. (Offered also as PHIL 4363.)

CHRI 4381 Special Topics Prerequisites: CHRI 1313, 1323. Guided research involving special projects relating to Christianity and its mission to the world.

CHRI 4382, Special Topics Prerequisites: CHRI 1313 and CHRI 1323. This course is an upper-level Christianity course. It fulfills requirements for one elective course for a major in Christianity or one elective course required for a minor in Biblical Studies, Theological Studies, or Christian Studies.

CHRI 4383 Baptist History Prerequisites: CHRI 1313, 1323. A study of Baptist history and polity with particular emphasis given to Baptist origins, developments, distinctive theological positions, leaders, and current trends. Special attention will be given to Baptist life in America and particularly the Southern Baptist Convention.

CHRI 4391, Romans Prerequisites: CHRI 1313 and 1323 CHRI 4391 is an upper-level Christianity course. This course fulfills requirements for one elective course required for a minor in Biblical Studies, Theological Studies, or Christian Studies.

CHRI 4392, Revelation Prerequisites: CHRI 1313 and 1323. CHRI 4392 is an upper-level Christianity course. This course fulfills requirements for one elective course for a major in Christianity or one elective course required for a minor in Biblical Studies, Theological Studies, or Christian Studies.

CHRI 5300 Introduction to Biblical Texts and Doctrines A course designed to engage students in introductory studies in Old Testament, New Testament, and Christian Doctrine.

CHRI 5310 Christian Scriptures I Major issues of Old Testament background and interpretation. The areas of study are the Pentateuch and Wisdom Literature. The study will involve specific literature as well as historical, theological, sociological, canonical, and critical issues of the biblical text.

CHRI 5311, Hermeneutics A course designed to introduce a student to the basic issues, methods, and history of biblical interpretation.

CHRI 5315 Christian Scriptures II The focus of this course of study is on New Testament background and interpretation. The areas of study are the Gospels and Acts. The study will involve specific literature as well as historical, theological, sociological, canonical, and critical issues of the biblical text.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 175

CHRI 5330 History of Christianity In this course, the student will study the history of Christianity in the ancient, medieval, and modern periods. Although the primary focus will be on the development of Western (Latin) Christianity, some consideration will be given to Byzantine (Eastern) Christendom as well as the spread of Christianity throughout the third world. In addition to the basic content of the history of Christianity, attention will be given to the application of a critical historiography in the interpretation of events and movements.

CHRI 5340 Biblical and Systematic Theology The course will focus on twelve areas of doctrinal study. The student will be assigned doctrines to examine from a biblical perspective and from a comparative study of various theologies on the doctrines assigned.

CHRI 5350 The Theology of the New Testament The study concentrates on the theological message of the New Testament as communicated by the various New Testament witnesses.

CHRI 5360, Old Testament Theology The study concentrates on the theological message of the Old Testament as communicated by the various Old Testament documents and literature in the discipline of Old Testament studies.

CHRI 6311 Philosophy and the Christian Faith The study will introduce students to the general topic of the relationship of theology and philosophy as well as major philosophical inquiries in the area of religion. In particular, students will pursue concentrated investigation among major issues in the field of philosophy of religion such as the nature and existence of God, the nature of religious experience, the nature and understanding of religious language, the source of religious knowledge, the nature of evil, the relationship between Christianity and other reflective disciplines, and Christianity¿s response to philosophical challenge and discourse.

CHRI 6312 Church Ministry Students will study church ministry, pastoral care, and spiritual formation in this course. Church ministry will include areas such as evangelism, church growth, and administration. Pastoral care with practical aspects of the pastoral role in caring for people. Spiritual formation will relate the spiritual life to the tasks of ministry. Students also will conduct interviews with local and state church and denominational leaders for practical aspects of ministry, available resources, and programming helps.

CHRI 6313 Pastoral Care and Spiritual Formation This course examines the integration of the life of prayer and the caring tasks of ministry. Classic writings in the area of pastoral care will be used with particular reference to the functions of ministry and the role of the devotional life in the performance of various ministerial duties. The course may also focus on the relationship between the cura animarum of classic pastoral care and the therapeutic approaches of contemporary pastoral counseling.

CHRI 6314 Missions and Evangelism This course of study will include the history of missions and the history of great awakenings. Also included would be studies in the church growth movement. Practical applications of evangelistic missions or church growth activities will be part of the requirements for this course.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 176

CHRI 6315 Christian Scriptures III This course continues the study of Old Testament background and interpretation. The areas of study are the major and minor prophets. The study will involve specific literature as well as historical, theological, sociological, canonical, and critical issues of the biblical text.

CHRI 6320 Christian Scriptures IV This course continues the study of New Testament background and interpretation. The areas of study are Paul¿s letters, general letters, and Revelation. The study will involve specific literature as well as historical, theological, sociological, canonical, and critical issues of the biblical text.

CHRI 6330 Christian Readings Involves selected primary and secondary readings within specific areas as designated by the professor and according to the student's educational needs in their fields of study. Limited to one enrollment.

CHRI 6333, Historical and Moral Theology The subject of this course is the historical development of Christian theology and ethics from the second century to the present. Directed study will focus on the theological and moral ideas in the writings of significant figures of ancient, medieval, and modern Christianity. The student will be required to study each writer as a person of his or her own age by means of a critical analysis of the influences, context, and content of his or her own writings. Additionally, consideration will be given to the matter of how the theology and ethics of the Christian past offer insight into contemporary issues and problems.

CHRI 6340 Christian Readings Involves selected primary and secondary readings within specific areas as designated by the professor and according to the student's educational needs in their fields of study. Limited to one enrollment.

CHRI 6350 Christian Readings Involves selected primary and secondary readings within specific areas as designated by the professor and according to the student's educational needs in their fields of study. Limited to one enrollment.

CHRI 6392 Thesis The thesis component is in lieu of the last six hours in the MATS program. The thesis proposed by the student must be selected under the guidance and approval of the department, and the rendering of the thesis must be in a minimum of 75 pages.

CHRI 6393 Thesis The thesis component is in lieu of the last six hours in the MATS program. The thesis proposed by the student must be selected under the guidance and approval of the department, and the rendering of the thesis must be in a minimum of 75 pages.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 177 Computer Information Systems Management (CISM) Course Descriptions

CISM 1321 Introduction to Computer Applications This course emphasizes current concepts and techniques for utilizing the microcomputer as an information processor. A practical laboratory component affords hands-on experience with word processing, database management, and spreadsheet programs.

CISM 3330 Management Information Systems Prerequisite: ACCT 2301 Provides a basic understanding of the value and uses of information systems for business operation, management decision-making, and strategic advantage. Concentrates on providing the tools needed for mastery of the information systems concepts and terms important to non- technical business managers. .

CISM 6367 Global Business and Technology Strategies Focuses on information technology management issues that must be addressed for a company to succeed in the intensely competitive global marketplace. Specific topics include models and paradigms of global information systems, national information technology infrastructure, technical and managerial information technology issues in different parts of the world, and technology transfer. Graduate Business programs only.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 178 Classical Greek (CLAS) Course Descriptions

CLAS 1351 Classical Greek I Elementary introduction to the fundamentals of Classical, principally Attic, Greek. Topics include alphabet, pronunciation, basic vocabulary, grammar and syntax, and practice in reading elementary Classical Greek. Graded reading material is adapted from classical texts and cultivates an appreciation of Classical literature and culture.

CLAS 1352 Classical Greek II Prerequisite: CLAS 1351 Continuation of elementary Classical Greek sequence. Topics include continued study of vocabulary, grammar and syntax, reading more difficult Greek, and gaining greater appreciation of Classical literature and culture.

CLAS 2311 Classical Greek III PREREQ: CLAS 1352 This course has three main goals: to develop proficiency in reading Classical Greek, to strengthen command of Greek grammar and ocabulary, and to explore key features of Classical Greek life and culture. Students read extended selections in the original Greek prose/poetry; classroom discussion addresses cultural and historical issues while also reviewing grammar, stylistics, and poetics.

CLAS 2351 Classical Greek III Prerequisite: CLAS 1352 An intermediate course in Classical Greek with three main goals: to develop proficiency in reading Classical Greek; to strengthen command of Classical Greek grammar and vocabulary; and, to explore key features of Greek life and culture. Students read extended selections in original Greek prose. Classroom discussion addresses cultural and historical issues while also reviewing grammar.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 179 Cinema & New Media (CNMA) Course Descriptions

CNMA 1301 Cinematic Core Principles An overview and survey of the cinematic medium and its various forms, with an emphasis on historical foundations and developing opportunities. Includes an in-depth look at the fundamental components of the medium - writing, directing, acting, cinematography, and editing - and synthesizes these various roles so that students can see how these components work together to create the end product. Building off of smaller exercises, students will produce their own short films from start-to-finish.

CNMA 1302 The Art of Cinema & New Media A survey of various artistic mediums and their relation to cinema, focusing on what distinguishes cinema as a unique art form and what it holds in common with other mediums. Paired with this, an introduction to aesthetics, beauty, and the moral responsibilities of artists from a Christian foundation. Students will develop a personal philosophy of art and aesthetics, which will be further developed in future courses.

CNMA 2300 Faith & Culture in Cinema & New Media Prerequisites: CNMA 1301, 1302 This class explores the role of Christian artists in culture. Students will study how great Christian thinkers have thought about culture and art throughout church history and be challenged to understand their vocation as media creators from a biblical perspective. Students will also develop an understanding of how to live out their faith through their work as they seek to affect the culture around them.

CNMA 2301 Writing for Cinema & New Media Prerequisites: CNMA 1301, 1302, 1303 An introduction to the art, technique, and structure of screenplay writing. Through exercises, students will develop their writing abilities and craft their first film or new media script.

CNMA 2303 Directing for Cinema & New Media Prerequisites: CNMA 1301, 1302, 1303 An introduction to the art and craft of directing, including an overview of different mediums, styles, and approaches. Throughout the class, students will direct short scenes and videos to practice and apply the techniques they are learning.

CNMA 2305 Producing for Cinema & New Media Prerequisites: CNMA 1301, 1302, 1303 An introduction to the work of a producer in cinema and new media. This class includes a detailed look at the pre-production steps that a producer oversees - including budgeting, scheduling, and crewing a production - as well as practical considerations, business realities, and elements of leadership.

CNMA 2310 Cinematography & Production Prerequisites: CNMA 1301, 1302, 1303 An introduction to the film set and its key participants, including the cinematographer, gaffer, key grip, assistant director, script supervisor, and sound recordist. Students will explore different production techniques and learn how different scales of crew and budget affect on-set workflow.

CNMA 2312 Editing & Post-Production Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 180 Prerequisites: CNMA 1301, 1302, 1303 An introduction to the post-production workflow with a focus on the art and craft of cinematic editing. The class also guides students through sound, visual effects, color grading, and finishing.

CNMA 2316 Production Design & Art Direction Prerequisites: CNMA 1301, 1302, 1303 An overview of production design for cinema, including conceptual design, sets, props, wardrobe, and lighting. Students will be challenged to develop a strong aesthetic for art direction and will explore the practical challenges associated with executing production design in cinema and new media.

CNMA 3110 Cinematography Practicum Prerequisite: CNMA 2310 Cinematography students work with a mentor to prep and shoot a short film (or equivalent production).

CNMA 3112 Sound/Visual Effects Practicum Prerequisite: CNMA 2312 Post-production students work with a mentor as they complete sound, visual effects, or other post-production work on a short film (or equivalent production).

CNMA 3116 Production Design Practicum Prerequisite: CNMA 2316 Production design students work with a mentor as they conceptualize and execute the art direction on a short film (or equivalent production).

CNMA 3120 Special Topics Directed study of a minimum of 30 clock hours for each hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected based on student interest and need.

CNMA 3125 Casting Practicum Prerequisite: CNMA 1301, 1302, 1303 Students work with an experienced casting director to cast a feature film production (or equivalent production).

CNMA 3145 Internship Prerequisite: 6 hrs of CNMA 2000 level coursework Credit is awarded for approved professional internships. Opportunities include media related work in the Houston area or summer internships in Austin, Hollywood, or other regions.

CNMA 3151 Media Studies: Silent Film Study the origins of cinema through this comprehensive survey of the first decades of the medium. We’ll watch the great early works of Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Fritz Lang, F. W. Murnau, and more, discussing what makes their groundbreaking films work and endure.

CNMA 3152 Media Studies: Directorial Debuts In this class, we'll study the first films from a number of great filmmakers. Many of these directors went on to have successful careers in Hollywood. Others are known for their independent spirit and artistic merit. In every case though, we'll see how these pioneering artists took advantage of their first filmmaking opportunities, leveraged whatever limitations they may

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 181 have had, and created great films that would set the trajectory for the rest of their cinematic work.

CNMA 3153 Media Studies: Silent Film I Study the origins of cinema through this comprehensive survey of the first decades of the medium. We’ll watch the great early works of Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Fritz Lang, F. W. Murnau, and more, discussing what makes their groundbreaking films work and endure. (To be taken with Silent Film II)

CNMA 3154 Media Studies: Silent Film II Study the origins of cinema through this comprehensive survey of the first decades of the medium. We’ll watch the great early works of Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Fritz Lang, F. W. Murnau, and more, discussing what makes their groundbreaking films work and endure. (To be taken with Silent Film I)

CNMA 3154 Media Studies: Silent Film II Study the origins of cinema through this comprehensive survey of the first decades of the medium. We’ll watch the great early works of Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Fritz Lang, F. W. Murnau, and more, discussing what makes their groundbreaking films work and endure. (To be taken with Silent Film I)

CNMA 3161 Media Studies These classes are programmed each semester to expose students to a broad range of cinematic styles and approaches. Classes focus on a variety of subjects - for example, a European Film Survey, the complete works of Frank Capra, or a season of Emmy-award-winning television. Other screenings are programmed throughout the semester and could include special guests or a related lecture.

CNMA 3162 Media Studies These classes are programmed each semester to expose students to a broad range of cinematic styles and approaches. Classes focus on a variety of subjects - for example, a European Film Survey, the complete works of Frank Capra, or a season of Emmy-award-winning television. Other screenings are programmed throughout the semester and could include special guests or a related lecture.

CNMA 3163 Media Studies These classes are programmed each semester to expose students to a broad range of cinematic styles and approaches. Classes focus on a variety of subjects - for example, a European Film Survey, the complete works of Frank Capra, or a season of Emmy-award-winning television. Other screenings are programmed throughout the semester and could include special guests or a related lecture.

CNMA 3164 Media Studies These classes are programmed each semester to expose students to a broad range of cinematic styles and approaches. Classes focus on a variety of subjects - for example, a European Film Survey, the complete works of Frank Capra, or a season of Emmy-award-winning television. Other screenings are programmed throughout the semester and could include special guests or a related lecture.

CNMA 3197 Media Studies: Independent Study

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 182 With faculty guidance, students choose a media topic of study for the semester to study independently. Course hours count toward the CNMA media Studies requirement.

CNMA 3198 Media Studies: Independent Study With faculty guidance, students choose a media topic of study for the semester to study independently. Course hours count toward the CNMA media Studies requirement.

CNMA 3199 Media Studies: Independent Study With faculty guidance, students choose a media topic of study for the semester to study independently. Course hours count toward the CNMA media Studies requirement.

CNMA 3210 Cinematography Practicum Prerequisite: CNMA 2310 Cinematography students work with a mentor to prep and shoot a short film (or equivalent production).

CNMA 3212 Sound/Visual Effects Practicum Prerequisite: CNMA 2312 Post-production students work with a mentor as they complete sound, visual effects, or other post-production work on a short film (or equivalent production).

CNMA 3216 Production Design Practicum Prerequisite: CNMA 2316 Production design students work with a mentor as they conceptualize and execute the art direction on a short film (or equivalent production).

CNMA 3220 Special Topics Directed study of a minimum of 30 clock hours for each hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected based on student interest and need.

CNMA 3225 Casting Practicum Prerequisite: CNMA 1301, 1302, 1303 Students work with an experienced casting director to cast a feature film production (or equivalent production).

CNMA 3245 Internship Prerequisite: 6 hrs of CNMA 2000 level coursework Credit is awarded for approved professional internships. Opportunities include media related work in the Houston area or summer internships in Austin, Hollywood, or other regions.

CNMA 3301 Advanced Writing Prerequisite: CNMA 2301 Students apprentice with an experienced screenwriter who mentors them through the writing of a feature film screenplay (or equivalent). Students are also introduced to collaborative writing environments (as would be found in a television or new media production with multiple writers).

CNMA 3303 Advanced Directing Prerequisite: CNMA 2303 Students apprentice with an experienced director who mentors them through the direction of a short film. Students will work with the director through each stage of development and planning

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 183 for their film.

CNMA 3305 Advanced Producing Prerequisite: CNMA 2305 Students apprentice with an experienced producer throughout pre-production of a large-scale production. Students will attend production meetings and work with the producer to assemble budgets and schedules, secure locations and permits, and prepare equipment and crews.

CNMA 3307 Advanced Editing Prerequisite: CNMA 2312 Students apprentice with an experienced editor who works with them on the editing of a feature film production. Students have the opportunity to edit their own scenes, as well as to collaborate with the editor and director in editorial meetings.

CNMA 3309 Documentary Filmmaking Prerequisites: CNMA 1301, 1302, 1303 An overview of the art and craft of documentary filmmaking. Explores various styles, goals, and artistic opoprtunities. Includes a focus on the technical aspects of documentary production.

CNMA 3310 Cinematography Practicum Prerequisite: CNMA 2310 Cinematography students work with a mentor to prep and shoot a short film (or equivalent production).

CNMA 3312 Sound/Visual Effects Practicum Prerequisite: CNMA 2312 Post-production students work with a mentor as they complete sound, visual effects, or other post-production work on a short film (or quivalent production).

CNMA 3316 Production Design Practicum Prerequisite: CNMA 2316 Production design students work with a mentor as they conceptualize and execute the art direction on a short film (or equivalent production).

CNMA 3320 Special Topics Directed study of a minimum of 30 clock hours for each hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected based on student interest and need.

CNMA 3325 Casting Practicum Prerequisite: CNMA 1301, 1302, 1303 Students work with an experienced casting director to cast a feature film production (or equivalent production).

CNMA 3345 Internship Prerequisite: 6 hrs of CNMA 2000 level coursework Credit is awarded for approved professional internships. Opportunities include media related work in the Houston area or summer internships in Austin, Hollywood, or other regions.

CNMA 4151 World-Building & Non-Linear Storytelling New media opens artists up to a whole new world of storytelling opportunities. This class

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 184 explores the art of world-building - creating a fictional universe of characters, places, and events that can be explored through art and story - as well as the unique ways that new media allows us to engage with these worlds in non-traditional, non-linear ways.

CNMA 4152 Developing Technologies A survey of new technologies that will likely impact cinema and new media creation. Whenever possible, this will be accompanied by demonstrations of new technologies and discussion of how such advancements may change or affect the medium.

CNMA 4300 Entertainment Business Prerequisite: 6 hrs of CNMA 2000 level coursework An overview of the business and legal elements that will affect students' work, whether as independent filmmakers or in industry careers. This class also examines the changing dynamics in the digital economy and trains students in the art of pitching and presentation.

CNMA 4325 Principles of Acting Students are taught the elements of acting and directing actors. Key theories and approaches are explored, including method acting and improvisation.

CNMA 4350 Advanced Film Theory Prerequisite: 9 hrs of CNMA 2000 level coursework Building on the ideas explored in earlier classes, this is a rigorous study of cinematic theory, including in-depth examinations of Eisenstein's theories of montage, French auteur theory, and Tarkovsky's notion of sculpting in time.

CNMA 4390 Senior Project I Prerequisite: 34 hours of CNMA coursework The capstone experience for each student is a year-long final project. Developed and completed with oversight from a faculty member, these classes offer students the time and space to create a professional-quality project that can be used to kickstart their artistic career after graduation.

CNMA 4395 Senior Project II Prerequisite: 34 hours of CNMA coursework The capstone experience for each student is a year-long final project. Developed and completed with oversight from a faculty member, these classes offer students the time and space to create a professional-quality project that can be used to kickstart their artistic career after graduation.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 185

Speech Communications (COMM) Course Descriptions

COMM 1101 Forensic Workshop Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor Workshop for students who actively compete in mock trial tournaments. A maximum of four semester hours may be counted toward a degree.

COMM 1323, Rhetoric and Public Speaking This course improves communication skills in a variety of contexts and develops an understanding and apprecitaion of the importance of public rhetoric in a democratic society. Since ancient Greek and Roman times, rhetoric has been taught both as the foundation of a liberal arts education and as an essential skill of democratic citzenship.

COMM 2101 Forensic Workshop Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor Workshop for students who actively compete in mock trial tournaments. A maximum of four semester hours may be counted toward a degree.

COMM 3101 Forensic Workshop Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor Workshop for students who actively compete in mock trial tournaments. A maximum of four semester hours may be counted toward a degree.

COMM 3323 Communication Theory Prerequisite: COMM 1313 or COMM 1323 The class provides a comprehensive view of the theoretical traditions that influence our understanding of communication.

COMM 3324 Legal Communication Prerequisite: COMM 1313 or COMM 1323. This course examines the central role that communication occupies in the study, practice, and understanding of the legal process. Students will be introduced to key elements of the communication process relevant in legal settings, learn basic and advanced principles of trial advocacy through participation in a mock trial.

COMM 3334 Argumentation and Advocacy Prerequisite: COMM 1313 or COMM 1323. This course explores the nature, types, effects, and ethical dimensions of argument. Current public policy issues will be considered in classroom discussions, with the goal of teaching students how to express themselves clearly in speaking and writing.

COMM 4101 Forensic Workshop Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor Workshop for students who actively compete in mock trial tournaments. A maximum of four semester hours may be counted toward a degree.

COMM 4304 Interpersonal Communication Prerequisite: COMM 1313 or COMM 1323 Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 186 A study of the theory and practice of person-to-person interaction. Examines such topics as self- disclosure, trust, emotions, perception and language, intimacy and distance, and conflict resolution.

COMM 4314 American Public Address Prerequisite: COMM 1313 or COMM 1323. A study of the speakers and speeches that have shaped our history from colonial America to the present. The tools of rhetorical criticism will be developed and applied.

COMM 4315 Political Communication Prerequisite: COMM 1313 or COMM 1323 This course investigates the role of communication in contemporary American politics. Topics to be discussed include speeches, rhetorical artifacts, and political campaigns.

COMM 4323 Intercultural Communication Prerequisite: COMM 1313 or COMm 1323. A study of the impact of globalization, technology, travel, and immigration on communication. The effects of culture and experience on perception are also studied.

COMM 4373 Internship in Speech Communication Prerequisite: Permission of instructor prior to the beginning of the semester registered Directed work experience in a variety of public and private organizations. The primary objective of this course is to provide students with opportunities to apply speech communication theory and practice in a career-oriented setting. Also provides students with the opportunity to attain applied research experience.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 187 Economics (ECON) Course Descriptions

ECON 2311, Microeconomics An introduction to microeconomic theory with emphasis on the determination of price and output in the competitive and noncompetitive market structures of American capitalism. Includes applications of price theory to a range of economic issues.

ECON 2312, Macroeconomics Prerequisite: ECON 2311 or 2302 An introduction to macroeconomic theory including supply and demand analysis, national income accounting, monetary theory and policy, modern employment theory, and applications of theory to policy.

ECON 3303, Macroeconomic Theory Intermediate Prerequisite: ECON 2312 or ECON 2301 An intensive study of the assumptions and concepts wihch are basic to the theories of income determination and aggregate employment.

ECON 3304, Microeconomic Theory Intermediate Prerequisite: ECON 2311 (or ECON 2302); BUSA 2301 or MATH 1451 or higher An intensive examination of the assumptions and forces which underlie the price system.

ECON 3315 Security Markets and Financial Institutions Prerequisite: FINA 3320 An introduction to the US financial system. Topics include interest rate theory, financial markets such as money markets and capital markets including stock and bond markets, and financial institutions such as banks and other depository institutions, finance companies, insurance companies, investment companies, pension funds, securities firms. (Offered also as FINA 3315.)

ECON 3330 International Finance Prerequisite: FINA 3320 and WRIT 3310 A study of the theories and practices of international trade and finance, direction and composition of world trade, institutions for facilitating trade, international payments, capital movement, exchange rates. (Offered also as FINA 3330.)

ECON 4312 Global Economy Prerequisites: ECON 2311 or 2302; ECON 2312 or 2301 This course examines international trade beginning with an evaluation of the gains of trade, types of restrictions on free trade and their impacts, and policies regarding trade. The effects of the movement of resources across national boundaries are also examined. The discussion of international monetary theory includes balance of payments and the functions and impacts of the foreign-exchange markets. The course is structured around case studies that require the student to analyze and apply knowledge gained from the course.

ECON 4330 Seminar on Law and Economics Prerequisites: BUSA 2320; ECON 2311 or 2302; WRIT 3310 This course will provide an analytical framework for studying the relationship between the environment and economic and political systems. Students will cover cost/benefit analysis and economic issues concerning valuation, and then apply the theory to current legislation, case law, and state and federal statutes dealing with air and pollution, waste management, wildlife Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 188 management, and resource management.

ECON 4335 History of Economic Thought Prerequisites: ECON 2311 or 2302; ECON 2312 or 2301 A survey of major contributors to economic thought from Adam Smith to Milton Friedman in modern times with emphasis on their impact on contemporary economic thought and analysis. Research papers will be required on selected topics in economic history.

ECON 4181, 4281, 4381 Special Topics Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean of the School of Business Directed study of a minimum of thirty clock hours for each hour of credit. Provides an opportunity for economics majors to conduct detailed investigations of selected economic problems.

ECON 5260, Economic Principles A survey course of microeconomic theory combined with an introduction to key macroeconomic concepts. Microeconomic theory will include supply and demand analysis, with emphasis on the determination of price and output in the competitive and noncompetitive market structures of American capitalism. Macroeconomic theory will include gross domestic product, employment, inflation, and business cycles. Graduate Business Programs only.

ECON 5361, Survey of Economics for HRM This course will provide an overview of basic microeconomic and macroeconomic theory. Microeconomic theory will include how markets function using supply and demand analysis and competitive and noncomopetitive market structures of American capitalism. A study of the macroeconomic theory will examine the implications of global markets, economic growth, inflation, unemployment, interest rates, monetary policy, and fiscal policy. MS-HRM Program only.

ECON 6353, Global Economy and Institutions Prerequisite: None This course provides an overview of global economies, institutions and how macroeconomic factors impact different economies. This will impact the way business leaders manage risks that globalization entails. The course goes beyond the theory and includes a discussion of current global economic events drawing on articles from current publications. Graduate Business Programs only.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 189 Educational Administration (EDAD) Course Descriptions

EDAD 5306 Educational Applications of Technology The goal of this course is to provide a combination of hands-on and student-centered experiences with administrative and instructional technology applications. These experiences will provide students with a working knowledge of electronic systems that manage student data, curriculum, assessment instruments, and on-line resources. (Offered also as EDUC 4306/5306.)

EDAD 5319 Internet Resource Management Prerequisite: None Internet Resource Management is designed to allow participants to experience appropriate uses of technology as a learner, and thus better use technology in teaching and learning. The digital world can produce a management nightmare without the proper tools for resource management. The goal of this course is to provide a combination of hands-on and student-centered experiences that will assist in the management of Internet resources. These experiences will enable participants to search for information, share information, generate materials, and evaluate web- based instructional materials. Instructional strategies will focus on the acquisition, analysis, and synthesis of Internet resources that address appropriate educational needs. Graduate students will create a group of 4 inquiry based Webquest and make it available online for students.

EDAD 5320 Systems Thinking: Theory and Application Prerequisites: EDAD 5306 This class will provide an overview, background, and foundation in systems theory and performance technology. This focus will assist in developing a vision of teaching and learning with technology as a major component. Topics covered include performance technology, general systems theory, needs assessment, and change management. A class project, including a needs assessment and final report of potential solutions, is required of all students.

EDAD 6181 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDAD 6281 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDAD 6291 Internship in the Principalship Prerequisite: Completion of at least 24 hours in the EDAD program This course provides for administrative internship at the home campus of the student with the supervision of a campus-based administrator and a university supervisor.

EDAD 6292 Internship in the Principalship Prerequisites: EDAD 6291 and completion of at least 24 hours in the EDAD program This is the second course in the Internship and is recommended for the summer term. The student shadows an administrator in a summer school session. The internship is scheduled in a district other than the employing district of the student. Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 190

EDAD 6301 Administrative Theory and Practice Analysis of administrative behavior and organizational patterns. Study of conceptual models in decision-making. Examination of theory and practice as they relate to continuing problems of school administration.

EDAD 6302 Instructional Leadership and Evaluation Study of major issues, problems, and trends in the K-12 curriculum from an administrative point of view. Analysis of leadership skills required of the principal in the areas of supervision, group processes, organization for school improvement, and staff development techniques. Emphasis on strategies for stimulating, implementing, and evaluating alternatives in curriculum and instruction. Development of skill in use of the Professional Development Appraisal System.

EDAD 6303 School Law Legal basis of education at national, state, and local levels. Major court decisions affecting organization and administration of public and private schools. Legal rights and responsibilities of school administrators and other school personnel.

EDAD 6304 School Business Management and Finance Study of roles, responsibilities, systems, and procedures in school business matters. Includes budgeting, accounting, data processing, purchasing, personnel, and management of facilities, equipment, and real property. Examination of federal, state, and local programs to finance education.

EDAD 6307 Classroom Management A study of a broad spectrum of approaches to classroom management, including authoritarian, behavior-modification, group-process, instructional, and psycho-emotional-climate orientations. Examination of research regarding effective classroom management. Exploration of multiple strategies for handling common classroom management problems. (Offered also as EDUC 6301.)

EDAD 6308 The Role of the Principal Study of the roles and responsibilities in the administration of elementary, middle, and secondary schools, with focus on the principal¿s professional relations with teachers, parents, pupils, educational leaders within the district, and the board of education. Analysis of the role of the principal in curriculum development, organization, and evaluation; school organization; discipline; student behavior; community relations; the teaching/learning process; in-service training; and leadership in teacher growth and evaluation. Emphasis is on the personal qualities of leadership conducive to good human relations.

EDAD 6309 The School and Its Instructional Program Factors influencing school curriculum in grades K-12 are studied. Included are the components of the curriculum: organization of the curriculum; how curriculum is changed; how new curriculum is developed; and the curriculum programs in elementary and secondary schools.

EDAD 6310 Applications of Educational Research A study of investigations relating to schooling with applications suitable to the role of the principal. Includes examination of reports from abstracts and original sources, valid research criteria in making written evaluations, and applications in specific field settings. (Offered also as EDUC 6320 and PSYC 6320.)

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 191

EDAD 6313 School Personnel Leadership An integration of personnel leadership skills required in the legal, academic, and administrative considerations of regular and special school programs. Included are state and federal regulations.

EDAD 6381 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 192 Bilingual Education (EDBI) Course Descriptions

EDBI 3121 Special Topics in Language and Literature Special topics to be treated are determined by interested students with the approval of the Department Chair. Mexican-American literature, sociolinguistics, grammar for native speakers of Spanish, and field experience in Hispanic language and culture are examples of possible areas of interest.

EDBI 3221 Special Topics in Language and Literature Special topics to be treated are determined by interested students with the approval of the Department Chair. Mexican-American literature, sociolinguistics, grammar for native speakers of Spanish, and field experience in Hispanic language and culture are examples of possible areas of interest.

EDBI 3321 Special Topics in Language and Literature Special topics to be treated are determined by interested students with the approval of the Department Chair. Mexican-American literature, sociolinguistics, grammar for native speakers of Spanish, and field experience in Hispanic language and culture are examples of possible areas of interest.

EDBI 3335 Spanish Writing Workshop This course provides students with strategies to write fluently in Spanish. Techniques emphasize the steps of the writing process. Students use self-editing and peer collaboration to produce a portfolio of their work. (Offered also as SPAN 3335.)

EDBI 3387 Teaching School Content Areas in the Bilingual Classroom Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program; EDUC 4301 or 4311 This course will include the preparation and teaching of lessons and units in Spanish for content area; Spanish vocabulary development and instruction including the multifaceted knowledge of word knowledge; appropriate strategies for before, during and after reading; the role of fluency in comprehension and strategies to improve fluency; evaluation of curriculum materials for the Spanish speaker; familiarization with the state adopted materials written in Spanish; assessment that leads to data informed decisions; comprehension skills in content areas; grouping procedures in a multi-tiered approach; and lesson design that differentiates based on student need. Students apply course content in a field-based practicum in a bilingual classroom.

EDBI 4293 Senior Seminar: Foundations of Bilingual Education Prerequisite: EDBI 3387 and 4314 or permission of the instructor. Students study topics in applied linguistics, psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, and multilingual, multicultural education. Students prepare written assignments, give oral presentations, and participate in discussion of these topics. Students conduct in-depth research on one of these areas and present their research in a senior seminar paper and in an oral presentation to the class.

EDBI 4304 Methods of Teaching English as a Second Language Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program; EDUC 4301 or 4311. This course will enable students to explore theories, pedagogical considerations and current methodology in the teaching of reading, speaking, listening, thinking and writing visualizing, and visually representing for second languages and targeted cultures. The five critical components of reading instruction (phonemic awareness, phonics and word study, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension) will frame the study of learners of second languages. An emphasis will be Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 193 placed on developing interpersonal communication skills of the beginning and intermediate ESL students. (Also offered as ENGL 4304 and SPAN 4304)

EDBI 4305 Second Language Acquisition Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program This course will introduce students to theories of second language acquisition; comparison of first and second language acquisition; second language acquisition in children and adults and in the bilingual child. Also included in this course is an introduction to sociolinguistic considerations and assessment of language dominance and proficiency to inform instructional decisions. This course will make use of a multi-tiered system of support to provide the necessary differentiation. Student learning will focus on acquisition of English as a second language.

EDBI 4306 ESL Theory and Practice A study of research findings in the teaching of English as a Second Language (ESL) and of legal, cultural, linguistic, and educational consideration for ESL teaching. School-based practicum project.

EDBI 4307 Foundations of ESL and Bilingual Education Survey of the historical, theoretical, and policy foundations of programs which serve English language learners (ELL's); types of programs; research findings related to these programs; and factors in creating an effective multicultural environment for addressing students' affective, linguistic, and cognitive needs.

EDBI 4314 Survey of Linguistics Nature and structure of language. Language variation and change. Language and society. Introduction to contrastive linguistics, with emphasis on English. Languages of the world.

EDBI 4343 Hispanic Cultural Perspectives Prerequisites: Two 3000-level Spanish courses or the equivalent. A study of the major cultural aspects of Spanish speaking countries, with a special emphasis on literature, art, history, geography and cultural patterns. Not open to students with language proficiency below Intermediate High. (Offered also as SPAN 4343.)

EDBI 4344 Hispanic Cultural Perspectives Prerequisites: Two 3000-level Spanish courses or the equivalent. A study of the major cultural aspects of Spanish speaking countries, with a special emphasis on literature, art, history, geography and cultural patterns. Not open to students with language proficiency below Intermediate High. (Offered also as SPAN 4344.)

EDBI 4350 Developing Literacy in the Bilingual Classroom Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program; EDUC 4301 or 4311. This course will include an analysis of the development of reading, speaking, listening, thinking and writing visualizing, and visually representing as it applies to the young bilingual child. The five critical components of reading instruction (phonemic awareness, phonics and word study, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension) will frame the study of the bilingual learner. The course will also include a theoretical framework for literacy development in the first language of bilingual students using a multi-tiered approach to classroom instruction that involves being able to gather assessment data that will inform instructional decisions and differentiate instruction. This course will also include an exploration of the selection and development of activities that promote literacy acquisition in the first language of bilingual students. This class will be taught

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 194 primarily in Spanish.

EDBI 5304 Methods of Teaching English as a Second Language Prerequisites: None. This course will help to prepare learners to function as knowledgeable and effective teachers/scholars of students in a bilingual/ESL classroom. Students will conduct an in-depth study of theories, pedagogical considerations and current methodology in the teaching of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills for second languages and target cultures. Emphasis is on developing interpersonal communication skills of beginning and intermediate ESL students.

EDBI 5305 Second Language Acquisition This course will prepare professional educators to function as knowledgeable and effective teachers/scholars of students in a bilingual classroom. Students will explore theories of second language acquisition, comparison of first and second language acquisition, and second language acquisition in children and adults and in the bilingual child. Students will conduct an in-depth study of assessment of language dominance and proficiency with a focus on acquisition of English as a second language.

EDBI 5306 ESL Theory and Practice A study of research findings in the teaching of English as a Second Language (ESL) and of legal, cultural, linguistic, and educational consideration for ESL teaching. School-based practicum project.

EDBI 5314 Survey of Linguistics Nature and structure of language. Language variation and change. Language and society. Introduction to contrastive linguistics, with emphasis on English. Languages of the world.

EDBI 5315 Integrating ESL with the Content Areas Prerequisites: None. Approaches to teaching English as a Second Language within the context of comprehensible content-area instruction. Sheltered English. Emphasis on developing literacy skills and fostering oral and written student interaction in all subject areas. Understanding of cultural diversity and its implications to classroom climate. Adapting instruction to the diagnosed needs of the LEP student. Fifteen-hour school-based practicum project.

EDBI 5335, Spanish Writing Workshop This course will provide students with techniques for developing writing skills in Spanish. Knowledge and skills developed in the class will be applicable to the teaching of writing in the EC-6 Bilingual/ESL classroom. Their project will involve a compilation of entries with a focus on composing, revising, editing, and publishing a memoir or personal life story.

EDBI 5343 Hispanic Cultural Perspectives A study of the major cultural aspects of Spanish-speaking countries, with a special emphasis on literature, art, history, geography and cultural patterns. This course will be taught in Spanish. Not open to students with language proficiency below ACTFL Intermediate High.

EDBI 5344 Hispanic Cultural Perspectives A study of the major cultural aspects of Spanish-speaking countries, with a special emphasis on literature, art, history, geography and cultural patterns. This course will be taught in Spanish. Not open to students with language proficiency below ACTFL Intermediate High.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 195

EDBI 5350 Developing Literacy in the Bilingual Classroom This course will prepare professional educators to function as knowledgeable and effective teachers/scholars of students in a bilingual classroom. Students will gain an in-depth understanding the theoretical framework for the literacy development in the first language of bilingual students. Students will explore and analyze current methods of teaching reading and writing. Students will develop and evaluate activities that promote literacy acquisition in the first language of bilingual students. This class will be taught primarily in Spanish.

EDBI 6181 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected based on student interest and need.

EDBI 6281 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected based on student interest and need.

EDBI 6304 Applied Linguistics for Bilingual Teaching Contrastive analysis between English and Spanish. Implications of linguistic considerations for identification of special concerns in the teaching of bilingual literacy and language arts.

EDBI 6305 Foundations of Bilingual Education Rationale for bilingual education. Goals, curriculum, classroom management, and testing in the various types of bilingual programs. Research findings in bilingual education.

EDBI 6307 The Teaching of Mathematics, Science and Social Studies in the Bilingual Classroom Development, utilization, and adaptation of resources and materials for teaching math, science and social studies in the bilingual classroom. Current approaches to teaching the content areas in the bilingual classroom. Vocabulary and fluency development in content areas in Spanish. Program and staffing models. Use of the first and second languages. This course will be taught primarily in Spanish.

EDBI 6381 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected based on student interest and need.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 196 Early Childhood Education (EDEC) Course Descriptions

EDEC 4181 Special Topics This course provides opportunities for individual research and development in areas of special interest, current issues, and special problems within the field of education of young children. A minimum of 30 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit.

EDEC 4281 Special Topics This course provides opportunities for individual research and development in areas of special interest, current issues, and special problems within the field of education of young children. A minimum of 30 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit.

EDEC 4290, Practicum in Early Childhood Prerequisites: EDEC 4306, 4310, 4311, EDRE 4351, and EDUC 2311 (or permission of the Program Director).

EDEC 4313, Curriculum and Instruction in Early Childhood Education Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program; EDUC 4301 or 4311 This course is focused on the study of research-based curriculum, instruction, and assessment for early childhood. All areas of study are focused on developmentally appropriate practices for children of preschool and kindergarten age and are supported by national standards and state standards-National Association for the Education of the Young Child (NAEYC), Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) and guidelines. Topics include learning about the specific characteristics and expectations for this age group, becoming knowledgeable of early childhood programs, planning learning activities and facilities, developing positive school/home relations, being aware of the diverse needs of the learner, and other aspects of creating and maintaining rich learning experiences.

EDEC 4381 Special Topics This course provides opportunities for individual research and development in areas of special interest, current issues, and special problems within the field of education of young children. A minimum of 30 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit.

EDEC 5181 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDEC 5281 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDEC 5302 Survey of Exceptional Children Prerequisite: EDUC 5313, 5314, 6302, or 6312 (or teacher certification) This course is an in-depth study in all areas of exceptionalities.(Offered also as EDSP 5302 and EDUC 5304.) Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 197

EDEC 5306 Language and Concept Development in Young Children Prerequisite: permission of the instructor Study includes the relationship between language and thought; theories of language and learning; changes in the young child's intellectual structure; role of the teacher, and practical application. (Offered also as EDSP 5306.)

EDEC 5310 Preschool Curriculum and Instruction This course is designed to provide an in-depth study of developmentally appropriate curriculum and instruction for three and four year old children. Fieldwork is required.

EDEC 5311 Kindergarten Curriculum and Instruction Prerequisites: EDEC 5306 or permission of the instructor This course includes the study of and experiences with instructional strategies; planning and evaluation of learning activities; selection and planning of physical facilities; and the skills necessary for management of kindergarten programs.

EDEC 5351 Emergent Literacy Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education In this course students examine emergent literacy and explore ways to encourage the development of initial literacy. A wide variety of topics pertaining to the emergent reader and writer are included. (Offered also as EDRE 5351 and EDSP 5351.)

EDEC 5381 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDEC 6181 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDEC 6281 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDEC 6381 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 198 Reading Education (EDRE) Course Descriptions

EDRE 4301 Advanced Developmental Reading Prerequisite: EDRE 4310 This course examines developmental reading programs for grades pre-school through college. Skill in recognizing various stages in the development of reading processes and an analysis of the total reading program, emphasizing procedures for improvement, is developed. (Offered also as EDRE 5301.)

EDRE 4320 Teaching Reading Through Children's Literature Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Preparation Program. Students in this course will be introduced to the best examples in literature for children. The student will gain an in-depth knowledge of the major genres of children’s literature, how to critically evaluate books using specific criteria, and how to make use of that knowledge in extending pupil skills in developmental reading as well as the creation of lifetime reading habits. Students also become familiar with the lives and works of major authors and illustrators of works for children.

EDRE 4330 Teaching Content Area Reading Skills Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program Students in this course will explore methods for teaching reading in the content areas. Topics will include assessment that leads to data informed decisions; comprehension skills in content areas; readability and material suitability; study skills; vocabulary development and instruction, the multifaceted knowledge of word knowledge; appropriate strategies for before, during and after reading; the role of fluency in comprehension and strategies to improve fluency, reading efficiency; grouping procedures in a multi-tiered approach; and lesson design that differentiates based on student need.

EDRE 4350 Reading and the Language Arts Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program; EDRE 4351, Emergent Literacy must be taken simultaneously with EDRE 4360. Co-requisite: EDRE 4360. This course includes an analysis of the development of writing and spelling for grades 2-8 and the use of differentiated instruction. The use of assessment and data driven decision making for instruction are covered. The style of instruction will focus on effective teaching: (1) Explicit instruction with modeling, (2) Systematic instruction and scaffolding, (3) Multiple opportunities for independent practice and application, (4) Immediate affirmative & corrective feedback, and (5) On-going progress monitoring and a multi-tiered system of support. Both on-campus and field experiences are included. It must be completed before student teaching.

EDRE 4351 Emergent Literacy Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education This course includes an analysis of the development of reading, speaking, listening, thinking and writing visualizing, and visually representing as it applies to the young child. The five critical components of reading instruction (phonemic awareness, phonics and word study, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension) frame the study of the emergent learner. The course also includes a multi-tiered approach to classroom instruction: being able to differentiate instruction as needed and gather assessment data that will inform instructional decisions.

EDRE 4352 Literacy in the Secondary Schools Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 199 This course provides students with opportunities to use literacy as a tool to meet a broad range of personal, social, and curricular functions as well as real-world applications. It stresses comprehension strategies, metacognition, reflection and positive attitudes toward literacy. (Offered also as EDRE 5352.)

EDRE 4360, Developing and Teaching Literacy Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program Corequisite: EDRE 4350 Included in this course are methods and materials for teaching developmental reading to children in school settings from grades Pre-K to 8. The course emphasizes competence in assessing specific strengths and weaknesses in the reading skills of children, differentiation in instruction, lesson planning in order to prepare learning activities appropriate to children’s needs, and interaction with children in such a way that learning is maximized. It includes a multi-tiered approach to meet the various needs of students along with assessment that drives instructional decisions. It builds on the concepts from emergent literacy (EDRE 4351) that stress the 5 critical components of reading instruction and the understanding of effective instruction (5 features). Both on-campus activities and field experiences are included. This course must be completed before student teaching.

EDRE 4381 SPECIAL TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

EDRE 5181 Special Topics This is a service course designed to permit offerings of topics of current interest and special workshops. It may also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study are required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDRE 5182 SPECIAL TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

EDRE 5301 Advanced Developmental Reading Prerequisite: EDRE 5310 This course examines developmental reading programs for grades pre-school through college. Skill in recognizing various stages in the development of reading processes and an analysis of the total reading program, emphasizing procedures for improvement, is developed. (Offered also as EDRE 4301.)

EDRE 5304 Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Difficulties Causes of reading difficulties along with the use of diagnostic evaluation to select appropriate instructional materials and strategies for correction are explored. (Offered also as EDRE 4304.)

EDRE 5305 Literacy Management and Technology Prerequisites: EDUC 5313 or 6302, and EDRE 5310. Literacy instructional concerns such as grouping, diversity, portfolios, study skills, and test- taking strategies are addressed along with practical applications for using technology in the classroom. (Offered also as EDRE 4305.)

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 200 EDRE 5310 Reading & Writing for Pre-Adolescents Prerequisite: None. Included in this course are methods and materials for teaching developmental reading to children in elementary school settings. The course emphasizes competence in assessing specific strengths and weaknesses in the reading skills of children, lesson planning in order to prepare learning activities appropriate to children¿s needs, and interacting with children in such a way that learning is maximized. Both on-campus activities and field experiences are included. This course is a prerequisite for student teaching. Students taking this course must simultaneously register for EDRE 4310-L1, except in summer. (Offered also as EDRE 4310.)

EDRE 5320 Teaching Reading Through Children's Literature Prerequisite: None. This course will enable professional educators to construct and evaluate reading programs at all levels. Graduate students taking this course will gain an in-depth knowledge of the major genres of children’s literature and how to critically evaluate books using specific criteria. The course will provide educators with the skills and experience necessary to enrich their reading instruction, as well as the creation of lifetime reading habits. Students will explore the lives and works of major authors and illustrators of works for children and their impact on this area of reading education, as well as exploring the use of multicultural literature.

EDRE 5330 Content Area Reading Prerequisite: None This course will introduce professional educators (and those seeking initial certification) to specific methods for teaching reading in content areas. Students will study assessment procedures, comprehension skills in content areas, readability and materials suitability, study skills, vocabulary development, developing reading rate flexibility, reading efficiency, grouping procedures, and lesson design. Using these experiences, students will learn to write formal lesson plans or prepare units of study for content areas that incorporate reading instruction. Students will learn to evaluate the effectiveness of reading strategies and how to make improvements.

EDRE 5350 Reading and the Language Arts Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education An analysis of the development of reading, speaking, listening, thinking and writing visualizing, and visually representing abilities. Both on-campus and field experiences are included. Students taking this course must simultaneously register for EDRE 4350-L1, except in summer. (Offered also as EDRE 4350.)

EDRE 5351 Emergent Literacy PREREQUISITE: Admission to Teacher Education In this course students examine emergent literacy and explore ways to encourage the development of initial literacy. A wide variety of topics pertaining to the emergent reader and writer are included. (Offered also as CDEV 4351, EDEC 4351/5351, and EDSP 4351/5351 .)

EDRE 5352 Literacy in the Secondary Schools This course provides students with opportunities to use literacy as a tool to meet a broad range of personal, social, and curricular functions as well as real-world applications. It stresses comprehension strategies, metacognition, reflection and positive attitudes toward literacy. (Offered also as EDRE 4352.)

EDRE 5381 Special Topics

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 201 This is a service course designed to permit offerings of topics of current interest and special workshops. It may also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study are required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDRE 6181 Special Topics This is a service course designed to permit offerings of topics of current interest and special workshops. It may also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study are required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDRE 6281 Special Topics This is a service course designed to permit offerings of topics of current interest and special workshops. It may also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study are required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDRE 6305 Reading: A Linguistic Perspective This course examines reading within the framework of literacy development. Linguistic and psychological perspectives toward reading as well as their relationship to the comprehensive process are emphasized.

EDRE 6381 Special Topics This is a service course designed to permit offerings of topics of current interest and special workshops. It may also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study are required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 202 Special Education (EDSP) Course Descriptions

EDSP 4181 Special Topics Topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum credit of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDSP 4252 Clinical Experiences in Generic Special Education Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program; EDSP 4302, 4311, and 4319. Application required. A field-based practicum which requires fieldwork in a generic special education setting. This course must be completed prior to student teaching.

EDSP 4281 Special Topics Topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum credit of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDSP 4302 Survey of Exceptional Children Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program This course provides a survey of populations with exceptionalities. Cognitive, emotional, social, physical, and motivational characteristics as well as educational needs of children with exceptionalities are explored. Knowledge of professional, ethical and legal issues that apply to working with students with exceptionalities is also included. Students apply current and new knowledge regarding instructional planning, assessment and collaboration.

EDSP 4311 Diagnostic and Prescriptive Teaching for Exceptional Children Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program; EDSP 4302. This course focuses on the diagnostic-prescriptive approach to individualizing instruction which provides educators with a comprehensive method of assessing learning styles, identifying where breakdowns occur in the learning process, and developing appropriate programming related to the specific needs of learners. Key topics include response to intervention (RTI) approaches, the screening process for dyslexia, standardized and informal assessments, and data analysis as well as laws related to eligibility, ethics and parents’ rights. Students learn to write Individualized Educational Programs (IEPs) based on the diagnostic-prescriptive approach to individualizing instruction for students with exceptionalities. Further, interviews of experienced educators will be conducted regarding current issues and practices in assessment and intervention.

EDSP 4319 Teaching Strategies in Special Education Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program; EDSP 4302. All learners possess unique characteristics, interests, and abilities. Special educators are responsible for connecting instructional planning to learner strengths and needs with typical and atypical exceptionalities. In this course, the educator examines research based instructional strategies to ensure student success across the curriculum, according to human growth and development. An investigation of characteristics associated with cross categorical learners, as defined by the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Improvement Act (IDEA, 2004), and how they affect teaching and learning will also be covered. Further, educational implications for students with exceptionalities will also be addressed. The course also explores research-based practices and subject area instructional strategies that result in accommodations and modifications for students with exceptionalities; including the five components mandated by the Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 203 State Board for Educator Certification in the screening process for Dyslexia. Also included is the importance of effective and positive collaborative relationships with all stakeholders to support development and educational progress. The educator also applies knowledge of characteristics of students with learning disabilities and how knowledge of professional, ethical, and legal issues applies to working with students. In addition, opportunities are presented in which the teaching professional applies current and new knowledge regarding instructional planning, assessment, and collaboration.

EDSP 4325, Educating Gifted LearnersPrerequisite(s): EDUC 4301 or 4311 This course presents an overview of the intellectual and developmental characteristics of the gifted and talented as well as an introduction to identification techniques, instructional approaches, educational programs, and special problems. The course focuses on classroom educational practices designed to meet the unique needs of the gifted and talented students. Historical, legal, and conceptual foundations of gifted education are examined as well as current research relevant to the education of gifted learners.

EDSP 4351 Emergent Literacy Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education In this course students examine emergent literacy and explore ways to encourage the development of initial literacy. A wide variety of topics pertaining to the emergent reader and writer are included. (Offered also as CDEV 4351, EDEC 4351/5351, EDRE 4351/5351,and EDSP 5351.)

EDSP 4352, Behavior and Classroom Management Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and EDSP 4302 Promoting positive behavior and effectively responding to misbehavior are critical skills necessary for all educators. This course helps educators create safe, supportive, and respectful learning environments that promote social-emotional development, self-responsibility, and character, in order to optimize learning for all students. Age-appropriate skills and strategies for managing dynamic and flexible grouping structures and for teaching conflict resolution will be presented. Through this course, the educator will also learn the ABC's of behavior, function, and effective strategies for implementing a behavior intervention plan (BIP) for students that exhibit behavior deficits. The course also provides strategies for building positive relationships, fostering motivation, and engaging in effective communication and problem solving with parents and families.

EDSP 4353, Field Experiences in Special EducationPrerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program as well as EDSP 4302, 4311, 4319, and 4352 Students will become knowledgeable about various methods of special service delivery to students with exceptionalities as they come in contact with a continuum of service delivery systems ranging from least restrictive (inclusive) to most restrictive (self-contained) environments. Observations, classroom assistance, instructional planning, classroom and individual instruction, and conference activities will be required. Students will create a Teacher Work Sample (TWS), which consists of a project demonstrating mastery of the components of effective instruction and student learning. Successful completion of the TWS is required for program completion.

EDSP 4381 Special Topics Topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum credit of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 204 Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDSP 5302 Survey of Exceptional Children Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program Students will determine the goals of instruction according to the needs of the various exceptionalities; they will develop an appropriate curriculum using the essential elements as a base. Students will learn the techniques of managing behavior, how to individualize instruction, how to apply methods of intervention, and how to evaluate adequacy of teaching. The future educator will learn how to arrange classrooms specific to management theories. Students must be computer literate. Fieldwork is required.

EDSP 5311 Diagnostic and Prescriptive Teaching for Exceptional Children Prerequisites: EDSP 5302 The learning experiences in this course will contribute to the knowledge and skills of professional educators in developing and assessing programs for students who exhibit learning and behavior difficulties. Students will learn the diagnostic-prescriptive approach to individualized instruction. Students in the course will learn about comprehensive methods of assessing learning styles and to identify where the breakdowns can occur in the learning process. This course will assist educators in developing, administering and evaluating appropriate programming related to specific needs of learners. The screening process for dyslexia mandated by the State Board for Educator Certification is taught in this course.

EDSP 5319 Teaching Strategies in Special Education Prerequisites: EDSP 5302 and 5311 This course is designed to enable students to develop the expertise of the professional educator with the needs of the various student exceptionalities. Teachers seeking certification as Educational Diagnosticians will learn to apply specialized techniques of managing behavior, how to individualize instruction, how to apply methods of intervention, and how to evaluate adequacy of teaching. The practicing educator taking this course will be able to develop a comprehensive knowledge about classroom management theories as they relate to special education.

EDSP 5335 Identification, and Evaluation in Early Childhood Prerequisite: EDSP 5302 and 5311 This course involves an in-depth study of growth and development of the young child during infancy and early childhood. Additionally, this course emphasizes the acquisition of knowledge and identification of exceptionalities. It will include observations, screen, and assessment of young children, report writing, and identifying appropriate evidence-basaed interventions.

EDSP 5345 Student Evaluation Techniques Prerequisites: Teaching experience and/or a course in instructional design, i.e. EDUC 5313, 5314, 6302, or 6312) This course is designed to enable the student to improve the design, construction, and validation of teacher-made tests, and to evaluate, select, administer, and interpret standardized tests for all levels of instruction. Also included is brief attention to the organization and management of schools and legal and ethical aspects of teaching. (Offered also as EDAD 5345 and EDUC 4345/5345)

EDSP 5351 Emergent Literacy Prerequisite: EDUC 5313 or 6302 (or teacher certification) In this course students examine emergent literacy and explore ways to encourage the

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 205 development of initial literacy. A wide variety of topics pertaining to the emergent reader and writer are included. (Offered also as CDEV 4351, EDEC 4351/5351, EDRE 4351/ 5351 , and EDSP 4351.)

EDSP 5381 Special Topics A study of topics of current interest. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need and must be approved by the instructor.

EDSP 6181 Special Topics A study of topics of current interest. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need and must be approved by the instructor.

EDSP 6281 Special Topics A study of topics of current interest. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need and must be approved by the instructor.

EDSP 6305 Individual Psychological Evaluation Prerequisite: EDUC 6304 Review of theory underlying individual ability tests. supervised practice in test administration, scoring, and interpretation. Skills in report preparation are addressed. The Wechsler scales are emphasized. (Offered also as EPSY 6305 and PSYC 6305.)

EDSP 6315 Practicum in Diagnosis Prerequisite: EDUC 6305 Each student works under the supervision of a certified Educational Diagnostician five days a week during regular school hours for the length of the term that the course is offered at the university.

EDSP 6344 Educational Appraisal of Individuals with Exceptionalities Prerequisites: EDSP 5302, 5311, 5335, and 5319 This course is an introduction to appraisal techniques and instruments used to identify the presence or absence of a specific disability. Administration, scoring, interpretation, preparation of written reports and the development of IEPs will be taught in this course. Students must be computer literate. (Offered also as EPSY 6344.)

EDSP 6345 Advanced Assessment in Special Education Prerequisites: EDSP 5302, 5311, 5319, 5335, 6305, and 6344 This course addresses the explosion of information related to assessment in special education and to the diverse populations served by special education. It examines advanced assessment techniques currently used by educational diagnosticians. The course will focus on developing proficiency in the administration and interpretation of instruments such as the following: The Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, the KABC, the Wechsler Achievement Test, the Bender Gestalt, the Test of Nonverbal Intelligence, the Woodcock Johnson Cognitive Battery, the UNIT, the KABC, Adaptive Behavior Scales, and the Vineland Social Maturity Scales. Students must

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 206 be computer literate.

EDSP 6381 Special Topics A study of topics of current interest. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need and must be approved by the instructor.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 207 Professional Education (EDUC) Course Descriptions

EDUC 2320, Learning and Development This is a comprehensive study of child and adolescent development (cognitive, social, physical, and emotional development) combined with examination and analysis of learning theory and other factors and principles that affect learning. Observation and experience in schools is included. (Students who wish to enter the Teacher Preparation Program must earn a C or better in this course.)

EDUC 2330, Foundations of American Educational Thought This course of study introduces the historical, philosophical, and sociological influences that have shaped the dynamic nature of private and public educational systems in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the Christian influence on education, great educational leaders, as well as examining the future of education. A great variety of selected classical readings are included with authors such as William Penn, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Noah Webster, Ralph Waldo-Emerson, G. Stanley Hall, John Dewey, Booker T. Washington, Jane Addams, W.E.B. DuBois, E.L. Thorndike, and others. An overview of the many facets and issues of teaching are introduced. (Students who wish to enter the Teacher Preparation Program must earn a C or better in this course.)

EDUC 4100 TExES State Certification Exam Preparation Seminar Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program, a degree plan on file in the Registrar's Office, and completion of at least 90 hours of degree-plan specified coursework. This course assists students in understanding the state and federal standards for their chosen certification areas. Students complete intensive reviews for their Pedagogy and Professionalism (PPR) and content area certification exams. They must successfully complete PPR and content area practice exams. This course must be completed prior to entering Student Teaching.

EDUC 4181 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest, additional field work and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 30 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDUC 4281 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest, additional field work and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 30 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDUC 4290 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

EDUC 4294 Senior Seminar: Classroom Management This course involves an exploration of means for creating and maintaining optimal learning environments and helping children and adolescents develop into considerate, responsible adults. It includes independent observation which must be completed during student teaching or the CDEV practicum. (Offered also as CDEV 4294, INDC 4294.)

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 208 EDUC 4301 Curriculum and Instruction in the Elementary School Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program. This course is designed to provide an integrated and in-depth understanding of principles of curriculum and instruction, as well as practical experiences in instructional design for elementary school contexts and learners. Multiple approaches to learning, the roles of teachers in the teaching-learning process, as well as current Texas state curriculum requirements and guidelines are explored. The effective use of media/technology is included. Field work is required. This course must be taken with EDUC 4312. (Also offered as EDUC 5313.)

EDUC 4306 Educational Applications of Technology Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program A broad spectrum of technology application is explored including the use of word processing, software evaluation, Internet use, multimedia, and telecommunications. Technology is used for communication, management, teaching, and learning. Software is reviewed and evaluated.

EDUC 4311 Curriculum and Instruction in the Secondary School Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program This course is designed to provide an integrated and in-depth understanding of principles of curriculum and instruction, as well as practical experiences in instructional design for secondary school contexts and learners. Multiple approaches to learning, the roles of teachers in the teaching-learning process, as well as current Texas state curriculum requirements and guidelines are explored. The effective use of media/technology is included. Field work is required. This course must be taken with EDUC 4312. (Also offered as EDUC 5314.)

EDUC 4320, Teaching Methodology for Secondary Teachers Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Preparation Program; EDUC 4301 or 4311 This course combines campus-based instruction with field-based experiences. Students observe as well as plan and present lessons in their designated content area. An emphasis is placed upon content specific instructional methods, using data to make instructional decisions and application of classroom management skills. This course must be completed before student teaching.

EDUC 4325, Educating Gifted Learners Prerequisite(s): EDUC 4301 or 4311 This course presents an overview of the intellectual and developmental characteristics of the gifted and talented as well as an introduction to identification techniques, instructional approaches, educational programs, and special problems. The course focuses on classroom educational practices designed to meet the unique needs of the gifted and talented students. Historical, legal, and conceptual foundations of gifted education are examined as well as current research relevant to the education of gifted learners.

EDUC 4340 Action Research The Action Research model is explored and students complete an Action Research project. Preparation for certification exams is also a component of the course. Students take this course immediately preceding student teaching or concurrent with student teaching if student teaching in the Fall quarter.

EDUC 4381 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest, additional field work and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 30 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 209 selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDUC 4400, Student Teaching Seminar Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee This course is founded on foundational research-based content and best practices in education concerning the topics of classroom management, assessment and professional development. Classroom management is focused on the exploration of means for creating and maintaining optimal learning environments and helping children and adolescents develop into considerate, responsible adults. Other components explored and revisited include classroom assessment, home/school communication and the roles and responsibilities of teaching. Students complete the professional E-Portfolio during this course.

EDUC 4461 Student Teaching in Elementary School Spanish Prerequisites: Approval to Student Teach by the Center for the Preparation of Professional Educators (CPPE) This course is a field-based student teaching experience in elementary school Spanish for the student preparing for all-level certification. The student teacher works with an experienced teacher in a school setting for one-half of an academic semester. This course must be taken concurrentlywith another four-hour student teaching course; this provides a full semester of student teaching experience.

EDUC 4462 Student Teaching in Secondary School Spanish Prerequisites: Approval to Student Teach by the Center for the Preparation of Professional Educators (CPPE) This course is a field-based student teaching experience in secondary school Spanish for the student preparing for all-level certification. The student teacher works with an experienced teacher in a school setting for one-half of an academic semester. This course must be taken concurrentlywith another four-hour student teaching course; this provides a full semester of student teaching experience.

EDUC 4471, Student Teaching in the EC-6 Classroom Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee. This course must be taken concurrentlywith another four-hour student teaching course; this provides a full semester of student teaching experience.

EDUC 4472, Student Teaching in Special Education Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee. This course must be taken concurrentlywith another four-hour student teaching course; this provides a full semester of student teaching experience.

EDUC 4481 SPECIAL TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

EDUC 4484, Student Teaching in Elementary PE Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 210 This course must be taken concurrentlywith another four-hour student teaching course; this provides a full semester of student teaching experience.

EDUC 4485, Student Teaching in Secondary PE Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee. This course must be taken concurrentlywith another four-hour student teaching course; this provides a full semester of student teaching experience.

EDUC 4486, Student Teaching in the ESL Classroom Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee. This course must be taken concurrentlywith another four-hour student teaching course; this provides a full semester of student teaching experience.

EDUC 4487, Student Teaching in the Bilingual Classroom Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee. This course must be taken concurrentlywith another four-hour student teaching course; this provides a full semester of student teaching experience.

EDUC 4489, Student Teaching in Pre-School Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee. This course must be taken concurrentlywith another four-hour student teaching course; this provides a full semester of student teaching experience.

EDUC 4493, Student Teaching in Elementary Art Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee. This course must be taken concurrentlywith another four-hour student teaching course; this provides a full semester of student teaching experience.

EDUC 4494, Student Teaching in Elementary School Music Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee. This course must be taken concurrentlywith another four-hour student teaching course; this provides a full semester of student teaching experience.

EDUC 4495, Student Teaching in Secondary School Subjects Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee. This course must be taken concurrentlywith another four-hour student teaching course; this provides a full semester of student teaching experience.

EDUC 4496, Student Teaching in Secondary Art Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee. This course must be taken concurrentlywith another four-hour student teaching course; this provides a full semester of student teaching experience.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 211

EDUC 4497, Student Teaching in Secondary School Choral Music Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee. This course must be taken concurrentlywith another four-hour student teaching course; this provides a full semester of student teaching experience.

EDUC 4498, Student Teaching in Secondary School Instrumental Music Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee. This course must be taken concurrentlywith another four-hour student teaching course; this provides a full semester of student teaching experience.

EDUC 4671 Student Teaching in the Bilingual EC-4 Classroom

Prerequisites: demonstration of second language proficiency and approval of the Teacher Education Committee. This course is a field-based student teaching experience in a bilingual classroom, where instruction is delivered in two languages. A student teacher works with an experienced teacher for twelve weeks. (Offered also as EDUC 5671.)

EDUC 4870, Student Teaching in the EC-4 Classroom Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.

EDUC 4871, Student Teaching in the Bilingual EC-4 Classroom Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.

EDUC 4872, Student Teaching in All-Level Special Education Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee. This course is a field-based student teaching experience in special education classroom for students preparing for all-level special education certification. A student teacher works with an experienced teacher for an academic semester.

EDUC 4873, Student Teaching in the EC-6 Classroom Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.

EDUC 4876, Student Teaching in the Bilingual Classroom Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.

EDUC 4891, Student Teaching in Secondary School Subjects Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 212 Education Committee.

EDUC 4892, Student Teaching in Elementary and Special Education Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.

EDUC 4893, Student Teaching in the Middle School Grades Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.

EDUC 4894, Student Teaching in the High School Grades Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and approval of the Teacher Education Committee.

EDUC 5101, ACP Internship I Prerequisites: Must have an ACP plan on file in the School of Education office and be employed in an EC-12 school as a teacher. This is a field-based course required for students in the HBU Alternative Certification Program (ACP). To be encolled in the course, the student must be employed as a teacher in an EC-12 state-accredited school. HBU faculty will provide regular supervision and support for the student during the semester to assist the student in becoming a successful and effective teacher. (Offered Fall and Spring only.)

EDUC 5181 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDUC 5201, ACP Internship II Prerequisite: EDUC 5101 This is a field-based course required for students in the HBU Alternative Certification Program (ACP). To be enrolled in the course, the student must be employed as a teacher in an EC-12 state-accredited school and have completed EDUC 5101 in the semester immediately prior (excluding summer). HBU faculty will provide regular supervision and support for the student during the semester to assist the student in becoming a successful and effective teacher. Preparation for the EC-12 Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities certification exam is provided during this course. (Offered Fall and Spring only.)

EDUC 5281 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDUC 5302 Multimedia Instructional Strategies

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 213 This course is part of the introductory sequence of courses designed to introduce and train educators in the appropriate applications of instructional technology. Information acquisition will focus on methodologies and appropriate use of multimedia as an instructional tool. Application of skills will focus on demonstrated proficiency in manipulation of text, graphics, and sound. Problem-solving activities will focus on the integration of multimedia programs as appropriate. Participants will complete the design and development of an individual multimedia project and a group multimedia project, using advanced technical features and multiple sources of media. Participants will learn to use multimedia tools to enhance their own communication, expand their repertoire of instructional strategies, and lead students in creating their own multimedia projects

EDUC 5305 Technology Enhanced Instructional Design Prerequisite: EDUC 5306 This course is designed to provide integrated and in-depth understanding of the principles and processes of technology-enhanced instructional design and curriculum development. Learning will be focused on the application of learner, instructional, and resource analyses with an emphasis on technology-enhanced resources, assessment, and computer-based curriculum management.

EDUC 5306 Educational Applications of Technology A broad spectrum of technology application is explored including the use of word processing, software evaluation, Internet use, multimedia, and telecommunications. Technology is used for communication, management, teaching, and learning. Researching the roll technology plays in digital natives of today and how that influences teaching and learning will be examined with special emphasis on how to change digital immigrant teachers methodology and pedagogy. Students will also be exposed to and begin to demonstrate competencies related to the Master Technology Teacher Standards.

EDUC 5320, Teaching Methodology for Secondary Teachers Prerequisite: Teacher Certification This course combines campus-based instruction with a minimum of 25 clock hours of field- based experience in observation and the planning and presenting of lessons for prospective student teachers or interns. An emphasis is placed upon lesson presentation skills; lesson preparation and planning, using a variety of teaching methods including technology; application of classroom management skills; and research into the teaching of the specific content area for which the student is being certified.

EDUC 5325, Educating Gifted Learners Prerequisite(s): None. This course presents an overview of the intellectual and developmental characteristics of the gifted and talented as well as an introduction to identification techniques, instructional approaches, educational programs, and special problems. The course focuses on classroom educational practices designed to meet the unique needs of the gifted and talented students. Historical, legal, and conceptual foundations of gifted education are examined as well as current research relevant to the education of gifted learners.

EDUC 5331 Mathematics for Pre-Adolescents This course prepares prospective and practicing preschool, elementary school and middle school teachers to teach mathematics effectively. Students overview all aspects of the PK-6 mathematics curriculum and acquire an in depth knowledge of the content, methods, and materials involved in the development of mathematical processes and of the number and

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 214 operations strand of preschool, elementary, and middle school mathematics. Classroom use of models and manipulatives is emphasized.

EDUC 5335 Clinical Teaching in the 4-8 Classroom Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and the approval of the Teacher Education Committee This is a field-based student teaching experience in a middle grade (4-8) for students seeking certification in grades 4-8. The student teacher works with an experienced teacher in a school setting each school day for 12 weeks.

EDUC 5340 Social Studies for Pre-Adolescents Prerequisite: EDUC 5313, 5314, 6302, or 6312 (or teacher certification) This course provides an exploration of social studies content and skills as well as teaching/learning materials and strategies for developing content and skills at preschool through grade 6 levels. Essential knowledge and skills are emphasized. Field-based experiences and technology applications are required. (Offered also as INDC 4340)

EDUC 5350 Science for Pre-Adolescents Prerequisite: None. This course is an exploration of teaching science for educators in preschool through grade 6. Graduate students will examine a variety of science curricula as well as teaching/learning materials and strategies for developing new content and skills at preschool through grade 6 levels. Applications of knowledge and skills are emphasized. Technology applications are required.

EDUC 5360, Essential Elements of Math Prerequisite: Teacher Certification. Any one Curriculum and Instruction course (EDUC 6202, 6312, or 6322). This course prepares prospective and practicing preschool, elementary school and middle school teachers to teach mathematics effectively. Students acquire an in-depth knowledge of the content, methods, and materials involved in the development of mathematical processes and in development of the number and operations strand of preschool, elementary, and middle school mathematics. Classroom applications and use of models and manipulatives are emphasized. Fieldwork in which students teach mathematics in an elementary or middle school is required.

EDUC 5361 Student Teaching in Elementary School Spanish Prerequisites: Approval to Student Teach by the Center for the Preparation of Professional Educators (CPPE) This course is a field-based student teaching experience in elementary school Spanish for the student preparing for all-level certification. The student teacher works with an experienced teacher in a school setting for one-half of an academic semester. This must be combined with another four-hour student teaching course/experience so that the student comletes a full semester of student teaching.

EDUC 5362 Student Teaching in Secondary School Spanish Prerequisites: Approval to Student Teach by the Center for the Preparation of Professional Educators (CPPE) This course is a field-based student teaching experience in secondary school Spanish for the student preparing for all-level certification. The student teacher works with an experienced teacher in a school setting for one-half of an academic semester. This must be combined with another four-hour student teaching course/experience so that the student comletes a full semester

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 215 of student teaching.

EDUC 5371 CLINICAL TEACH:EC-6 CLASSROOM For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

EDUC 5372 Clinical Teaching in Special Education This course is a field-based student teaching experience consisting of placement in a special education classroom. (Offered also as EDUC 4372.)

EDUC 5373 Clinical Teaching in the 7-12 Classroom Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and the approval of the Teacher Education Committee. This is a field-based student teaching experience in a secondary grade (8-12) for students seeking certification in grades 7-12. The student teacher works with an experienced teacher in a school setting each school day for 12 weeks.

EDUC 5374 Clinical Teaching in EC-6/Special Education EC-12 Classrooms Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program and the approval of the Teacher Education Committee. A completed student teaching application must be submitted by the deadline and approved prior to registering for this course. This is a field-based student teaching experience in both elementary and secondary grades. The student teaching experience is divided between general and special education classes. This experience is for students seeking certification in EC-6 generalist with All-Level Special Education. The student teacher works with an experienced teacher in a school setting each school day for 12 weeks.

EDUC 5375 Essential Elements of Fine Arts and PE/Health This course explores EC-6 fine arts, PE and Health content and methodology. It includes development of knowledge skills, and dispositions identified in the art, music, theatre, PE and Health TEKS (Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills), as well as ways to integrate into learning in other content areas.

EDUC 5380, Essential Elements of Social Studies Prerequisites: EDUC 6302 or 6312. This course provides an in-depth study of social studies content and skills, as well as teaching/learning materials and strategies for developing content and skills at preschool through grade 12 levels. Teachers will apply content knowledge as they learn to implement and enhance classroom essential knowledge and skills; construct assessments that assess in a differentiated manner using multiple approaches to assessment; and create diagnostic assessment tools. Emphasis is placed on developing a professional perspective and knowledge base designed for service as a teacher leader at campus/district/national levels. Technology integration to enhance instruction is an integral element of the course.

EDUC 5381 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 216 EDUC 5384 Clinical Teaching in Elementary Physical Education This course is a field-based teaching experience in elementary school physical education for the student preparing for all-level physical education certification. The student teacher works with an experienced teacher in a school setting for one-half of an academic quarter. (Offered also as EDUC 4384.)

EDUC 5385 Clinical Teaching in Secondary Physical Education This course is a field-based teaching experience in secondary school physical education for the student preparing for all-level physical education certification. The student teacher works with an experienced teacher for one-half of an academic quarter. (Offered also as EDUC 4385.)

EDUC 5386 Clinical Teaching in the ESL Classroom This course is a field-based student teaching experience in the ESL classroom. The student teacher works with an experienced teacher in the ESL school setting for one-half of an academic quarter. (Offered also as EDUC 4386.)

EDUC 5390 Clinical Teaching in Elementary Grades (Offered also as EDUC 4390.)

EDUC 5393 Clinical Teaching in Elementary School Art This course is a field-based student teaching experience in elementary school art for the student preparing for all-level certification. The student teacher works with an experienced teacher in a school setting for one-half of an academic quarter. (Offered also as EDUC 4393.)

EDUC 5394 Clinical Teaching in Elementary School Music This course is a field-based student teaching experience in elementary school music for the student preparing for all-level certification. The student teacher works with an experienced teacher in a school setting for one-half of an academic quarter. (Offered also as EDUC 4394.)

EDUC 5396 Clinical Teaching in Secondary School Art This course is a field-based student teaching experience in secondary school art for the student preparing for all-level certification. The student teacher works with an experienced teacher in a school setting for one-half of an academic quarter. (Offered also as EDUC 4396.)

EDUC 5397 Clinical Teaching in Secondary School Choral Music This course is a field-based student teaching experience in secondary school choral music for the student preparing for all-level certification. The student teacher works with an experienced teacher in a school setting for one-half of an academic quarter. (Offered also as EDUC 4397.)

EDUC 5398 Clinical Teaching in Secondary School Instrumental Music This course is a field-based student teaching experience in secondary school instrumental and/or band music for the student preparing for all-level certification. The student teacher works with an experienced teacher in a school setting for one-half of an academic quarter. (Offered also as EDUC 4398.)

EDUC 5672 ST TCH:EC-12 SP EDUC CLASSRM For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

EDUC 5673 Clinical Steaching in the EC-6 Classroom

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 217

EDUC 5674 Clinical Teaching in the EC-6 Bilingual Classroom

EDUC 5691 Clinical Teaching in Secondary School Subjects Prerequisite: Approval of the Teacher Education Committee This course is a field-based student teaching experience in a secondary school for students seeking secondary school certification. The student teacher works with an experienced teacher for twelve weeks. (Offered also as EDUC 4691.)

EDUC 5693 Clinical Teaching in Middle Grades

EDUC 5694, Clinical Teaching in High School Grades Prerequisite: Approval of the Teacher Education Committee This course is a field-based student teaching experience in grades 8-12 for students seeking certification in grades 8-12. The student teacher works with an experienced teacher in a school setting each school day for twelve weeks. (Offered also as EDUC 4694.)

EDUC 5870 ST TCH: EC-4 CLASSROOM For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

EDUC 5891 ST TCH: SECONDARY SCH SUBJ For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

EDUC 5894 ST TCH: HIGH SCHOOL GRADES For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

EDUC 6181 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDUC 5181, 5281, 5381, 6181, 6281, 6381 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

EDUC 6301 Classroom Management A study of a broad spectrum of approaches to classroom management, including authoritarian, behavior-modification, group-process, instructional, and psycho-emotional-climate orientations. Examination of research regarding effective classroom management. Exploration of multiple strategies for handling common classroom management problems.(Offered also as EDAD 6307.)

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 218 EDUC 6302 Elementary School Curriculum and Instruction This course provides a study of influencing factors and guiding principles for curriculum and instruction in the elementary school. It includes practical experience in instructional design as well as first-hand teaching experiences.

EDUC 6304 Children, Adolescents, and Learning This course combines a study of learning (including both cognitive and behavioral perspectives), human development (childhood through adolescence), and assessment (traditional and performance; teacher-made and standardized). Related constructs such as motivation and self- esteem are explored.

EDUC 6307 Design of Print-Based Media Prerequisites: EDUC 5306 Information acquisition activities include analysis of graphic and text layout design for various print-based media. Application competencies include creation and evaluation of documents using advanced standards and styles of publishing. Problem-solving activities will focus on matching the appropriate production software.

EDUC 6308 Distance Learning Prerequisites: EDUC 5306 Information acquisition focuses on case studies and research efforts documenting effective and ineffective applications of distance learning technologies. Application of research findings will lead to the development of a distance learning prospectus. By participating in distance learning demonstrations and simulations, students will apply and test instructional strategies appropriate for learners in a remote learning scenario. Problem-solving activities will include delivery system design and program design.

EDUC 6312 Secondary School Curriculum and Instruction This course provides a study of influencing factors and guiding principles for curriculum and instruction in the secondary school. It includes practical experience in instructional design as well as first-hand teaching experiences.

EDUC 6315, American Educational Reform In this course of study the historical, philosophical, sociological and political influences of the past, present, and future issues and trends of American education are examined. Emphasis is placed on interconnectivity and impact on teaching and learning in both private and public venues. Study framed within this context provides opportunity for the professional educator to develop a deeper understanding of the current challenges faced in educational settings. A broad selection of readings range from traditional classical works to current perspectives on challenging issues such as: demographics, diversity, vouchers, charter schools, home schooling, accountability, high-stakes testing, special needs, giftedness, bilingual instruction, technology, and more.

EDUC 6320 Research Techniques and Procedures A study of investigations relating to schooling with applications suitable to the role of the principal. Includes examination of reports from abstracts and original sources, valid research criteria in making written evaluations, and applications in specific field settings. (Offered also as EDAD 6310 and PSYC 6320.)

EDUC 6322 Curriculum and Instruction: Grades K-12

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 219 This course provides a study of influencing factors and guiding principles for curriculum and instruction in grades K-12. It includes practical experience in instructional design as well as first- hand teaching experiences. It is designed to provide integrated and in-depth understandings of principles and processes for curriculum and instruction, as well as practical experiences in planning and facilitating learning (instructional design, media/technology usage, and classroom teaching). The role of the student and teacher in the teacher-learning process as well as current Texas curriculum requirements, including Essential Knowledge and Skills, are explored.

EDUC 6330 Teaching Methodology for the Professional Structured to meet the needs of those professionals who must design, organize, and present materials to various target populations, this graduate level course focuses on teaching methods, media, and evaluation of the learning process.

EDUC 6370 Critical Issues in Teaching Reading in the Elementary School An analysis of issues important to effective development of reading abilities during the elementary school years. Emphasis is placed upon teaching comprehension processes and understanding factors which affect comprehension processes.

EDUC 6371 Critical Issues in Teaching Reading in the Secondary School An analysis of issues important to effective development of reading abilities during the secondary school years. Emphasis is placed upon teaching comprehension processes and understanding factors which affect comprehension processes.

EDUC 6381 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 220 English (ENGL) Course Descriptions

See Profesional Writing (WRIT) for writing courses.

ENGL 1303 Basic Grammar and Composition A prerequisite course for enrollment in ENGL 1313 for students scoring below 18 on the English section of the ACT or below 480 on the SAT. Students with no available test scores will also be enrolled in ENGL 1303. ENGL 1303 is an introduction to the principles of composition accomplished through the study of grammar, standard English usage, and rhetorical techniques and strategies. This course emphasizes basic grammar and composition and focuses on sentence structure and on organizing and developing the short essay. Students must also register for one writing lab, ENGL 1003 which meets for two hours weekly. ENGL 1303 does not meet the Smith College requirements for either the BA or the BS degree but does carry elective credit.

ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I Prerequisite: SAT Essay Subscore 08 or SAT Writing 500 or ACT English 22 or ENGL 1303 with a minimum grade of C This course teaches the fundamentals of college reading, thinking, and writing from a classical, Christian perspective. Writing for Wisdom grounds students in a deep understanding of and appreciation for proper standards of written English including mechanical skills and forms while using writing as a vehicle for intellectual, emotional, ethical, and spiritual wrestling. It moves past the kinds of fashionable current event topics normally assigned in freshmen Composition classes. Rather, students engage wider issues and questions: Who am I? Why am I here? What is my purpose? How do I know I am of value? Finally, through a close study of a series of classical works from our Greco-Roman and Judeo-Christian heritage, students will explore their status as citizens of a deliberative democracy and seek to define, and manifest in their lives, the nature of the Good, the True, and the Beautiful.

ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II Prerequisite: ENGL 1320 This course continues the study of composition and rhetoric introduced in English 1320: Writing for Wisdom I. Students will gain an understanding of why reading literatue is deeply important for Christians, learn the conventions of such literary genres as poems, stories, novels, and plays, study methods of literary analysis, interpret literature from a Biblical perspective through the exploration of Biblical archetypes, typology, language constructions, and metaphor in classic works of English literature, and learn to write well-constructed and well-written arguments about literature and life in standard English including the use of research in MLA format and the writing of a fully developed research paper.

ENGL 2302 CHRI INTELLECTUAL TRAD II For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Humanities.

ENGL 2310 Walking to Piraeus: Conversations with Great Minds of the Ancient World Prerequisite: Admission to Honors College

ENGL 2315 Great Works of Literature I Prerequisite: ENGL 1320, 1330 A reading course in the literary heritage of western civilization. This course includes readings Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 221 from the Greeks, the Romans, and the Middle Ages.

ENGL 2320 Faith, Reason and Romance: The Struggle for the Medieval Mind Prerequisite: Admission to Honors College

ENGL 2325, Great Works of Literature II Prerequisite: ENGL 1320, 1330 A reading course in the literary heritage of western civilization. This course includes readings from the 18th century to the present.

ENGL 2353 Continental Literature Prerequisites: ENGL 1313,1323, or their equivalents. This course acquaints students with the significant literature written in continental Europe. All material read is in English translation. No works written in the Americas or in England are included.

ENGL 2363 Masterworks: Poetry Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 and 1323. This course shows students how to read poetry and allows them to increase their abilities to read, understand and enjoy many types of poetry from many periods.

ENGL 2364 Masterworks: Fiction Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 and 1323. This course acquaints students with significant masterpieces of short fiction from all over the world, although the majority selected stem from the Western tradition. Students become active and responsive readers and develop insights into the imaginative and intellectual dimensions of shorter fiction.

ENGL 2365 Masterworks: Drama Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 and 1323. This course acquaints students with some of the most popular plays, ranging over the entire spectrum of Western literary history. Students learn to identify the aims and techniques of the theater and develop an appreciation of those qualities that produce vital and exiting stage productions.

ENGL 2367 Masterworks: English Literature Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 and 1323. This course acquaints students with selected major works of English literature from various periods.

ENGL 2368 Masterworks: American Literature Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 and 1323. This course acquaints students with selected major works of American literature.

ENGL 3313 English Literature I Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 and 1323. A survey of the historical development of English literature from its beginning through the eighteenth century: historical background and major authors of each period. The course will provide requisite information for advanced study in major periods of English literature. For

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 222 English majors or by permission of the instructor.

ENGL 3321 Special Topics Prerequisites: ENGL 1320 and 1330. Topics are determined by faculty and interested students with the approval of the Department Chair. Ethnic literature, science fiction, and Christ archetypes in literature are examples of possible areas of interest.

ENGL 3323 English Literature II Prerequisites: ENGL 1320 and 1330. A survey of the historical development of English literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: historical background and major authors of each period. The course will provide requisite information for advanced study in major periods of English literature. For English majors or by permission of the instructor.

ENGL 3331 American Literature I Prerequisites: ENGL 1320 and 1330. This course examines the beginnings of America¿s literary self-definition in the Colonial Period and covers the rise of American Romanticism and its culmination in writers such as Emerson, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, and Dickinson. For English majors or by permission of the instructor.

ENGL 3332 American Literature II Prerequisites: ENGL 1320 and 1330. This course examines American literary trends after the Civil War, including Realism, Naturalism, and Modernism. Writers under consideration include Twain, S. Crane, Frost, Stevens, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and Faulkner. For English majors or by permission of the instructor.

ENGL 3334 Literature and Culture of the Southwest Prerequisites: 1320 and 1330. The course addresses the way the American West has shaped American culture and popular culture. It examines the Frontier Myth, Manifest Destiny, Regeneration through Violence, America¿s cowboy archetype, the ¿savage¿ archetype, and the American dream. Students read literature written by authors from a variety of cultures, including Anglo, Mexican-American, and Native American. Students view television shows and films to examine how popular culture has created and enforced stereotypes. The course is designed for non-majors seeking upper level elective credit or to fulfill Smith College requirements.

ENGL 3342, Women¿s Literature Prerequisites: ENGL 1320 and 1330. This course will acquaint students with literature by and about women from the medieval period to the present. Through a study of various literary genres, students will learn that the issues that concern women transcend time, place, race, religion, and ethnicity. This course is designed for non-English majors seeking upper level elective credit or to fulfill Smith College requirements and for persons seeking certification in Language Arts Grades 6-8 and Grades 8-12.

ENGL 3346 Austen and the Brontes Prerequisites: ENGL 1320 and 1330. This course covers selected novels of Jane Austen and Charlotte, Emily, and Anne Bronte,

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 223 influential 19th century writers who wrote of affairs of the heart with insight and passion. Students will study the authors¿ social and intellectual milieu and discuss their works and compare them to some of the film adaptations of these popular works.

ENGL 3363 Film Studies Prerequisites: ENGL 1320 and 1330 or their equivalents. An introduction to the art of film. Students are provided with a methodology and a vocabulary for understanding film and are encouraged to consider how different directors guide and shape our perceptions of reality, how different genres generate their own unique vision of the world and of humanity, how the multi-media aspects of film affect us as viewers, how film provides us with a record of cultural values and cultural change, and how screen writers, actors, directors, and cinematographers translate literary genres into visual terms. This course may not be used as a Humanities selection in the Smith College requirements. It may be used for elective credit.

ENGL 3370 Hispanic Literature Prerequisites: ENGL 1320 and 1330. The study of major periods and masterworks of Hispanic literature, read and discussed in English. Introduces literary/cultural figures of medieval and early modern Spain (El Cid, Don Quixote, Don Juan); and includes major 20th-century writers, as well as literary movements that were propagated from Latin America to the rest of the literary world (e.g., magical realism). This course may not be used to fulfill requirements for the Spanish major. (Offered also as SPAN 3370.)

ENGL 3371, Chronicles of Narnia Prerequisites: ENGL 1320 and 1330 Students complete a close reading of the seven novels that make up the Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis. Students assess how and to what extent the Chronicles successfully foster spiritual maturity, strength of character, and moral virtue. Special focus will be placed on the Christian allegories that underlie each of the novels.

ENGL 3372 Multicultural Literature Prerequisites: ENGL 1320 and 1330. Students study ethnic literatures, including works by authors from the following cultural voices: North American Indian, African American, Mexican American, Asian American, and Americans of Middle Eastern descent.

ENGL 3373 Shakespeare Prerequisites: ENGL 1320 and 1330. A study of selected tragedies, history plays, and comedies, with emphasis on the major tragedies. Some consideration will be given to the cultural and philosophical characteristics of the Elizabethan Age as they are reflected in the drama of Shakespeare. For English majors or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 3377, Lord of the Rings Prerequisites: ENGL 1320, 1330 Students complete readings from Beowulf and selected Arthurian romances and a close reading of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. The course also includes an overview of The Silmarillion and a discussion of how Tolkien was influenced by Norse mythology, Beowulf, Arthurian Romances, his Catholic faith, and his friendship with C. S. Lewis.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 224 ENGL 3378, The Legacy of Greece Prerequisites: ENGL 1320, 1330 This course takes students on an exciting journey through the great literary works of Ancient Greece: Homer's Iliad and Odyssey; Aeschylus' Oresteia (Agamemnon, Libation Bearers, Eumenides), Sophocles' Oedipus, Antigone, Women of Trachis, and Philoctetes; Euripides' Medea, Hippolytus and Bacchae. The course examines the nature of the epic and tragic hero and those universal questions we all must answer for ourselves: Who am I?, What is my purpose?, How do I know I am of value? The course will also offer an overview of ancient Greek history and consider Greece's legacy for Western civilization.

ENGL 3379, The Legacy of Rome Prerequisites: ENGL 1320, 1330 This course takes students on an exciting journey through the great literary works of Ancient Rome and Medieval Italy: Virgil's Aeneid; Ovid's Metamorphoses, Dante's Divine Comedy: Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso. The course examines the nature of the classical and medieval epic heho and those universal questions we all must answer for ourselves: Who am I?, What is my purpose?, How do I know I am of value? The course will also offer an overview of ancient Roman history, consider Rome's legacy for Western civilization, and discuss how Dante, while imitating pagan writers, was able to fashion a Christian epic..

ENGL 3381 SPECIAL TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Humanities.

ENGL 3384 Religion in American Literature and Film Prerequisites: ENGL 1320 and 1330 Students read novels, including Flannery O'Connor's Wise Blood, Davis Grubb's Night of the Hunter (screenplay by James Agee), Sinclair Lewis's Elmer Gantry, and Marilyn Robinson's Gilead. Students also view films based on these and other novels that portray religion in 20th century American society, and learn to analyze both genres for plot, characterization, metaphors, themes and other literary elements.

ENGL 4304, Methods of Teaching English as a Second Language Prerequisites: EDUC 4301 and 4312 or permission of the instructor. Theories, pedagogical considerations and current methodoogy in the teaching of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills for second languages and target cultures. Emphasis on developing interpersonal communication skills of beginning and intermediate ESL students. (Offered as EDBI 4304, FREN 4304, and SPAN 4304.)

ENGL 4311 Literary Criticism Prerequisites: ENGL 1320, 1330 or HNRS 2310, 2340 A survey of literary theory from Plato to Postmodernism. The course provides an understanding of the different theoretical structures, schools, and methodologies that have influenced our understanding and appreciation of literature. It explores the presuppositions upon which each theoretical system is founded and the special terminology associated with each system. Students planning to pursue a graduate degree are strongly encouraged to take this course.

ENGL 4313 Periods of English Literature Prerequisite: ENGL 1320, ENGL 1330 Intensive study of the major works of one of the following periods: (a) The Middle Ages, (b) The

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 225 Renaissance, (c) The Seventeenth Century, (d) The Eighteenth Century, (e) The Romantic Age, (f) The Victorian Age, or (g) The Twentieth Century.

ENGL 4314 Periods of English Literature Prerequisite: ENGL 1320, 1330 Intensive study of the major works of one of the following periods: (a) The Middle Ages, (b) The Renaissance, (c) The Seventeenth Century, (d) The Eighteenth Century, (e) The Romantic Age, (f) The Victorian Age, or (g) The Twentieth Century.

ENGL 4315 Periods of English Literature Prerequisite: ENGL 1320, 1330. Intensive study of the major works of one of the following periods: (a) The Middle Ages, (b) The Renaissance, (c) The Seventeenth Century, (d) The Eighteenth Century, (e) The Romantic Age, (f) The Victorian Age, or (g) The Twentieth Century.

ENGL 4316 Periods of English Literature Prerequisite: ENGL 1320, 1330 Intensive study of the major works of one of the following periods: (a) The Middle Ages, (b) The Renaissance, (c) The Seventeenth Century, (d) The Eighteenth Century, (e) The Romantic Age, (f) The Victorian Age, or (g) The Twentieth Century.

ENGL 4317 Periods of English Literature Prerequisite: ENGL1320, 1330 Intensive study of the major works of one of the following periods: (a) The Middle Ages, (b) The Renaissance, (c) The Seventeenth Century, (d) The Eighteenth Century, (e) The Romantic Age, (f) The Victorian Age, or (g) The Twentieth Century.

ENGL 4318 Periods of English Literature Prerequisite: ENGL 1320, 1330 Intensive study of the major works of one of the following periods: (a) The Middle Ages, (b) The Renaissance, (c) The Seventeenth Century, (d) The Eighteenth Century, (e) The Romantic Age, (f) The Victorian Age, or (g) The Twentieth Century.

ENGL 4319 Periods of English Literature Prerequisite: ENGL 1320, 1330 Intensive study of the major works of one of the following periods: (a) The Middle Ages, (b) The Renaissance, (c) The Seventeenth Century, (d) The Eighteenth Century, (e) The Romantic Age, (f) The Victorian Age, or (g) The Twentieth Century.

ENGL 4323 Periods of American Literature Prerequisite: ENGL 1320, 1330 Intensive study of the major works of one of the following periods: (a) Age of Romanticism, (b) Age of Realism and Naturalism, or (c) The Twentieth Century.

ENGL 4324 Periods of American Literature Prerequisite: ENGL 1320, 1330 Intensive study of the major works of one of the following periods: (a) Age of Romanticism, (b) Age of Realism and Naturalism, or (c) The Twentieth Century.

ENGL 4325 Periods of American Literature

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 226 Prerequisite: ENGL 1320, 1330 Intensive study of the major works of one of the following periods: (a) Age of Romanticism, (b) Age of Realism and Naturalism, or (c) The Twentieth Century.

ENGL 4381, Special Topics/Independent Study Prerequisites: ENGL 1320, 1330

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 227 Engineering Science (ENGR) Course Descriptions

ENGR 1301 Introduction to Engineering Prerequisites: MATH 1313 and 1323 or the equivalent An introduction to the engineering profession, including registration, ethics, and an introduction to the different fields of engineering. Topics include: a review of basic mathematical skills required for engineering, including operations with vectors, matrices, and complex numbers; the use of graphing calculators and computer algebra systems; an introduction to engineering analysis and design techniques; and the use of word processors, spreadsheets, and computer- aided-design software in engineering. Includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

ENGR 1302, Introduction to Engineering II Prerequisite: ENGR 1301 A continuation of ENGR 1301. Topics include: explorations of basic mechanics, acoustics, optics, thermodynamics, analog and digital electronics, and computer systems. This course also covers additional mathematical skills required for engineering: numerical techniques, statistics, nonlinear systems, iterative systems, and chaotic behavior. Includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 228 Educational Psychology (EPSY) Course Descriptions

EPSY 5310 ETHICAL/PROF ISSUES:PSYC/COUN For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

EPSY 5313, Methods and Techniques in Counseling This course will introduce the student to those active listening skills which communicate the qualities of empathy, genuineness and unconditional positive regard. The course will include role-playing and videotaped exercises. Other selected interventions will be included.

EPSY 5323 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy Comprehensive and intensive study of major theoretical orientations in counseling and psychotherapy, stressing implications for research and practice. Includes experiences in micro- counseling and other simulations to develop counseling skills. (Offered also as PSYC 4323/5323.)

EPSY 5330 Psychology of Learning A course stressing the contributions of major learning theories to understanding behavior. Particular attention is paid to human learning and the applicability of learning theory to the educational process as well as to goal attainments. (Offered also as PSYC 4330, EDUC 4330, PSYC 5330.)

EPSY 5363 Principles of Guidance Introduction to philosophical and historical foundations of guidance and counseling, stressing practical problems of organizing and implementing guidance programs in the secondary and elementary schools. Consideration is given to professional issues, present and future, as they impact the role and function of the counselor. Includes the design of a guidance and counseling program for an elementary, secondary, or postsecondary institution.

EPSY 5381 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need. Permission of the department required.

EPSY 6181 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need. Permission of the department required.

EPSY 6191 Counseling Practicum This course includes supervised field experience in counseling with emphasis on methods and techniques and evaluation. Competence in counseling is developed.

EPSY 6192 Counseling Practicum This course includes supervised field experience in counseling with emphasis on methods and techniques and evaluation. Competence in counseling is developed.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 229 EPSY 6281 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need. Permission of the department required.

EPSY 6301 Principles of Human Development Intensive study and examination of literature and theory in developmental psychology as it relates to persons through the lifespan from infancy through adulthood. Social and personality development, intellectual development, language acquisition, and developmental expectations are emphasized. The unique concerns of the exceptional child are studied as well as in-depth, case-study skill development. (Offered also as PSYC 6301.)

EPSY 6302 Measurement and Appraisal Principles and techniques of psychological measurement are emphasized. Major instruments are surveyed, exclusive of projective measures and individual intellectual measures. The knowledge and skills covered can apply in a variety of settings: agencies, clinics, schools, and businesses. Uses and critical evaluation of achievement, aptitude, interest, and non-projective personality tests are included, as are experiences in administering and scoring of tests, and ethical standards for uses of tests. (Offered also as PSYC 6302.)

EPSY 6305 Individual Psychological Evaluation Prerequisite: EPSY 6302 Review of theory underlying individual ability tests; supervised practice in test administration, scoring, and interpretation. Skills in report preparation are addressed. The Wechsler scales are emphasized. (Offered also as EDSP/PSYC 6305.)

EPSY 6306 Career Information and Career Counseling Prerequisite: EPSY 6302 Methods and processes of collecting, organizing, evaluating, and interpreting educational, occupational, and personal-social information. Theories of career development are included as well as the counselor¿s role in career education. Career interest inventories and other measures are reviewed with reference to their utility in career counseling.

EPSY 6308 Methods of Group Guidance Prerequisite: EPSY 5323 or permission of the instructor Group aspects of student personnel and clinical work for counselors, administrators, and other professionals dealing in services where group counseling is provided. Theory and research relevant to providing group counseling to various populations are emphasized. Didactic and experiential activities are offered. (Offered also as PSYC 6308.)

EPSY 6310 CLINICAL PSYCHOPATHOLOGY For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

EPSY 6381 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest and special workshops. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 40 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and need. Permission of the department required.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 230 Finance (FINA) Course Descriptions

FINA 3315 Security Markets and Financial Institutions Prerequisite: FINA 3320 An introduction to the US financial system. Topics include interest rate theory, financial markets such as money markets and capital markets including stock and bond markets, and financial institutions such as banks and other depository institutions, finance companies, insurance companies, investment companies, pension funds, securities firms. (Offered also as ECON 3315.)

FINA 3320 Corporate Finance Prerequisites: ACCT 2301, BUSA 2311, ECON 2311 or 2302 Introduction to the basic concepts, principles, and analytical techniques of financial management. Topics include financial planning and analysis, risk and return, time value of money, valuation and capital budgeting. The following key aspects of finance will be emphasized ¿ net present value, cash flows, and the tradeoff between risk and return.

FINA 3322 Introduction to Risk Management PREREQ: FINA 3320 This course provides an introduction to corporate risk management by combining concepts, tools, and techniques from finance and related disciplines such as economics and statistics. It discusses the identification, measurement, and management of risk from both personal and corporate perspectives. Topics covered include how to characterize and measure risks, compare and price risk, evaluate the effects that risk has upon stakeholder incentives and firm value, etc.

FINA 3330 International Finance Prerequisite: FINA 3320 and WRIT 3310 A study of the theories and practices of international trade and finance, direction and composition of world trade, institutions for facilitating trade, international payments, capital movement, exchange rates. (Offered also as ECON 3330.)

FINA 4307 Investment Principles Prerequisite: FINA 3320 An introductory investment course designed to teach students how to make investment decisions. It helps prepare students become investment professionals and financial planners. It analyzes different types of investment products and discusses the characteristics of different kinds of investors for purposes of developing an effective investment policy. Topics include debt securities, equity securities, derivative securities, security analysis, and portfolio management. The course provides the first good step for those students who are interested in obtaining the CFP® (Certified Financial Planner) certification or the CFA® (Charted Financial Analyst) charter. (Offered also as ECON 4307.)

FINA 4318 Corporate Financial Management Prerequisite: FINA 3320 This course will examine the theories and practice of corporate finance and provide practical solutions to the problems faced by financial managers and analysts. This course will demonstrate the problems of utilizing financial decision making tools under uncertainty, establish a framework for the analysis of financial problems, and illustrate the breadth of financial decision making.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 231 FINA 4322 Options and Futures Prerequisite: FINA 4307 The objective of this course is to give students an understanding of the wide range of derivative financial securities, including options and futures, and better prepare them for the types of careers available in today¿s complex financial world. Students will learn how these securities are priced and used in risk management and speculative strategies by individuals and companies.

FINA 4330, Financial Analysis and Modeling Prerequisite: FINA 4318 This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of financial modeling using the theories, concepts, and tools covered in FINA 3310, Corporate Finance, and FINA 4318, Corporate Financial Management. Extensive application of spreadsheet models incorporating real life financial data is used to familiarize students with the methodology in financial analysis and financial decision-making. Specific emphasis is on the interpretation of financial statements and their forecasts in support of planning, budgeting, and asset, as well as corporate, valuation objectives.

FINA 4181, 4281, 4381 Special Topics Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean of the School of Business Directed study of a minimum of thirty clock hours for each hour of credit. Provides an opportunity for finance majors to conduct detailed investigations of selected finance problems.

FINA 5260, Principles of Finance An introduction to the basic theory and tools of financial management. Topics include financial statement analysis, risk and return, time value of money, and security valuation.

FINA 6330 Financial Management Application of current financial analysis techniques within the firm. Topics covered include capital budgeting techniques, investment analysis, capital structure decisions, financial planning, and working capital management. The course includes review of multinational or global corporations and multinational versus domestic financial management. This course also looks at business ethics and social responsibility by firms, including agency problem, management compensation, and executive stock options. Legal aspects are considered throughout the course and involve Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), bankruptcy, reorganizations, liquidation proceedings, initial offerings (IPO¿s) and mergers, leveraged buyouts (LBO¿s), divestitures, and holding companies. Graduate Business programs only.

FINA 6331 Money, Banking, and Financial Institutions Prerequisite: FINA 6330 A study of the role of money and financial institutions in the economic system. This includes theories of money and the nature and function of institutions providing financial services. Graduate Business programs only.

FINA 6332 Investments Prerequisite: FINA 6330 A detailed analysis of the types of investment media integrated with the basic concepts of portfolio selection, diversification, and risk management. Sophisticated investment techniques and strategy will be utilized. Graduate Business programs only.

FINA 6333 International Finance

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 232 Prerequisite: FINA 6330 or ACCT 5460 Studies of the factors that influence international financial decision making and the institutions and instruments that facilitate international trade and investment. Includes the international payments system, foreign exchange rates, and international capital movements. Graduate Business programs only.

FINA 6335 Risk Management Prerequisite: FINA 6330 Decision-making under uncertainty and the management of risk by corporations, recognizing the relationship between risk management and the overall goals of the firm. Emphasis is placed upon the identification, measurement and management of corporate risks. Risk exposures due to complex financial structures are also covered in this course. Graduate Business programs only.

FINA 6336, Applied Financial Management Prerequisite: FINA 6330 An active, hands-on class that applies financial theory to real world problems in a case study environment. Students, acting in the role of financial managers, financial consultants, or firm owners, will use financial planning and financial analytical skills to make decisions about capital budgeting, capital structure, dividends, different financing tactics, enterprise valuation, and acquisitions and buyouts. Graduate Business programs only.

FINA 6338, Financial Management for HRM This course shows how to apply current financial analysis techniques within the firm. Topics covered include capital budgeting techniques, investment analysis, capital structure decisions, financial planning, and working capital management. The course includes review of financial instruments like preferred stock, bonds, options, and futures. Emphasis is placed on the use of spreadsheets to develop financial models. The course also provides an overview of the major types of Financial Information Systems, such as AIS, EIS, DSS, and ERPs. MS-HRM Program only.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 233 Freshman Year Seminar (FYS) Course Descriptions

FYS 1100 FRESHMAN YEAR SEMINAR For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the Smith College of Liberal Arts.

FYS 1300 Freshman Year Seminar The ultimate purpose of college is student learning. The purpose of the first-year seminar is to help the new student begin exploring how to make his or her education, both in and out of the classroom, relevant and meaningful. Emphasis is on assisting the student in becoming aware of the spectrum of learning opportunities at this university, directing the student to the academic, social, cultural, recreational, and spiritual resources and opportunities to the university and teaching the new student how to effectively utilize and take part in these as a new member of the university community.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 234 Government (GOVT) Course Descriptions

GOVT 2313 American and Texas Government A survey of the structure and operation of the national and Texas governments. This course is required for certification to teach in the public schools of Texas.

GOVT 2334, Campaigns and Elections An analysis of the American electoral system and political campaigns. This course focuses on political parties, campaign strategy, the electoral process, public opinion, and voter turnout.

GOFT 2343, Public Policy This course will examine policy issues at the national level including crime, welfare, healthcare, the environment, taxation, immigration, defense, and education. The course will not only emphasize policy content, but also will focus upon the policy process, the influence of various political personalities on shaping public policy, and policy evaluation.

GOVT 2350, Introduction to Criminal Justice This course is designed to provide an introduction into ciminal justice. It will improve one's basic understanding of crime and the criminal justice systems and familiarize one with the key concepts and terminology utilized in the field by discussing the role of the core elements: police, courts, and corrections. It will force students to examine individual rights protected by the constitution and balance them against a community's need for public safety and public order. It highlights the complexities of the criminal justice discipline and encourages students to think critically and employ ethical reasoning by presenting real-life examples faced by criminal justice practitioners and asking the student to balance values, criminal procedures, and the law when coming up with solutions. (This course is usable under the Public Law Option of the Degree Plan.)

GOVT 2360 Understanding Politics This course explores the purpose and function of government from both theoretical and applied perspectives. Students will read various foundational theories of government, understand different ways in which governments can be designed and implemented, and examine the working governments of countries other than the United States.

GOVT 3340 Legal Aspects of Criminal Justice This course is designed to provide an indepth look into the aspects of law which are relevant to and essential for a better understanding of the criminal justice system and its related processes. Laws that govern policing are primarily based upon the United States Constitution, United States Supreme Court decisions, and statutes passed by the United States Congress and state legislatures. This course focuses on these sourses but will present the material in a format and in language designed to meet the needs and interests of non-lawyers while preserving the meaning and content of the law as interpreted by the courts. This class will force students to examine individual rights protected by the constitution and balance them against a community's need for public safety and public order. It highlights the complexities of the criminal justice discipline and encourages students to think critically and employ ethical reasoning by presenting real-life examples faced by criminal justice practitioners and asking the student to balance values, criminal procedures, and the law when coming up with solutions. (This course is usable under the Public Law Option of the degree plan.)

GOVT 3341 Ethics, Crime, and Criminal Justice Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 235 This course is designed to provide a comprehensive study of ethics, crime, and criminal justice by exploring different themes and issues, including concepts such as good vs. evil, right vs. wrong, duty, obligation, virtue, freedom, rationality, and free will. The themes that ethics explores underlie many circumstances we routinely confront as individuals, groups, organizations, communities, and cultures. Ultimately, if the criminal justice aim of ethics is realized, the student will be equipped to adopt more informed beliefs, to make better decisions, to undertake healthier actions, to be a better citizen, and consequently, to live a more rewarding and fulfilling life in the United States or any country on earth. The study into criminal justice ethics concludes by discussing why faith matters and how it could matter more.

GOVT 3342 Foundations of Criminal Law The course will focus on introducing students to the substantive criminal law and the criminal justice system. The course will include a treatment of the origin of laws, the penal code, the definition of law and crime, general principles of criminal responsibility, elements of major crimes, punishments, conditions or circumstances which may excuse one from criminal responsibility or mitigate punishment, and introduce students to the court system. Although the course will familiarize students with federal criminal law, the main emphasis will be on the penal laws of Texas (Texas Penal Code).

GOVT 3344, The American Court System Survey of state and federal court systems, the U.S. Supreme Court, introduction to civil and crimilal law, the role of lawyers, judges, and juries in the American court system. This course is basic to pre-law.

GOVT 3345 Ancient and Medieval Political Thought An examination of classic dilemmas and recurrent problems in political theory and how they are dealt with by ancient Greek, Roman, and feudal thinkers. This course will focus on the original writings of philosophers who have made a substantial contribution to political theory, from Plato to machiavelli.

GOVT 3348 American Political Thought This course covers American political thought from the colonial experience, the Revolution, the drafting of the Constitution, the Civil War, the Civil Rights movement, to the present - an analysis of ideas that shaped the American political system.

GOVT 3353, Contemporary Political Thought A study of the major political doctrines of the present day, with primary emphasis upon Marxism, Fascism, and the doctrines of the modern democratic state.

GOVT 3374 The United States Congress An analysis of the institutional behavior, procedures, and organization of Congress. Special attention paid to the roles of representatives, senators, lobbyists, and the legislative process.

GOVT 3384, The Presidency Analysis of the nation's chief executive, including the origins of the office, electoral process, powers and duties of the office, organization and staffing of the White House, and influence on national and world politics.

GOVT 3390, Law and Justice: Great Trials of the Western Legal Tradition An analysis of the great trials that shaped the Western legal tradition, from ancient Athens to

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 236 contemporary America. This course focuses on the formation and justification of three principles of justice (reason, autonomy, and consent) which define the natural law jurisprudence underlying the legal and governmental institutions of England and the United States. This course also examines the horrific consequences of abandoning these principles of justice in three 20th century legal systems: the Soviet Union, Nazi Germany, and the United States. (This course is usable under the Public Law Option of the degree plan.)

GOVT 3394, Law and Religion in the United States This course provides the historical background for the development of the separation of church and state and the subsequent development of secularism. Law and religion is designed to teach students to think in sophisticated ways about religious liberty and the interaction of religion and politics.

GOVT 4310, Jurisprudence, Law, and Legal Theory This course presents an introduction to jurisprudence. It surveys (1) the rudiments of the common law system, (2) the existence conditions (essential elements) of law, and (3) what determines the legal validity (enforceability) of law. These issues necessarily involve a number of fundamental philosophical issues, including: 1) the appropriate relationship between law and morality, 2) the appropriate relationship of the individual to the state, and the appropriate limits and boundaries of governmental coercion, 3) the nature of justice, and the principles of reason, autonomy, and consent, 4) the relationship between individual liberty and the protection of property, freedom of expression, and freedom of religious belief and practice., 5) the appropriate limits and boundaries of judicial discretion, and 6) constitutional interpretation. The course also addresses important substantive issues of tort law, property law, contract law, and constitutional law. The course concludes by examining the recent emergence of the economic approach to law, a judicial philosophy that evaluates the morality of law by its ability to generate profits. (This course will be included in the Political Theory Option of the degree plan.)

GOVT 4313, Constitutional Law A study of judicial review, the political role of the courts, American federalism, the jurisdiction of and the limitations on the judicial branch, the power of taxation, the commerce power, the substantive and procedural rights of the individual, and the powers of the President.

GOVT 4333, United States Foreign Policy A survey of the foundation of foreign policy and the major diplomatic developments from the founding period to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the means and methods by which United States foreign policy is formulated and executed.

GOVT 4343, Intelligence and National Security An analysis of the role played by the American intelligence community (CIA, NSA, DIA, etc.) in the assessment and realization of U.S. national security interests, with special attention to methods, duties, and preregatives of the various agencies that make up the intelligence community.

GOVT 4353, International Relations A survey of contemporary international political conditions. Along with the analysis of the forces and pressures behind contemporary events, the principles, origin, and development of international law and international organizations will be given consideration.

GOVT 4363 POLITICAL ECONOMY OF LATIN AMERICA: REVOLUTIONS, REFORM,

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 237 AND RESISTANCE This course explores the political dynamics involved in economic decision-making and action in contemporary Latin America. In examining the relationship between politics and economics in the region, the course will focus on issues of dependency and development, neo-liberalism, authoritarian rule and transition to democracy, and religious and social mobilization in revolution.

GOVT 4381 INDIVIDUAL STUDY/SPECIAL TOPIC For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Humanities.

GOVT 4383, Internship in Political Science Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor Directed work experience in a variety of public and private organizations. The primary objective of this course is to provide students with opportunities to apply what they have learned in class in a career-oriented setting. Also provides students with the opportunity to attain applied research experience and develop analytic skills.

GOVT 4392, Independent Research Project Prerequiste: Permission of the instructor. This course is designed to provide a mentoring experience for students interested in producing a research paper related to government/political science. The instructor will help students develop their research question and then will meet with them periodically throughout the semester to supervise the progress of their papers.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 238 Greek (GREK) Course Descriptions

GREK 2312 Greek Grammar I An introduction to the forms, vocabulary, and grammatical usage of the Koine Greek, designed to give the student the tools necessary for translation and analysis of the Greek New Testament.

GREK 2322 Greek Grammar Prerequisite: GREK 2312 A continuation of GREK 2312. An introduction to additional forms, vocabulary, and grammatical usage of Koine Greek designed to give the student the skills necessary for translation and analysis of the Greek New Testament.

GREK 3311 Greek Syntax and Reading I Prerequisite: GREK 2312 and 2322. An intermediate study of Greek syntax with application to the translation and analysis of the Greek New Testament.

GREK 4351 Greek Reading and Syntax II Prerequisite: GREK 2312, 2333, 3311 Advanced study of Greek syntax with application to the translation and analysis of the Greek New Testament.

GREK 4352 Directed Studies in Greek Prerequisite: GREK 2312, 2322, 3311, and 4351. Advanced study of Greek literature of the Koine period. This course may not be repeated more than twice.

GREK 5301 Greek I Greek I is a study of Koine Greek grammar and syntax for reading the Greek New Testament and selected extrabiblical literature.

GREK 5302 Greek II Prerequisite: GREK 5301 Greek II is an advanced study of Koine Greek grammar and syntax for reading and exegesis of the Greek New Testament and other selected literature.

GREK 6301 Greek Studies I Prerequisite: GREK 5301 and 5302. Introductory studies in Greek grammar and syntax of select literature of the Koine period.

GREK 6303 Greek Studies II Prerequisite: GREK 5301, 5302, and 6301. Intermediate sutdies in Greek grammar, syntax and linguistic approaches to select literature of the Koine period.

GREK 6351, Greek Studies III Prerequiste: GREK 5301, 5302, and 6301. Advanced studies in Greek grammar, syntax, and linguistic approaches to literature of the Koine Period.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 239 GREK 6352, Advanced Directed Studies in Greek Prerequisites: GREK 5301, 5302, 6301, 6303, AND 6351. Advanced studies in Greek grammar, syntax, linguistic approaches, and/or text critical theories with application to literature of the Koine Period. Course may be repeated as course content differs.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 240 Hebrew (HEBR) Course Descriptions

HEBR 2312, Hebrew Grammar I An introduction to the forms, vocabulary, and grammatical usage of biblical Hebrew designed to give the student the skills necessary for the translation and analysis of the Hebrew Bible.HEBR 2312, Hebrew Grammar IAn introduction to the forms, vocabulary, and grammatical usage of biblical Hebrew designed to give the student the skills necessary for the translation and analysis of the Hebrew Bible.

HEBR 2322 Hebrew Grammar II Prerequisite: HEBR 2312 A continuation of HEBR 2312. An introduction to additional forms, vocabulary, and grammatical usage of biblical Hebrew designed to give the student the skills necessary for the translation and analysis of the Hebrew Bible.

HEBR 3311 Hebrew Reading and Syntax I Prerequisite: HEBR 2312 and 2322. An intermediate study of Hebrew syntax with application to the translation and analysis of selected portions of the Hebrew Bible and/or Second Temple literature.

HEBR 4351, Hebrew Reading and Syntax II Prerequisite: HEBR 2312 and 2322 Advanced study of Hebrew syntax with application to the translation of selected portions of the Hebrew Bible and/or Second Temple literature.

HEBR 4352, Directed Studies in Hebrew Prerequisite: HEBR 2312, 2322, 3311, and 4351. Advanced study of the Hebrew Bible and/or selected Second Temple literature. This course may not be repeated more than twice.

HEBR 4393 Senior Seminar Prerequisite: HEBR 2312, 2322, 3311, and 4351. Directed studies in the Hebrew Bible and other Second Temple literature.

HEBR 5301 Hebrew I Hebrew I is a study of Hebrew grammar and syntax for reading the Hebrew Bible and other Second Temple literature.

HEBR 5302 Hebrew II Prerequisite: HEBR 5301. Hebrew II is an advanced study of Hebrew grammar and syntax for reading the Hebrew Bible and other Second Temple literature.

HEBR 6301 Hebrew Studies I Prerequisites: HEBR 5301 and 5302. Introductory studies in Hebrew grammar and syntax of select literature of the Hebrew Bible and/or Second Temple period.

HEBR 6303 Hebrew Studies II Prerequisites: HEBR 5301, 5302, and 6301 Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 241 Intermediate studies in Hebrew grammar, syntax, and linguistic approaches with application to select readings from the Hebrew Bible and/or Second Temple literature.

HEBR 6351, Hebrew Studies III Prerequisite: HEBR 5301, 5302, 6301, 6303. Advanced studies in Hebrew grammar, syntax, and linguistic approaches with application to select readings from the Hebrew Bible and/or Second Temple literature.

HEBR 6352, Advanced Directed Studies in Hebrew Prerequisites: HEBR 5301, 5302, 6301, 6303, and 6351. Advanced studies in Hebrew grammar, syntax, linguistic approaches, and/or text critical theories with application to literature of the Hebrew Bible and/or Second Temple literature. Course may be repeated as course content differs.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 242 History (HIST) Course Descriptions

HIST 2303, Introduction to Historical Methods Prerequisite(s): None This course is designed to introduce students to the approaches and methods involved in the study of history. It will focus on basic tools of historical research and writing, questions about the concept of history, and the fundamental issues involved in studying the past.

HIST 2311 Western Civilization to 1500 A survey of Western Civilization from the Ancient World to the end of the Middle Ages in Europe.

HIST 2312, Western Civilization from 1500 A survey of Western Civilization from the Renaissance and Reformation to the present.

HIST 2313 U.S. History to 1877 A survey of American history from its origins to the close of Reconstruction.

HIST 2323 U.S. History from 1877 A survey of American history from the close of Reconstruction to the present.

HIST 2381 Special Topics/Independent Study

HIST 3311 American Religious History Prerequisites: HIST 2311, 2312, 2313, and 2323 This course covers the history of American religion from the pre-contact period to the present.

HIST 3313 Colonial America Prerequisites: HIST 2311 or 1314, HIST 2312 or 1324, HIST 2313, HIST 2323 An advanced survey of the establishment and development of the British colonies in North America to 1763. Includes the transplanting of English institutions and their modifications in the North American setting.

HIST 3314 Revolutionary and Early National America Prerequisites: HIST 2311 or 1314, HIST 2312 or 1324, HIST 2313, HIST 2323 An advanced study of the causes and consequences of the American Revolution and teh development of the United States to 1808. Includes the evolution of the political system from Confederation to Federation and the origin of political parties.

HIST 3323 Civil War and Reconstruction Prerequisites: HIST 2311 or 1314, HIST 2312 or 1324, HIST 2313, HIST 2323 A study of the rise of sectionalism, the abolition crusade, the secession crisis, United States versus Confederate States, aftermath of the war, reconstruction, economic and social consequences of the war, and emergence of a New South.

HIST 3333 History of Texas Prerequisites: HIST 2311 or 1314, HIST 2312 or 1324, HIST 2313, HIST 2323 A survey course from the period of exploration and early colonization to the present. It includes the struggle for independence, the Civil War in Texas, and the growth of the state into an Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 243 industrialized, urbanized society.

HIST 3341, The Old South Prerequisites: HIST 2311 or 1314, HIST 2312 or 1324, HIST 2313, HIST 2323 This course covers the history of the American South (the Old South) from the pre-contact period to the beginning of the Civil War.

HIST 3346 History of Latin America: From Kings to Presidents This course focuses on Latin America from the Spanish and Portuguese conquest to the twentieth century. Emphasis will be placed on the colonial era, the development of nationalism and independence movements, and the major historical developments in the last 70 years. The course will examine the region's development chronologically, examining the dominant trends across national boundaries, providing students with a framework to understand how current situations are rooted in past historical processes.

HIST 3354 History of Britain I - To 1688 Prerequisites: HIST 2311 or 1314, HIST 2312 or 1324, HIST 2313, HIST 2323 The origins and development of political, social, and cultural institutions in the British Isles, including Britain's impact on Europe and the British Empire. HIST 3354 extends from pre-roman times to 1714.

HIST 3364 History of Britain II - From 1688 Prerequisites: HIST 2311 or 1314, HIST 2312 or 1324, HIST 2313, HIST 2323 The origins and development of political, social, and cultural institutions in the British Isles, including Britain's impact on Europe and the British Empire. HIST 3364 starts at 1688 and deals with Britian's rise and fall as a colonial world power up to the present day.

HIST 3375 Great Texts in History This course introduces students to a variety of ideas, methods, and texts, and the kinds of genres and sources that compose historical studies. Emphasis is placed on the Great Books of the Western Tradition and other key historical texts that are important to the discipline.

HIST 3377, Ancient Greece Prerequisites: HIST 2311, 2312, 2313, 2323 This course examies the political, social, and cultural history of the ancient Greek world. Topics include the Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods.

HIST 3378, Ancient Rome Prerequisites: HIST 2311, 2312, 2313, 2323 This course examines the political, social, religious, and cultural history of the ancient Roman world from the founding of Rome to approximately AD 250. Topics include Republican expansion, transition to Empire, and Pax Romana.

HIST 3379, Late Antiquity Prerequisites: HIST 2311, 2312, 2313, 2323) This course examines the political, social, religious and cultural history of the Mediterranean world from approximately AD 250 to 600. Topics include the rise of Christianity, the Germanic migrations, and the birth of Islam.

HIST 3380 Blood & Fire: Religion, Science, and Medicine, 1000-1700

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 244 This course explores the changes in natural philosophy and scientific thought in Christian Europe and the Muslim world during the medieval and early modern periods, as well as the role of religion in these changes. Particular emphasis is placed on advances in medicine and physics as well as the transition from a medieval to modern view of science.

HIST 3388 Comparative World Civilizations This course focuses on major world civilizations from ancient times to the present.

HIST 4181 Special Topics Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and the Dean of the College of Humanities. Directed study of a minimum of thirty clock hours for each hour of credit. Projects are selected based on student interest and need. Open to history majors only.

HIST 4281 Special Topics Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and the Dean of the College of Humanities. Directed study of a minimum of thirty clock hours for each hour of credit. Projects are selected based on student interest and need. Open to history majors only.

HIST 4311, Renaissance and Reformation Prerequisites: HIST 2311, 2312, 2313, 2323 This course examines the European cultural, religious, and social transformations that occurred between 1350 and 1650--transformations known as the Renaissance and Reformation.

HIST 4314, The Guilded Age and Progressive Era, 1870-1917 Prerequisites: HIST 2311 or 1314, HIST 2312 or 1324, HIST 2313, HIST 2323 An advanced study of the Guilded Age (1870-1890) and Progressive Era (1890-1917) as the formative stage of modern America.

HIST 4330, United States Legal History Prerequisites: HIST 2311 or 1314, HIST 2312 or 1324, HIST 2313, HIST 2323 This course provides an introduction to the history of American law from the Declaration of Independence in 1776 to the establishment of women's suffrage in 1920.

HIST 4340, Unborn Life in the Western Tradition and American History Prerequisites: HIST 2311 or 1314, HIST 2312 or 1324, HIST 2313, HIST 2323 This course explores the history of American ideas and practices regarding unborn human life within the context of the philosophical and religious traditions of the West.

HIST 4357 American Experience in Vietnam Prerequisites: HIST 2311 or 1314, HIST 2312 or 1324, HIST 2313, HIST 2323 This course is a study of the American military experience in Vietnam, 1950-1975.

HIST 4381 Special Topics Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and the Dean of the College of Humanities. Directed study of a minimum of thirty clock hours for each hour of credit. Projects are selected based on student interest and need. Open to history majors only.

HIST 4383 Internship in History Prerequisites: HIST 2311 or 1314, HIST 2312 or 1324, HIST 2313, HIST 2323 Directed work experience in a variety of public and private organizations. The primary objective

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 245 of this course is to provide students with opportunities to apply what they have learned in class in a career-oriented setting. Also provides students with the opportunity to attain applied researach experience and develop analytic skills.

HIST 4392 INDEPENDENT RSCH&DIRECTED READ For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Humanities.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 246 Honors College (HNRS) Course Descriptions

HNRS 1710 Walking to Piraeus: The Ancient Greek World Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors CollegeCorequisites: Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 1020 and HNRS 1030 This course will explore the human intellectual tradition during the Classical Age. Students will examine themes that underscore human experience during a particular historical period from various academic perspectives. The themes may be chosen from leadership, war, race, ethics, globalization and community. Students will gain a critical understanding of the literary, philosophical, historical, theological, and socio-cultural traditions that shape our world. (Also offered as ENGL 2710)

HNRS 1740 All Roads Lead to Rome: The Ancient Roman & Early Christian Worlds Prerequisites: Admission to the Honors College; HNRS 1710Corequisites: Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 1050 and HNRS 1060 This course will explore the human intellectual tradition during the classical Roman period and the period of the early Christian church. Students will examine themes that underscore human experience during a particular historical period from various academic perspectives. The themes may be chosen from leadership, war, race, ethics, globalization, and community. Students will gain a critical understanding of the literary, philosophical, historical, theological, and socio- cultural traditions that shape our world.

HNRS 2301 CHRI INTELLECTUAL TRADITION I For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the Smith College of Liberal Arts.

HNRS 2302, The Christian Intellectual Tradition II Prerequisite: Admission into the Honors College and HNRS 2301 This course will introduce students to the basic beliefs and central developments in the history of the Christian tradition. Through the examination of primary texts in the Christian intellectual tradition, students will be encouraged to develop and put into practice their own theology. Students will read from a collection of Christian writings including The Bible, Clement, Ignatius, Irenaeus, John Chrysostom, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Martin Luther, John Calvin, and Dietrich Bonhoeffer.

HNRS 2310, Walking to Piraeus: Conversatinos with Great Minds of the Ancient World Prerequisite: Admission into the Honors College This course will explore the human intellectual tradition during the Classical Age. Students will examine themes that underscore human experience during a particular historical period from various academic perspectives. The themes may be chosen from leadership, war, race, ethics, globalization and community. Students will gain a critical understanding of the literary, philosophical, historical, and socio-cultural traditions that shape our world. (Also offered as ENGL 2310.)

HNRS 2315 All Roads Lead to Rome: Conversations with Great Minds of the Roman World Prerequisite: Admission into the Honors College; HNRS 2310. This course will explore the human intellectual tradition during the classical Roman period. Students will examine themes that underscore human experience during a particular historical period from various academic perspectives. The themes may be chosen from leadership, war, race, ethics, globalization, and community. Students will gain a critical understanding of the Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 247 literary, philosophical, historical, and socio-cultural traditions that shape our world.

HNRS 2320, Faith, Reason and Romance: The Struggle for the Medieval Mind Prerequisite: Admission into Honors College and HNRS 2310 This course will explore the human intellectual tradition during the Medieval period. Students will examine themes that underscore human experience during a particular historical period from various academic perspectives. The themes may be chosen from leadership, war, race, ethics, globalization and community. Students will gain a critical understanding of the literary, philosophical, historical, and socio-cultural traditions that shape our world.(Also offered as ENGL 2320.)

HNRS 2330 ARISTOTELIAN LOGIC:FND TRIVIUM For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the Smith College of Liberal Arts.

HNRS 2340 Classical Rhetoric: Capstone of the Trivium Prerequisite: Admission into the Honors College; HNRS 2330 Students in this course will learn how the ancient conceptions of the Good, the True, and the Beautiful shape the classical discipline of Rhetoric. Special attention will be devoted to the three elements of Rhetoric (speaker, audience, and message), the three kinds of persuasive speech (political, legal, and ceremonial), and the three modes of Rhetoric (ethos, logos, and pathos). Primary works by Aristotle, Cicero, and Quintilian will provide the textual foundation for the course.

HNRS 2710 Faith, Reason & Romance: The Medieval & Renaissance Worlds Prerequisites: Admission to the Honors College; HNRS 1740Corequisites: Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 2020 and HNRS 2030 This course will explore the human intellectual tradition during the medieval and Renaissance periods. Students will examine themes that underscore human experience during a particular historical period from various academic perspectives. The themes may be chosen from leadership, war, race, ethics, globalization and community. Students will gain a critical understanding of the literary, philosophical, historical, theological, and socio-cultural traditions that shape our world. (Also offered as ENGL 2720)

HNRS 2740 Enlightment & Modernity: 1600-1900 Prerequisites: Admission to the Honors College; HNRS 2710Corequisites: Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 2050 and HNRS 2060 This course will explore the human intellectual tradition during the Enlightment and Modern periods. Students will examine themes that underscore human experience during a particular period from various academic perspectives. The themes may be chosen from leadership, war, race, ethics, globalization and community. Students will gain a critical understanding of the literary, philosophical, historical, theological, and socio-cultural traditions that shape our world.

HNRS 3199 Independent Study Prerequisites: Admission to the Honors College; permission of the instructor Independent study on a research topic directed by a faculty member. May be repeated for credit only if the research topic differs.

HNRS 3299 Independent Study Prerequisites: Admission to the Honors College; permission of the instructor.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 248 Independent study on a research topic directed by a faculty member. May be repeated for credit only if the research topic differs.

HNRS 3300 Honors Study Abroad: Oxford Much of the intellectual heritage of western civilization comes to us by way of England. The university system with its roots in the Middle Ages flowered in Oxford. Many of England's greatest writers have lived and studied in Oxford, and some have set their works of literature in the city and the university. This seminar will examine several Oxford writers including C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Evelyn Waugh, and G.K. Chesterton. Works by william Shakespeare and T.S. Eliot will also be considered. Where possible, lectures on and discussion of the works will take place in venues in and around Oxford that will deepen student appreciation and understanding.

HNRS 3330, The Rebirth of Man Prerequisite: Admission into the Honors College and HNRS 2320 This course will explore the human intellectual tradition during the Renaissance. Students will examine themes that underscore human experience during a particular historical period from various academic perspectives. The themes may be chosen from leadership, war, race, ethics, globalization, and community. Students will gain a critical understanding of the literary, philosophical, historical, and socio-cultural traditions that shape our world.

HNRS 3340, Enlightenment and Modernity Prerequisite: Admission into the Honors College and HNRS 3330 This course will explore the human intellectual tradition during the Enlightenment and the Modern Period. Students will examine themes that underscore human experience during a particular historical period from various academic perspectives. The themes may be chosen from leadership, war, race, ethics, globalization and community. Students will gain a critical understanding of the literary, philosophical, historical, and socio-cultural traditions that shape our world.

HNRS 3350, The Last Fifty Years: Postmodern America Prerequisite: Admission into the Honors College This course will examine important dimensions of social experience that have created the environment of change and development that has occurred during the last fifty years in the United States. Dimensions reviewed will include such areas as: family, economy, politics, social class, ethics, health care, religion, technology, sex/gender, race relations, transcultural competence, mass culture and education. This course will help students synthesize aspects of United States trends within a broad context to make learning more meaningful in specialty and career areas.

HNRS 3370, Exploring Cultures through Art and Music Prerequisite: Admission into the Honors College This survey course introduces the student to art and music throughout history. The student will explore the fine arts through observations and experience. The student will learn the basic theories of each fine art form. Examination of art and music throughout history will allow the student to appreciate the fine arts. Emphasis is placed on recognizing the styles and genres by studying original works. Active participation allows the student to experience the arts on a personal level.

HNRS 3371 CEZANNE:LOVE,GEST,PERS VIS ART

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 249 For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the Smith College of Liberal Arts.

HNRS 3399, Independent Study Prerequisites: Admission to the Honors College; permission of the instructor Independent study on a research topic directed by a faculty member. May be repeated for credit only if the research topic differs.

HNRS 3404, Imaging the Future: Themes and Ideas in Science Prerequisite: Admission into the Honors College This course will examine scientific theory using a thematic approach. Students will read original scientific articles and use both observation and experimental techniques to understand scientific principles. Themes may include Nobel Prize Winners in the sciences, man and the environment, or biological warfare throughout Time. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

HNRS 3710, The Last One Hundred Years: 1900 to the Present Prerequisites: Admissions to the Honors College; HNRS 2740Corequisites: Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 3020, 3030, and 3135 This course will explore the human intellectual tradition during the last one hundred years. Students will examine themes that underscore human experience during a particular historical period from various academic perspectives. The themes may be chosen from leadership, war, race, ethics, globalization, community, and science. Students will gain a critical understanding of the literary, philosophical, historical, theological, and socio-cultural traditions that shape our world.

HNRS 3740, The Story of Scripture: The Biblical Narrative from Genesis to Revelation Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors College; HNRS 3710Corequisites: Concurrent enrollment in HNRS 3050 and 3060 This course will explore the biblical narrative from the beginning of the Old Testament to the end of the New Testament. Students will examine themes that underscore human experience recorded in the biblical text. The themes may be chosen from leadership, war, race, ethics, globalization, and community. Students will gain a critical understanding of the literary, philosophical, historical, theological, and socio-cultural traditions that shape our world.

HNRS 4215, Honors Capstone Experience Prerequisite: Admission into the Honors College and completion of 27 hours of Honors courses. This course is designed to provide an opportunity for integration of the ideas and themes of the Honors curriculum with the courses of the student's major. The course is an intensive research study designed to broaden the student's perspectives and knowledge. The course culminates in the completion of a Senior Project to be presented at an Honors Symposium.

HNRS 4310, Special Topics Prerequisites: Admission to the Honors College; HNRS 3740 Topics are selected on the basis of students' needs and academic qualifications of faculty. May be repeated for credit only if course content differs.

HNRS 4320, Special Topics Prrerequisites: Admission to the Honors College; HNRS 3740 or permission of the instructor

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 250 Topics are selected on basis of students' needs and academic qualifications of faculty. May be repeated for credit only if course content differs.

HNRS 4330, Special Topics Prrerequisites: Admission to the Honors College; HNRS 3740 or permission of the instructor Topics are selected on basis of students' needs and academic qualifications of faculty. May be repeated for credit only if course content differs.

HNRS 4340, Special Topics Prrerequisites: Admission to the Honors College; HNRS 3740 or permission of the instructor Topics are selected on basis of students' needs and academic qualifications of faculty. May be repeated for credit only if course content differs.

HNRS 4350, The Last Fifty Years: The Emergence of the Global Village Prerequisite: Admission into the Honors College and HNRS 3350 This course will explore important dimensions of global human experience during the last fifty years. This contextual learning experience will include dominant events and ideas within the social, economic, political and historical categories. Important events and ideas that will be covered in this course include: the Cold War, modern revolutions, globalization, African genocide, Asian economic boom, global terrorism, and religious conflict. The larger objectives of this course are to help students gain a degree of transcultural competence and build an important context within which to make learning more meaningful. After taking this series of courses, studends will be able to make important connections between their learning from the classical texts and their lived experiences in today's world.

HNRS 4370, Visual and Performing Arts - Film and Theater Prerequisite: Admission into the Honors College This survey course introduces the student to theater and film throughout history. Using observation and experience, the student will learn the basic theories and ideas of each. Examination of original works in theater and film will allow the student to appreciate the performing arts. Emphasis is placed on recognizing the styles and genres that have influenced American and gobal cultures. Active participation allows the student to experience the arts on a personal level.

HNRS 4381 SPECIAL TOPICS/IND STUDY For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the Smith College of Liberal Arts.

HNRS 4398, Senior Thesis Prerequisites: Admission to the Honors College; permission of the director The Senior Thesis is a capstone learning experience in the Honors College. The thesis must be on an original topic, involve significant research and writing, and be defended orally upon its completion. A faculty advisor shall direct the research and writing project.

HNRS 4399, Senior Thesis Prerequisites: Admission to the Honors College; permission of the director The Senior Thesis is a capstone learning experience in the Honors College. The thesis must be on an original topic, involve significant research and writing, and be defended orally upon its completion. A faculty advisor shall direct the research and writing project.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 251 Honors Program (HONR) Course Descriptions

HONR 4399 Senior Honors Thesis The Senior Honors Thesis is the capstone learning experience in the departmental honors program. The thesis must be at least 35 pages in length, include a one page abstract, be on an original topic, involve significant research, and must be defended orally upon its completion. A faculty thesis advisor shall direct the research and writing project. An approved prospectus is a pre-requisite for registration for this course.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 252 Interdisciplinary Courses (INDC) Course Descriptions

INDC 2333 American Heritage Destinations This course explores various historical and cultural aspects of the nation's heritage in three specific locations: Boston, Philadelphia, and Washington D.C. The first week of the course will be spent in preparation for an academically oriented field trip during the second week. Students may repeat this course for each NEW destination. Only offered during May Fast Term each spring.

INDC 3310 Essential Elements of Art Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program. This course adds a concentrated focus on art education to an overview of fine arts history and education (including art, music and theatre). It explores the philosophy of preschool and elementary pedagogy based upon Discipline-based Art Education (DBAE) and Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills standards. Practical applications for integrating the arts into a cross- curriculum program are emphasized. Also offered as ART 3310.

INDC 3315 Cultural Craft for the Pre- Adolescent Student Prerequisite: Admission to teh HBU Teacher Education Program This course combines a basic mulitcultural study of classical and traditional craft and creative problems in three-dimensional media for teaching in the pre-adolescent (EC-6) classroom. (Offered also as ART 3315).

INDC 3316 Cultural Craft for the Adolescent Student Prerequisite: Admission to the HBU Teacher Education Program This course encourages expanded multicultural appreciation of classical and traditional craft and includes practical experience and preparation for teaching a variety of fiber arts, printmaking, bookbinding, mosaic and three-dimensional design in the adolescent (6-8 and 9-12) classroom. (Offered also as ART 3316.)

INDC 3320 Essential Elements of Music Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program This course adds a concentrated focus on music education to an overview of fine arts history and education (including art, music and theatre). It includes a study of the child voice, rote singing, development of rhythmic and melodic expression, directed listening, and music reading readiness. Basic materials including song text are studied, and simple percussion and melodic instruments are used in creative activities.

INDC 3381 SPECIAL TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

INDC 4160 Wellness and Fitness for Children Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program This course prepares students to effectively teach health and P.E. in grades PK-6. In addition to PK-6 health content and methodology, it includes exploration of developmentally appropriate movement education methods for PK through grade 6 as well as ways to use movement activities to help children learn academic content areas other than health and P.E. (such as math, science, social studies and language arts).

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 253 INDC 4181 Special Topics Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor Speical course designed to respond to rapidly evolving issues in media and media technology.

INDC 4281 Special Topics Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor Speical course designed to respond to rapidly evolving issues in media and media technology.

INDC 4290 CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

INDC 4294 Senior Seminar: Classroom Management Must be taken during the CDEV practicum. This course involves an exploration of means for creating and maintaining optimal learning environments and helping children and adolescents develop into considerate, responsible adults. It includes independent observation which must be completed during student teaching or the CDEV practicum.(Offered also as CDEV 4294 and EDUC 4294.)

INDC 4302: Multimedia Instructional Strategies This course is designed to develop skills necessary for today’s educators in the development and integration of multimedia projects into their curriculum and to explore trends and issues in the use of multimedia tools for communication and instruction.

INDC 4305 TECH ENHANCED INSTRUCT DESIGN For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

INDC 4319: Internet Resource Management Internet Resource Management is designed to allow participants to experience appropriate uses of technology as a learner, and thus better use technology in teaching and learning. The goal of this course is to provide a combination of hands-on and student-centered experiences that will assist in the management of Internet resources. These experiences will enable participants to search for information, share information, generate materials, and evaluate web-based instructional materials. Instructional strategies will focus on the acquisition, analysis, and synthesis of Internet resources that address appropriate educational needs.

INDC 4340 Social Studies for Pre-Adolescents Prerequisites: EDUC 4301, 5313 or 6302 This course provides an exploration of social studies content and skills as well as teaching/learning materials and strategies for developing content and skills at preschool through grade 6 levels. Essential knowledge and skills are emphasized. Field-based experiences and technology applications are required. (Offered also as EDUC 5340)

INDC 4350 Essential Elements of Science Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program; EDUC 4301 or 4311. This course provides an exploration of science content and skills, as well as teaching/learning materials and strategies for helping preschool through grade six students learn science. It includes an overview of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) for science at these grade levels and exploration of discipline specific pedagogy and reading strategies. Technology

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 254 applications are required.

INDC 4360, Essential Elements of Math Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program; EDUC 4301 or 4311; MATH 2301; MATH 2302 This math methods course prepares prospective elementary and middle school teachers with knowledge of methods and materials needed to teach math effectively. EC-6 math content is briefly reviewed as students explore research validated ways to develop children’s problem solving and reasoning abilities as well as their understanding and use of whole numbers, decimals and fractions. Active learning using models and inquiry is emphasized. Fieldwork in which students teach mathematics in an elementary or middle school is required.

INDC 4380, Essential Elements of Social Studies Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Preparation Program; EDUC 4301 or 4311. This course is an introduction to theories, pedagogical considerations and current methodology, including technology integration, in the teaching of social studies to elementary age children. Students gain experience in applying this knowledge through instructional design projects and simulated teaching experiences. The course includes an overview of PK-8 social studies content including Texas history and world geography and an exploration of discipline specific reading strategies.

INDC 4381 Special Topics Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor Speical course designed to respond to rapidly evolving issues in media and media technology.

INDC 4385 Essential Elements of Fine Arts This course explores EC-6 fine arts content and methodology. It includes development of knowledge, skills and dispositions identified in the art, music and theatre Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) as well as ways to integrate fine arts into learning in other content areas.

INDC 4390, Advanced Elements of Social Studies Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program; EDUC 4301 or 4311 This course provides an exploration of social studies content and skills. Social studies content will include World History, Geography, and Texas History. The course will introduce students to teaching/learning materials and strategies for developing concepts and skills for middle to high school students. Integration of technology and interactive learing are integral aspects of this course.

INDC 6330 Global Political Economy This course examines the interaction of politics and the economy at the global level. In particular, it evaluates how political and economic decisions of one country or groups of countries affect institutions and life circumstances in others and assesses the causes and consequences of globalization as rooted in political economy. Key topics include major conceptual frameworks for understanding the linkages between international politics and international economics, international monetary and financial relations, international trade, foreign investment and multinational enterprises, key international economic institutions such as the International Monetary Fund, World Trade Organization, and World Bank, the rise of the BRIC economics and the shift of global balance, and global economonic governance. Graduate Business programs only.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 255

INDC 6331, Foreign Cultures As global corporations span national boundaries, their employees must interact with a wide variety of national cultures, societal structures, and world views. This course adopts the viewpoint of the anthropologist, applying anthropological theory to business situations. This course covers a wide variety of topics, including, but not limited to, the following: the methods of anthropology; issues of culture; issues of language and communication; the economic aspects of anthropology; the role of family and kinship in society; religion and ethics; gender; and issues of ethnicity. It also examines how national cultures affect behaviors in business situations. Graduate Business programs only.

INDC 6332, International Organizations As global corporations span national boundaries, they must interact with a large number of international organizations. This course examies the major international institutions that deal with crime, diplomacy, grade, finance, the environment, and human rights, and how these institutions both facilitiate and constrain the activities of global corporations. Examples of such organizations are the United Nations, the World Bank and IMF, the World Trade Organization, the World Court, and others. This course deals with a wide variety of issues, including, but not limited to: theoretical frameworks of international organizations; the historical evolution of international organizations; the structure and governance of international organizations; classification of international organizations; and the functions and roles of individual international organizations. Graduate Business programs only.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 256 Journalism and Mass Communications (JMC) Course Descriptions

JMC 1313 History of American Journalism A study of the develoment of American Journalism, from colonial days to the present in context of social, economic, and political change.

JMC 1323, The Press and Democracy Prerequisite: None Examination of the principles, concepts, theories, and functions of journalism in American society including significant 20th and 21st century journalists.

JMC 1324 Fundamentals of Broadcasting The course acquaints the student with the equipment, terminology, and operation of a production studio and field production.

JMC 1325 Media Writing Media writing explores the different styles of writing information content, entertaining scripts, advertising copy, and public relations materials for print media, broadcast media, and mobile media. Students will learn how to gather information and various forms content, write for specific audiences, and check for accuracy.

JMC 2301 Publication Production - Newspaper Prerequisite: Permission of instructor This course offers the student the opportunity to prepare news, feature, entertainment, religion, and sports articles for publication in The Collegian. The Collegian newsroom offers students the opportunity to develop desktop publishing skills and to become familiar with software programs such as InDesign, PhotoShop, and Illustrator that are commonly used in multimedia productions. The student serves on the newspaper staff under the direction of The Collegian editor and faculty advisor.

JMC 2302 Publication Production - Video Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. This course offers the student the opportunity to develop video production techniques by preparing videos for a variety of HBU venues including possible publication on The Collegian Website or the HBU Website. Students will digitally shoot, edit using industry-standard software, render in a variety of digital formats, and upload their videos to a website for grading. The student works under the direction of the course instructor. External hard drive required.

JMC 2324 Editing News Copy Introduces the fundamentals of news media copyediting for grammar, punctuation, style rules, condensing, rewriting and headline writing.

JMC 2414 Reporting and Writing I Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 and ENGL 1323 Teaches the fundamentals of news reporting and writing. Lectures, discussions and laboratory work provide training in the development and organization of basic news stories and in meeting deadlines. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 257 JMC 3302, Multimedia Production Prerequisite: JMC 2414 or JOUR 2303 This course will emphasize both traditional journalistic values and skills, while also preparing students to function in a dynamic and evolving multimedia environment. Assignments are designed to help students to work across multiple-media platforms, including broadcast, print, and online journalism. The goal is to develop a range of techniques that includes research, writing, editing, and presentation for news, corporate and strategic communication in print, audio, video and online. Students produce projects that may be distributed and/or entered in competitions.

JMC 3324 MULTIMEDIA PRODUCTION For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Fine Arts.

JMC 3325 Principles of Public Relations This course teaches the theory and practice of public relations, how public relations operates in organizations, its impact on publics, and its function in society. The course will also focus on professional development of the field; concepts, issues, and principles in the practice; and models and theories guiding the practice.

JMC 3326 Understanding Audiences Fundamentals of research in mass communication with focus on how people are attracted to media. Principles of messages and markets, appropriate strategies for analyzing message effectiveness. Practical training in how to conduct primary and secondary research, undestand sampling, questionnaire design, survey, data processing, and analysis.

JMC 3365, Video Production I Prerequisite: None Introduces fundamental single camera/film style production concepts to the Multimedia Production students. This course teaches the theory and practices relative to professional video standards and introduces practical hands-on applications. Studio/Field applications will include cameras, microphones, lighting, audio, graphics, non-linear editing, and switching. Additional lab fee and external hard drive required.

JMC 3366 Video Production II Introduces multi-camera studio and field production concepts to the Multimedia Production students. This course teaches the theory and practices relative to professional video standards and introduces practical hands-on applications in situations requiring more than one camera. Advanced applications of video production including scriptwriting, directing and production of live events on campus ranging from operas to athletic activities.

JMC 3414, Reporting and Writing II Prerequisite: JMC 2414 This course is designed to enhance the reporting and writing skills developed in JMC 2414. Interviewing techniques are emphasized. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

JMC 4314, Feature Writing Prerequisite: JMC 2414 or permission of the instructor. This course helps students learn the effective use of dialogue, development of narrative

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 258 techniques, including vivid description and detail, and comparison and contrast in developing the feature story. Exercises in this course are designed to help students develop techniques to involve the reader emotionally through human interest including drama, pathos, empathy, humor, and curiosity.

JMC 4315 Public Affairs Reporting Prerequisite: JMC 2414 or permission of the instructor This course emphasizes public affairs reporting in its traditional role as the staple of American journalism while stressing the increased and evolving role of journalists, working in the age of information, to go beyond gathering, organizing, and presenting facts, to finding ways to present increasingly complicated information in ways that help the public to better understand and manage 21st century issue that dominate the news. Public affairs issues discussed in this course include, but are not limited to, public agencies, law enforcement, courts, local, state, and national government, education, science, the environment, medicine, health, and business, and the global issues of energy, hunger, health, war and terrorism.

JMC 4336 Principles of Advertising A study of the advertising component of the firm. Emphasizes the interactive coordination and strategy of this promotional tool. Applications necessary for developing target markets, utilization of the mass media, advertising research, and analysis of the complete campaign are stressed. (Also offered as MKTG 4336)

JMC 4367, Non-Linear Editing Prerequisite: None This advanced course in video production will offer students experience in non-linear editing using both PC and MAC editing suites. Students will develop projects to be used in a variety of applications from tape to multimedia.

JMC 4373 Internship in Journalism and Mass Communication Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor prior to the beginning of the semester registered. Directed work experience at newspaper, radio and televion, advertising agencies, public relations firms, and production houses. Students are encouraged to intern in more than one area. A professional portfolio is required.

JMC 4374 Internship in Journalism and Mass Communication Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor prior to the beginning of the semester registered. Directed work experience at newspaper, radio and televion, advertising agencies, public relations firms, and production houses. Students are encouraged to intern in more than one area. A professional portfolio is required.

JMC 4375 Internship in Journalism and Mass Communication Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor prior to the beginning of the semester registered. Directed work experience at newspaper, radio and televion, advertising agencies, public relations firms, and production houses. Students are encouraged to intern in more than one area. A professional portfolio is required.

JMC 4381 SPECIAL TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Fine Arts.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 259 JMC 4392, Media Law Prerequisite: JMC 1313 and JMC 1323 Examines legal concepts, including prior restraint, libel, privacy, obscenity, contempt, and access as they relate to print and electrnoic media.

JMC 4393 Media Ethics Prerequisites: JMC 1313, 1323 Examines ethical issues that challenge media professionals by interpreting and applying ethical theory - from the classicists to the contemporary - students will analyze ethical challenges inherent in modern media.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 260 Kinesiology (KINE) Course Descriptions

KINE 1310, Basic Helth Assessment and Terminology This course is a study of the basic structure of medical terms, including prefixes, suffixes, roots, and general rules and guidelines. Emphasis is placed on pronunciation, spelling, and application of general rules for translation and composition of medical terms. Commonly used medical terms are presented for ech body system. This course also provides the basic knowledge and skills necessary to obtain a detailed health assessment of individuals across the age continuum. Emphasis is placed on obtaining a systematic health history and physical exam using the techniques of inspection, palpation, percussion, and auscultation.

KINE 2202 Creating a Wellness Lifestyle Provides information regarding the components of physical fitness: cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, and body composition. In addition, nutrition, disease control, stress management, proper diet and exercise procedures are emphasized. Pre- selected physical activities will be conducted during many of the class sessions to allow the application of principles taught in the lecture sessions. Students are expected to design and implement a wellness plan during the class. Required for all baccalaureate degrees.

KINE 2304, Athletic Training Internship I Practical experience supervised by a Texas licensed athletic trainer. The course's emphasis is on learning and mastering clinical skills appropriate to skill level. A minimum of 300 clinical hours must be accumulated for the internship.

KINE 2305, Athletic Training Internship II Prerequisite: formal retention within the ATEP or permission of instructore Practical experience supervised by a Texas licensed athletic trainer. The course's emphasis is on learning and mastering clinical skills appropriate to skill level. A minimum of 300 clinical hours must be accumulated for the internship.

KINE 2310 Foundations of Kinesiology Prerequisite: Kinesiology major or minor Students will study the various areas of kinesiology and will learn basic information concerning each discipline studied. Students will also study the history and philosophy of kinesiology, and will develop their own philosophy or goals regarding the kinesiology field. Field trips, guest speakers, class projects, and lectures are utilized to highlight the different fields such as exercise science, teaching, coaching, sports psychology and sociology, and sports media.

KINE 2320 Sport Psychology Prerequisite: PSYC 1313 An introduction to the field of health psychology, which is devoted to understanding how people stay healty, why they become ill, and how they respond to illness and disease. Topics will be discussed from local, national, and global perspectives and will include the behavioral aspects of the health care system, exercise and nutrition, health-compromising behaviors, stress, AIDS, and the etiology and correlates of health, disease, and dysfunction.

KINE 2334 Tests and Measurements in Kinesiology Introductory course in the area of measurement and evaluation in kinesiology. Fundamental statistics and practical experiences of administering and taking physical education skills tests are included. Students also learn how to construct knowledge tests. Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 261

KINE 2335 Sports and Fitness Activities Methods and materials are provided in the areas of teaching team and individual activities to elementary and secondary students, church recreation programs, or summer recreation programs. A variety of activities will be presented such as archery, golf, horseshoes, table tennis, bowling, pickleball, and badminton to name a few. Students will also be required to develop an activity and teach it to the class as well as take tests, and learn the rules of the sport activities that are taught.

KINE 2336 Strategies and Principles of Coaching An overview of strategies and principles involved in coaching are emphasized. In addition, organization and administration of practices and games is discussed. The student will learn to develop drills and teach students in the proper developmental sequences appropriate for both junior and senior high school age students.

KINE 2337, Standard First Aid/CPR Prerequisite: None Students will be given information that will allow them to recognize when an emergency has occurred, how to follow a plan of action, and how to provide care for injuries or sudden illnesses until professional medical help arrives. Students will learn how to splint, bandage, care for individuals experiencing a diabetic coma, stroke, shock, heat exhaustion, or burns, and administer one person CPR on an infant, child, and adult. Role-playing, and outside class and in- class assignments are used to demonstrate and teach the necessary skills. Certification is received in both CPR and first-aid from the American Red Cross.

KINE 2340 Health Psychology Health Psychology is an introductory course dealing with the major content areas of health psychology. Topics include an overview of the field of health psychology, major body systems, important theoretical models for explaining, promoting, and changing health behaviors, moderators for stress and coping, and an introduction to health services including patient provider relations. The psychosocial aspects of pain, coronary heart disease, hypertension, stroke, diabetes, and other chronic health conditions will be introduced. (Also offered as PSYC 2340)

KINE 3210 Exercise Prescription Prerequisite: KINE 2230 or KINE 1350; Must be taken concurrently with KINE 3393 An upper level required class designed to enhance the student's ability to develop wellness activities appropriate for specific populations, such as senior citizens, preschool students, fitness classes, day care students, or other individuals with special needs.

KINE 3232 Wellness for Special Populations PREREQ: BIOL 2404 Students will be taught wellness concepts and techniques that will enable them to determine body composition, test flexibility, measure muscular strength and endurance, and determine cardiorespiratory capabilities. In addition, on test subjects students will learn the concepts involved in prescribing an exercise program and how to plan a proper exercise program for specific populations based on information learned and test results.

KINE 3301 Prevention and Treatment of Sports Injuries Prerequisite: KINE 2310 Basic instruction in the prevention, care, and evaluation of athletic injuries through lectures,

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 262 discussions, and laboratories, for the future trainer, coach, or physical education instructor.

KINE 3304, Athletic Training Internship III Practical experience supervised by a Texas licensed athletic trainer. The course's emphasis is on learning and mastering clinical skills appropriate to skill level. A minimum of 300 clinical hours must be acculumlated for the internship.

KINE 3305, Nutrition for Health A course designed to study foods and their effects upon health, development, and performance of the individual. The student will be introduced to concepts of nutrition for optimal health, sports nutrition, and basic essential nutrient dietary needs.

KINE 3315, Athletic Training Internship IV Practical experience supervised by a Texas licensed athletic trainer. The course's emphasis is on learning and mastering clinical skills appropriate to skill level. A minimum fo 300 clinical hours must be accumulated for the internship.

KINE 3360 Administration in Sports and Kinesiology Prerequisite: KINE 2310 Students will learn leadership, management, communication, and motivation skills necessary for dealing with sports and kinesiology programs. In addition, the course will cover human resource issues, public relation opportunities, how to develop partnerships and market wellness and sport programs. Other areas also covered are risk management, facility management, finances, transportation, and law issues.

KINE 3370 Fieldwork in Sports Administration PREREQ: KINE 3360 This internship course provides students with real world experience in the area of sport management. Students are placed based on internship site availability.

KINE 3393 Physiology of Exercise Prerequisite: KINE 2230 or KINE 1350, and BIOL 2404 with grade C or better A course concerning human physiology and its relationship to exercise. All systems in the body are studied with regard to how each system reacts and adapts to the stress of exercise. Must be taken simultaneously with KINE 4293.

KINE 3395 Kinesiology/Applied Biomechanics Prerequisites: KINE 2310 (or 1350 or 2230), KINE 3393 and BIOL 2404 Muscles of the human body and their functions in relation to movement will be studied. Simple examples and analyses of human motion will be studied in an effort to acquaint the student with the reasons for teaching specific sport movements.

KINE 3398 Foundations of Health Instruction Prerequisite: KINE 2230, 1350 or 2310 The class emphasizes the dimensions of wellness and how to teach school age children (K-12) and or adults. Areas that will be covered involve the health components (cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and body composition), proper hygiene, sex education, disease prevention, drug use prevention, mental health stability, environmental health management, and stress management. In addition to learning details about the health components, students will learn how to teach, develop, and present health lessons to a class of

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 263 students of individual with whom a student is developing a wellness program.

KINE 3410, Evaluation of Sports Injuries Prerequisite: KINE 2337; BIOL 1414 or CHEM 1404; BIOL 2404; formal admission to the athletic training internship program (or instructor's permission). This course is designed for athletic training students seeking Texas Licensure. This course includes an in-depth inquiry into the anatomical and physiological process associated with the occurrence of injuries to athletes and physically active individuals. By recognizing the signs and symptoms and then interpreting results of special tests, the student will develop techniques and methods with which to accurately evaluate and determine the extent of the injury sustained. This course focuses on the evaluation process for common injuries and conditions sustained by athletes that are related to the upper and lower extremities of the body. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

KINE 3420, Therapeutic Exercise and Rehabilitation Prerequisite: KINE 2410; BIOL 2404; KINE 3304; formal admittance to the Athletic Training Internship Program; (or instructor's permission) This course will focus on the theoretical basis of exercise, techniques and specific rehabilitative programs to give the student a basic competency level in designing and implementation of therapeutic exercise programs for the injured athlete. An understanding of the concepts of range of motion, strength, power, endurance, and return to activity will be obtained in this course.

KINE 4304, Athletic Training Internship V Practical experience supervised by a Texas licensed athletic trainer. The course's emphasis is on learning and mastering clinical skills appropriate to skill level. A minimum of 300 clinical hours must be accumulated for the internship.

KINE 4305, Athletic Training Internship VI Practical experience supervised by a Texas licensed athletic trainer. The course's emphasis is on learning and mastering clinical skills appropriate to skill level. A minimum of 300 clinical hours must be accumulated for the internship.

KINE 4323 Motor Learning Prerequisites: BIOL 2404; KINE 2310(or 2230 or KINE 1350); and KINE 3393 A course structured around the basics of human movement and motor performance. Subject matter includes perceptual-motor foundations of physical education with emphasis on the state of the performer and his ability to learn motor skills.

KINE 4328 Wellness and Fitness in EC-12 Schools Prerequisite: KINE 2310 (or 2230 or 1350) This course is designed to introduce the kinesiology major to practical concepts and programs that are presently being taught in elementary, junior high, and secondary physical education programs. The course includes information on daily and unit lesson plan preparation, class organization, classroom management, and field experience. A big part of this class is devoted to what is going on in the schools, as well as what is effective and valuable in a modern physical education curriculum. (12-hour practicum included)

KINE 4340 Wellness Internship Prerequisite: KINE 2310 (or 2230 or 1350); KINE 4370; and BIOL 2404 with a grade of C or better; completion of 22 hours of Kinesiology courses (excluding activity courses); senior

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 264 standing A field experience in kinesiology involving supervised experiences working in either an on- campus or off-campus setting that must be approved by the Kinesiology Department. This student will be required to complete 200 field experience hours. In addition, the class will complete a portfolio of work assigned by the profession.

KINE 4351 Sports Facility and Event Management PREREQ: KINE 3360 This course will focus on elements of planning, design and management related to maintenance, operations, security, and marketing for successful facility and event managaement of high school, collegiate, professional and recreational facilities and events. During the semester, students will get hands-on experience through the planning of their own event, and upon completion of the course, students will then be prepared to design, run, and evaluate a key event.

KINE 4352 Sports Media and Ethics PREREQ: KINE 3360 The purpose of this course is to provide students an opportunity to reflect on and discuss ethical and media concerns in athletics. It is designed to allow students the opportunity to examine the concepts of ethics throughout sport without being limited to just considering those competing on the field or court. Topics will include ergogenic aids, exploitation, cheating, genetic enhancement, violence and spectatorship, as well as broadcast and social media.

KINE 4353 Sports Law PREREQ: KINE 3360 This course is designed to enable students to expand their knowledge on laws, rules, and regulations surrounding sport and recreation, including legal issues associated with sports, sporting events, sports-related industries, sports programs, athletic education, recreation management and their constituents. Topics include negligence, property and premises law, risk management, contract law, constitutional law, and sports legislation.

KINE 4363 Sports Sociology Prerequisite: KINE 2310(or 2230 or 1350) Sport Sociology is designed to thoughtfully examine and analyze the role of sports in modern society. Understanding sports as a part of our American culture is appropriate in analyzing the many subcultures involved in the world of sport.

KINE 4370 Research in Kinesiology Prerequisite: KINE 2310 (or 2230 or 1350); completion of 22 hours of Kinesiology courses (excluding activity courses); and senior standing Research in current issues of kinesiology will be addressed to provide information regarding the field of kinesiology. Students will write a research paper and give a presentation addressing the issues. Additional research projects will be assigned.

KINE 4380 SPECIAL TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Nursing and Allied Health.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 265 Latin (LATN) Course Descriptions

LATN 1311 Elementary Latin I Introduction to the fundamentals of classical Latin. Topics include: pronunciation, basic vocabulary, grammar and syntax, practice in reading basic Latin. Graded reading material is adapted from classical texts and cultivates an appreciation of Latin literature and culture.

LATN 1312 Elementary Latin II Prerequisite: LATN 1311 Continuation of elementary Latin sequence. Topics include: continued study of vocabulary, grammar and syntax; reading more difficult Latin; gaining greater appreciation of Latin literature and culture.

LATN 2311, Intermediate Latin Prerequisite: LATN 1312 This course has three main goals: to develop proficiency in reading Latin, to strengthen command of Latin grammar and vocabulary, and to explore key features of Roman life and culture. Students read extended selections in the original Latin prose/poetry; and classroom discussion addresses cultural and historical issues while also reviewing grammar, stylistics, and poetics.

LATN 3301, Classical Mythology Prerequisite(s): None This course introduces the major Greek and Roman Myths in translation, analyzes the ways myths function in ancient and modern society, and considers the importance of Classical Myth on the modern world.

LATN 3302, Cicero Prerequisite: LATN 2311 Selected Latin readings from Cicero's oratory, philosophy, or letters.

LATN 3303, Vergil Prerequisite(s): LATN 2311 Selected Latin readings from Vergil's Aeneid, Georgics, or Eclogues.

LATN 3304, Horace Prerequisite(s): LATN 2311 Selected Latin readings from Horace's poetic works.

LATN 3305, Ovid Prerequisite(s): LATN 2311 Selected Latin readings from Ovid's poetic works.

LATN 3306, Plautus and Terrence Prerequisite(s): LATN 2311 Selected Latin readings from the comedies of Plautus and/or Terrence.

LATN 3307, St. Augustine Prerequisite(s): LATN 2311 Selected Latin readings from St. Augustine's Confessions, City of God, or other works. Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 266

LATN 4301, Latin Letters Prerequisite(s): LATN 2311 Selected Latin readings from the letters of Cicero, Pliny, Seneaca, or others.

LATN 4302, Roman Satire Prerequisite(s): LATN 2311 Selected Latin readings from the satires of Horace, Juvenal, Martial, Apuleius, and/or others.

LATN 4303, Roman Philosophical Works Prerequisite(s): LATN 2311 Selected Latin readings from Roman philosophical works including Cicero, Seneca, and others.

LATN 4304, Roman Historians Prerequisite(s): LATN 2311 Selected Latin readings from Caesar, Sallust, Livy, Suetonius, or Tacitus.

LATN 4305, Roman Lyric Poetry Prerequisite(s): LATN 2311 Selected Latin readings from Horace, Catullus, Propertius, Tibullus, and/or others.

LATN 4306, Readings from Christian Latin Prerequisite(s): LATN 2311 Selected Latin readings from Christian authors from Late Antiquity through the Medieval period.

LATN 4399, Readings from Latin Literature Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor Latin authors to be read are selected to meet the needs of the student. With content changed, this course may be repeated.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 267 General Linguistics (LING) Course Descriptions

LING 3310, General Linguistics Prerequisite: GREK 2312 and 2322 An introduction to basic linguistic concepts and applications for biblical languages students as applied to biblical texts.

LING 5310, General Linguistics Prerequisite: GREK 5301, GREK 5302 or permission of the instructor. An introduction to basic linguistic concepts and applications for biblical languages students as applied to biblical texts.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 268 Mathematics (MATH) Course Descriptions

MATH 1301 Introductory Algebra Prerequisite: None The quantitative tools required in a modern society, including a brief review of arithmetic, graphical representation of data, and beginning algebra. This course is offered to aid students with deficiencies in basic mathematical skills. Students who already have credit in a higher-level mathematics course will not be given credit in this course. This course may not be counted as part of the mathematics major.

MATH 1302 Intermediate Algebra PREREQS: MATH 1301, MATH SAT score of at least 400 or MATH ACT score of at least 18, or a satisfactory score on a math placement exam This course is intended for students who have had some previous exosure to algebra, either an introductory algebra course or two years of high school algebra. Topics include: linear equations and inequalities, absolute value, quadratic equations, polynomials, rational functions, algebraic fractions, exponentials and radicals, systems of linear equations, and applications. Students who already have credit for a higher-level mathematics course will not be given credit for this course. This course may not be counted as part of the mathematics major or the mathematical studies major.

MATH 1304 Introductory Algebra Prerequisite: A satisfactory score on a placement test given on the first day of class The quantitative tools required in a modern society, including a brief review of arithmetic, graphical representation of data, and beginning algebra. This course is offered to aid students with deficiencies in basic mathematical skills. Students who already have credit in a higher-level mathematics course will not be given credit in this course. This course may not be counted as part of the mathematics major.

MATH 1305 Math for Critical Thinking Prerequisite: MATH 1301 or 1302 or a MATH SAT/ACT score of at least 400/18 or a satisfactory score on a departmental placement exam Mathematical topics needed for the critical evaluation of quantitative information and arguments, including logic and the critical appraisal of graphs and tables including the use of some simple mathematical models and an introduction to elementary probability, statistics, and finance. This course may not be counted as part of a mathematics major, or a mathematical studies major.

MATH 1313 College Algebra Prerequisite: MATH 1302 or a MATH SAT/ACT score of at least 550/25 or a satisfactory score on a departmental placement exam Evaluating and manipulating algebraic expressions, the laws of exponents, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, radicals, the quadratic formula, solving equations and inequalities, systems of linear equations, an introduction to graphing, and applications. Students with no previous exposure to algebra should take MATH 1304 before MATH 1313. MATH 1313 may not be counted as part of a mathematics major. It may not be counted as part of a mathematical studies major except by students with a specialization in middle grades.

MATH 1323 Trigonometry Prerequisite: MATH 1313 or a satisfactory score on a departmental placement exam A study of trigonometric functions, exponentials, logarithms, and applications for students Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 269 needing a more comprehensive background than the accelerated coverage given in MATH 1434. This course may not be counted as part of the mathematics major.

MATH 1434 Precalculus Mathematics Prerequisites: MATH 1313 and MATH 1323 or a satisfactory score on a departmental placement exam Sets, relations, functions, roots of polynomial equations, trigonometry, and analytic geometry. This course may not be counted as part of the mathematics major. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

MATH 1451 Calculus I Prerequisite: MATH 1434 or a satisfactory score on a placement test Limits, continuity, differentiation and integration of elementary and transcendental functions, L¿Hôpital¿s Rule. Applications, including rates of change, max/min problems, and area between curves. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

MATH 1452, Calculus II Prerequisite: MATH 1451 A continuation of MATH 1451. Topics include: Techniques and applications of integration, improper integrals, parametric representations of curves, polar coordinates, L'Hopital's Rule, numerical approximation of integrals, an introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

MATH 2181, 2281, 2381, 2481 Special Topics Topics are selected on the basis of students needs and the academic qualifications of the staff. A minimum of 30 hours of study is required for each semester hour of credit.

MATH 2201 Foundations of Higher Mathematics PREREQ: MATH 1451 or consent of the instructor This course is a mathematically rigorous introduction to fundamental concepts required for higher-level mathematics. Topics include logic, sets, relations, functions, and algebraic structures, with an emphasis on formal mathematical proof techniques. It is required for the mathematics major.

MATH 2181, 2281, 2381, 2481 Special Topics Topics are selected on the basis of students needs and the academic qualifications of the staff. A minimum of 30 hours of study is required for each semester hour of credit.

MATH 2302 Foundations of Arithmetic and Numeration Prerequisite: MATH 1305 or higher level mathematics A study, from an advanced perspective, of the concepts and skills involved in arithmetic and numeration. Topics include sets, rational numbers (whole numbers and place value, fractions, integers and decimals), number theory, properties and algebraic reasoning, arithmetic operations, percents, ratios, and proportions. Problem solving is emphasized. This course, designed for education majors, may not be counted as part of the mathematics major or minor or meet the Liberal Arts Core Curriculum, math proficiency requirement.

MATH 2303 Foundations of Geometry, Measurement, Probability & Statistics Prerequisite: MATH 1305 or higher level mathematics A study, from an advanced perspective, of the basic concepts and methods of geometry,

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 270 measurement, probability and statistics. Topics include representation and analysis of data; discrete and conditional probability; measurement; and geometry as approached through similarity and congruence, through coordinates, and through transformations. Problem solving is emphasized. This course, designed for education majors, may not be counted as part of the mathematics major or minor or meet the Liberal Arts Core Curriculum, math proficiency requirement.

MATH 2181, 2281, 2381, 2481 Special Topics Topics are selected on the basis of students needs and the academic qualifications of the staff. A minimum of 30 hours of study is required for each semester hour of credit.

MATH 2423, Linear Algebra Prerequisite: MATH 1451 Introduction to linearity in mathematics. Topics include: matrices, determinants, abstract vector spaces, linear dependence, bases, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and linear transformations. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

MATH 2451, Calculus III Prerequisite: MATH 1452 A continuation of MATH 1452. Topics include: three-dimensional coordinate systems, quadric surfaces, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, vector calculus in three dimensions, partial derivatives, the total differential, multiple integrals, line integrals, surface integrals, vector fields, Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and applications. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

MATH 2181, 2281, 2381, 2481 Special Topics Topics are selected on the basis of students needs and the academic qualifications of the staff. A minimum of 30 hours of study is required for each semester hour of credit.

MATH 3302 Foundations of Geometry Prerequisite: MATH 1451 (or 2434) or consent of instructor A study of classical Euclidean geometry using both analytic and synthetic techniques, with an emphasis on the formal development of geometry. Topics include axiomatic systems, congruence and similarity, transformations, area and volume, Euclidean construction, finite geometries, and a brief introduction to non-Euclidean geometry. This course is required for the mathematical studies major but may not be counted as part of a mathematics major.

MATH 3311, Introduction to Discrete Mathematics and Combinatorics Prerequisites: MATH 1451; MATH 3301 is highly recommended. This course introduces students to elements of combinatorics, number theory, and discrete structures. Topics covered include permutations, combinations, prime factorizations, the Euclidean Algorithm, relations, the pigeonhole principles, inclusion and exclusion, and finite state machines. It exposes students to areas of mathematics of current practical interest and involves the use of proof and algorithmic thinking.

MATH 3331, Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos Prerequisite: MATH 3333 An introduction to dynamical systems. This course develops the theory for normal forms, structural stability of solutions, robust behavior, transversality, and local bifurcations.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 271 MATH 3333 Ordinary Differential Equations PREREQS: MATH 1452 and MATH 2423 A first course. Topics include: existence and uniqueness of solutions, initial and boundary value problems, solutions of first order equations, solutions of higher order linear equations with constant coefficients, infinite series solutions, numerical solutions, solutions of linear systems, solutions using Laplace transforms, and applications.

MATH 3334, Partial differential Equations Prerequisites: MATH 3333 An introduction to the basic properties of partial differential equations, including ideas and techniques that have proven useful in analyzing and solving them. Topics include vibrations of soilds, fluid flow, molecular structure, photon and electron interactions, and radiation of electromagnetic waves, with emphasis on the role of partial differential equations in modern mathematics, especially in geometry and analysis.

MATH 3353 Modern Abstract Algebra Prerequisite: MATH 1452, 3301 and 2323 An introduction to algebraic structures. Topics include sets, operations, relations, groups, subgroups, equivalence classes, Lagrange¿s Theorem, homomorphisms, rings, and ideals.

MATH 3364, Mathematical Computing PREREQ: MATH 1451 or consent of instructor An introductory course in computer programming with applications to mathematics. The programming language used will vary; possible choices include but are not restricted to Java, C++, C#, Maple, and MATLAB. Topics include: design of algorithms, structured programming, data types, control structures, functions and procedures, and mathematical problem solving. This course may be repeated for credit provided a different computer programming language is used.

MATH 3371, Introduction to Complex Variables(Previously offered as MATH 4333) Prerequisite: MATH 2451 An introduction to complex analysis and the study of complex-valued functions of a single complex variable. Topics include the complex number system, the Cauchy-Riemann conditions, analytic functions including linear, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric transformations, differentiation and integration of complex-valued functions, line integrals, and Taylor and Laurent Series expansions.

MATH 3381 SPECIAL TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Science and Mathematics.

MATH 3383 Mathematical Methods for Science and Engineering Prerequisites: Credit for or concurrent enrollment in MATH 3333 and 3414 Advanced techniques in applied mathematics for students of science and engineering, with topics chosen from partial differential equations, Laplace transforms, Fourier series, complex analysis, and vector analysis. (Offered also as PHYS 3383.)

MATH 3401, Introductory Statistics for the Life Sciences Prerequisite: MATH 1434 or MATH 1451 or a satisfactory score on a departmental placement examination. An introduction to elementary probability and statistics with applications to the life sciences.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 272 Topics include frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and spread, probability concepts, discrete and continuous distributions, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, and an introduction to linear correlation and regression. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. May not be counted as part of a math major or a math studies major. Students may not receive credit for both MATH 3401 and MATH 3404.

MATH 3404 Probability and Statistics with Computer Applications Prerequisite: MATH 1451 A mathematical development of the basic concepts of probability and statistics, emphasizing the theory of discrete and continuous random variables, with applications in science and engineering. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability theory, random variables, expected value, probability density functions, probability distributions, correlation and regression, and an introduction to statistical inference. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

MATH 4181, 4281, 4381, 4481 Special Topics Topics are selected on basis of students¿ needs and the academic qualifications of the staff. A minimum of 30 hours of study is required for each semester hour of credit. Up to one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions may be included.

MATH 4201, Mathematical Topics for Teachers Prerequisites: 15 hours of mathematics and junior or senior standing A review of mathematical topics of special interest to students obtaining teacher certification in mathematics, including material from algebra, geometry, probability, statistics, linear algebra, discrete math, and others. This course includes instruction on technology used in teaching mathematics, both graphing calculators and computer software. Required for the mathematical studies major, but may not be counted as part of a mathematics major.

MATH 4181, 4281, 4381, 4481 Special Topics Topics are selected on basis of students¿ needs and the academic qualifications of the staff. A minimum of 30 hours of study is required for each semester hour of credit. Up to one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions may be included.

MATH 4301 Real Variables I Prerequisites MATH 2451 and MATH 3301 A rigorous introduction to mathematical analysis. Topics covered include the real and complex number systems, basic topology, numerical sequences and series, continuity of functions, and differentiation.

MATH 4302 Real Variables II Prerequisite: MATH 4301 A continuation of MATH 4301. Further study of mathematical analysis. Topics covered include Riemann integration, sequences and series of functions, functions of several variables, and integration of differential forms.

MATH 4310 Advanced Discrete Mathematics and Combinatorics Prerequisite: MATH 3311 Further study of enumerative techniques and discrete structures including generating functions, recurrence relations, graph theory, spanning trees, optimization, and Boolean Algebras.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 273 MATH 4311 Topology I PREREQ: MATH 3353 or MATH 4301 An introduction to topology and its applications. Topics include a review of basic abstract algebra; the definition of a topological space, interior, closure, and boundary of sets; subspace, product, and quotient topologies; continuity and homeomorphisms; metrics and metric spaces; connectedness; and compactness.

MATH 4312 Topology II Prerequiste: MATH 4311 A continuation of MATH 4311. Topics include dynamical systems and chaos, homotopy and degree theory, fixed point theorems, embeddings, knots, graphs, and manifolds.

MATH 4332 Dynamics and Bifurcations Prerequistes: MATH 3301 and 2451 Introduction to the theory of equilibrium solutions of nonlinear equations. Presentation of the theory of bifurcations includes the analysis of the nonlinear ordinary and algebraic equations that arise from the methods of reduction by projections.

MATH 4341 Mathematical Biology Prerequisites: MATH 3333 Introduction to modeling in biology and genetics. Some of the models covered include populations models, host-parasite models, and gene spread models as described by difference equations, differential equations, and partial differential equations. The emphasis of this course will be to familiarize students with the selection of models and predictions based on the models chosen.

MATH 4353 Advanced Abstract Algebra Prerequisite: MATH 3353 A continuation of MATH 3353. The focus of this course is on rings, domains, fields, polynomials, Galois theory, Boolean algebra, and modules. Other topiocs may be covered if time permits.

MATH 4372 Advanced Complex Variables Prerequisite: MATH 3371 Further study of differentiable complex-valued functions of a single complex variable. Topics include residue theory and contour integrals, z-transforms, conformal mapping, harmonic functions and their applications, Fourier Series, and Laplace transforms.

MATH 4380 Differential Geometry Prerequisites: MATH 2451 and 3301 An introduction to differomorphisms and smooth manifolds. Topics covered include tangent spaces, orientation of manifolds, vector fields, homotopy, and the index of a map.

MATH 4181, 4281, 4381, 4481 Special Topics Topics are selected on basis of students needs and the academic qualifications of the staff. A minimum of 30 hours of study is required for each semester hour of credit. Up to one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions may be included.

MATH 4401 Introduction to Numerical Analysis Prerequisites: MATH 2451 and either MATH 3364 or consent of the instructor.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 274 An introduction to modern approximation techniques. This course shows how, why, and when numerical techniques can be expected to work and fail. It demonstrates the relevance of numerical analysis to a variety of disciplines and provides ample practice for students. Topics covered include approximating solutions to equation in one variable, interpolation and approximation of polynomials, numerical differentiation and integration, applications to differential equations, and solutions of both linear and nonlinear systems of equations.

MATH 4181, 4281, 4381, 4481 Special Topics Topics are selected on basis of students needs and the academic qualifications of the staff. A minimum of 30 hours of study is required for each semester hour of credit. Up to one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions may be included.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 275 Master of Fine Arts (MFA) Course Descriptions

MFA 5311 Graduate Painting I Graduate painting students will, in this introductory course, use a variety of painting processes including watercolor, oil, acrylic, and mixed media works to establish their central body of creative art. Interdisciplinary activities combining 2-Dimensional and 3-Dimensional processes will be acceptable. Students will be expected to continue their development of a formidable classical ability both in drawing and painting techniques and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

MFA 5312 Graduate Painting II Graduate painting students will, in this second level course, continue in their use of a variety of painting processes including watercolor, oil, acrylic, and mixed media works to establish their central body of creative art. Interdisciplinary activities combining 2-Dimensional and 3- Dimensional processes will be acceptable. Students will be expected to continue their development of a formidable classical ability both in drawing and painting techniques and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

MFA 5313 Graduate Painting III Graduate painting students will, in this third level course, become more adept with a variety of painting processes including watercolor, oil, acrylic, and mixed media works to establish their central body of creative art. Interdisciplinary activities combining 2-Dimensional and 3- Dimensional processes will be acceptable. Students will be expected to continue their development of a formidable classical ability both in drawing and painting techniques and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

MFA 5314 Graduate Painting IV Gaduate painting students will use a variety of painting processes including watercolor, oil, acrylic, and mixed media works to establish their central body of creative art. Interdisciplinary activities combining two-dimensional and three-dimensional processes will be acceptable. Students will be expected to continue their development of a formidable classical ability both in drawing and painting techniques and be prepared to explore their thesis content in painting activities. These courses in graduate painting focus the development of the interdisciplinary professional discourse and works of art needed in order to master the fine art of painting. All activities of graduate painting are juxtaposed towards the creation of original works of art, which express the individual. These creative impulses are organized with the student through criticism by the professor, which express critical thoughts towards the implementation of content and processes that lead the artist down the critical and spiritual path of discoveries required of any professional artist.

MFA 5319 STRUCTURES OF POETRY For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Fine Arts.

MFA 5321 Graduate Drawing I This course will introduce students to use the processes of wet and dry media, including watercolor, ink, charcoal, pastel, conte combined with new and experimental media including encaustic, rubbing, etc. Students will be expected to continue their development of a formidable classical ability drawing and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 276 MFA 5322 Graduate Drawing II This course will continue to introduce students to use the processes of wet and dry media, including watercolor, ink, charcoal, pastel, conte combined with new and experimental media including encaustic, rubbing, etc. Students will be expected to continue their development of a formidable classical ability drawing and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

MFA 5323 Graduate Drawing III Students in this course will begin to become more adept in the use of processes of wet and dry media, including watercoor, ink, charcoal, pastel, conte combined with new and experimental media including encaustic, rubbing, etc. Students will be expected to continue their development of a formidable classical ability drawing and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

MFA 5324 Graduate Drawing IV This course will allow students to use the processes of wet and dry media, including watercolor, ink, charcoal, pastel, and conte combined with new and experimental media including encaustic, rubbing, etc. Students will be expected to continue their development of a formidable classical ability drawing and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

MFA 5328 TheHolocaust: After 50 Years Students read poetry, fiction, personal narratives, and essays that reflect the Holocaust experience. Through their reading and research papers, a visit to the Holocaust Museum, and viewing films, students come to understand the history of anti-Semitism and how it culminated in the greatest crime against humanity of the 20th century. Students also consider subsequent genocides and discuss whether or not the hope Never again can ever be realized.

MFA 5331 Graduate Ceramics I This course in Ceramics will require a high level of traditional skills in building 3-Dimensional clay sculptural forms in addition to traditional ceramic techniques such as throwing, and hand- building. The course will combine experimental processes, glaze variations and clay body recipes for low and high range firing temperatures. Student's work will begin to achieve a thematic focus by the end of the semester.

MFA 5332 Graduate Ceramics II This course in Ceramics will require a high level of traditional skills in building 3-Dimensional clay sculptural forms in addition to traditional ceramic techniques such as throwing, and hand- building. The course will combine experimental processes, glaze variations and clay body recipes for low and high range firing temperatures. Student's work will continue to achieve a thematic focus by the end of the semester.

MFA 5333 Graduate Ceramics III This course in Ceramics will require a high level of traditional skills in building 3-Dimensional clay sculptural forms in addition to traditional ceramic techniques such as throwing, and hand- building. The course will combine experimental processes, glaze variations and clay body recipes for low and high range firing temperatures. Student's work will begin to develop a more mature thematic focus by the end of the semester.

MFA 5334 Graduate Ceramics IV This course combines, through experimental processes, glaze variations and clay body recipes

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 277 for low and high range firing temperatures. This course will require a high level of traditional skills in building three-dimensional clay sculptural forms in addition to traditional ceramic techniques such as throwing and hand-building. A student's work is expected to achieve a thematic focus by the end of the semester.

MFA 5340 Expressionism and the Arts This course will examine the expressive aspects of the Hellenistic, Baroque, and Romantic eras, but will emphasize the artistic movement of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries known as Expressionism. Emphasis will be on the European and American experience.

MFA 5341 Graduate Sculpture I In this graduate sculpture course, students will begin to learn how to translate drawings into 3- Dimensional media such as steel, bronze, assemblage, found objects, wood, plaster, film, and installation including video and audio. Students will be expected to continue their development of a high level of drawing skill and materials and methods of sculpture both subtractive and additive techniques. All techniques used in this course and the resulting projects culminate towards each student's thesis content.

MFA 5342 Graduate Sculpture II In this graduate sculpture course, students will continue to learn how to translate drawings into 3- Dimensional media such as steel, bronze, assemblage, found objects, wood, plaster, film, and installation including video and audio. Students will be expected to continue their development of a high level of drawing skill and materials and methods of sculpture both substractive and additive techniques. All techniques used in this course and the resulting projects culminate towards each student's thesis content.

MFA 5343 Graduate Sculpture III In this graduate sculpture course, students will begin to become more adept in learning how to translate drawings into 3-Dimensional media such as steel, bronze, assemblage, found objects, wood, plaster, film, and installation including video and audio. Students will be expected to continue their development of a high level of drawing skill and materials and methods of sculpture both subtractive and additive techniques. All techniques used in this course and the resulting projects culminate towards each student's thesis content.

MFA 5344 Graduate Sculpture IV In this graduate sculpture course, students will begin to become more adept in learning how to translate drawings into 3-Dimensional media such as steel, bronze, assemblage, found objects, wood, plaster, film, and installation including video and audio. Students will be expected to continue their development of a high level of drawing skill and materials and methods of sculpture both subtractive and additive techniques. All techniques used in this course and the resulting projects culminate towards each student's thesis content.

MFA 5350 Study and Studio Abroad This course meets during an HBU School of Art Study Abroad Trip and includes touring important artistic, architectural and religious venues. Students are expected to produce artistic works during their trip as well as gather information which will inspire future artistic crativity upon their return.

MFA 5351 Graduate Printmaking I This course will allow a student to begin to explore in new ways one or more of the following

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 278 drawing and printmaking techniques: etching, silkscreen, woodblock printing, intaglio, mono printing in the traditional and digital processes. Students will discover a personal voice in preparation for the development of their thesis content. Students are expected to have a working knowledge of printmaking techniques before enrolling.

MFA 5352 Graduate Printmaking II This course will allow a student to explore in new ways one or more of the following drawing and printmaking techniques: etching, silkscreen, woodblock printmaking, intaglio, mono printing in the traditional and digital processes. Students will discover a personal voice in preparation for the development of their thesis content.

MFA 5353 Graduate Printmaking III This course will allow a student to continue to explore in new ways one or more of the following drawing and printmaking techniques: etching, silkscreen, woodblock printing, intaglio, mono printing in the traditional and digital processes. Students will discover a personal voice in preparation for the development of their thesis content.

MFA 5354 Graduate Printmaking IV This course will allow a student to begin to explore in new ways one or more of the following drawing and printmaking techniques: etching, silkscreen, woodblock printing, intaglio, mono printing in the traditional and digital processes. Students will discover a personal voice in preparation for the development of their thesis content. Students are expected to have a working knowledge of printmaking techniques before enrolling.

MFA 5381 INDEPENDENT STUDY/SP TOPIC For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Fine Arts.

MFA 5382 The Greek World This course introduces students to the world of Ancient Greece. The goals of the course are to read the foundational texts of the Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods, to place them in their historical, philosophical, and archaeological contexts, and to consider their impact on western civilization. Authors read in this class may include: Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle and Thucydides.

MFA 5383, The Roman World This course introduces students to the world of Ancient Rome. The goals of the course are: to read the foundational texts of the Republican and Imperial periods, to place them in their historical, philosophical, and archaeological contexts, to understand the interrelationship between the Greek and Roman worlds, to discuss the emergence of Christianity in its classical context, and to consider the impact of Ancient Rome on western civilization. Authors read in this class may include: Vergil, Cicero, Lucretius, Horace, Plautus, Terrence, Suetonius, Tacitus, and Pliny.

MFA 5384 The Medieval World This course introduces students to the Medieval World. The goals of the course are: to read the foundational texts of the Medieval period, to place them in their historical, philosophical, and architectural contexts, to understand the relationship between the Classical Antiquity and the emergence of Christian Europe, and to consider the impact of the Medieval period on western civilization. Authors read in this class may include: Boethius, Augustine, Aquinas, Dante, Bede and Chaucer.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 279

MFA 5385 The Renaissance and Reformation This course introduces students to the period of the Renaissance and Reformation. The goals of the course are: to read the foundational texts of the Reformation period, to place them in their historical, philosophical, and religious contexts, to understand the relationship between the Classical Antiquity, the middle ages, and the emergence of early modern Europe, and to consider the impact of the Renaissance and Reformation on western civilization. Authors read in this class may include: Luther, Calvin, Machiavelli, Erasmus, Petrarch, Shakespeare, Milton and Donne.

MFA 5386 The Enlightenment This course introduces students to the period of the Enlightenment. The goals of the course are: to read the foundational texts of the Enlightenment period, to place them in their historical, philosophical, scientific and religious contexts, to understand the relationship between the Classical Antiquity, the scientific revolution, and the emergence of representative democracy, and to consider the impact of the Enlightenment on western civilization. Authors read in this class may include: Locke, Hobbes, Pope, Swift, Austen, Voltaire, Rousseau and Kant.

MFA 5387 The Modern World This course introduces students to the period of Romanticism and Modernity. The goals of the course are: to read the foundational texts of Romanticism and Modernism, to place them in their historical, philosophical, scientific, and religious contexts, to understand the relationship between the Romanticism and Modernism, and to consider the impact of these movements on the post- modern world. Authors read in this class may include: Goethe, Wordsworth, Nietzsche, Eliot, Einstein and Beckett.

MFA 5388 The Last Fifty Years This course introduces students to recent developments in western civilization. Special attention will be given to postmodernism and how has it influenced American culture. The goals of the course are: to examine the critical moral, political, economic, and social questions of the 20th century, and to understand the connection between this period and those that have preceded it. Special attention will be given to primary source readings.

MFA 5390 Western Culture and Human Experience These courses are a core component of the MLA program and offer a broad overview of history, politics, art, and philosophy. MLA 5390 will cover the years from the time of classical Greece through the medieval period; MLA 5391 will cover the Renaissance, Reformation, and Early Modern period; MLA 5392 will cover from the French revolution through Modern times.

MFA 5391 Western Culture and Human Experience II This course offers a broad overview of history, politics, art, and philosophy. MFA 5391 will cover the Renaissance, Reformation, and Early Modern periods.

MFA 5392 Western Culture and Human Experience II MFA 5392 offers a broad overview of history, politics, art, and philosophy. The course will cover the period from the French revolution through Modern times.

MFA 6315 Graduate Painting V Gaduate painting students will use a variety of painting processes including watercolor, oil, acrylic, and mixed media works to establish their central body of creative art. Interdisciplinary activities combining two-dimensional and three-dimensional processes will be acceptable.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 280 Students will be expected to continue their development of a formidable classical ability both in drawing and painting techniques and be prepared to explore their thesis content in painting activities. These courses in graduate painting focus the development of the interdisciplinary professional discourse and works of art needed in order to master the fine art of painting. All activities of graduate painting are juxtaposed towards the creation of original works of art, which express the individual. These creative impulses are organized with the student through criticism by the professor, which express critical thoughts towards the implementation of content and processes that lead the artist down the critical and spiritual path of discoveries required of any professional artist.

MFA 6316 Graduate Painting VI Gaduate painting students will use a variety of painting processes including watercolor, oil, acrylic, and mixed media works to establish their central body of creative art. Interdisciplinary activities combining two-dimensional and three-dimensional processes will be acceptable. Students will be expected to continue their development of a formidable classical ability both in drawing and painting techniques and be prepared to explore their thesis content in painting activities. These courses in graduate painting focus the development of the interdisciplinary professional discourse and works of art needed in order to master the fine art of painting. All activities of graduate painting are juxtaposed towards the creation of original works of art, which express the individual. These creative impulses are organized with the student through criticism by the professor, which express critical thoughts towards the implementation of content and processes that lead the artist down the critical and spiritual path of discoveries required of any professional artist.

MFA 6317 Graduate Painting VII Gaduate painting students will use a variety of painting processes including watercolor, oil, acrylic, and mixed media works to establish their central body of creative art. Interdisciplinary activities combining two-dimensional and three-dimensional processes will be acceptable. Students will be expected to continue their development of a formidable classical ability both in drawing and painting techniques and be prepared to explore their thesis content in painting activities. These courses in graduate painting focus the development of the interdisciplinary professional discourse and works of art needed in order to master the fine art of painting. All activities of graduate painting are juxtaposed towards the creation of original works of art, which express the individual. These creative impulses are organized with the student through criticism by the professor, which express critical thoughts towards the implementation of content and processes that lead the artist down the critical and spiritual path of discoveries required of any professional artist.

MFA 6318 Graduate Painting VIII Gaduate painting students will use a variety of painting processes including watercolor, oil, acrylic, and mixed media works to establish their central body of creative art. Interdisciplinary activities combining two-dimensional and three-dimensional processes will be acceptable. Students will be expected to continue their development of a formidable classical ability both in drawing and painting techniques and be prepared to explore their thesis content in painting activities. These courses in graduate painting focus the development of the interdisciplinary professional discourse and works of art needed in order to master the fine art of painting. All activities of graduate painting are juxtaposed towards the creation of original works of art, which express the individual. These creative impulses are organized with the student through criticism by the professor, which express critical thoughts towards the implementation of content and processes that lead the artist down the critical and spiritual path of discoveries required of any

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 281 professional artist.

MFA 6324 The Art of Being Human This course is an introduction to the humanities. It reaffirms the liberal arts tradition that maintains that the humanities constitute the best and brightest expressions of all people. The emphasis is on the interaction between the arts, religion, and philosophy, and on the humanities, believing that this approach helps us to see artists and philosophers at work, trying to solve real problems that we all know about.

MFA 6325 Graduate Drawing IV This course will allow students to use the processes of wet and dry media, including watercolor, ink, charcoal, pastel, and conte combined with new and experimental media including encaustic, rubbing, etc. Students will be expected to continue their development of a formidable classical ability drawing and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

MFA 6326 Graduate Drawing VI This course will allow students to use the processes of wet and dry media, including watercolor, ink, charcoal, pastel, and conte combined with new and experimental media including encaustic, rubbing, etc. Students will be expected to continue their development of a formidable classical ability drawing and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

MFA 6327 Graduate Drawing VII This course will allow students to use the processes of wet and dry media, including watercolor, ink, charcoal, pastel, and conte combined with new and experimental media including encaustic, rubbing, etc. Students will be expected to continue their development of a formidable classical ability drawing and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

MFA 6328 Graduate Drawing VIII This course will allow students to use the processes of wet and dry media, including watercolor, ink, charcoal, pastel, and conte combined with new and experimental media including encaustic, rubbing, etc. Students will be expected to continue their development of a formidable classical ability drawing and be prepared to explore thesis content in their painting activities.

MFA 6335 Graduate Ceramics V This course combines, through experimental processes, glaze variations and clay body recipes for low and high range firing temperatures. This course will require a high level of traditional skills in building three-dimensional clay sculptural forms in addition to traditional ceramic techniques such as throwing and hand-building. A student's work is expected to achieve a thematic focus by the end of the semester.

MFA 6336 Graduate Ceramics VI This course combines, through experimental processes, glaze variations and clay body recipes for low and high range firing temperatures. This course will require a high level of traditional skills in building three-dimensional clay sculptural forms in addition to traditional ceramic techniques such as throwing and hand-building. A student's work is expected to achieve a thematic focus by the end of the semester.

MFA 6337 Graduate Ceramics VII This course combines, through experimental processes, glaze variations and clay body recipes for low and high range firing temperatures. This course will require a high level of traditional

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 282 skills in building three-dimensional clay sculptural forms in addition to traditional ceramic techniques such as throwing and hand-building. A student's work is expected to achieve a thematic focus by the end of the semester.

MFA 6338 Graduate Ceramics VIII This course combines, through experimental processes, glaze variations and clay body recipes for low and high range firing temperatures. This course will require a high level of traditional skills in building three-dimensional clay sculptural forms in addition to traditional ceramic techniques such as throwing and hand-building. A student's work is expected to achieve a thematic focus by the end of the semester.

MFA 6345 Graduate Sculpture V In this graduate sculpture course, students will begin to become more adept in learning how to translate drawings into 3-Dimensional media such as steel, bronze, assemblage, found objects, wood, plaster, film, and installation including video and audio. Students will be expected to continue their development of a high level of drawing skill and materials and methods of sculpture both subtractive and additive techniques. All techniques used in this course and the resulting projects culminate towards each student's thesis content.

MFA 6346 Graduate Sculpture VI In this graduate sculpture course, students will begin to become more adept in learning how to translate drawings into 3-Dimensional media such as steel, bronze, assemblage, found objects, wood, plaster, film, and installation including video and audio. Students will be expected to continue their development of a high level of drawing skill and materials and methods of sculpture both subtractive and additive techniques. All techniques used in this course and the resulting projects culminate towards each student's thesis content.

MFA 6347 Graduate Sculpture VII In this graduate sculpture course, students will begin to become more adept in learning how to translate drawings into 3-Dimensional media such as steel, bronze, assemblage, found objects, wood, plaster, film, and installation including video and audio. Students will be expected to continue their development of a high level of drawing skill and materials and methods of sculpture both subtractive and additive techniques. All techniques used in this course and the resulting projects culminate towards each student's thesis content.

MFA 6348 Graduate Sculpture VIII In this graduate sculpture course, students will begin to become more adept in learning how to translate drawings into 3-Dimensional media such as steel, bronze, assemblage, found objects, wood, plaster, film, and installation including video and audio. Students will be expected to continue their development of a high level of drawing skill and materials and methods of sculpture both subtractive and additive techniques. All techniques used in this course and the resulting projects culminate towards each student's thesis content.

MFA 6350 Study and Studio Abroad This course meets during an HBU School of Art Study Abroad Trip and includes touring important artistic, architectural and religious venues. Students are expected to produce artistic works during their trip as well as gather information which will inspire future artistic crativity upon their return.

MFA 6352 GRADUATE DRAWING V

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 283 For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Fine Arts.

MFA 6355 Graduate Printmaking V This course will allow a student to begin to explore in new ways one or more of the following drawing and printmaking techniques: etching, silkscreen, woodblock printing, intaglio, mono printing in the traditional and digital processes. Students will discover a personal voice in preparation for the development of their thesis content. Students are expected to have a working knowledge of printmaking techniques before enrolling.

MFA 6356 Graduate Printmaking VI This course will allow a student to begin to explore in new ways one or more of the following drawing and printmaking techniques: etching, silkscreen, woodblock printing, intaglio, mono printing in the traditional and digital processes. Students will discover a personal voice in preparation for the development of their thesis content. Students are expected to have a working knowledge of printmaking techniques before enrolling.

MFA 6357 Graduate Printmaking VII This course will allow a student to begin to explore in new ways one or more of the following drawing and printmaking techniques: etching, silkscreen, woodblock printing, intaglio, mono printing in the traditional and digital processes. Students will discover a personal voice in preparation for the development of their thesis content. Students are expected to have a working knowledge of printmaking techniques before enrolling.

MFA 6358 Graduate Printmaking VIII This course will allow a student to begin to explore in new ways one or more of the following drawing and printmaking techniques: etching, silkscreen, woodblock printing, intaglio, mono printing in the traditional and digital processes. Students will discover a personal voice in preparation for the development of their thesis content. Students are expected to have a working knowledge of printmaking techniques before enrolling.

MFA 6361 Graduate Gallery and Museum Practices I This Gallery and Museum Practices course will begin to introduce the MFA student to a conceptual and practical understanding of art exhibitions and their importance in the careers of visual artists, as well as their contributions to contemporary society. Visitations to Houston area museums and galleries will be an important component of this course. Lectures will be offered on the history of fine art venues from the late 19th century to the present. At the time of graduation, the graduate student will be also be offered the opportunity of exhibiting their MFA work in Houston Baptist University's UAC Gallery.

MFA 6362 Graduate Gallery and Museum Practices II This Gallery and Museum Practices course will provide the MFA student with a conceptual and practical understanding of art exhibitions and their importance in the careers of visual artists, as well as their contributions to contemporary society. Visitations to Houston area museums and galleries will be an important component of this course. Lectures will be offered on the history of fine art venues from the late 19th century to the present. At the time of graduation, the graduate student will also be offered the opportunity of exhibiting their MFA work in Houston Baptist University's UAC Gallery.

MFA 6363 Graduate Gallery and Museum Practices III

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 284 This Gallery and Museum Practices course will provide the MFA student with a more sophisticated conceptual and practical understanding of art exhibitions and their importance in the careers of visual artists, as well as their contributions to contemporary society. Visitations to Houston area museums and galleries will be an important component of this course. Lectures will be offered on the history of fine art venues from the late 19th century to the present.

MFA 6364 Graduate Gallery and Museum Practices IV This Gallery and Museum Practices course will provide the MFA student with a more sophisticated conceptual and practical understanding of art exhibitions and their importance in the careers of visual artists, as well as their contributions to contemporary society. Visitations to Houston area museums and galleries will be an important component of this course. Lectures will be offered on the history of fine art venues from the late 19th century to the present. At the time of the graduation, the graduate student will also be offered the opportunity of exhibiting their MFA work in Houston Baptist University's UAC Gallery.

MFA 6375 Van Gogh and the Post Impressionist Movement The course deals with the major formative phase of the modern movement in art. Both Impressionist and Post Impressionist styles and artists will be examined. The focus of the course is concerned with the expressive and lively paintings of this modern master. His style will be traced from his early days in this native Holland, through his contact with the Impressionists in Paris, to his final days in Southern France.

MFA 6376 Michelangelo and Leonardo This course is concerned with a study of the art of two of the great masters of the High Renaissance in Italy--Michelangelo Buonarroti and Leonardo da Vinci. These two great individuals, who have had a tremendous impact in western culture from their own times through our own era, will be studied through a variety of their works.

MFA 6377 Contemporary Art Movements This course is designed to provide an overview of the major visual art movements of the 20th century and to extend an investigation into the current art scene. An introduction will begin with study of the influence of late 19th century movements such as Impressionism, PostImpressionism, and Art Noveau.

MFA 6378 The Gothic Cathedral This course exmaines the architectural development of the Christian Basilica from the middle of the twelfth through the sixteenth century. The Gothic Cathedral is an enduring symbol of the Middle Ages and provides one of the most important links between ancient and modern times.

MFA 6381 SPECIAL TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Fine Arts.

MFA 6385 Modern Architecture This course is designed to provide an overview of the major developments of architecture of the 20th century pioneers. The study will include the following: the innovations of the tall buildings in America, the Bauhaus in Germany, the development of major masters of the 20th century, and new forms from new materials. An important objective of the course is to explore current architects and their contemporary efforts, and a substantial part of the course will include an investigation of the architecture of the metropolitan Houston area.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 285

MFA 6386 Art Impressionism This course is designed to cover the movement of Impressionism in art during the latter part of the 19th century. It is recognized as the beginning point of the modern era in art. Works by the major artists of the group to be examined include Degas, Monet, Manet, Renoir, and Pissaro.

MFA 6388 Writing About Art The Master of Fine Arts course Writing About Art explores written documents and taped interviews by modern and contemporary artists and critics. This course differs from those that explore art historical movements, in that a primary focus is on the written and verbal statements by individual artists whether or not they agree with art historical canons. The writings are an extension of the visual artist’s studio life, with the course being organized to explore the artist as; correspondent, aesthetic statesman, critic, and collaborator. MFA students will be required to keep a journal of their own writings, as well as participate in the seminar style discussions of the assigned readings.

MFA 6392 Modern Masters - Picasso This course consists of a thorough study of the life and art of the twentieth-century master artist, Pablo Picasso. His long and productive career is studied in the context of the complex arena of twentieth century art.

MFA 6399 Graduate Thesis/ Portfolio Development All MFA graduate studio majors will, in this course, coordinate their thesis writing and body of art created during their MFA period of study preparing both for their Thesis MFA professional exhibition. Each student will work with their graduate committee chair, as primary instructor for this final seminar course during a full semester prior to his or her exhibition and planned graduation of the MFA program. The professor and candidate will work together to ensure the best possible portfolio development. Though not mandatory it is advised that this course be taken in one’s last semester of study prior to the MFA thesis lecture and solo exhibition. Work that has already been started relating to the student’s individual Thesis writing and creative Oeuvre will be coordinated and edited during the duration of this course. Satisfactory approval of both the instructor and the UAC Gallery director are needed prior to any MFA thesis exhibition, public MFA presentation lecture and oral thesis defense.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 286 Management (MGMT) Course Descriptions

MGMT 3302, Principles of Management Prerequisite: None This course provides background in the theory and practice of management principles centered around leading, controlling, planning and organizing for a more effective workplace. Students will learn the historical underpinnings of current management practice in the areas of organization design, theory, strategy and planning, team building, motivation, leadership and decision-making, among others. Heavy emphasis is placed upon application in the modern organization.

MGMT 3305 Organization Behavior and Management Prerequisites: One of the following: MGMT 2341 or MGMT 3302 An introduction to problems and decision making processes of organizations from a behavioral theory viewpoint. The level of analysis of the material is that of the individual manager and groups within the organizations. Topics include personality, motivation and attitude effects on organizational effectiveness, decision making models, leadership traits and behaviors, stress management, and group and team behavior. The integration of these concepts occurs within the organizational structures and processes. Emphasis is on effective management leading to effective organizations.

MGMT 3316, Innovation and New Offering Development Prerequisite: MGMT 3302 This course deals with the critical issues in the management of highly innovative enterprises and the way they create value through innovation. Innovation can be applied at all levels of the value chain and in the areas of research and development, manufacturing, marketing, and new offering development and support. The concept of innovation in the area of new offering development will be examined in great detail and the students will become familiar with how some of the best-in-class companies create products and services much more quickly and effectively than the rest of the industry.

MGMT 3322, Human Resources Management Prerequisite: MGMT 3302 Study of all phases of the human resources management (HRM) function from recruitment to retirement of the employee. Included are employment strategic planning, recruitment, selection, training and development, compensation, discipline, and the various laws under which employers must operate. Emphasis is on improving organizational effectiveness through the HRM function.

MGMT 3336 Organizational Theory Prerequisite: MGMT 3302 This course provides the student with a foundation in the area of organizational theory. The focus of the course is on the structure of organizations and the interrelationship of organizations and their environments. Emphasis will be given to theoretical development, comparison of theoretical foundations, the assessment of empirical support for the theories, current perspectives of management, and current frontiers in organizational research. Applications of the theoretical perspectives to management and to current organizational events will be discussed.

MGMT 4315 Power and Negotiation Prerequisite: MGMT 2341 or MGMT 3305 or MGMT 3302 This course examines the art and science of management negotiation. The use of power to affect Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 287 outcomes is explored. Students are exposed to cooperation theory, as well as multiple perspectives and analytical skills, in power management with a firm and between firms. Labor relations negotiations are also discussed. The course heavily depends upon cases that stimulate decision-making in the real business setting.

MGMT 4323, Transformational Leadership and Change Prerequisite: MGMT 3302 In-depth overview of the behaviors and characteristics of an effective leader conducted through current readings from experts on management, leadership, and business and through the study of the habits of visionary companies. Emphasizes the importance of innovation while studying various ways of leading people and organizations to become innovative. Examines common misconceptions about leadership and provides a practical understanding of leadership by analyzing great leaders and their organizations.

MGMT 4335, Managing the Global Enterprise Prerequisite: MGMT 3302 Focuses on general management and integration of functional area skills needed to compete in a complex international business environment. Case material addresses strategic issues, operational practices, and governmental relations of multinational companies. Key topics include identifying, developing, and defending an international competitive advantage; evaluating the international environment; and, organizing to become a successful global competitor.

MGMT 5260, Decision Making Techniques for Managers This course will provide a sound knowledge of many quantitative methods used by managers in the decision making process - linear programming, multi-objective decision making, analytic hierarchy process, decision making under uncertainty, decision trees and simulations. The course will integrate modeling into many functional areas of business, including Finance, Management, Marketing and Economics. Students will get hands-on modeling experience in the Microsoft Excel environment. Basic principles of probability and statistics are also explored. Graduate Business programs only.

MGMT 5261, Management Principles This course provides background in the theory and practice of management principles centered around leading, controlling, planning and organizing for a more effective workplace. Students will learn the fundamental and historical underpinnings of current management practice in the areas of human resources management, motivation, leadership operations, and decision-making, among others. Graduate Business Program Only

MGMT 5262, Organizational Principles This course introduces students to fundamental organizational concepts. Students will learn the elements and advantages of various organizational structures and processes. Further, students will be introduced to the most current thinking and practices in the management of organizational operations, both in manufacturing and services. Graduate Business Program only

MGMT 5263, Legal Environment of Business A study of the legal environment of business, the role of law in society, the judicial process, and government regulation. Emphases are given to the law of contracts, torts, intellectual property, as well as employment law dealing with discrimination and its relation to human resources. Graduate Business Program Only

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 288 MGMT 5340 Internship: MBA Prerequisites: current enrollment in MBA Program, completion of 12 hours in the MBA Program, good academic standing An opportunity or experience by which students learn by undertaking responsible roles in organizations where the business practices of the enterprise will be studied. The students will have the opportunity to develop interpersonal skills while acquiring practical knowledge in their disciplines. The students will be exposed to various work roles and career choices.

MGMT 5348, Organizational Behavior for HRM This course investigates the impact that individuals, groups and structure have on behavior within organizations. Special attention is paid to the functions of the HR department and Production and Operations Management. This knowledge will be developed and applied using frameworks provided by a conventional text and a compilation of theoretical and practical research. MS-HRM Program only.

MGMT 5360 Decision Making Techniques for Managers This course will provide a sound knowledge of many quantitative methods used by managers in the decision making process ¿ linear programming, multi-objective decision making, analytic hierarchy process, decision making under uncertainty and decision trees. Topics include simplex method, sensitivity analysis, transportation and scheduling models, inventory models and other widely used quantitative methods. This course will integrate modeling into many functional areas of business, including Finance, Marketing and Operations Management. Students will get hands-on modeling experience in a Microsoft Excel environment. Basic principles of probability and statistics are also explored. This course must be taken within the first 12 semester hours in the Program. Graduate Business programs only.

MGMT 5361 Staffing and Performance Management Examines strategic approaches for determining staffing requirements. Focuses on the overall staffing process including identifying non-traditional innovative recruiting sources, labor and supply and demand impacts, candidate evaluation/selection methods, legal framework, interviewing techniques and marketing strategies for attracting the best candidates. Development of knowledge and skills in contemporary performance management processes, and coaching methods. Graduate Business programs only.

MGMT 5362 Human Resources Information Technology Examines the application of technology to human resource administrative processes and management information requirements. Applications include resume management, training, interviewing and selection, performance management, compensation administration, governmental reporting, payroll and benefits administration. The theory is reinforced through a series of real-world exercises using current software technologies. Topics also include defining technology needs based on business requirements, selecting technology vendors, outsourcing and preparing cost/benefit analyses for proposed projects. Graduate Business programs only.

MGMT 5363, Decision-Making Tools for HRM This is a sruvey course on basic quantitative methods. The course will provide sound knowledge of basic business statistics and quantitative tools used by management in decision-making process. Topics include measures of central tendency and varition, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, regression analysis and forecasting, single and multi objective decision- making techniques, decision-making under uncertainties, simulations. Students will get extensive hands-on modeling and decision-making experience in the Miscosoft Excel environment. MS-

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 289 HRM program only.

MGMT 6181 SPEC TOP/INDEPENDENT STUDY For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Business.

MGMT 6307, International Law As global corporations span national boundaries, they must interact with a large number of national legal systems, international agreements, and international organizations. This course deals with a wide variety of international legal issues which affect the conduct of business, including, but not limited to, the following: the evolution of international law; laws and regulations that concern international trade; organizations that regulate and promote international trade, such as WTO, NAFTA, and the EU; employment law; criminal law for business fraud; laws for the protection of IP-patents, copyrights, and trade secrets; environmental laws and organizations; issues of personal privacy and confidentiality; and laws that govern property rights and the resolution of ownership. Graduate Business programs only.

MGMT 6310 Legal and Ethical Environment of Business This course is a functional study of the legal environment of business, examining the role of law in the business environment. Emphasis is given to the legal process and substantive legal areas of torts, strict liability, product liability; business related crimes, contracts, agency and employment law. Graduate Business programs only.

MGMT 6319, Legal and Ethical Environment of Business for HRM This course is a functional study of the legal environment of business, examining the role of law in the business environment. Emphasis is given to the legal process and substantive legal areas of torts, strict liability, product liability, business-related crimes, contracts, agency and employment law. Ethical considerations are addressed throughout. MS-HRM Program only.

MGMT 6328, Executive Communication and Information Strategies This course has two related but separate components – executive communications and information strategies. Overall, the fundamentals of communicating, sharing, storing, and protecting organizational ideas and information will be examined. Communicating ideas and information, both orally and in writing, is a major part of the course. Students will examine different genres of written communication appropriate for managers and executives. Similarly, they will examine the different genres of oral communications expected of business leaders. In examining information strategies, the course deals with a manager’s use of information resources for decision making and explores best practices for managing the acquisition and operation of information systems. Students will learn the role of information technology in various business processes. Finally, the course examines the processes and technologies involved in protecting information and privacy of the organization and all of its stakeholders.

MGMT 6331 Compensation and Benefits This course provides an in-depth understanding of total rewards including compensation and benefits. The content of the course considers the role of total rewards within the larger context of human resources management and business strategy with an emphasis on the theories, principles, design, imlementation and administration of total rewards programs. Topics include internal and external pay relationships, job analysis, job evaluation, compensation models, performance appraisals, salary structures, short and long-term incentives, benefit designs and cost management. Graduate Business programs only.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 290

MGMT 6332, Managing the HR Function This course introduces students to the tools and techniques to manage human resource functions. The context of the course will emphasize the implementation of human resource functions as projects and includes a discussion of organizational behavior and project management. The course focuses on various aspects of organizational behavior including culture, performance and reward systems, ethics, organizational change and teams. Applications include the methodology, tools and techniques used to design, track, and manage human resource functions as projects. The focus of the course will include the knowledge and skills necessary to manage the challenges of implementing human resource functions. MS-HRM Program only.

MGMT 6333 Human Resources Management Provides a strategic overview and integrated perspective of all the primary human resources functions. Emphasis is on the integration of HR practices and programs with the business strategy and culture of the organization. Topics include formulating HR strategy, staffing, performance management, strategic compensation, managing change, benefits, policy development, embracing diversity, employee development and HR technology. Graduate Business programs only.

MGMT 6334 Legal Challenges in HR Management This course explores the legal aspects of the employee/employer relationship from a functional standpoint- beginning with the recruiting and selecting of employees, through their development and growth in the organization and ultimately, in some cases, their departure. Emphasis is on limiting employer liability though effective and sound interviewing processes, documentation of employee performance, execution and the ultimate handling of employee/employer conflict, including but not limited to labot relations and discrimination issues such as harassment, disability, etc. Graduate Business Programs only.

MGMT 6335 History of Management, Human Resources, and Employment Relations Tracing the evolution of managerial thought from the Industrial Revolution to contemporary theory, this course provides background in the theory and practice of management and human resources. Principles of scientific management, the human relations movement, and the modernization of personnel to the modern models of human resource management will be examined. Concomitantly, employee relations will be examined both as a by-product of management systems and socio-cultural pressures.

MGMT 6338, Human Resource Management for HR Professionals The course provides a strategic overview and integrated perspective of all the primary human resources functions. Emphasis is on the integration of HR practices and programs with the business strategy and culture of the organization. Topics include formulating HR strategy, staffing, performance management, strategic compensation, managing change, benefits, policy development, embracing diversity, employee development, and HR technology. Since students are HR professionals, the course is structured to draw upon their work experience. MS-HRM Program only.

MGMT 6338, Human Resource Management for HR Professionals The course provides a strategic overview and integrated perspective of all the primary human resources functions. Emphasis is on the integration of HR practices and programs with the business strategy and culture of the organization. Topics include formulating HR strategy, staffing, performance management, strategic compensation, managing change, benefits, policy

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 291 development, embracing diversity, employee development, and HR technology. Since students are HR professionals, the course is structured to draw upon their work experience. MS-HRM Program only.

MGMT 6341 Operations Management This course explores the design, management and improvement of productive processes, systems and projects associated with services, manufacturing and public sector organizations. Continuous improvement processes, time-based competition, work design and project management are described. Attention is given to global supply chain and e-Procurement, inventory management, six sigma and service operations. This course emphasizes a value-based management process. Graduate Business programs only.

MGMT 6346, Global Supply Chain Management This course presents a methodology that links all the organizations involved with a company’s global supply-chain in an integrated two-way communication system to manage high-quality inventory in the most effective and efficient manner. It examines the multitude of policies, procedures, and organizational structures that are required to do this. It presents the evolution of the Purchasing function into Supply Management, examining such issues as buyer-supplier relationship, cross-functional teams, total cost of ownership, quality management, and others. It further presents the whole process of product development. Other management issues include outsourcing, strategic sourcing, strategic cost management, and pricing. In addition, the course examines legal and ethical issues, government procurement, and institutional supply management. Graduate Business programs only.

MGMT 6352, Organizational Behavior This course deals with the basic concepts of management from a behavioral viewpoint. The behavior of individuals and groups in an organizational setting as well as the dynamics of the organization as the aggregate of individual behaviors are emphasized. Organizational theory and human resource management are discussed. Production operations management will be introduced. Graduate Business programs only.

MGMT 6357, Project Management This course will introduce students to project management by providing an overview of project management activities. The focus of the course is to execute a standardized body of knowledge that can be used to handle projects in various industries and institutions including engineering, construction, business, and education. Additionally, the students will obtain knowledge and skills necessary to manage the challenges of human resources.

MGMT 6364 Training and Development Focuses on creating learning designs and delivery approaches to meet employee development needs and business priorities. Topics include training needs analysis, methods of instruction, consulting skills to determine performance issues and potential training solutions, audio-visual hardware, educational software, validation and evaluation. Students are exposed to new learning technologies and authoring tools and the broader issues of employee development, including career planning and succession management. Graduate Business programs only.

MGMT 6374, Global Business Strategy This course deals with the management of global enterprises in their pursuit to maximize value provided to their respective stakeholders. It examines the evolution from international to global competition and how this affects a variety of industry types. It also looks at the different

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 292 competitive structures that have appeared in the global area--alliances, partnerships, and acquisitions. Related to this, it presents the resulting organizational structures and business models. It further examines many issues of global management, such as global marketing, global risk management, global supply chains, global R&D, global knowledge management, and others. Graduate Business programs only.

MGMT 6376 Business Strategy and Policy This course focuses on strategic management from a value-based perspective. The corporate level of decision-making is emphasized. Various models of the strategic process from formulation, to implementation, to evaluation are discussed. How resources, including such intangible assets as knowledge, are used to implement strategic decisions is evaluated. Graduate Business programs only.

MGMT 6378 Management of Global Human Resources Examines the human resources issues facing multi-national organizations and joint venture. Areas covered include the process of expanding internationally, the process of understanding culture and applying human resource management concepts in a multinational environment. Provides an understanding of organizational design in multinational corporations. The course will develop skills in gathering information on the business, economic, legal and cultural environment in various regions and countries around the world. Graduate Business programs only.

MGMT 6380, Seminar: Selected Topics Directed study. Involves specification and approval of a study design; development of data; and analysis and reporting results. Graduate Business programs only.

MGMT 6381 SPECIAL TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Business.

MGMT 6382 Strategic Planning and HRM Challenges Focuses on the integration of business strategy and human resources strategy. Prepares students to understand the linkages and impact of HR programs on the successful execution of business strategy and to develop HR strategies that are aligned with business strategy, culture and employee motivation. Includes examination of contemporary political, social and economic and environmental issues that impact the development of HR strategy. Graduate Business programs only.

MGMT 6386, Organizational Problems, Diagnostics, and Solutions Prerequisites: Completion of 15 credit hours of core courses in the program This course focuses on the role of the manager as a problem-solver, including the processes involved in anticipating, recognizing, diagnosing, and generating solutions for large-scale organizational problems. Students are exposed to the proper methodologies and are given the tools to go beyond events and “patterns of events” to the underlying systemic structures responsible for organizational and other problems. In addition to the managerial role in organizational problem-solving, the course will explore the possible roles of business in addressing large-scale social and global problems. Such problems represent legitimate business opportunities and threats and, thus, the role of business in solving them is explored in terms of emerging business and social models. Graduate Business Programs only.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 293 MGMT 6389, Value Creation through Innovation and Entrepreneurship This course explores the critical role that knowledge and innovation play in corporate entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship. Entrepreneurial thinking and innovative processes are vital for gaining and maintaining advantages in the marketplace. Topics include entrepreneurial processes, the types and management of knowledge assets, knowledge management processes, innovation processes, and protection of an organization’s intellectual resources. Graduate Business Programs only

MGMT 6392, Transformational Leadership and Ethics in Business This course focuses on integrating leadership theory, ethical frameworks, current events, and experiential practice to help students become leaders who are grounded in ethical foundations. While a breadth of Leadership models will be explored and discussed, special attention will be given to the transformational leadership that becomes necessary in the midst of organizational change. The course will further emphasize the importance of ethical behavior in leadership, strategic thinking, leading transformational change, and shaping organizational culture to nurture leadership development. Graduate Business Programs only.

MGMT 6393 Global Enterprise Management The multinational enterprise must deal with a variety of institutions, forces, and problems that extend far beyond those faced by the organization which operates in only one economy. Effective management of the multinational requires solving a set of problems that differ intrinsically from those faced by the manager in a single economy. This course addresses the nature of these problems and their effective solutions. Graduate Business programs only.

MGMT 6395 International Management Experience This course combines classroom work with international travel and provides the student with direct contact with managers operating in another country. A weeklong international trip (scheduled at the end of the term) is a part of the course. Topical coverage in class sessions emphasizes cultural and historical differences in countries that produce different managerial styles and contrasting business practices. Graduate Business programs only

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 294 Management Information Systems (MIS) Course Descriptions

MIS 3330 Information Systems and Business Analytics PREREQS: BUSA 2301, 2311 This course provides students with basic knowledge of Information Systems and Business Analytics and their use for business operations, managerial decision-making, and strategic advantage. The computer hardware, software, and networks are discussed. The development and use of databases and data warehouses are addressed. Various tools and techniques for data interrogation, visualization, presentation, data mining, and predictive analytics are examined. Data analysis and spreadsheet modeling are addressed. Students will gain hands-on experience and develop skills necessary for working with large data sets from various business areas.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 295 Marketing (MKTG) Course Descriptions

MKTG 3301 Principles of Marketing Prerequisite: ECON 2311 or 2302 The fundamental marketing concepts and functions are analyzed and interpreted within the framework of the competitive, legal, economic, and social environments.

MKTG 3310 Consumer Behavior Prerequisite: MKTG 3301 A study of human behavior in the market place. Attention is focused on applying concepts from the social sciences to understanding the consumer decision processes and buying patterns.

MKTG 3313 Social Media Marketing A study of social media marketing and the various strategies that promotes successful usage of this promotion and consumer engagement tool. Marketing's role in e-commerce, Web-design, and Internet advertising principles are also explored. Students, through a real-world project/case, apply the functions of marketing to a social media marketing problem situation/case.

MKTG 3333 Sports, Entertainment, & Event Marketing A study of the sports, entertainment, and event sectors of the economy. Marketing strategies used in these three venues are emphasized. Real-life projects are used in each of the three areas to enhance learning experiences and reinforce knowledge acquisition. Marketing and management problem-solving techniques guide student-generated marketing plans.

MKTG 3360 Professional Sales Prerequisite: MKTG 3301 A study of the principles and techniques of personal selling using a behavior approach.

MKTG 3380 Online Marketing Prerequisite: MKTG 3301 A study of marketing on the Internet. Emphasizes marketing¿s role in e-commerce. Applications for effective web site design, Internet advertising principles, proper usage of information technology in designing and implementing marketing strategy, and how to do marketing research via the Internet are demonstrated and discussed.

MKTG 4330 International Marketing Prerequisite: MKTG 3301 A study of the problems and procedures of marketing in foreign countries, including the effects of cultural dynamics in assessing world markets.

MKTG 4336 Principles of Advertising Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing A study of the advertising component of the firm. Emphasizes the interactive coordination and strategy of this promotional tool. Applications necessary for developing target markets, utilization of the mass media, advertising research, and analysis of the complete campaign are stressed.

MKTG 4340 Internship Prerequisites: See the School of Business Internship Coordinator for current prerequisite information Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 296 The course is an integrating field experience by which students learn actual business practices by undertaking responsible roles in an organization. The students develop interpersonal skills while acquiring practical knowledge in their disciplines. The students are exposed to various work roles and career choices.

MKTG 4350 Marketing Research Prerequisites: MKTG 3301 Studies the methodology and procedures used to meet the information needs of marketing management.

MKTG 4360 Marketing Strategy Prerequisite: senior standing A comprehensive course designed to study marketing strategy using case histories. This is a capstone course and requires the basic knowledge the student has acquired in earlier marketing courses.

MKTG 4381 Special Topics Prerequisite: Approval of the Dean of the School of Business Directed study of a minimum of thirty clock hours for each hour of credit. Provides the marketing major the opportunity to conduct a detailed investigation of selected marketing problems.

MKTG 5260, Marketing Principles This course provides background in the theory and pratice of marketing principles. Marketing concepts and functions are presented within the framework of the competitive, legal, economic, and social environments.

MKTG 6310 Marketing Management An inquiry into marketing decision-making. Emphasis is placed on strategic planning and analytical procedures for marketing decisions. The course integrates all areas of marketing management and relates marketing activities to the other functional areas of the firm. This course culminates with the presentation of a comprehensive marketing plan to a panel of venture capitalists. Graduate Business programs only.

MKTG 6311, Marketing Management for HRM An inquiry into marketing decision-making. Emphasis is placed on strategic planning and analytical procedures for marketing decisions. The course integrates all areas of marketing management and relates marketing activities to the other functional areas of the firm. The course culminates with the presentation of a comprehensive marketing plan to a planel of venture capitalists. MS-HRM Program only.

MKTG 6333 International Marketing Seminar Prerequisite: MKTG 6310 The study of marketing structures, organization, policies, and procedures as applied to the international environment. This course examines competition, strategies, and technology in the global market place. Graduate Business programs only.

MKTG 6334 Marketing Strategy Seminar Prerequisite: MKTG 6310 A comprehensive course that studies strategy formulation, planning procedures and challenges

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 297 present in today¿s marketplace. This course uses case analysis to illustrate contemporary issues and decision making. Graduate Business programs only.

MKTG 6373 Changing Markets and Organizations This course is designed to provide insight into how new markets are formed. Study centers around new business paradigms created by organizations to respond to these new and changing markets. Insights into how marketing management strategies are formulated with respect to diverse market segments, e-commerce, and innovations are also provided. Information technology from a marketing perspective is tied to the newly emerging business structures. Graduate Business programs only.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 298 Master of Liberal Arts (MLA) Course Descriptions

MLA 5301 The Trivium in the Western Tradition This course explores the historical and practical importance of the Trivium as a fundamental part of teaching and learning. It incorporates the basic elements of the Western tradition and the liberal arts, focusing them around the disciplines of grammar, logic, and rhetoric.

MLA 5302, Logic and the Great Texts This course introduces students to the study of logic in the Western tradition, with particular emphasis on Aristotelian and classical forms of logic from the ancient Greeks to the modern world. Particular emphasis will be placed on logic as it is applied to classical education and the Great Books of the Western tradition.

MLA 5303, Classics and Christianity This course is a broad survey of the history, literature, philosophy, religion, art, archaeology and politics of the Ancient Graeco-Roman World with the purpose of focusing on specific elements that shed light on our understanding of the Bible and the development of Christianity.

MLA 5311 Islam: Resurrection of Empire This course will address the question of whether Islamic fundamentalism is becoming a more potent force on the current world stage.

MLA 5314 THE NATURE OF BIOGRAPHY For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the Smith College of Liberal Arts.

MLA 5315 The Vietnam Experience This course will focus on the collective American experience during the Vietnam War era from 1954-1976. Through various media and first hand experience, the class will examine the impact of the war on the United States and the generation of men and women who fought for American ideals at home and abroad.

MLA 5318 Texas Culture The purpose of this course is to view the ¿Texas experience¿ from a variety of angles, including the history of the Lone Star State, and how Texas fits in the national, social and political mosaic.

MLA 5319 Structures of Poetry Structures of Poetry teaches students to read poetry thoughtfully, accuratley, and wisely. Students who are experienced with reading poetry will emerge from this course as capable readers. Students who have read much poetry will emerge from this course with a much fuller understanding fo the way a poem functions.

MLA 5321 Victorian Fiction This course will serve as an introductory course on Victorian Fiction that will bridge MLA 6338, Great Detectives; MLA 6355, Gothic Novels; and MLA 6369, Charles Dickens. Victorian Fiction will be a survey of the major Victorian novelists from Dickens to Hardy.

MLA 5322 Fictional History This course will be a survey of historical fiction from Sir Walter Scott to the present day with an emphasis on those works that have shaped popular concepts of history. Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 299

MLA 5323 Tolkien and the World of Fantasy Critical interest in the study of fantasy has grown because of the vast popularity of J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis. This course will include the relationship of fantasy to medieval literature, fairy tales, fables and folklore, but emphasis will be on works since 1800.

MLA 5326 The Conquest of the Americas In The Conquest of the Americas students will examine the three major pre-Columbian cultures in Latin America (Maya, Aztec, and Inca). Documents recording the encounter of the Old and New Worlds will be read (in English): diaries, letters, and histories plus hieroglyph/pictograph histories.

MLA 5328 HOLOCAUST:AFTER 50 YEARS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the Smith College of Liberal Arts.

MLA 5329 Hildegard von Bingen and Her Music The purpose of this course is to study and become familiar with the musical works of Hildegard von Bingen, placing them within the history, environment and thought of the time. Students will become familiar with earlier forms of worship music and the contemporary Christian music of her day.

MLA 5335 Egypt: Pharaohs and Pyramids This course will provide a survey of Egyptian history from the earliest pharaohs through the Roman occupation; it will also examine the literature, mythology, art, architecture, and science of Egypt as well as the West¿s rediscovery of the Egyptian culture.

MLA 5336 Romanticism and Revolution: Art and Literature This course will study the impact of the French and American revolutions with emphasis on the visual arts. This survey of the Romantic Era will include a brief review of the major English poets, composers who based their major works on Romantic literary works, and artists of the Romantic Era.

MLA 5338 World Religions: Hinduism and Buddhism in India and Southeast Asia This course will examine Hinduism and Buddhism through readings in works such as the Vedic Hymns, the Bhagavad-Gita, and the Ramayana which link classical and popular Asian religion. Numerous examples of religious architecture, geography, and myth will further illustrate subject matter.

MLA 5341 Three Cities of the Revolution This class will enhance the student¿s critical understanding of the American republic through studies and readings in Revolutionary War perspectives presented by Williamsburg, Boston, and Philadelphia.

MLA 5343 African-American Literature Students will study slave narratives, spirituals and gospel music, folk tales, sermons, speeches, poetry, drama and fiction and analyze the literature as it relates to and reflects the periods in which it was written.

MLA 5345 Faulkner

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 300 Students read novels and short stories by William Faulkner and relate his themes and style to American Modernism.

MLA 5349 THE EPIC:HOMER AND VIRGIL For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the Smith College of Liberal Arts.

MLA 5351 Great Books in Ancient and Medieval Political Theory This course is an examination of the classic dilemmas and recurring problems in political theory and how they are dealt with by ancient Greek, Roman, and Medieval thinkers. Central to the course is a discussion of the nature of man, the meaning of life, and how best to achieve it.

MLA 5352 Dangers and Dilemmas in Democracy By examining classic texts in democratic theory, students will develop greater insight into the dangers and dilemmas of democracy, how they might be resolved, and how our own nation might overcome some of these same obstacles.

MLA 5353 Southern Women Writers Students will examine the literature of writers of the American South that reflect issues peculiar to that region as it comes to terms with slavery and its legacy. The reading list will include selected works of Kate Chopin, Harper Lee, Ellen Gilchrist and Eudora Welty.

MLA 5354 Law and Lawyers in Literature, Film and Video A study of the ways in which lawyers have been viewed in literature, cinema, and television.

MLA 5355, THE AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL EXPERIENCE This course examines the American constitution from a historical and philosophical perspective, approaching the American constitutional experience as a battle of ideas and words. The course relies on historical documents such as the Declaration of Independence, Federalist Papers, and the US Constitution.

MLA 5357 Voices of the Civil War The American Civil War as it is related by the participants themselves, through the interpretation of the most influential historians of the 20th century, and on to the visions of today¿s filmmakers and novelists. Each class session gives us an opportunity to read, view, and discuss memoirs, novels, histories, movies, and TV programs that illuminate the Civil War experience. Students will be asked to read and view these materials in the context of the times in which they were created. This will allow us to see the development of Civil War themes across the years since the conflict. Finally, students will be able to better articulate the meaning of the war in today¿s society.

MLA 5358 Women of Tudor England This course will study women during the Tudor Era (1485-1603). Even though women during this era were exhorted to be silent and obedient, ironically, for the first time in English history several women ruled as queens in their own right and numerous other women had a significant impact on history. Some famous women of the era were the six wives of Henry VIII, Bloody Mary, Mary Queen of Scots, Lady Jane Grey, and Bess of Hardwick. Special emphasis will be on the exceptional reign of Elizabeth I, who survived both to rule as an unmarried woman and become, by many standards, the most successful monarch in English history. This course will also explore the lives of the common women of Tudor England and trace cultural, social, and

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 301 economic changes impacting their lives.

MLA 5359 Utopia, Dystopia and the Literature of Technology This course will cover literature that portrays societies that are utopian and/or dystopian in nature, and feature the use or misuse of technology. The course will begin with Sir Thomas More¿s Utopia (1516), then proceed chronologically through the 19th and 20th centuries. We will end by exploring a new literary genre, hypertext fiction, which is not only produced but also consumed using technology, since it can only be read on a computer screen. Students will analyze the works using selected 20th century critical theories.

MLA 5360, Mythology in Literature and the Arts This course provides an overview of the major myths, the archetypes based on those myths, and their use in literature and the arts. It emphasizes the Greco-Roman, Norse, and Celtic myths, but also covers other mythologies. Coverage will include major stories from the Old and New Testaments.

MLA 5361, Understanding the Greeks: Socrates, Plato, Aristotle This course investigates the lasting impact of Greek thought on Western Civilization. The course provides a look at ancient Greek civilization including origins, religion, gender roles, daily life, theater, war, mythology, and politics. The primary focus of the course is tracing the intellectual contributions of the Greeks to Western Civilization and the way we view the world today.

MLA 5364 Chaucer and the Fourteenth Centery Examines the fourteenth century as a turning point in English and European culture: the end of the High Middle Ages and the beginnings of the pre-Renaissance. The course emphasizes the rise of vernacular languages as literary languages, particularly in Italy and England, and the role of Geoffrey Chaucer as the father of English poetry.

MLA 5365 Milton This course considers the thought and works of John Milton, with special attention devoted to Paradise Lost. Through examination of Milton's poetry and his major prose writings as well as their historical context and influence, students will explore the artistic, religious, political, and philosophical contributions of this key intellectual figure.

MLA 5382, The Greek World This course introduces students to the world of Ancient Greece. The goals of the courase are to read the foundational texts of the Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods, to place them in their historical, philosophical, and archaeological contexts, and to consider their impact on western civilization. Authors read in this class may include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Europides, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle, and Thucydides.

MLA 5383, The Roman World This course introduces students to the world of Ancient Rome. The goals of the course are to read the foundational texts of the Republican and Imperial periods, to place them in their historical, philosophical, and archaeological contexts, to understand the interrelationship between the Greek and Roman worlds, to discuss the emergence of Christianity in its classical context, and to consider the impact of Ancient Rome on western civilization. Authors read in this class may include Vergil, Cicero, Lucretius, Horace, Plautus, Terrence, Suetonius, Tacitus, and Pliny.

MLA 5384, THE MEDIEVAL WORLD

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 302 This course introduces students to the Medieval World. The goals of the course are to read the foundational texts of the Medieval period, to place them in their historical, philosophical, and architectural contexts, to understand the relationship between the Classical Antiquity and the emergence of Christian Europe, and to consider the impact of the Medieval period on western civilization. Authors read in this class may include Boethius, Augustine, Aquinas, Dante, Bede and Chaucer.

MLA 5385, The Renaissance and Reformation This course introduces students to the period of the Renaissance and Reformation. The goals of the course are to read the foundational texts of the Reformation period, to place them in their historical, philosophical, and religious contexts, to understand the relationship between the Classical Antiquity, the middle ages, and the emergence of early modern Europe, and to consider the impact of the Renaissance and Reformation on western civilization. Authors read in this class may include Luther, Calvin, Machiavelli, Erasmus, Petrarch, Skakespeare, Milton, and Donne.

MLA 5386, The Enlightenment This course introduces students to the period of the Enlightenment. The goals of the course are to read the foundational texts of the Enlightenment period, to place them in their historical, philosophical, scientific and religious contexts, to understand the relationship between the Classical Antiquity, the scientific revolution, and the emergence of representative democracy, and to consider the impact of the Enlightenment on western civilization. Authors read in this class may include Locke, Hobbes, Pope, Swift, Austen, Voltaire, Rousseau and Kant.

MLA 5387, The Modern World This course introduces students to the period of Romanticism and Modernity. The goals of the course are: to read the foundational texts of Romanticism and Modernism, to place them in their historical, philosophical, scientific, and religious contexts, to understand the relationship between the Romanticism and Modernism, and to consider the impact of these movements on the post- modern world. Authors read in this class may include: Goethe, Wordsworth, Nietzsche, Eliot, Einstein and Beckett.

MLA 5388, The Last Fifty Years This course introduces students to recent developments in western civilization. Special attention will be given to postmodernism and how has it influenced American culture. The goals of the course are: to examine the critical moral, political, economic, and social questions of the 20th century, and to understand the connection between this period and those that have preceded it. Special attention will be given to primary source readings.

MLA 5390 Western Culture and Human Experience These courses are a core component of the MLA program and offer a broad overview of history, politics, art, and philosophy. MLA 5390 will cover the years from the time of classical Greece through the medieval period; MLA 5391 will cover the Renaissance, Reformation, and Early Modern period; MLA 5392 will cover from the French revolution through Modern times.

MLA 5391 Western Culture and Human Experience These courses are a core component of the MLA program and offer a broad overview of history, politics, art, and philosophy. MLA 5390 will cover the years from the time of classical Greece through the medieval period; MLA 5391 will cover the Renaissance, Reformation, and Early Modern period; MLA 5392 will cover from the French revolution through Modern times.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 303 MLA 5392 Western Culture and Human Experience These courses are a core component of the MLA program and offer a broad overview of history, politics, art, and philosophy. MLA 5390 will cover the years from the time of classical Greece through the medieval period; MLA 5391 will cover the Renaissance, Reformation, and Early Modern period; MLA 5392 will cover from the French revolution through Modern times.

MLA 5399, Thesis This course is for the research, writing, and defense of a faculty-approved Master of Liberal Arts thesis. Course may be taken twice for credit.

MLA 6301 Science and the Common Understanding This course will include readings and discussions concerning the great scientific discoveries of the past, the historical context from which they arose, and the conflicts that resulted during their eventual resolution.

MLA 6304 Scientists: Their Philosophy, Their Essays This course studies scientific essays, some of historical significance - most from the modern world in which we live, most in written form but some in the form of video - all composed by scientists/essayists. No scientific or mathematical background is assumed or expected; instead, the approach is that of the seeker of knowledge and understanding, the aesthetic looking for beauty in content and style, and the critic viewing all with a skeptical eye.

MLA 6310, Unborn Life in the Western Tradition and American History Through a close study of great texts as well as individual scholarly research, this graduate-level course explores the history of ideas, attitudes, and practices regarding unborn life in the Western Tradition. The course pays special attention to American history as an expression of that tradition and to Christian reflection on the unborn from antiquity to the present.

MLA 6312 The French Enlightenment This course focuses on the cosmopolitan popularization of ideas and rhetorical strategies for their dissemination that became not only characteristics of the major philosophies of the French Enlightenment but also compelling and normative models for nearly all subsequent philosophical, critical, and scientific thought in the Modern Age.

MLA 6315 Critical Approaches to Literature: Don Quixote This course uses the Cervantes masterpiece Don Quixote de la Mancha as a springboard for the study of literary theory that may, in turn, be applied to other literary texts. Contemporary theories such as psychological, mythological-archetypal, formalist, structuralist, and poststructuralist methodologies will be examined and applied to Quixote.

MLA 6317 The Graying of America This course is designed to provide the student with sociological approaches to the study of aging. An examination of the emergence of aging as a problem in industrial nations will be undertaken. Consideration of specific problems and programs related to aging will also be addressed.

MLA 6318 Church and State in Early Modern England This course examines the relationship between the church and the state as a fundamental aspect of early modern English history (c.1500-170). Events of the period such as the Reformation, the Wars of Religion, the Enlightenment, and the Scientific Revolution deeply impacted church-state relations and the development of the modern nation-state. Particular attention will be paid to the

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 304 opinion-shaping influence of early printed books, including: Bibles, devotional manuals, sermons, plays, printed images, and other literature. The course also will provide an introduction to early modern paleography and historiography.

MLA 6324 The Art of Being Human This course is an introduction to the humanities. It reaffirms the liberal arts tradition that maintains that the humanities constitute the best and brightest expressions of all people. The emphasis is on the interaction between the arts, religion, and philosophy, and on the humanities, believing that this approach helps us to see artists and philosophers at work, trying to solve real problems that we all know about.

MLA 6331 Jane Austen and the Brontes The Jane Austen and the Brontes course is significant in its juxtaposition of both canonical and non-canonical early female novelists who represent both enlightenment and romantic literary and social values. The aim of this course is for the student to develop an appreciation of the authors¿ contributions to the development of the novel, and to fully understand the cultural periods that influence these novels.

MLA 6344 American Popular Culture A study of the development and impact of the mass media and society with an emphasis on the 20th century. Materials to be studied include dime novels, pulp magazines, comic books, and paperback books as well as their relationships to other mass media, particularly radio, television, and motion pictures. Other aspects include the production, marketing and distribution of popular culture as well as the sociological and psychological implications.

MLA 6345 SHAKESPEARE:GOODLY FRAME EARTH For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the Smith College of Liberal Arts.

MLA 6346 King Arthur in History and the Arts This course examines the major literary, musical, and artistic works inspired by the legends of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. The course will cover the historical roots of the legends, their use by major historians, and their influence on European and English literature.

MLA 6354 MYTH OF THE WEST IN FILM For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the Smith College of Liberal Arts.

MLA 6358 OUR TIMES/ OUR LITERATURE For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the Smith College of Liberal Arts.

MLA 6359 The Rhetoric of Social Change This course will explore the evolution of social movements from a rhetorical perspective. Special attention will be given to how public opinion is manipulated by both agents of change and agents of control. Topics to be studied will include civil rights, women¿s liberation, Vietnam, and the ¿new right.¿

MLA 6363 Men's Visions in Literature and Art This course will examine a variety of 20th century male perceptions, values, visions, and art

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 305 forms. Western world literature celebrates the courage, competitions, and conquests of men in conflict with one another, nature, God, and themselves. Men who lose such conflicts consider themselves failures, and the literature about them is tragic. But when a man wins those conflicts, he often destroys, damages, or diminishes his antagonists, the natural world, his God and his own humanity, dignity, satisfaction and joy.

MLA 6366 Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic Period This course will focus on the life of Alexander, his impact on the Greek and Eastern Mediterranean world, and the forces which he unleashed in the Hellenistic Period.

MLA 6368 Power in the Middle Ages The question of what power is and who should wield it became particularly acute in the disorder of the Middle Ages. After the collapse of the Roman Empire kings, nobles, and the church all attempted to maintain or expand their authority, and women and intellectuals carved their own niche in the life of the time. This course examines how thier battles for power and the solutions they worked out in the heat of the moment not only bulit their institutions of government but also laid the foundations for our own government and some of the ideas of liberty we hold most dear today.

MLA 6369 The World of Charles Dickens This course will provide an overview of the life, world, and work of Charles Dickens, the ¿Shakespeare of the English novel.¿ His development as a writer will be traced through his major novels: Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, Dombey and Son, Little Dorrit.

MLA 6371 Music in the Theatre The major emphasis of this course will be a presentation of the characteristics and differences between the Operetta and the Broadway show. Discussion of the components of the operetta will use as illustrations Lehar, Strauss, and Victor Herbert; the section on Broadway shows will feature standard composers such as Rodgers and Hammerstein and Lerner and Loewe; and including, finally, the contemporaries such as Bernstein, Bacharach, Herman, and Sondheim.

MLA 6374, Travel: The Italian Renaissance A tour of the three cities most associated with the Renaissance: Rome, Florence, and Venice. It will also include other significant sites such as Pisa, Ravenna, Verona, and Milan.

MLA 6375 Van Gogh and the Post Impressionist Movement The course deals with the major formative phase of the modern movement in art. Both Impressionist and Post Impressionist styles and artists will be examined. The focus of the course is concerned with the expressive and lively paintings of this modern master. His style will be traced from his early days in his native Holland, through his contact with the Impressionists in Paris, to his final days in Southern France.

MLA 6376 Michelangelo and Leonardo This course is concerned with a study of the art of two of the great masters of the High Renaissance in Italy - Michelangelo Buonarroti and Leonardo da Vinci. These two great individuals, who have had a tremendous impact on western culture from their own times through our own era, will be studied through a variety of their works.

MLA 6377 Contemporary Art Movements This course is designed to provide an overview of the major visual art movements of the 20th

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 306 century and to extend an investigation into the current art scene. An introduction will begin with study of the influence of late 19th century movements such as Impressionism, PostImpressionism, and Art Noveau.

MLA 6378 The Gothic Cathedral This course examines the architectural development of the Christian Basilica from the middle of the twelfth through the sixteen centuries. The Gothic Cathedral is an enduring symbol of the Middle Ages and provides one of the most important links between ancient and modern times.

MLA 6381 A World in Transition The transition from the classical world to a world is divided into three successor states¿ the Byzantine Empire, the Germanic kingdoms of the Latin West, and the Islamic Caliphates. This course examines a number of different sources ¿ historical, literary, and artistic ¿ to trace the evolution of these various forces.

MLA 6386 Art Impressionism This course is designed to cover the movement of Impressionism in art during the latter part of the 19th century; it is recognized as the beginning point of the modern era in art. Works by the major artists of the group to be examined include Degas, Monet, Manet, Renoir, and Pissaro.

MLA 6387 Music of Paris, 1870-1930 This course is a survey of music composed, performed, and experienced in Paris at the turn of the century and through World War I. The survey will include a study of influences shared by the arts ¿ visual, literary, ballet, opera, and other musical genre.

MLA 6391 Three Auteurs of the Cinema: Bergman, Fellini, Truffaut Student will examine three films each of these universally recognized masters of the post-World War II cinema. Their vision of movies as art will be emphasized.

MLA 6392 Modern Masters: Picasso This course consists of a thorough study of the life and art of the twentieth-century master artist, Pablo Picasso. His long and productive career is studied in the context of the complex arena of twentieth century art.

MLA 6397 Shakespeare: History and Film The purpose of this course is to introduce students to William Shakespeare¿s plays about the Wars of the Roses; to examine those plays in the contexts of Shakespeare¿s era and our own; to analyze his use and misuse of his sources for dramatic and political purposes; and to study the major modern cinematic and televised adaptations of the plays.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 307 Military Science (MSCI) Course Descriptions

MSCI 1125 PHYSICAL READINESS TRAINING For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

MSCI 1126 PHYSICAL READINESS TRAINING For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

MSCI 1131 INTERMEDIATE PHYSICAL FITNESS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

MSCI 1210 INTRODUCTION TO LEADERSHIP For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

MSCI 1211 INTRO-LEADERSHIP (NON-MAJORS) For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

MSCI 1220 SURVIVAL/UNARMED SELF-DEFENSE For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

MSCI 1221 INTRO-LEADERSHIP (NON-MAJORS) For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

MSCI 2210 FOUNDATIONS OF LEADERSHIP For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

MSCI 2211 FOUNDATION-LEADERSHIP(NON-MJR) For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

MSCI 2220 MILITARY SCIENCE II For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

MSCI 2221 FOUND-LEADERSHIP II(NONMAJORS) For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

MSCI 3239 SPECIAL PROBLEMS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 308 MSCI 3310 ADAPTIVE TEAM LEADERSHIP For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

MSCI 3311 ADAPTIVE TEAM LDRSHP (NON-MJR) For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

MSCI 3320 ADV MILITARY SCIENCE For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

MSCI 3321 APPLIED LEADERSHIP(NON-MAJORS) For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

MSCI 3398 SPECIAL PROBLEMS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

MSCI 4310 ADAPTIVE LEADERSHIP For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

MSCI 4311 ADAPTIVE LEADERSHIP (NON-MJR) For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

MSCI 4320 ADVANCED MILITARY SCIENCE For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

MSCI 4321 LEADERSHIP/COMPLEX WORLD(NMJR) For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

MSCI 4398 SPECIAL PROBLEMS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Military Science department at Univeristy of Houston.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 309 Music (MUSI) Course Descriptions

MUSI 0222, Fundamentals of Music Theory Prerquisite(s): Audition Theory Placement Exam A basic course designed only for conditional admit students to the School of Music who do not meet the minimum level score required on the Audition Theory Placement Exam for entrance into Music Theory I (MUSI 1322). MUSI 0222 is not applicable to degree requirements for a music major or minor. Students placed in MUSI 0222 will continue on with MUSI 1322, Theory I, and MUSI 1122, Theory I Lab, only after they pass this course. It will be only offered in the summer at HBU. As another option, conditional admit students may choose to enroll in and pass an approved Fundamentals of Music Theory on-line course or elsewhere with written permission from the Director of the School of Music or the Office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Humanities. An official transcript for the course (whether taken on-line or elsewhere) must also be sent to and received in the Office of the Registrar prior to full School of Music admission and scholarship eligibility.

MUSI 1111, Husky Band Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor/Band Director An instrumental ensemble rehearing 3-4 hours per week, performing primarily for University basketball games and other HBU functions. Course may be repeated for credit. Open to non- music majors.

MUSI 1113, University Singers Prerequisite: Permission of the Area Coordinator, Choral Music Rehearsal and performance of the finest music written for choral ensembles. Course may be repeated for credit. Open to non-music majors.

MUSI 1114, Guitar Ensemble Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. Group guitar performance of classical guitar literature. Course may be repeated for credit.

MUSI 1119, Opera Workshop Ensemble Prerequisite: Permission of the Area Coordinator, Vocal Studies Basic technical preparation and performance of individual scenes or complete operas, including dramatic exercises, improvisations, and the integration of music, acting, and opera staging, allowing students to experience all facets of production technique. Course may be repeated for credit.

MUSI 1143, Class Piano I Prerequisite: Declared Music Major or Minor Basic keyboard instruction for music majors and minors whose applied instrument is not piano.

MUSI 1144, Class Piano II Prerequistes: Declared Music Major or Minor; MUSI 1143, Class Piano I, with a grade of C or higher. Continued basic keyboard instruction for non-piano majors.

MUSI 1145, Class Piano III Prerequisites: Declared Music Major or Minor; MUSI 1144, Class Piano II, with a grade of C or higher. Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 310 Intermediate instruction in keyboard skills for non-piano majors.

MUSI 1146, Class Piano IV Prerequisites: Declared Music Major or Minor; MUSI 1145, Class Piano III, with a grade of C or higher.Corequisite(s): MUSI 0002, Piano Proficiency Advanced keyboard instruction directed toward demonstrated completion of Piano Proficiency requirements. Must be taken concurrently with MUSI 0002, Piano Proficiency.

MUSI 11B1, Horn One half-hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 11B2, Trumpet One half-hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 11B3, Trombone One half-hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 11B4, Euphonium One half-hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 11B5, Tuba One half-hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 11C1, Composition One half-hour private lesson per week in music composition.

MUSI 11G1, Classical Guitar One half-hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 11H1, Harp One half-hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 11K1, Piano One half-hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 11K2, Organ One half-hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 11K3, Harpsichord One half-hour private lessson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 311

MUSI 11P1, Percussion One half-hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 11S1, Harpsichord One half-hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 11S2, Viola One half-hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 11S3, Cello One half hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 11S4, Double Bass One half-hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 11V1, Voice One half-hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 11W1, Flute One half-hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 11W2, Oboe One half-hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 11W3, Clarinet One half-hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 11W4, Bassoon One half-hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 11W5, Saxophone One half-hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 1256, English/Italian Diction Prerequisite: None. Introduction to the speech sounds and rhythms of the English and Italian lanauges as applied to vocal literature.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 312 MUSI 1257, French/German Diction Prerequisite(s): None. Introduction to the speech sounds and rhythms of German and French languages as applied to vocal literature.

MUSI 12B1, Horn One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance on School of Music Forum once annually is required.

MUSI 12B2, Trumpet One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance on School of Music Forum once annually is required.

MUSI 12B3, Trombone One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance on School of Music Forum one annually is required.

MUSI 12B4, Euphonium One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance on School of Music Forum once annually is required.

MUSI 12B5, Tuba One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance on School of Music Forum once annually is required.

MUSI 12C1, Composition One hour private lesson per week in music composition.

MUSI 12G1, Classical Guitar One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance on School of Music Forum once annually is required.

MUSI 12H1, Harp One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance on School of Music Forum once annually is required.

MUSI 12K1, Piano One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solor performance on School of Music Forum one annually is required.

MUSI 12K2, Organ One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solor performance on School of Music Forum once annually is required.

MUSI 12K3, Harpsichord One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance on School of Music Forum once annually is required.

MUSI 12P1, Percussion One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 313 solo performance on School of Music Forum once annually is required.

MUSI 12S1, Violin One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance on the School of Music Forum once annually is required.

MUSI 12S2, Viola One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance on School of Music Forum once annually is required.

MUSI 12S3, Cello One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance on School of Music Forum once annually is required.

MUSI 12S4, Double Bass One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance on School of Music Forum once annually is required.

MUSI 12V1, Voice One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance on School of Music Forum once annually is required.

MUSI 12W1, Flute One half-hour private lesson per week. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 12W2, Oboe One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance on School of Music Forum once annually is required.

MUSI 12W3, Clarinet One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance on School of Music Forum once annually is required.

MUSI 12W4, Bassoon One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance on School of Music Forum once annually is required.

MUSI 12W5, Saxophone One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance on School of Music Forum once annually is required.

MUSI 1322, Theory I Prerequisites: Acceptable Audition Theory Placement Exam score, or MUSI 0222, Fundamentals of Music Theory, or an approved online Fundamentals of Music Theory course. Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MUSI 1122, Theory Lab I. An integrated course involving analysis and elementary composition of melody, two-part, three- part, and four-part homophonic textures, binary and ternary forms, tonal harmony through secondary dominant chords, and near-related modulations. It may not be taken out of sequence.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 314 MUSI 1323, Theory II Prerequisite: MUSI 1322, Theory ICorequisite: MUSI 1123, Theory II Lab An integrated course involving more in-depth analysis and elementary composition of melody, two-part, three-part, and four-part homophonic textures, binary and ternary forms, tonal harmony through secondary dominant chords, and near-related modulations. It may not be taken out of sequence.

MUSI 1331, Music Appreciation Prerequisite(s): None (a Liberal Arts Core requirement) A requried entry level music course for all non-music majors, surveying a variety of musical styles. No music reading skills are required. May serve as a preparatory course to MUSI 2331, History I, and MUSI 2332, Music History II.

MUSI 1422 Theory I Prerequisite(s): Acceptable Audition Theory Placement Exam score; MUSI 0222 Fundamentals of Music Theory (C or higher); or an approved on-line Fundamentals of Music Theory course. Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in MUSI 1022 Theory I Lab An integrated course involving analysis and elementary composition of melody, two-part, three- part, and four-part homophonic textures, binary and ternary forms, tonal harmony through secondary dominant chords, and near-related modulations. It may not be taken out of sequence.

MUSI 1423 Theory II Prerequisite(s): MUSI 1422 Theory I. Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in MUSI 1023 Theory II Lab An integrated course involving more in depth analysis and elementary composition of melody, two-part, three-part and four-part homophonic textures, binary and ternary forms, tonal harmony through secondary dominant chords, and near-related modulations. It may not be taken out of sequence.

MUSI 2111, Schola Cantorum Prerequisite: Audition and Permission of the Area Coordinator, Choral Activities A select chamber ensemble which may be divided into smaller groups of quartets, sextets, and octets, studying and performing chamber choral literature. Course may be repeated for credit. Open to non-music majors.

MUSI 2112, Chamber Music Ensemble Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor and the Area Coordinator, Keyboard Studies The study and performance of the major chamber music literature written for combinations of instruments including the piano. May be repeated for ensemble credit. Open to non-music majors.

MUSI 2181, Instrumental Techniques: Brass Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003 Sophomore Review. The study of technical problems, teaching materials, and basic performance problems of brass instruments. Teaching each instrument at the elementary level is included.

MUSI 3182, Instrumental Techniques: Percussion Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003 Sophomore Review The study of technical problems, teaching materials, and basic performance problems of percussion instruments. Teaching each instrument at the elementary level is included.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 315 MUSI 3183, Instrumental Techniques: Strings Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003 Sophomore Review The study of technical problems, teaching materials, and basic performance problems of string instruments. Teaching each instrument at the elementary level is included.

MUSI 2184, Instrumental Techniques: Woodwinds Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003 Sophomore Review. The study of technical problems, teaching materials, and basic performance problems of woodwind instruments. Teaching each instrument at the elementary level is included.

MUSI 2249, Class Piano Pedagogy Prerequisite(s): Piano MajorCorequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in MUSI 0002, Piano Proficiency Devoted to the development of keyboard skills covered in Class Piano I-IV including improvisation, harmonization, realization of figured bass, transposition, sigh-reading, accompanying, and basic score reading. Observation and guided field experience is included.

MUSI 2322, Theory III Prerequisite(s): MUSI 1323, Theory IICorequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in MUSI 2122, Theory III Lab This course examines the rudiments of analysis of larger 17th-19th Century forms, Chromatic Harmony (altered and borrowed harmony in particular) integrated with analysis and basic composition techniques. It includes Theme and Variations (Cantus Firmus or Continuous Variations) and Sectional Theme and Variations. Course must be taken in sequence.

MUSI 2323, Theory IV Prerequisite(s): MUSI 2322, Theory IIICorequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in MUSI 2123, Theory IV Lab. This course includes the study of chromatic harmony/remote modulation techniques, large-scale form analysis (Sonata-Allegro and Sonata-Rondo), and comprehensive analysis with attention to thematic growth processes. Course must be taken in sequence.

MUSI 2331, Music History I Prerequisite(s): MUSI 1322, Theory I, and MUSI 1122, Theory I Lab (or concurrent enrollment in both). A survey of Western music from Antiquity through the Renaissance. Course will include representativbe works, analytical listening, genres/forms, and composition recognition. Music History courses must be taken consecutively.

MUSI 2332, Music History III Prerequisite(s): MUSI 1323, Theory II (or concurrent enrollment); MUSI 1123, Theory II Lab (or concurrent enrollment); MUSI 2331, Music History I. A survey of Western usic from the Baroque through the Classical period. Course will include representative works, analytical listening, genres/forms, and composition recognition. Music History courses must be taken consecutively.

MUSI 2341, Vocal Accompanying Prerequisite(s): Piano must be primary Applied Instrument; MUSI 1323, Theory II; and, MUSI 1123, Theory II Lab Techniques for collaboration with singers are taught through the exploration of repertoire for

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 316 piano and voice. Additionally, students learn rehearsal and vocal coaching techniques through performance and individualized instruction in a performance class setting.

MUSI 2381, Foundations of Music Education Prerequisite(s): Music Education (BME) Majors An introductory survey course for music teacher certification candidates designed to present philosophical, historical, and psychological foundations for music education. Field experience is required. This course is a prerequisite for Elementary Music Methods (MUSI 4382) and Secondary Music Methods (MUSI 4383).

MUSI 2422 Theory III Prerequisite(s): MUSI 1423 Theory II. Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in MUSI 2022 Theory III Lab This course examines the rudiments of analysis of larger 17th-19th Century forms, Chromatic Harmony (altered and borrowed harmony in particular) integrated with analysis and basic composition techniques. It includes Theme and Variations (Cantus Firmus or Continuous Variations) and Sectional Theme and Variations. Course must be taken in sequence.

MUSI 2423 Theory IV Prerequisite(s): MUSI 2422 Theory III. Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in MUSI 2023 Theory IV Lab This course includes the study of chromatic harmony/remote modulation techniques, large-scale form analysis (Sonata-Allegro and Sonata-Rondo), and comprehensive analysis with attention to thematic growth processes. Course must be taken in sequence.

MUSI 3140, Studio Accompanying Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review, and MUSI 2341, Vocal Accompanying Guided practical experience in Collaborative Arts for Piano Majors through assigned studio accompaniment and performance. May be repeated for credit.

MUSI 3180, Performance Recital Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review The exploration of techniques for understanding and developing the young voice, including a survey of literature and other resources for teachers and directors working with young voices.

MUSI 31B1, Horn One half-hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 31B2, Trumpet One half hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 31B3, Trombone One half hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling dgree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 317 MUSI 31B4, Euphonium One half-hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 31B5, Tuba One half-hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 31C1, Composition One half hour private lesson per week in music composition. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music.

MUSI 31G1, Classical Guitar One half hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 31H1, Harp One half-hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 31K1, Piano One half-hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 31K2, Organ One half-hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 31K3, Harpsichord One half-hour private lesson per week. This course ie eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 31P1, Percussion One half-hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 31S1, Violin One half hour private lesson per week. The course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 318 MUSI 31S2, Viola One half hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 31S3, Cello One half hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 31S4, Double Bass One half-hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 31V1, Voice One half hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 31W1, Flute One half-hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 31W2, Oboe One half-hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 31W3, Clarinet One half-hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 31W4, Bassoon One half-hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 31W5, Saxophone One half hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 3260 Introduction to Conducting Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review, and Junior Standing (64 hrs) The course seeks to develop skill in conducting small and larger works for chorus and orchestra and to develop the necessary conducting grammar to accomplish this task.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 319 MUSI 3262 Advanced Conducting Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review; MUSI 3260, Introduction to Conducting; Junior Standing (64 hrs) The course continues to develop skill in conducting smaller and larger works for chorus and orchestra and to develop the necessary conducting grammar to accomplish the task.

MUSI 3263, Choral Conducting Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review The conducting of choral groups, including a study in basic technique, style, and interpretation.

MUSI 3264, Advanced Choral Conductin Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review; MUSI 3263, Choral Conducting The conducting of choral groups, including a study in advanced techniques, style, and interpretation as it applies to conducting chorses.

MUSI 3265, Choral Arranging Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review The course provides practical study of the techniques needed for arranging choral music. Includes setting music for worship, secular situations, choral counterpoint, chorale textures, and study of varying accompanimental styles.

MUSI 3281 INDEPENDENT STUDY/SPEC TOPIC For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Fine Arts.

MUSI 32B1, Horn One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance of a required recital before graduation is required.

MUSI 32B2, Trumpet One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance of a required recital before graduation is required.

MUSI 32B3, Trombone One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance of a required recital before graduation is required.

MUSI 32B4, Euphonium One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance of a required recital before graduation is required.

MUSI 32B5, Tuba One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance of a required recital before graduation is required.

MUSI 32C1, Composition One hour private lesson per week in music composition.

MUSI 32G1, Classical Guitar One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 320 solo performance of a required recital before graduation is required.

MUSI 32H1, Harp One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance of a required recital before graduation is required.

MUSI 32K1, Piano One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance of a required recital before graduation is required.

MUSI 32K2, Organ One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance of a required recital before graduation is required.

MUSI 32K3, Harpsichord One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance of a required recital before graduation is required.

MUSI 32P1, Percussion One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance of a required recital before graduation is required.

MUSI 32S1, Violin One half hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music. A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 32S2, Viola One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance of a required recital before graduation is required.

MUSI 32S3, Cello One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance of a required recital before graduation is required.

MUSI 32S4, Double Bass One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance of a required recital before graduation is required.

MUSI 32V1, Voice One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance of a required recital before graduation is required.

MUSI 32W1, Flute One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance of a required recital before graduation is required.

MUSI 32W2, Oboe One half-hour private lesson per week. This course is eligible only for fulfilling degree requirements with permission of the Area Coordinator and the Director of the School of Music.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 321 A minimum of one hour per day of individual practice is required.

MUSI 32W3, Clarinet One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance of a required recital before graduation is required.

MUSI 32W4, Bassoon One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance of a required recital before graduation is required.

MUSI 32W5, Saxophone One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance of a required recital before graduation is required.

MUSI 32W5, Saxophone One hour private lesson per week. A minimum of two hours per day of individual practice and solo performance of a required recital before graduating is required.

MUSI 3322, Theory V: Contemporary Theory Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review This course is a study of new compositional materials and analytical techniques in the 20th Century and includes intensive wor in aural skills and sight singing. It is a continuation of skills and techniques introduced in MUSI 2322 and MUSI 2323. It may not be taken out of sequence.

MUSI 3323, Theory VI: Counterpoint Prerquisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review A polyphonic study of eighteenth through twentieth century writing, including forms and composition of shorter contrapuntal forms. The course also includes intensive work in aural skills.

MUSI 3324 Instrumentation Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003 Sophomore Review An introduction to the principles of instrumentation and orchestration.

MUSI 3325, Scorereading Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review The practical application of analysis skills and score reading skills for Theory/Composition majors. May include aspects of instrumentation.

MUSI 3326, Advanced Analysis Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review; successful completion of MUSI 3322, Theory V; and, Permission of the Instructor. An advanced study of analytical techniques for Theory/Composition majors.

MUSI 3327, Instrumental Techniques Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review The study of ranges, tonal possibilities, technical limitations, and necessary transpositions for orchestral and band instruments.

MUSI 3333, Music History III

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 322 Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review A survey of Western music in the Romantic period. Course will include representative works, analytical listening, genres/forms and composition recognition. Music History courses must be taken consecutively.

MUSI 3334, Music History II Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review, MUSI 3333 A survey of Western music in the Contemporary period, including 20th and 21st century music. Course will include representative works, analytical listening, genres/forms and composition recognition. Music History courses must be taken consecutively.

MUSI 3340, Instrumental Accompanying Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review; Piano must be Primary Applied Instrument; and, Permission of the Area Coordinator, Keyboard Studies. Through the exploratiaon of repertoire for piano and other instruments, this course encompasses techniques for collaboration with instrumentalists. Rehearsal and instrumental coaching techniques are developed through performance and individualized instruction in a performance class setting.

MUSI 3356, Vocal Literature Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review; Permission of the Area Coordinator, Vocal Studies A survey study of solo song literature from approximately 1400-present.

MUSI 3371, Sacred Music Literature Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review A survey of music used for congregational worship spanning from Gregorian chant to the present focusing on texts and music from a historical and cultural perspective, including recent trends. Examination of the evolution of liturgical song from the chorale through the anthem, cantata, and oratorio. Methods for building a library of hymns and anthems for weekly use based on the seasons of the church year may be included.

MUSI 3374, Church Music Practicum Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review; Sacred Music Major Includes specialized topics pertaining to the sacred music ministry such as church leadership, development of service outlines, and contemporary worship considerations, in addition to required on-site class participation in worship services.

MUSI 3381 INDEPENDENT STUDY/SPEC TOPIC For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Fine Arts.

MUSI 4273, Technical Church Musician Skills Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review This course assists students in developing competencies for the vast array of technical skills required for today's church musician. Areas explored may include the church organ, hand bells, keyboards, multi-media computer technology including music notation and sequencing software, sound reinforcement systems, and microphone techniques. Visiting consultants will augment instruction.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 323 MUSI 4299, Senior Capstone Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review; successful completion of at least 110 credit hours An advanced study, critical analysis, and/or research-oriented course required for all BM majors covering one or more of the following rotating special topics/areas: history, musical works, sacred music, or notable composers. Should be taken during the final year of a student's undergraduate music program.

MUSI 4341, Piano Literature Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review; Piano Major A general survey of music written for the piano and its predeccors. It includes a substantial aural component.

MUSI 4343, Piano Pedagogy Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review; Piano Major Covers aspects of piano pedagogy including instruction for beginning and advanced students, as well as business considerations needed for private studio instruction. Field experience is included.

MUSI 4355, Vocal Pedagogy Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review A historical and practical approach to the art of teaching voice. Emphasis is on research, writing, and observation, involving some student teaching as directed by the instructor.

MUSI 4382, Elementary Music Methods Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review; MUSI 2381, Foundations of Music Education; BME major degree plan filed Develops competencies necessary for implementing music learning and skill development for pre-adolescents, in addition to surveying important methodologies used in elementary general music teaching for the music specialist. Observation and practical experience is included.

MUSI 4383, Secondary Music Methods Prerequisite(s): MUSI 0003, Sophomore Review; MUSI 2381, Fundamentals of Music Education; BME major degree plan filed Develops competencies necessary for implementing musical learning and skill development for students at the secondary school level. Examines principles and strategies relevant to successful music production in the junior and senior high student in schools. Observation and practical teaching experience is included.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 324 Music: Music Theory (MUTH) Course Descriptions

MUTH 4332 Instrumentation Prerequisite: MUTH 2232. An introduction to the principles of instrumentation and orchestration.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 325 Naval Science (NAVA) Course Descriptions

NAVA 101 NAVAL ORIENTATION For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Navy ROTC at Rice University.

NAVA 102 NAVAL ENGINEERING For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Navy ROTC at Rice University.

NAVA 201 NAVAL WEAPONS-SHIP SYSTEMS II For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Navy ROTC at Rice University.

NAVA 202 SEA POWER AND MARITIME AFFAIRS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Navy ROTC at Rice University.

NAVA 301 NAVIGATION I For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Navy ROTC at Rice University.

NAVA 302 NAVAL OPERATIONS/SEAMANSHIP For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Navy ROTC at Rice University.

NAVA 401 LEADERSHIP MANAGEMENT For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Navy ROTC at Rice University.

NAVA 402 LEADERSHIP AND ETHICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Navy ROTC at Rice University.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 326 Nursing (NURS) Course Descriptions

NURS 2222 Perspectives on Health Care Delivery Systems Prerequisites: Formal acceptance to the Nursing Program, and GPA of 3.0. Pre or Corequisites: NURS 2323, 2404, 2309 Students analyze the trends that influence the health care system and methods of health care delivery in the United States. The class discusses agencies, initiatives, and roles for promoting quality improvement in the health outcomes. The practicum experiences provide opportunities to assess health service organizations and world health care delivery systems in order to determine their effectiveness in promoting health consistent with cultural beliefs. This is a two-semester hour course that includes 18 practicum hours. 3

NURS 2309, Pharmacology Prerequisites: Formal acceptance to the Nursing Program, and GPA of 3.0. Pre or Corequisites: NURS 2323, 2404, 2222 A course designed to assist students in preparing for clinical experiences by applying concepts of assessment, pathophysiology, pharmacology, diagnostic and laboratory testing analysis, and therapeutic interventions to specific clinical situations. The course involves didactic and experiential teaching methods and active learning experiences. In addition to preparing for clinical experiences, the course is designed to promote the development of critical and creative thinking, problem-solving, and time management skills.

NURS 2323 Health Assessment Prerequisites: Formal acceptance to the Nursing Program, and GPA of 3.0. Pre or Corequisites: NURS 2222, 2404, 2309 Assessment of the individuals across the lifespan is taught within the context of growth and development. The student should be able to differentiate between normal findings, normal variations and abnormal findings in individuals when performing assessments in a variety of settings. Assessment, as the first step of the nursing process, is the foundation for a systematic approach to care of the individual. The student will organize and analyze data to select appropriate NANDA Nursing Diagnoses for health promotion. This is a three-semester hour course, including 67.5 clinical hours.

NURS 2404 Art and Science of Nursing Prerequisites: Formal acceptance to the Nursing Program, and GPA of 3.0. Pre or Corequisites: NURS 2323, 2222, 2309 Students learn systematic approaches, basic skills, and professional attitudes for providing care and therapeutic interventions used to promote health in clients across the lifespan and assist these clients with activities of daily living. This course incorporates knowledge of humans in health and illness, aesthetic perception of human experiences, personal understanding of self and others, and the capacity to make legal and ethical choices. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and legal and ethical decision-making. The course incorporates the principles learned in NURS 2323. This is a four-semester hour course, including 90 clinical hours.

NURS 3222 Perspectives on Health Care Delivery Systems Prerequisites: Formal acceptance to the Nursing Program, and GPA of 3.0. Pre or Corequisites: NURS 3323 (2323), 3408 (2404), 3309 (2309) Students analyze the trends that influence the health care system and methods of health care delivery in the United States. The class discusses agencies, initiatives, and roles for promoting quality improvement in the health outcomes. The practicum experiences provide opportunities to Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 327 assess health service organizations and world health care delivery systems in order to determine their effectiveness in promoting health consistent with cultural beliefs. This is a two-semester hour course that includes 18 practicum hours.

NURS 3309, Pharmacology Prerequisites: Formal acceptance to the Nursing Program, and GPA of 3.0. Pre or Corequisites: NURS 3323 (2323), 3408 (2404), 3222 (2222) A course designed to assist students in preparing for clinical experiences by applying concepts of assessment, pathophysiology, pharmacology, diagnostic and laboratory testing analysis, and therapeutic interventions to specific clinical situations. The course involves didactic and experiential teaching methods and active learning experiences. In addition to preparing for clinical experiences, the course is designed to promote the development of critical and creative thinking, problem-solving, and time management skills.

NURS 3323 Health Assessment Prerequisites: Formal acceptance to the Nursing Program, and GPA of 3.0. Pre or Corequisites: NURS 3222 (2222), 3408 (2404), 3309 (2309) Assessment of the individuals across the lifespan is taught within the context of growth and development. The student should be able to differentiate between normal findings, normal variations and abnormal findings in individuals when performing assessments in a variety of settings. Assessment, as the first step of the nursing process, is the foundation for a systematic approach to care of the individual. The student will organize and analyze data to select appropriate NANDA Nursing Diagnoses for health promotion. This is a three-semester hour course, including 67.5 clinical hours.

NURS 3404 and 3424 Care of Individuals I and II Prerequisites: NURS 2323, 2222, 2309, 2404; GPA of 2.5 or higher, and successful completion of the Novice Level Curriculum Checkpoint. Co-requisites: BIOL 3433 may be taken concurrently with this course This is a four-semester hour course, including 90 clinical hours. It is the first in a series of three courses that focuses on nursing care of individuals. These courses must be taken in order. The dimensions of health are assessed in individuals experiencing health problems. Students apply concepts of case management and continuity of care to individuals across the lifespan, including care during perioperative experiences. Students are expected to be able to provide care in a variety of acute care settings.

NURS 3408 Art and Science of Nursing Prerequisites: Formal acceptance to the Nursing Program, and GPA of 3.0. Pre or Corequisites: NURS 3323 (2323), 3222 (2222), 3309 (2309) Students learn systematic approaches, basic skills, and professional attitudes for providing care and therapeutic interventions used to promote health in clients across the lifespan and assist these clients with activities of daily living. This course incorporates knowledge of humans in health and illness, aesthetic perception of human experiences, personal understanding of self and others, and the capacity to make legal and ethical choices. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and legal and ethical decision-making. The course incorporates the principles learned in NURS 3323. This is a four-semester hour course, including 90 clinical hours.

NURS 3414 Pathophysiology for Health Care Prerequisites: CHEM 1404, NURS 3212, 2323 and 2404, and GPA of 2.5 or higher Students describe the pathology of health conditions and use concepts of pathophysiology for

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 328 applying caring/healing practices to designing health care plans for promoting fullness in living across the lifespan. The manifestations of pathology form a basis for health assessment. Synthesis of pathophysiology with levels of health promotion and prevention provides rationale for case management priorities. Three semester hours, including 14 laboratory hours.

NURS 3404 and 3424 Care of Individuals I and II Prerequisites: NURS 2222, 2309, 2323, 2404, 3404, BIOL 3433; GPA of 2.5 or higher, and successful completion of the Novice Level Curriculum Checkpoint. This is a four-semester hour course, including 90 clinical hours. It is the second in a series of three courses that focuses on nursing care of individuals. These courses must be taken in order. The dimensions of health are assessed in individuals experiencing health problems. Students apply concepts of case management and continuity of care to individuals across the lifespan, including care during perioperative experiences. Students are expected to be able to provide care in a variety of acute care settings.

NURS 3434 Care of Individuals III Prerequisites: GPA of 2.5 or higher, and NURS 3424 This is the third in a series of three courses that focus on nursing care of individuals. The dimensions of health are assessed in individuals experiencing major and/or life-threatening health problems. Upon successful completion of the course, students are expected to be able to apply concepts of case management and continuity of care across the lifespan and use a systematic approach to provide care for individuals with major and/or life-threatening health problems. Students provide care in a variety of critical care units. The course is four semester hours, including 90 clinical hours.

NURS 4412, Care of Vulnerable Populations Co-Requisites: NURS 3404, BIOL 3444. A GPA of 2.5 is required to progres in the curriculum. Novice Level Checkpoint: Passed. This course is one of four courses for the Baccalaureate Nursing program that focuses on care of groups, populations, and communities. Students apply concepts of epidemiology to determine the factors that contribute to volnerability in groups, communities, and populations. Students examine research methodologies and approaches that are employed to improve health outcomes for vulnerable populations. The levels of prevention serve as a basis for analyzing recommendations for health programming for the vulnerable populations. The course is four semester hours, including 45 clinical hours.

NURS 4414 Care of Families with Mental Health Problems Prerequisite: NURS 2404, GPA of 2.5 or higher, and successful completion of the Advanced Beginner Curriculum Checkpoint. Pre or corequisite: NURS 3404, 4412 This is one of three courses that focus on specialty care of individuals and their families. In this course, the dimensions of health are assessed in families dealing with mental health problems. Students apply concepts of care to case management and continuity of care of families with mental health problem in the home, community, and specialized environments. Students are expected to be able to use a systematic approach to provide care for families with mental health problems. This course is four semester hours, including 90 clinical hours.

NURS 4424 Nursing in the Community and Nursing the Community Prerequisites: NURS 4412, and 4494; and a GPA of 2.5 or higher This course is one of four courses for the Baccalaureate Nursing program that focus on care of groups, populations, and communities. Students analyze historical trends and characteristics and

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 329 factors that have impacted community health nursing and contributed to community health issues. Students compare and contrast the professional nursing roles in the community and apply theories, models, and principles to community health nursing practice. Opportunities are provided to use systematic approaches to identify health needs to groups and populations and promote health in the community. This is a four-semester hour course, including 90 clinical hours.

NURS 4434 Care of Childbearing Families Corequisites: NURS 3434, GPA of 2.5 or higher, and successful completion of the Advanced Beginner Level Curriculum Checkpoint This is one of three courses that focus on specialty care of individuals and their families. The dimensions of health are assessed in childbearing families requiring specialized care. Students apply concepts of care to case management and continuity of care of childbearing families. Students use a systematic approach to providing care for childbearing families, in the community and in specialty care units such as labor and delivery, neonatal intensive care units, pre-natal and postpartum units. This is a four-semester hour, including 90 clinical hours.

NURS 4444 Care of Families with Children Prerequisites: NURS 3434, GPA of 2.5 or higher, and successful completion of the Advanced Beginner Level Curriculum Checkpoint This is one of three courses that focus on specialty care of individuals and their families. The dimensions of health are assessed in families with children and adolescents. Students are expected to be able to apply concepts of care to case management and continuity of care of families with children and adolescents in the community and in pediatric health care environments. Students use a systematic approach to provide care for families with children and adolescents. This course is four semester hours, including 90 clinical hours.

NURS 4494, Senior Seminar: Applied Nursing Research and Externship Prerequisites: Completion of all prerequisite courses for entry into nursing, and it is recommended that students have completed: Computer competency or CISM 1321; Humanities (15 hours); Fine Art (3 hours); CHRI (9 hours); KINE 2202. College of Nursing prerequisites: NURS 2222; NURS 3202; NURS 2323; Math for Meds competency or NURS 2111; NURS 2309; NURS 2404; NURS 3404; NURS 3414 and NURS 4412; NURS 3434; a GPA of 2.5 is required to progress in the curriculum; Novice Level Checkpoint: Passed; Advanced Beginner Level Checkpoint: Required completion at the end of NURS 3434; NURS 3434; NURS 4434 and have passed the proficiency for any of these courses. A GPA of 2.5 is required to progress in the curriculum. Honors College students will take HNRS 4215 in lieu of NURS 4494. Novice Level Checkpoint: Passed; Advanced Beginner Level Checkpoint: Passed. See checkpoint policy and procedure for those not successful on the checkpoint. This course focuses on professional issues in nursing and the research process and on the transition from student to professional role and applying the reserch process to clinical practice. Students practice nursing at the level of advanced beginner in specified environments and address clinical practice quality improvement issus via research methods appropriate for the baccalaureate prepared nurse. Upon successful completion of this course, students are expected to be able to address current issues in nursing and health care delivery; relate philosophical perspectives to nursing theories, research and practice; analyze nursing as a career and profession; and evaluate the professional role in developing health policy and regulation. In addition, students should be able to analyze and resolve ethical dilemmas in health care situations by applying critical thinking skills and ethical theories and principles. Students should also be able to apply research findings to Performance Improvement in health care delivery

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 330 system. The course is four semester hours (30 didactic hours and 90 practicum/externship hours).

NURS 4564, Professional Issues and Nurse Leadership Prerequisite: 66 semester hours of the general studies requirements and prerequisites for nursing, including the following courses:ENGL 1313 and 1323; BIOL 1414, 2404, 2414, and CHEM 1404; PSYC 1313, 2301, and 3313; social science elective (SOCI 1313, POLS 2313, ECON 2311 or 2312); MATH 1305 or higher; CHRI 1313, 1323, and elective; 18 semester hours of Humanities; 3 semester hours of Fine Arts; and CISM 1321. School of Nursing and Allied Health Requirements: Completion of all prior nursing courses: NURS 2222; NURS 2323; NURS 2404; NURS 3303; NURS 3202; NURS 3212; NURS 3404; NURS 3424; NURS 3434; NURS 4392; NURS 3414 or BIOL 2433; NURS 4212; NURS 4294; NURS 4414; NURS 4424; NURS 4434; NURS 4444. A GPA of 2.5 is required to progress in the curriculum. This course focuses on professional issues in nursing, nursing management and the use of research in clinical practice as well as the study of health administration and leadership from the nurse's perspective. Students apply leadership and management behaviors and skills to providing care for a group of patients and promoting positive consumer relationships; and analyze effectiveness and efficiency of care delivery systems promoting positive health outcomes. The course is five semester hours, including 108 clinical hours.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 331 Philosophy (PHIL) Course Descriptions

PHIL 1300 Introduction to Philosophical Dialogue This course introduces students to principles of philosophical discourse by means of Socratic dialogue, basic epistemology seminars, scholarly cultural analysis, and study of philosophical texts. Students are taught to recognize and avoid informal fallacies in discussion, and to strive for intellectual precision and logical soundness as they search for truthh

PHIL 1310 Logic Logic has long been part of the core of a liberal arts education. In this course, students will learn to become better thinkers and communicators; mastering skills in symbolic logic, fallacy identification, and the philosophy of language. Topics in the history of philosophy and other disciplines will be studied to illustrate the role of logic in the liberal arts and to provide an opportunity for students to use their skills in diverse contexts.

PHIL 1313 Introduction to Philosophy A foundational course designed to familiarize the student with the meaning and relevance of philosophy through a study of its main problems and the principal theories that have been proposed as solutions to them.

PHIL 3323, Ancient and Medieval Philosophy A study of the historical development of Western philosophy from its early beginnings in Greece to the end of the Middle Ages.

PHIL 3334, Philosophical Foundations for a Christian Worldview (Apologetics) Prerequisite: PHIL 1313 An in-depth study of the philosophical foundations for Christian belief and practice, including engaging philosophical criticisms of basic Christian beliefs and teaching.

PHIL 3344 Modern/Contemporary Philosophy A continuation of PHIL 3323, beginning with the Renaissance and ending with the more important philosophers of recent times.

PHIL 3350 Philosophy of Tragedy An analysis and evaluation of the tragic worldview as expressed in classic literature and philosophies of life. Topics considered could include the role of fate, free will, luck, and providence in moral responsibility, virtue, and happiness. Works considered could include the philosophies of Aristotle, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche, alongside the dramas of Sophocles and Shakespeare. Special attention will be paid to the problem of evil and the question of whether tragedy is compatible with the Christian worldview.

PHIL 3360 Medical Humanities A course designed to introduce students to medical humanities. The course is an interdisciplinary approach to looking at medical ethics and culture that will focus on the humanities and especially philosophy. Subjects to be covered may include the concept of personhood at the beginning and end of life, the arts and medicine, the historical development of medicine, theology of medicine, and the philosophy of science and medicine.

PHIL 3365 Medical Ethics This course will look at debates in medical ethics. Topics may include abortion, euthanasia, Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 332 medical testing and research, scarcity and distribution of health care, genetics, privacy, and reproductive technology.

PHIL 4181 SPEC TOPIC/INDEPENDENT STUDY For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Christian Thought.

PHIL 4323 Ethics A course in which the major ethical systems and their theories of value and conduct are studied critically and evaluated from a Christian point of view.

PHIL 4333, Aesthetics Prerequisite: PHIl 1313 Examination of texts from the history of philosophy focusing on the questions of beauty, appropriateness, and value of both art and nature.

PHIL 4334, Metaphysics Prerequisite: PHIL 1313 Metaphysics is the study of the nature of reality. Topics to be discussed may include freedom of the will, causation, being, the nature of universals, possibility and necessity,k space and time, philosophical anthropology and some philosophical theology. This class will provide a survey of these topics as it surveys views of the nature of reality over many different philosophical genres.

PHIL 4335 Epistemology Prerequisite: PHIL 1313 Considers questions such as the following: Can I have knowledge of anything outside my own mind - for example, physical objects or other minds? Or is the skeptic's attack on my commonplace claims to know unanswerable? What is knowledge?

PHIL 4336 Philosophy of Science Prerequisite: PHIL 1313 Examination of the philosophical foundations for the natural sciences, as well as conceptual issues surrounding the nature and extent of scientific inquiry.

PHIL 4358, Analytic Philosophy Prerequisite: PHIL 1313 Readings from post-Idealist Anglo-American philosophers who pursue clarity, precision, and formalized logical argument as the best means to engage recurring philosophical questions.

PHIL 4359, Political Philosophy Prerequisite: PHIL 1313 Examination of texts from the history of philosophy focusing on the relationship between the individual and collective neighbor. In this course, the great philosophers guide us as we wrestle with questions concerning the polis, state, just and unjust government, and the law.

PHIL 4363 Philosophy of Religion A critical examination of the nature and validity of religious experience and the place of religion in human life. Consideration is given to religious problems such as the existence and nature of God, the source of religious knowledge, the nature of man, the origin and nature of evil. (Offered also as CHRI 4363.)

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 333

PHIL 4381 Special Topics Prerequisite: PHIL 1313 Careful study of a few topics in the history of philosophy - either one philosopher's treatment of several philosophical problems or several philosophers' treatments of one or two closely related problems. Examples: selected topics in Aristotle, theories of causation in early modern philosophy, and Kant's reaction to Hume.

PHIL 4390, Great Philosophers and Their Works Prerequisite: PHIL 1313 This course will closely study one or more philosophical texts from an important philosophical thinker. Examples include a study of Kierkegaard, a seminar on the Critique of Pure Reason, a close look at The Republic and the secondary literature surrounding it, and the writings of Al Plantinga.

PHIL 5300 Fundamentals of Apologetics This course will cover the fundamentals of classic Christian apologetics. Topics such as arguments for God's existence, the problem of evil, and the epistemology of religious belief will be covered.

PHIL 5310, Logic Prerequisites: None This course will cover basic logic, including traditional logic, but focusing on modern symbolic logic. In addition to sentence logic and predicate logic, it will include probability and basic modal logic.

PHIL 5320, Philosophy of Religion: Faith and Reason This course will deal with basic issues in philosophy of religion, such as arguments, the problem of evil, the relationship between faith and reason, miracles, and life after death. Also offered as APOL 5320.

PHIL 5330, Metaphysics Prerequisites: None This course will examine fundamental issues such as the nature of ultimate reality or being, the mind body problem, and the nature of freedom and its relationship to determinism. Particular attention will be given to the role of God in metaphysics and to the difference his existence makes for various issues.

PHIL 5340, Epistemology Prerequisites: None This course will examine and assess different accounts of warranted belief and grounds for claims to knowledge. It will give attention to religious epistemology and the impact of theistic belief on epistemic theory.

PHIL 5350, Ethics Prerequisite: None This course will focus on the nature of the good and the right, and various accounts of these fundamental aspects of moral philosophy, both classical and contemporary. Attention will be given to theistic and Christian accounts of morality, such as natural law theory and divine command theory.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 334

PHIL 5360, History of Philosophy:Ancient and Medieval Prerequisite: None This course will survey major figures, issues and ideas in the history of philosophy from the period of the pre-Socratic philosophers through the middle ages. Particular attention will be given to development of Christian thought in these time periods.

PHIL 5370, History of Philosophy: Modern Prerequisites: None This course will survey major figures, issues, movements, and developments from Descartes in the beginning of the modern period to the early twentieth century. Particular attention will be given to the period of the enlightenment and other movements that have affected Christianity, either positively or negatively.

PHIL 5381 SPECIAL TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Christian Thought.

PHIL 6310, Aesthetics Prerequisite: None This course will analyze and assess theories of beauty, value and the nature and meaning of art. Particular attention will be given to the role that belief in God has in the creative process and the meaning and motivation for artistic creation.

PHIL 6320, Science and Faith This course will explore the history of the relationship between science and religion, including the alleged hostility between the two. It will examine various accounts of the compatibility between the two and ways they can be understood as mutually enriching. Other topics in the philosophy of science and how they interact with theism may be considered. Also offered as APOL 6320.

PHIL 6330, Philosophy of C. S. Lewis Prerequisite: None This course will critically examine the main philosophical and religious writings of C. S. Lewis. It will assess the value and ongoing significance of his work for Christian philosophy and apologetics.

PHIL 6340, Church and State Prerequisites: None This course is a survey of some of the different views of church-state relations that have been developed in western philosophy and in the Christian tradition over the last two thousand years. Its focus is on contemporary thinkers and also on the political philosophies of the major philosophers in the cannon. It includes studies of monarchy, two-kingdom theory, religious toleration, distributive justice, democracy, establishment and disestablishment, and citizenship, among other topics. Upon completion of the course, students will be familiar with the major theories of the relationship between church and state, and will be able to articulate and defend their own views of church-state interaction.

PHIL 6350, The Problem of Evil This course will examine the problem of evil as a challenge to theistic and Christian belief, and

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 335 explore different responses to the challenge, both classic and contemporary.

PHIL 6360, Philosophy of History This course explores topics in both substantive and critical philosophy of history. These topics may include the nature of historical explanation and narrative, the relation of history to other disciplines, and the way in which scholars have viewed historical progress. Of interest will be the way in which the Philosophy of History can inform our theological beliefs, and in particular, our understanding of the life of Christ.

PHIL 6380 Thesis Research This is a course for students writing a Master's thesis. Requirements and readings will be set by consultations with a student's advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies.

PHIL 6381 SP TOPICS/INDEPENDENT STUDY For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Christian Thought.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 336 Physics (PHYS) Course Descriptions

PHYS 1401 Physics for the Liberal Arts Mind Prerequisite: MATH 1313 or a higher level mathematics course or permission of the instructor A descriptive course designed for non-science majors with no previous knowledge of physics. Traces the development of our current understanding of physics with emphasis on conceptual understanding. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. This course does not count towards a physics major.

PHYS 1403 Physics of Sound Prerequisite: MATH 1313 or permission of the instructor. Basic knowledge of musical notation is recommended This course is an introduction to the physical principles behind sound and music. Topics include the fundamental theory of vibration, sound waves and propagation, diffraction and interference, free, coupled and driven oscillations, resonance and oscillation modes. The anatomy and psychophysics of the ear are also covered as well as musical scales, and the nature of sound from the musical instruments. The course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory experiments. This course does not count towards a physics major.

PHYS 1411 Astronomy and the Universe Prerequisite: MATH 1313 or permission of the instructor Designed for non-science majors, this course is an overview of the solar system, astronomical instruments, the origin and evolution of stars, galaxies, black holes, quasars, cosmology, and the structure and origin of the universe. Concepts and critical thinking are strongly emphasized. The course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory investigations consisting of computer work and observation sessions. This course does not count towards a physics major.

PHYS 1416 General Physics I Prerequisite: MATH 1434 or MATH 1451 or a satisfactory score on a departmental placement exam. A precalculus-based introduction to Newton's laws of motion, gravitation, fluids, and sound. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. This course may not be counted as part of the physics, chemistry, or biochemistry/molecular biology major.

PHYS 1417, General Physics II Prerequisite PHYS 1416 A precalculus-based introduction to the general principles of thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, and geometric wave optics. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions. This course may not be counted as part of the physics, chemistry, or biochemistry/molecular biology major.

PHYS 2181, 2281, 2381, 2481 Special Topics Topics are selected based on students¿ needs and academic qualifications of the staff. A minimum of 30 hours of study is required for each semester hour of credit. Up to one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions may be included.

PHYS 2181, 2281, 2381, 2481 Special Topics Topics are selected based on students¿ needs and academic qualifications of the staff. A minimum of 30 hours of study is required for each semester hour of credit. Up to one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions may be included. Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 337

PHYS 2343 Introductory Theoretical Physics Prerequisite: PHYS 2423, concurrent enrollment in MATH 1452, or consent of the instructor Designed as an introduction to mathematical methods used in classical mechanics, electromagnetism and quantum mechanics. Topics include separation of variables and solving Laplace¿s equation, special functions, differential and integral vector calculus.

PHYS 2181, 2281, 2381, 2481 Special Topics Topics are selected based on students¿ needs and academic qualifications of the staff. A minimum of 30 hours of study is required for each semester hour of credit. Up to one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions may be included.

PHYS 2413 Principles of Physics I Prerequisite: MATH 2434 An introduction to Newton¿s laws of motion, gravitation, fluids, and sound. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

PHYS 2423 Principles of Physics II Prerequisite: PHYS 2413 An introduction to the physical principles of thermodynamics, kinetic theory, electricity, magnetism, simple AC and DC circuits, and geometric wave optics. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

PHYS 2181, 2281, 2381, 2481 Special Topics Topics are selected based on students¿ needs and academic qualifications of the staff. A minimum of 30 hours of study is required for each semester hour of credit. Up to one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions may be included.

PHYS 3313 Mechanics Prerequisites: PHYS 2343 and MATH 3333 Topics include single-particle Newtonian mechanics, oscillations, gravitation, calculus of variations, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics, central-force motion and dynamics of system of particles.

PHYS 3323 Electricity and Magnetism Prerequisites: PHYS 2343 and MATH 1452 Topics include solving Laplace¿s and Poisson¿s equations, the method of images, multi-pole expansion, electrostatics and magnetostatics in the presence of matter, Maxwell¿s equations, electromagnetic waves and radiation.

PHYS 3383 Mathematical Methods for Science and Engineering Prerequisites: Credit for or concurrent enrollment in MATH 3333, 3414 Advanced techniques in applied mathematics for students of science and engineering, with topics chosen from partial differential equations, Laplace transforms, Fourier series, complex analysis and vector analysis. Fourier series. (Also offered as MATH 3383.)

PHYS 3413 Modern Physics I Prerequisite: PHYS 2343 or consent of the instructor An introduction to special relativity, pre-quantum physics and basic concepts of quantum mechanics and atomic structure. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 338 sessions designed as investigations of optical phenomena and fundamental constants.

PHYS 3423 Modern Physics II Prerequisite: PHYS 3413 A continuation of PHYS 3413. Topics include many-electron atoms, molecules, solid state, nuclear structure, and elementary particles. This course includes one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions.

PHYS 3433, The art of Electronics Prerequisite: PHYS 2423, 3413, or consent of instructor The Art of Electronics consists of basic electronics and solid state physics theories and experiments. Topics include the fundamentals of direct and alternating current circuits involving applications of Ohm's Law and Kirchhoff's Laws. Students learn semiconductor physics to understand the operation of diodes, transistors and op amps. In the laboratory section, students build and test circuits while developing skills in the operation of power supplies, function generators, oscilloscopes and spectrum analyzers.

PHYS 3443, Computational Physics Prerequisites: PHYS 3313, 3413, 3323 (or concurrent enrollment), or consent of instructor Students learn computational techniques useful for solving problems in advanced dynamics, electromagnetism and quantum mechanics. Advanced dynamics topics include the study of deterministic chaos solving systems of ordinary differential equations. Students apply finite element method electromagnetic modeling to calculate static electric and magnetic fields, solve time dependent magnetic problems, and calculate current flow. Quantum dynamics problems are analyzed by solving the time dependent Schrodinger equation. In the laboratory, students gain hands-on experience using mathematical software to solve problems in advanced dynamics, electromagnetism, and quantum mechanics.

PHYS 3481 INDEPENDENT STUDY/SPECIAL TOP For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Science and Mathematics.

PHYS 4181, 4281, 4381, 4481 Special Topics Topics are selected on the basis of students¿ need and academic qualifications of the staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of study is required for each semester hour of credit. Up to one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions may be included.

PHYS 4221, Undergraduate Research Experience in Physics I Prerequisite: At least 29 hours of Physics completed Senior physics majors will investigate a topic of current research interest with physics faculty. The course will involve problem identification, literature search, and start of research (building the necessary background or setting up the necessary experiment(s) to solve the research problem, development of the solution of the problem). All students will meet with faculty twice a week for instruction, guidance and exploration of the topic.

PHYS 4222, Undergraduate Research Experience in Physics II Prerequisite: PHYS 4221 This course is a continuation of PHYS 4221. The course will involve the further development of the solution of the research problem; finding applications; acquisition of new results; completion of research; writing of research paper; preparation and delivery of oral presentation; application,

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 339 preparation and presentation at the annual HBU Celebration of Scholarship Symposium. All students will meet with faculty twice a week for instruction, guidance and exploration of the topic.

PHYS 4181, 4281, 4381, 4481 Special Topics Topics are selected on the basis of students¿ need and academic qualifications of the staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of study is required for each semester hour of credit. Up to one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions may be included.

PHYS 4323 Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics Prerequisite: PHYS 2343 Energy in Thermal Physics, The Second Law of Thermodynamics, Thermal Interactions.

PHYS 4343 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics I Prerequisites: PHYS 2343, 3413, and MATH 3333 Foundations of quantum mechanics, Schroedinger¿s equation with applications such as the square well, harmonic oscillator, hydrogen atom, and electron spin.

PHYS 4344 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics II Prerequisite: PHYS 4343 Continuation of PHYS 4343 covering quantum mechanics of identical particles, time- independent perturbation theory, the variational principle, WKB approximation, and time- dependent perturbation theory.

PHYS 4181, 4281, 4381, 4481 Special Topics Topics are selected on the basis of students¿ need and academic qualifications of the staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of study is required for each semester hour of credit. Up to one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions may be included.

PHYS 4181, 4281, 4381, 4481 Special Topics Topics are selected on the basis of students¿ need and academic qualifications of the staff. If regular lectures are not given, a minimum of 30 hours of study is required for each semester hour of credit. Up to one semester hour credit for laboratory sessions may be included.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 340 Psychology (PSYC) Course Descriptions

PSYC 1313 General Psychology Prerequisite: MATH 1305; MATH 1313 or equivalent An introductory course dealing with the major content areas in psychology. Topics may include heredity and environment, emotions and motivation, perception, learning, personality, and intelligence. This course may be taken to meet Smith College requirements and as an elective by non-psychology majors. It is required for psychology majors.

PSYC 2181 SPECIAL TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

PSYC 2301 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences Prerequisite: MATH 1305, 1313 or equivalent The course provides an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics, correlation, probability, and regression-with applications in behavioral sciences. (Offered also as SOCI 2301.)

PSYC 2311 Schools and Learning A study of philosophical, cultural, and psychological constructs as well as ethical principles which influence education, schooling, and learning. Observation and experience in schools is combined with intensive analyses and applications of principles from philosophy, sociology, psychology, and ethics (as they apply to education and schooling). This course does not count toward a psychology major. (Offered also as EDUC 2311 and SOCI 2311.)

PSYC 2325 Dating and Intimate Relationships This is an introductory course understanding close relationships. It will cover the research on relationships from dating through family formation. This course will survey the scientific research about how people are attracted to each other and the processes of establishing and maintaining a dating relationship. The effects of cohabiting will be examined and its relationship on children. How this intimacy develops into a health marital relationship and how the stresses of marriage can threaten this intimacy is covered. The causes of divorce and the special challenges of single-parenting and intimacy are addressed.

PSYC 2330 Human Sexuality Prerequisite: None This is an introductory course about human sexuality. It will survey a variety of topics from biological to psychological to social aspects of human sexuality. This course will provide a scientific understanding of the historical, biological, psychological and social/cultural influences on human sexuality and its expression. Information about human sexuality across the lifespan will be included. This course provides information about sexual identity, orientation, and how changing sexual attitudes are influencing the culture. This course also provides information about the prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted infections. Information about the biological and psychological causes of sexual dysfunction and their treatments will also be covered.

PSYC 2340 Health Psychology Prerequisite: None Health Psychology is an introductory course dealing with the major content areas of health Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 341 psychology. Topics include: an overview of the field of health psychology, major body systems, important theoretical models for explaining, promoting, and changing health behaviors, and moderators for stress and coping. The psychosocial aspects of pain, coronary heart disease, hypertension, stroke, diabetes, and other chronic health conditions will also be introduced. (Offered also as KINE 2340)

PSYC 2364 Abnormal Psychology Prerequisite: PSYC 1313 A study of normal and abnormal psychological functioning, psychological disorders, behavioral disorders, psychosomatic illnesses, and substance abuses. May be taken by non-psychology majors as an elective. Recommended for majors in nursing, education, and areas which deal with problems of persons.

PSYC 2381 SPECIAL TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

PSYC 3303 Research Methods Prerequisites: PSYC 2301 and WRIT 2306 or 3304 or permission of instructor This is an applied research course for psychology majors. Students are instroduced to research design and methods for behavioral sciences to include experiments and correlational studies. Applied projects include using library databases, reading and critically reviewing current empirical literature, proposing original research, writing hypotheses, and discerning appropriate data analyses and statistics. (Offered also as SOCI 3303.)

PSYC 3305 Psychology of Personality Prerequisites: PSYC 1313 This course reviews the major theories of personality as they relate to explanations of human behavior, mental processes, and development. Issues of formal theory development and evaluation of formal theories are addressed. May be used as an advanced elective by psychology majors.

PSYC 3313 Human Growth and Development Prerequisite: PSYC 1313 An upper level psychology elective, this course is designed to emphasize the continuity of human development throughout the life span. The interrelationships among physical, cognitive and psychosocial development will be emphasized.

PSYC 3343 Experimental Psychology Prerequisites: PSYC 1313, 2301, and WRIT 2306 or 3304 This is an applied research course for psychology majors. Research design for experiments, co- relational studies and more complex research projects are studied. Actual projects are performed with formal project and laboratory reports filed for each such completed study. Quantitative methods and their applications are emphasized, including the use of descriptive, inferential and multivariate statistics.

PSYC 3410 Experimental Psychology Prerequisite: PSYC 1313, PSYC 2301 or SOCI 2301 Experimental psychology is an applied research course for psychology majors. Basic research methods and terminology will be presented and practiced in the classroom and these principles

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 342 then applied in a computer lab. Research design for experiments, correlational studies, and more complex research projects will be critically reviewed. Students will be expected to participate in the early stages of designing a quantitative research study to include a critical review of the literature, formulating testable hypotheses, choosing an appropriate research design and outlining the methods and analyses. Applied statistical analyses will be reviewed and then practiced with SPSS software in the lab.

PSYC 4181 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offerings of topics of current interest. May also be used for individual study in which a minimum of 30 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Advanced reading, testing, and projects involving research are included. Departmental approval required.

PSYC 4281 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offerings of topics of current interest. May also be used for individual study in which a minimum of 30 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Advanced reading, testing, and projects involving research are included. Departmental approval required.

PSYC 4292 Senior Seminar in Experimental Psychology Prerequisites: PSYC 2301, 3343, WRIT 2306 or 3304, and 15 hours in psychology In this course the student designs an original research project, preparing a proposal which describes the problem, the hypotheses, the review of literature, techniques to be used, and other components normally found in research proposals. See Note 9 under Undergraduate Degree Requirements.

PSYC 4295 Senior Seminar in Experimental Psychology Prerequisite: PSYC 4292 The student conducts an approved research project and prepares a report which includes findings and conclusions. See Note 9 under Undergraduate Degree Requirements.

PSYC 4310 History and Theoretical Systems in Psychology Prerequisites: PSYC 1313 and at least 64 credit hrs This course surveys current systems of thought in psychology and reviews the major philosophical and historical underpinnings of the discipline. Relevant material from scientific research, including the biological and physical sciences, will be included.

PSYC 4316 Child Psychopathology Prerequisites: PSYC 1313, WRIT 2306 or 3304 or permission of instructor This course will focus on major forms of atypical development in childhood and adolescence. Course material will include disorders of behavior, disorders of emotion, developmental and learning problems, and problems related to mental health. Child and adolescent disorders will be discussed in terms of defining characteristics, associated features, possible causes, theoretical formulations, research evidence, and current approaches to intervention and prevention. The possible developmental course of each disorder will be presented to show how biological, psychological and socio-cultural factors interact with the child¿s environment to determine the expression of atypical development. (Offered also as PSYC 5316.)

PSYC 4322, Cognitive Psychology Prerequisites: PSYC 1313; at least 64 credit hours, and any BIOL course

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 343 Cognitive psychology is the study of the mind, how we perceive the world, remember, reason, think, and learn. This course will present an overview of cognitive psychology, its findings, theories, and approach. Topics covered will include pattern recognition, attention, memory, imagery, concepts and categorization, and problem solving.

PSYC 4323 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy Prerequisites: PSYC 1313, WRIT 2306 or 3304, or permission of the instructor Comprehensive and intensive study of major theoretical orientations in counseling and psychotherapy, stressing implications for research and practice. Includes experiences in micro- counseling and other simulations to develop counseling skills. (Offered also as EPSY 5323 and PSYC 5323.)

PSYC 4326 Psychology of Dying, Bereavement, and Counseling Prerequisite: WRIT 2306 or 3304 or permission of instructor A course dealing with the process of dying and grief of the survivors. The psychological adjustments of the individual, family, and professional are examined. How to facilitate grief as well as therapeutic issues are discussed. (Offered also as PSYC 5326 and EPSY 5326.)

PSYC 4330 Psychology of Learning Prerequisites: None A course stressing the contributions of major learning theories to understanding behavior. Particular attention is paid to human learning and the applicability of learning theory to the educational process as well as to goal attainments. (Offered also as EDUC 4330, PSYC 5330, and EPSY 5330.)

PSYC 4332 Social Psychology Prerequisites: At least 64 credit hrs Contemporary approaches to social behavior are considered. Cultural influences, prejudice, persuasion, conformity, attribution theories, and social cognitions are some of the topics addressed. (Offered also as PSYC 5332 and SOCI 4332.)

PSYC 4333 MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

PSYC 4334 Psychology of Religion Prerequisite: CHRI 1313, 1323 and at least 64 credit hrs The insights of psychology as a science are used to inspect and evaluate the religious dimensions of life. How religion effects religious development, health, experience, and relationships in the church, family, and marriage will be covered. (Offered also as CHRI 4334 and PSYC 5334.)

PSYC 4353 Physiological Psychology Prerequisites: PSYC 1313; BIOL 1404 or 2404 or 2475 or 2414; and WRIT 2306 or 3304 A study of the physiological bases of behavior, with emphasis on learning the relationships between the functioning of the brain and nervous system with observable behavior. Neurodevelopment, the effects of drugs, and the biological basis of psychopathology will be some of the topics covered.

PSYC 4360, Cultural Psychology Prerequisites: PSYC 1313 and at least 64 credit hours

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 344 The course will introduce counseling relationships and processes. Included in the study are theories of multicultural counseling, dimensions of worldviews, racial/cultural identiy development, counseling ethnic minorities, bicultural/biracial minorities, women, and sexual minorities. The main focus of the course will be gaining practical knowledge and skills necessary to work effectively with ethnically and culturally diverse clients in North America.

PSYC 4381 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offerings of topics of current interest. May also be used for individual study in which a minimum of 30 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Advanced reading, testing, and projects involving research are included. Departmental approval required.

PSYC 4390 Psychology Capstone Course Prerequisite: PSYC 3410, Senior standing This course is the culminating experience for the psychology major. Students will incorporate the essential core concepts of psychology into one of two domains. Domain I will focus on an in- depth original research project written according to American Psychological Association guidelines. Domain II will focus on an internship at an approved site.

PSYC 5181 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offerings of topics of current interest. May also be used for individual study in which a minimum of thirty (30) clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Advanced reading, testing, and projects involving research are included. Permission of instructor required.

PSYC 5281 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offerings of topics of current interest. May also be used for individual study in which a minimum of thirty (30) clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Advanced reading, testing, and projects involving research are included. Permission of instructor required.

PSYC 5300 General Psychology An introductory course dealing with the major content areas in psychology. Topics may include heredity and environment, emotions and motivation, perception, learning, personaity, and intelligence. An examination of how introductory principles are applied in licensure programs is addressed. This course is taken by students fulfilling the leveling requirement for a master's degree in psychology or counseling.

PSYC 5301 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences This provides an intermediate level introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics, correlation, probability, and regression with applications in behavioral sciences. This course is taken by students fulfilling the leveling requirement for a Master's degree in psychology or counseling.

PSYC 5302 Abnormal Psychology A study of normal and abnormal psychological functioning, psychological disorders, psychosomatic illnesses, and substance abuses. May be taken by non-psychology majors as an elective. This course is taken by students fulfilling the leveling requirement for a Master's degree in psychology or counseling.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 345 PSYC 5310 Ethical and Professional Issues in Psychology and Counseling A seminar format will provide the student with opportunities to study ethical standards and applications in psychology.

PSYC 5312 Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling Theories This course is an introduction to the field of couples and family therapy. It will feature theory and practice in the treatment of dyadic relationships, marriages, and families (including families with children). Students will develop an understanding of the prominent theories, including emphasis on systems theories that form the basis of relevant therapy approaches, and will develop basic skills in utilizing therapeutic interventions with couples and families.

PSYC 5313 Methods and Techniques in Counseling This course will introduce the student to those active listening skills which communicate the qualities of empathy, genuineness and unconditional positive regard. The course will include role-playing and videotaped exercises. Other selected interventions will be included.

PSYC 5314 Methods and Techniques in Christian Counseling This course is designed to introduce graduate students to basic techniques, methods, and theories behind the practice of Christian counseling and to integrate established psychotherapeutic techniques into the practice Christian counseling.

PSYC 5315 Christian Integration Seminar I The purpose of this course is to help the student begin a path to effectively integrate their Christian faith with psychology and counseling. Theological backgrounds of counseling, major theories of Christian integration with counseling and the role of the Christian counselor in society will be examined. The student will formulate their own Christian integration perspective based on activities and readings in the course. This course is to be taken in the student¿s first year in the MACC program.

PSYC 5316 Child Psychopathology This course will focus on major forms of atypical development in childhood and adolescence. Course material will include disorders of behavior, disorders of emotion, developmental and learning problems, and problems related to mental health. Child and adolescent disorders will be discussed in terms of defining characteristics, associated features, possible causes, theoretical formulations, research evidence, and current approaches to intervention and prevention. The possible developmental course of each disorder will be presented to show how biological, psychological and socio-cultural factors interact with the child¿s environment to determine the expression of atypical development. (Offered also as PSYC 4316.)

PSYC 5323 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy Comprehensive and intensive study of major theoretical orientations in counseling and psychotherapy, stressing implications for research and practice. Includes experiences in micro- counseling and other simulations to develop counseling skills.(Offered also as PSYC 4323 and EPSY 5323.)

PSYC 5326 Psychology of Dying, Bereavement, and Counseling A course dealing with the process of dying and grief of the survivors. The psychological adjustments of the individual, family, and professional are examined. How to facilitate grief as well as therapeutic issues are discussed. (Offered also as PSYC 4326, EPSY 5326.)

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 346 PSYC 5330 Psychology of Learning A course stressing the contributions of major learning theories to understanding behavior. Particular attention is paid to human learning and the applicability of learning theory to the educational process as well as to goal attainments. (Offered also as EDUC 4330, PSYC 4330, and EPSY 4330.)

PSYC 5332 Social Psychology Contemporary approaches to social behavior are considered. Cultural influences, prejudice, persuasion, conformity, attribution theories, and social cognitions are some of the topics addressed. (Offered also as PSYC 4332 and SOCI 4332.)

PSYC 5334 Psychology of Religion The insights of psychology as a science are used to inspect and evaluate the religious dimensions of life. How religion effects religious development, health, experience, and relationships in the church, family, and marriage will be covered. (Offered also as CHRI 4334 and PSYC 4334.)

PSYC 5353 Physiological Psychology A study of physiological bases of behavior with an emphasis on mental disorders, behaviors, and emotions.

PSYC 5360, Cultural Psychology This course is designed to strengthen diversity and multicultural awareness among counselors, and other mental health providers. The course will strengthen counseling relationships and proesses. Included in the study are theories of multicultural counseling, dimensions of worldviews, racial/cultural identity development, counseling ethnic minorities, bicultural/biracial minorities, women, and sexual minorities. The main focus of the course will be on gaining practical knowledge and skills necessary to work effectively with ethnically and culturally diverse clients in North America.

PSYC 5363 PRINCIPLES OF GUIDANCE For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the College of Education and Behavioral Sciences.

PSYC 5381 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offerings of topics of current interest. May also be used for individual study in which a minimum of thirty (30) clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Advanced reading, testing, and projects involving research are included. Permission of instructor required.

PSYC 6101 Licensed Specialist in School Psychology Internship This course is designed for students who have completed the Masters of Arts in Psychology degree and the additional hours required for the LSSP. The internship experience is a minimum of 1200 contact hours, of which 600 must be in a public school supervised by an individual qualified in accordance with state requirements. A licensed psychologist must supervise the non- school experience. The student must complete the internship in less than two years and in no more than two sites. The student must have direct, systematic supervision with experiences that include assessment, intervention, behavior management, and consultation for children representing a range of ages, populations, and needs. This course meets on campus when the student is involved in an off-campus internship assignment.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 347 PSYC 6102 Licensed Specialist in School Psychology Internship This course is designed for students who have completed the Masters of Arts in Psychology degree and the additional hours required for the LSSP. The internship experience is a minimum of 1200 contact hours, of which 600 must be in a public school supervised by an individual qualified in accordance with state requirements. A licensed psychologist must supervise the non- school experience. The student must complete the internship in less than two years and in no more than two sites. The student must have direct, systematic supervision with experiences that include assessment, intervention, behavior management, and consultation for children representing a range of ages, populations, and needs. This course meets on campus when the student is involved in an off-campus internship assignment.

PSYC 6103 Licensed Specialist in School Psychology Internship This course is designed for students who have completed the Masters of Arts in Psychology degree and the additional hours required for the LSSP. The internship experience is a minimum of 1200 contact hours, of which 600 must be in a public school supervised by an individual qualified in accordance with state requirements. A licensed psychologist must supervise the non- school experience. The student must complete the internship in less than two years and in no more than two sites. The student must have direct, systematic supervision with experiences that include assessment, intervention, behavior management, and consultation for children representing a range of ages, populations, and needs. This course meets on campus when the student is involved in an off-campus internship assignment.

PSYC 6104 Licensed Specialist in School Psychology Internship This course is designed for students who have completed the Masters of Arts in Psychology degree and the additional hours required for the LSSP. The internship experience is a minimum of 1200 contact hours, of which 600 must be in a public school supervised by an individual qualified in accordance with state requirements. A licensed psychologist must supervise the non- school experience. The student must complete the internship in less than two years and in no more than two sites. The student must have direct, systematic supervision with experiences that include assessment, intervention, behavior management, and consultation for children representing a range of ages, populations, and needs. This course meets on campus when the student is involved in an off-campus internship assignment.

PSYC 6105 Licensed Specialist in School Psychology Internship This course is designed for students who have completed the Masters of Arts in Psychology degree and the additional hours required for the LSSP. The internship experience is a minimum of 1200 contact hours, of which 600 must be in a public school supervised by an individual qualified in accordance with state requirements. A licensed psychologist must supervise the non- school experience. The student must complete the internship in less than two years and in no more than two sites. The student must have direct, systematic supervision with experiences that include assessment, intervention, behavior management, and consultation for children representing a range of ages, populations, and needs. This course meets on campus when the student is involved in an off-campus internship assignment.

PSYC 6106 Licensed Specialist in School Psychology Internship This course is designed for students who have completed the Masters of Arts in Psychology degree and the additional hours required for the LSSP. The internship experience is a minimum of 1200 contact hours, of which 600 must be in a public school supervised by an individual qualified in accordance with state requirements. A licensed psychologist must supervise the non- school experience. The student must complete the internship in less than two years and in no

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 348 more than two sites. The student must have direct, systematic supervision with experiences that include assessment, intervention, behavior management, and consultation for children representing a range of ages, populations, and needs. This course meets on campus when the student is involved in an off-campus internship assignment.

PSYC 6181 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offerings of topics of current interest. May also be used for individual study in which a minimum of thirty (30) clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Advanced reading, testing, and projects involving research are included. Permission of instructor required.

PSYC 6191 Counseling Practicum Supervised laboratory experiences in individual and group counseling with emphasis upon methods and techniques. Competence in counseling with varied types of human concerns is developed. All practicum students must be involved in counseling activities and must exhibit skills in evaluation as well. This course meets on campus when the student is involved in an off- campus practicum assignment.

PSYC 6192 Counseling Practicum Supervised laboratory experiences in individual and group counseling with emphasis upon methods and techniques. Competence in counseling with varied types of human concerns is developed. All practicum students must be involved in counseling activities and must exhibit skills in evaluation as well. This course meets on campus when the student is involved in an off- campus practicum assignment.

PSYC 6193 Counseling Practicum Supervised laboratory experiences in individual and group counseling with emphasis upon methods and techniques. Competence in counseling with varied types of human concerns is developed. All practicum students must be involved in counseling activities and must exhibit skills in evaluation as well. This course meets on campus when the student is involved in an off- campus practicum assignment.

PSYC 6194 Counseling Practicum Supervised laboratory experiences in individual and group counseling with emphasis upon methods and techniques. Competence in counseling with varied types of human concerns is developed. All practicum students must be involved in counseling activities and must exhibit skills in evaluation as well. This course meets on campus when the student is involved in an off- campus practicum assignment.

PSYC 6199 Thesis Defense PREREQ: PSYC 6324 and the successful completion of 30 hrs of course work in the MPA- General Program This course if for students in the MAP-General program who have successfully completed the research project requirement for PSYC 6324. Students will select an advisory committee to prepare for formal manuscript preparation and the oral defense of the thesis.

PSYC 6281 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offerings of topics of current interest. May also be used for individual study in which a minimum of thirty (30) clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Advanced reading, testing, and projects involving research are

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 349 included. Permission of instructor required.

PSYC 6301 Principles of Human Development Intensive study and examination of literature and theory in developmental psychology as it relates to persons through the lifespan from infancy through adulthood. Social and personality development, intellectual development, language acquisition, and developmental expectations are emphasized. The unique concerns of the exceptional child are studied as well as in-depth, case-study skill development. (Offered also as EPSY 6301.)

PSYC 6302 Measurement and Appraisal Principles and techniques of psychological measurement are emphasized. Major instruments are surveyed, exclusive of projective measures and individual intellectual measures. The knowledge and skills covered can apply in a variety of settings; agencies, clinics, schools, and businesses. Uses and critical evaluation of achievement, aptitude, interest, and non-projective personality tests are included, as are experiences in administering and scoring of tests, and ethical standards for uses of tests. (Offered also as EPSY 6302.)

PSYC 6305 Individual Psychological Evaluation Prerequisite: EPSY/PSYC 6302 or permission of instructor Review of theory underlying individual ability tests; supervised practice in test administration, scoring, and interpretation. Skills in report preparation are addressed. The Wechsler scales are emphasized. (Offered also as EPSY 6305 and EDSP 6305.)

PSYC 6306 Career Information and Career Counseling Prerequisite: EPSY 6302 OR PSYC 6302 Methods and processes of collecting, organizing, evaluating, and interpreting educational, occupational, and personal-social information. Theories of career development are included as well as the counselor¿s role in career education. Career interest inventories and other measures are reviewed with reference to their utility in career counseling.

PSYC 6308 Methods of Group Process Prerequisite: PSYC 5323 This is a course in learning how to lead out-patient psychotherapy groups. Mock groups are conducted which allow students opportunities to practice group leadership. Feedback is provided by classmates and the professor.(Offered also as EPSY 6308.)

PSYC 6310 Clinical Psychopathology Prerequisite: 24 graduate semester hours in psychology or permission of instructor A course that examines the etiology, symptoms, diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic methods applicable to the major psychological disorders. Emphasis is placed on being able to differentiate one disorder from the other.

PSYC 6311 Addictions and Compulsive Disorders This course examines a variety of models for the etiology and treatment of addictions with an emphasis on the biopsychological perspective. Students are encouraged to integrate empirically based intervention into Christian counseling settings.

PSYC 6315 Christian Integration Seminar II Prerequisites: PSYC 5315 and at least 21 hours completed since taking PSYC 5315 or permission of the instructor

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 350 This course is an advanced survey course in the field of Christian Counseling. Students will learn how to apply the prominent theories that form the basis of Christian Counseling and develop a working knowledge of the special ethical and cultural considerations unique to the Christian counselor.

PSYC 6320 Research Techniques and Procedures A study of a spectrum of research methods related to psychological and educational research. The course is designed to develop research knowledge and skills. Included are theory, techniques, designs, evaluation of research, and integration of findings into professional decision-making. (Offered also as EDUC 6320 and EDAD 6310.)

PSYC 6324 Research Seminar Prerequisite: PSYC 6320 The student conducts an approved research project and prepares a report of findings of sufficient quality to be submitted for professional publication.

PSYC 6343 Personality Assessment Prerequisites: PSYC/EPSY 6302, PSYC/EPSY 6305, and PSYC 6310 or permission of instructor This course is an introduction to projective and objective psychological testing techniques used in the evaluation of people exhibiting mental, emotional, and/or behavioral disturbances. Report writing skills are addressed.

PSYC 6381 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offerings of topics of current interest. May also be used for individual study in which a minimum of thirty (30) clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Advanced reading, testing, and projects involving research are included. Permission of instructor required.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 351 Sociology (SOCI) Course Descriptions

SOCI 1313 Principles of Sociology A study of the nature of social relations, social institutions, and social processes, and of the products of these relationships. The nature of culture, communications, socialization, mobility, social control and other sociological concepts are considered. It is strongly recommended that this course be taken prior to all other sociology courses.

SOCI 2301 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences Prerequisites: MATH 1305, 1313 or equivalent. The course provides an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics, correlation, probability, and regression-with applications in behavioral sciences. (Offered also as PSYC 2301.)

SOCI 3320 Social Change Prerequisites: SOCI 1313; WRIT 2306 or 3304 This course critically examines the most contemporary social issues related to the practice of medicine, educational reform, and social structures such as mass media, religion, and the political process within a framework of historical change. This course is designed to develop an awareness, appreciation and critical evaluation of cultural transformations influencing the social world.

SOCI 3323 History of Sociological Thought A study of the development of social thought, including a critical analysis of theories of leading social thinkers.

SOCI 3327 Criminology Prerequisites: WRIT 2306 or 3304 This course critically examines contemporary social issues related to social norms, norm violations, and social sanctions. Specifically the content of the course will address crime and violence, juvenile delinquency, and the criminal justice system.

SOCI 3374 Urban Sociology Prerequisites: None A social systems approach to the analysis of the emerging problems of urban-suburban areas, with special consideration of the development of alternative solutions for these problems and strategies of intervention.

SOCI 3393 Sociology of Childhood and Adolescence Prerequisite: WRIT 2306 or 3304 Analysis of social class, ethnic influences and sex-role soicalization on childhood and adolescence; the socializing agents in these age groups will be examined.

SOCI 4181 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 30 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and demand. Permission of department required.

SOCI 4281 Special Topics Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 352 A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 30 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and demand. Permission of department required.

SOCI 4332 Social Psychology Prerequisites: SOCI 1313 Contemporary approaches to social behavior are considered. Language development, cultural influences, prejudice, persuasion, conformity, and attraction are some of the topics addressed. (Offered also as PSYC 4332 and PSYC 5332.)

SOCI 4373 The American Family Prerequisite: None An in-depth examination of current research related to the family as a dynamic component of American culture. Recent trends reflected in research data will be carefully examined within the context of sociological theory. Selected concepts and theories of the institutions of marriage and the family and factors and forces of society which impact on self-understanding, relationships, human development, life cycles, mate selection, alternative life styles, feminine and masculine roles, marital adjustments, parenting, and family crises will be addressed.

SOCI 4381 Special Topics A service course designed to permit the offering of topics of current interest. May also be used for individual study, in which a minimum of 30 clock hours of directed study is required for each semester hour of credit. Topics and projects are selected on the basis of student interest and demand. Permission of department required.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 353 Spanish (SPAN) Course Descriptions

SPAN 1314 Elementary Spanish I Focus is on achieving beginning proficiency in Spanish, developing the skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and showing in the interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes. Students learn to use and understand the language necessary for expressing basic needs, wants, and courtesies. Vocabulary and structures for meeting immediate survival needs are practiced. Students begin to gain insights into Hispanic cultural values and patterns of daily life. Not open to students with more than two years of high school Spanish or with proficiency level above Novice.

SPAN 1324 Elementary Spanish II Prerequisite: SPAN 1314 or permission of the instructor The focus of this course is on elementary proficiency in Spanish, continuing to develope the skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and showing in the interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes. Students learn to use and understand the language necessary for expressing basic needs, wants, and courtesies. Vocabulary and structures for meeting immediate survival needs are practiced. Students begin to gain insights into Hispanic cultural values and patterns of daily life.

SPAN 2314 Intermediate Spanish I Prerequisites: SPAN 1324 or permission of the instructor. The focus of this course is on intermediate proficiency in Spanish using the skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and showing in the interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes. Students ask and answer questions on everyday topics, initiate and respond to simple statements, and maintain basic conversations. Students learn to comprehend utterances in areas of immediate need and in situations where context aids understanding. Students gain insights into culture and civilization through interactive activities and through discussions and readings in the language.

SPAN 2324 Intermediate Spanish II Prerequisites: SPAN 2314 or permission of the instructor. The focus of this course is on advanced proficiency in Spanish using the skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and showing in the interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes. Students ask and answer questions on everyday topics, initiate and respond to simple statements, and maintain basic conversations. Students learn to comprehend utterances in areas of immediate need and in situations where context aids understanding. Students gain insights into culture and civilization through interactive activities and through discussions and readings in the language.

SPAN 3305 Individualized Spanish Proficiency Prerequisites: SPAN 1314 and 1324. Focus is on increasing proficiency in Spanish using the skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and showing in the interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes and on acquiring a more comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the cultures of the Spanish speaking world. Students develop individual language proficiencies while using Spanish to complete a series of projects where they make connections with other subject areas and participate in Spanish speaking communities. Not open to students with proficiency above Intermediate.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 354 SPAN 3306 Individualized Spanish Proficiency Prerequisites: SPAN 1314 and 1324. Focus is on increasing proficiency in Spanish using the skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and showing in the interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes and on acquiring a more comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the cultures of the Spanish speaking world. Students develop individual language proficiencies while using Spanish to complete a series of projects where they make connections with other subject areas and participate in Spanish speaking communities. Not open to students with proficiency above Intermediate.

SPAN 3307 Individualized Spanish Proficiency Prerequisites: SPAN 1314 and 1324. Focus is on increasing proficiency in Spanish using the skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and showing in the interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes and on acquiring a more comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the cultures of the Spanish speaking world. Students develop individual language proficiencies while using Spanish to complete a series of projects where they make connections with other subject areas and participate in Spanish speaking communities. Not open to students with proficiency above Intermediate.

SPAN 3308 Business Spanish Prerequisites: SPAN 1314, 1324, 2314, and 2324 or the equivalent (an intermediate knowledge of written and spoken Spanish). Students develop the communication skills needed to succeed in a business environment where Spanish is spoken by studying the various forms of business communications, including Spanish- language business publications, letters, memos, reports, and resumes. They practice the interpersonal skills of negotiating, persuading, defending, and hypothesizing. They study the effects of culture and experience on perception. They increase their knowledge about the countries where Spanish is spoken.

SPAN 3314 Advanced Grammar Prerequisites: SPAN 2314 and 2324 or the equivalent. Focus is on increasing proficiency in Spanish using the skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and showing in the interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes and on increasing knowledge of the cultures of Spain and the Spanish speaking world. Topics which may be included are literature, the arts, history, and work and leisure activities. Students review the grammar of Spanish as needed to increase proficiency.

SPAN 3321 Special Topics Special topics are determined by interested students with the approval of the Department Chair. Spanish-language literature in the United States, the contemporary Latin American short story and Spanish Golden Age comedia are examples of possible areas of interest.

SPAN 3324 Introduction to Hispanic Literature Prerequisites: SPAN 2314 and 2324 or the equivalent. Focus is on increasing proficiency in Spanish using the skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and showing in the interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes and on developing cultural knowledge. Students increase their expertise in the analysis and interpretation of the literature of Spain and the Spanish speaking world.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 355 SPAN 3335 Spanish Writing Workshop This course provides students with strategies to write fluently in Spanish. Techniques emphasize the steps of the writing process. Students use self-editing and peer collaboration to produce a portfolio of their work. (Offered also as EDBI 3335.)

SPAN 3345 Peninsular Literature Discussions, readings, and writing practices center on major historical periods and canonical authors from Spain, with a deep view toward preparation for the Spanish majors and minors. The course may include readings from classical texts such as Cervante's Don Quijote and the selected poetry of Gustavo Adolfo Becker.

SPAN 3346 Latin-American Literature This course centers on the deep analysis of masterpieces of the literature of Latin America. The course may include selected texts from Nobel Prize literature laureats Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Mario Vargas Llosa and Pablo Neruda among other authors. The learning activities will highlight the significance of the Latin-American literary movement and the ongoing influence of these authors.

SPAN 3347 The Art of Translation The art of Translation is centered on discussions of the history and theory of literary translation and other written text; provides the student with the specific vocabulary and cultural insight to effectively interpret the message intended in translating Spanish/English or English/Spanish. Emphasis is on the practice of translating and the acquisition of specialized knowledge in translation.

SPAN 3348, Medical Spanish I: Communication and Culture Prerequisite: SPAN 2324 or equivalent This course is designed to provide the student with the specific vocabulary, structure, and cultural awareness to effectively communicate with the growing Spanish-speaking patients in an international medical setting. The knowledge and skills developed in this course will benefit future health care majors and minors by preparing them to adequately convey, produce, evaluate and mediate oral and written health messages in Spanish.

SPAN 3360 Spain in the Americas Prerequisite: SPAN 3314 or 3324. This course presents historical and cultural information about the three dominant cultures in South America at the time of the first encounter with Spain-the Mayas, Aztecs, and Incas-and the events and perspectives of that initial encounter between two worlds, as recorded by eyewitnesses. Course is taught in Spanish.

SPAN 3365 Don Quixote This course will cover the classic and first contemporary novel of the Spanish language, Don Quixote, by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. The course will facilitate the literary analysis and close reading of Don Quixote, selected plays and exemplary novels written by Cervantes. The course will highlight the relevance of Don Quixote and the artistic and cultural impact that Don Quixote continues to have in modern times.

SPAN 3370 Hispanic Literature Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 and 1323. The study of major periods and masterworks of Hispanic literature, read and discussed in

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 356 English. Introduces literary/cultural figures of medieval and early modern Spain (El Cid, Don Quixote, Don Juan); and includes major 20th-century writers, as well as literary movements that were propagated from Latin America to the rest of the literary world (e.g., magical realism). The course may be used to fulfill Smith College humanities/literature requirements but not to fulfill requirements for the Spanish/English major. (Offered also as ENGL 3370.)

SPAN 3372, Spanish Film Studies Prerequisites: SPAN 1314, 1324, 2314, and 2324, or the equivalent (an intermediate knowledge of written and spoken Spanish). Students view important films in Spanish from one or more major periods and Spanish speaking countries, study the role of the movie directors and actors, consider how the multi-media aspects of film affects them as viewers, and study the films as a record of cultural values and cultural change. Further development of language proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing is emphasized. Theme or topic may vary as determined by instructor and student interest.

SPAN 3374, Hispanic Popular Music Students study the text of lyrics to important Hispanic popular music. They analyze the structure and various levels of meaning and learn to recognize the literary complexity. Students are introduced to the music that accompanies the lyrics. Vocabulary acquisition is emphasized. Class discussions and all written work will be in Spanish. At the end of the semester the students will be able to comprehend and appreciate the Spanish language in lyrics and have knowledge of the major musical trends and cultural traditions in Latin-American countries.

SPAN 3376, Hispanic Women Writers Students study significant literature by women writers in the form of narrative and poetry and explore the issues facing contemporary women. Discussions, readings, and writing practice center on major historical periods and authors, with a view toward preparation for the Spanish majors. Further development of language proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing is emphasized.

SPAN 3378 Hispanic Fantastic Literature Prerequisites: SPAN 1314, 1324, 2314, 2324, 3314, 3324, or the equivalent. Discussions, readings and writing practices center on masterpieces of the narrative of fantastic literature from Spain and Latin America. Students explore the emergence of magical realism in Latin America and the use of fantastic and supernatural elements. They also study the history, politics and culture of Hispanic countries to analyze the use of the fantastic elements in the text and compare societal conflicts of the present with those expressed in the readings. Further development of language proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading and writing is emphasized.

SPAN 3380 Contemporary Drama Prerequisites: Spanish 1314, 1324, 2314, 2324, 3314, 3324 or the equivalent. This course focuses on masterpieces of twentieth century dramatic texts from Spain and Latin American. The students dramatize the texts in class and interchange characters to do readings in a role-playing format. Deep literary analysis is an integral part of the course. Students learn to interpret the dramatic texts and understand the culture, history and politics of the time. The students compare societal conflicts embedded in the dramatic text with modern day troubles. The students will be exposed to audio and video of live theater performances. At the end of the class the students give a live theater performance of one of the plays.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 357 SPAN 4305 Masterworks of Hispanic Literature and Culture Discussions, readings, and writing practices center on major historical periods and authors, with a view toward preparation for the Senior Seminars. Further development of language proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing is emphasized. Theme or topic may vary as determined by instructor and student interest. Don Quixote or Latin American short story are examples of possible topics.

SPAN 4306 Masterworks of Hispanic Literature and Culture Discussions, readings, and writing practices center on major historical periods and authors, with a view toward preparation for the Senior Seminars. Further development of language proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing is emphasized. Theme or topic may vary as determined by instructor and student interest. Don Quixote or Latin American short story are examples of possible topics.

SPAN 4307 Masterworks of Hispanic Literature and Culture Discussions, readings, and writing practices center on major historical periods and authors, with a view toward preparation for the Senior Seminars. Further development of language proficiency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing is emphasized. Theme or topic may vary as determined by instructor and student interest. Don Quixote or Latin American short story are examples of possible topics.

SPAN 4324 Contemporary Spanish-American Literature A study of the selected works of the foremost contemporary Spanish-American writers.

SPAN 4343 Hispanic Cultural Perspectives A study of the major cultural aspects of Spanish speaking countries, with a special emphasis on literature, art, history, geography and cultural patterns. Not open to students with language proficiency below Intermediate High. (Offered also as EDBI 4343, 4344.)

SPAN 4344 Hispanic Cultural Perspectives A study of the major cultural aspects of Spanish speaking countries, with a special emphasis on literature, art, history, geography and cultural patterns. Not open to students with language proficiency below Intermediate High. (Offered also as EDBI 4343, 4344.)

SPAN 4385 Work Internship in Spanish Prerequisites: SPAN 3314 or the equivalent. Students use their oral and written proficiency in a supervised setting in (a) business or consulates, (b) health care, or (c) education or church work. To be eligible, students must be classified as a junior or senior, must be working towards a major in Spanish at Houston Baptist University, and must have at least a 3.0 QPA in Spanish. Interested students must take an oral proficiency test with a member of the Spanish faculty and receive a score of Intermediate High or higher. Students must also submit an application to the Intern Selection Committee at least one quarter in advance of the scheduled internship. If accepted by the committee, the applicant must also be interviewed and accepted by the supervisor in the internship setting.

SPAN 4386 Work Internship in Spanish Prerequisites: SPAN 3314 or the equivalent. Students use their oral and written proficiency in a supervised setting in (a) business or consulates, (b) health care, or (c) education or church work. To be eligible, students must be classified as a junior or senior, must be working towards a major in Spanish at Houston Baptist

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 358 University, and must have at least a 3.0 QPA in Spanish. Interested students must take an oral proficiency test with a member of the Spanish faculty and receive a score of Intermediate High or higher. Students must also submit an application to the Intern Selection Committee at least one quarter in advance of the scheduled internship. If accepted by the committee, the applicant must also be interviewed and accepted by the supervisor in the internship setting.

SPAN 4387 Work Internship in Spanish Prerequisites: SPAN 3314 or the equivalent. Students use their oral and written proficiency in a supervised setting in (a) business or consulates, (b) health care, or (c) education or church work. To be eligible, students must be classified as a junior or senior, must be working towards a major in Spanish at Houston Baptist University, and must have at least a 3.0 QPA in Spanish. Interested students must take an oral proficiency test with a member of the Spanish faculty and receive a score of Intermediate High or higher. Students must also submit an application to the Intern Selection Committee at least one quarter in advance of the scheduled internship. If accepted by the committee, the applicant must also be interviewed and accepted by the supervisor in the internship setting.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 359 Theatre (THEA) Course Descriptions

THEA 1100 Performance and Production In this laboratory course, students participate in a significant HBU theater production as a performer or assist in some other major aspect of theater production (e.g., scenery, lighting, design, stage crew, or directing). After auditions and assignments, the class is composed of the students in the college-produced play. This course may be taken up to six times. This course will be pass/fail.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 360 Professional Writing (WRIT) Course Descriptions

WRIT 3121, 3221, 3321 Special Topics Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 and 1323. Topics are determined by the needs and interests of students in the areas of advanced and specialized writing. They include topics not covered in creative or professional writing courses such as advanced creative writing, advanced rhetoric, advanced expository writing, advanced argumentative and persuasive writing, and writing for specific markets.

WRIT 3121, 3221, 3321 Special Topics Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 and 1323. Topics are determined by the needs and interests of students in the areas of advanced and specialized writing. They include topics not covered in creative or professional writing courses such as advanced creative writing, advanced rhetoric, advanced expository writing, advanced argumentative and persuasive writing, and writing for specific markets.

WRIT 3303 Elements of Professional Writing Prerequisites: ENGL 1313, 1323. This course offers students an overview of different types of writing and the role writing plays in the modern work place. Students evaluate examples of professional writing and selections from mass media, identify fallacious reasoning, use and recognize correct grammatical usage, write and revise a variety of papers. Each student compiles a portfolio representing his or her best work. Each student also interviews a person who writes on the job. NOTE: Students may select this course for credit towards the Professional Writing Specialization in Technical Writing or Rhetoric, and for elective credit towards the Professional Writing Specialization in Creative Writing.

WRIT 3121, 3221, 3321 Special Topics Prerequisites: ENGL 1320 and 1330. Topics are determined by the needs and interests of students in the areas of advanced and specialized writing. They include topics not covered in creative or professional writing courses such as advanced creative writing, advanced rhetoric, advanced expository writing, advanced argumentative and persuasive writing, and writing for specific markets.

WRIT 3334 Life Writing Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 and 1323. An introduction to the writing of personal history. Students read individual journals, autobiography and autobiographical fiction by a variety of authors from different time periods and of different nationalities, genders, and races. In their own expository writing students incorporate advanced techniques in the areas of description, narration, and analysis and compile a collection of their best works. Students may select this course for elective credit towards the Professional Writing Specialization in Creative Writing and in Rhetoric.

WRIT 3345 Technical Writing Prerequisites: ENGL 1313, 1323. This course trains students to write effectively in the modern workplace. Students study audience analysis, document design, graphics and web design. They apply what they have learned by creating a variety of written documents, including email messages, memos, letter, resumes, and reports. Some group work is required as students need to practice collaborative writing and peer review. Students may select this course for credit towards the Professional Writing Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 361 Specialization in Technical Writing and for elective credit towards the Professional Writing Specialization in Creative Writing.

WRIT 3350, Creative Writing Non-Fiction Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 and 1323. This course explores non-fiction prose and its rhetorical elements. Students both read and write creative non-fiction, compiling a reading journal and a writing portfolio of their own essays.

WRIT 3354, Creative Writing - Poetry Prerequisites: ENGL 1320 and 1330. An introduction to poetry writing, accomplished through the study and analysis of reputable literary models, followed by production of original poems and discussion of those poems in a workshop format. Note: WRIT 3354 fulfills Smith College credit under Humanities and may be used for the Professional Writing Specialization.

WRIT 3355, Creative Writing - Fiction Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 and 1323. An introduction to fiction writing, accomplished through the study and analysis of reputable literary models, followed by production of original short stories and discussion of those stories in a workshop format. Note: WRIT 3355 fulfills Smith College credit under Humanities and may be used toward the Professional Writing Specialization.

WRIT 3356, Playwriting and Screenwriting Prerequisites: ENGL 1320 and 1330 An introduction to writing for the stage and screen, accomplished through the study and analysis of appropriate models, followed by production of original works and discussion of those works in a workshop format. NOTE: WRIT 3356 fulfills Smith College credit under Humanities. Students may also select this course for credit toward the Professional Writing Specialization, the Writing Major, or the English Major.

WRIT 3381 SPECIAL TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Fine Arts.

WRIT 3383 Advanced Grammar and Writing Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 and 1323. The course includes and overview of the history of the English language. It emphasizes descriptive grammar using sentence diagramming and analysis. The course includes the in-depth study of construction, forms, and usage of words, phrases, clauses, and sentences. Required for teacher certification in Language Arts grades 4-8 and 8-12.

WRIT 4101, 4201, 4301 Writing Internship Prerequisites: ENGL 1313, 1323; at least 3 hours from WRIT 3303 or 3345; at least a 3.0 GPA in English, an application, and two letters of recommendation to the Intern Selection Committee at least one semester in advance. Students who excel in English may also enroll at the discretion of the Director of the Writing Specialization Program.This course provides students the opportunity to apply the principles of effective and correct written and oral communication in a professional or academic environment. Students will design, write and edit various documents while working in an approved position on or off campus. Students must complete 40 hours per credit hour.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 362

WRIT 4101, 4201, 4301 Writing Internship Prerequisites: ENGL 1313, 1323; at least 3 hours from WRIT 3303 or 3345; a 3.0 GPA in English, an application, and two letters of recommendation to the Intern Selection Committee at least one semester in advance. Students who excel in English may also enroll at the discretion of the Director of the Writing Specialization ProgramThis course provides students the opportunity to apply the principles of effective and correct written and oral communication in a professional or academic environment. Students will design, write and edit various documents while working in an approved position on or off campus. Students must complete 40 hours per credit hour.

WRIT 4281 SPECIAL TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Fine Arts.

WRIT 4101, 4201, 4301 Writing Internship Prerequisites: ENGL 1313, 1323; at least 3 hours from WRIT 3303 or 3345; at least a 3.0 GPA in English, an application, and two letters of recommendation to the Intern Selection Committee at least one semester in advance. Students who excel in English may also enroll at the discretion of the Director of the Writing Specialization ProgramThis course provides students the opportunity to apply the principles of effective and correct written and oral communication in a professional or academic environment. Students will design, write and edit various documents while working in an approved position on or off campus. Students must complete 40 hours per credit hour.

WRIT 4353, 4354, 4355, 4356, 4357, 4358 Advanced Creative Writing Workshop Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 & ENGL 1323 These courses are designed for advanced students of creative writing and will stress individual instruction and work on creative manuscripts such as a collection of poems or short stories, a novel or full-length play, screenplays, and radio and television scripts. NOTE: WRIT 4353, 4354, 4355, 4356, 4357, and 4358 do not satisfy requirements for the English major.

WRIT 4353, 4354, 4355, 4356, 4357, 4358 Advanced Creative Writing Workshop Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 & ENGL 1323 These courses are designed for advanced students of creative writing and will stress individual instruction and work on creative manuscripts such as a collection of poems or short stories, a novel or full-length play, screenplays, and radio and television scripts. NOTE: WRIT 4353, 4354, 4355, 4356, 4357, and 4358 do not satisfy requirements for the English major.

WRIT 4353, 4354, 4355, 4356, 4357, 4358 Advanced Creative Writing Workshop Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 & ENGL 1323 These courses are designed for advanced students of creative writing and will stress individual instruction and work on creative manuscripts such as a collection of poems or short stories, a novel or full-length play, screenplays, and radio and television scripts. NOTE: WRIT 4353, 4354, 4355, 4356, 4357, and 4358 do not satisfy requirements for the English major.

WRIT 4353, 4354, 4355, 4356, 4357, 4358 Advanced Creative Writing Workshop Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 & ENGL 1323 These courses are designed for advanced students of creative writing and will stress individual instruction and work on creative manuscripts such as a collection of poems or short stories, a

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 363 novel or full-length play, screenplays, and radio and television scripts. NOTE: WRIT 4353, 4354, 4355, 4356, 4357, and 4358 do not satisfy requirements for the English major.

WRIT 4353, 4354, 4355, 4356, 4357, 4358 Advanced Creative Writing Workshop Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 & ENGL 1323 These courses are designed for advanced students of creative writing and will stress individual instruction and work on creative manuscripts such as a collection of poems or short stories, a novel or full-length play, screenplays, and radio and television scripts. NOTE: WRIT 4353, 4354, 4355, 4356, 4357, and 4358 do not satisfy requirements for the English major.

WRIT 4358, Advanced Creative Writing Workshop Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 and 1323 These courses are designed for advanced students of creative writing and will stress individual instruction and work on creative manuscripts such as a collection of poems or short stories, a novel or full-length play, screenplays, and radio and television scripts. NOTE: WRIT 4358 does not satisfy requirements for the English major.

WRIT 4364 Advanced Poetry Writing Prerequisite: WRIT 3354 or 3355, or permission of the instructor. This advanced poetry writing course is designed to build upon the groundwork established in WRIT 3354. Class time is spent in the analysis of models - works from the tradition and more recent works in experimental veins - and intensive discussion of student poems. Students may select this course for credit toward the Professional Writing Specialization.

WRIT 4365 Advanced Fiction Writing Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 and 1323. This advanced fiction writing course is designed to build upon the groundwork established in WRIT 3355. Class time is spent in the analysis of models - works from the tradition and more recent work in experimental veins - and intensive discussion of student short stories or chapters from novels or novellas. Students may select this course for credit toward the Professional Writing Specialization.

WRIT 4370 Grant Writing Prerequisites: ENGL 1313 and 1323. This course examines the conventions for researching and writing grant proposals, specifically for educational and non-profit organizations.

WRIT 4373 The Critical Essay and Review Writing PREREQS: ENGL 1320, 1330 An examination of the basic elements of the critical essay, the review essay, the review, and the short notice.

WRIT 4374, Rhetoric for Professional and Technical Writers Prerequisites: ENGl 1313 and 1323 This course provides students with an overview of classical and modern rhetoric from ancient Greece to the 20th century, with an emphasis on written documents. Students will read excerpts from the writings of Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Quintilian, Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Bakhtin, Wittgenstein, Lyotard, and others. Students will also analyze professional and technical documents in light of classical and contemporary rhetorical theories. Students may select this course for credit towards the Professional Writing Specialization in Technical Writing or

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 364 Rhetoric, and for elective credit towards the Professional Writing Specialization in Creative Writing.

WRIT 4376, Promotional and Persuasive Writing Prerequistes: ENGl 1313 and 1323 This course provides students with an introduction to and an overview of persuasive and promotional writing. Students will read, analyze, and produce several types of persuasive and promotional documents in the following categories: proposal writing, political writing, non- profit/fundraising writing, religious writing, and sales/promotional writing. Students may select this course for credit towards the Professional Writing Specialization in Technical Writing or Rhetoric, and for elective credit towards the Professional Writing Specialization in Creative Writing.

WRIT 4381 SPECIAL TOPICS For course description and prerequisite for this course, please contact the Dean of the School of Fine Arts.

WRIT 4391, Senior Seminar: Creative Writing in Poetry Prerequisite: WRIT 3354 or permission of the instructor This seminar is designed to build upon the groundwork established in WRIT 3354. Class time is spent in the analysis of model-works from the tradition and more recent works in experimental veins--and intensive discussion of student poems. Students also present and monitor their progress on the research project and share final results with the class.

WRIT 4392, Senior Seminar: Creative Writing in Fiction Prerequisite: WRIT 3355 or permission of the instructor This seminar is designed to build upon the groundwork established in WRIT 3355. Class time is spent in the analysis of models-works from the tradition and more recent works in experimental veins--and intensive discussion of student short stories or chapters from novels or novellas. Students also present and monitor their progress on the research project and share final results with the class.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 365 Deans of the Colleges

Boyleston, Matthew, PhD Dean, School of Fine Arts; Assistant Professor of English and Writing

• BA in English and Philosophy, Furman University • MFA in Creative Writing, University of South Carolina • PhD in Literature and Creative Writing, University of Houston

Green, Jeffrey, PhD Dean, School of Christian Thought; Assistant Professor of Philosophy

• BA in History and Philosophy, Southern Methodist University • MA in Philosophy, University of Notre Dame • PhD in Philosophy, University of Notre Dame

Hammons, Christopher, Ph.D. Dean, School of Humanities; Professor of Government

• BA in Government, University of Texas at Austin • MA in Political Science, University of Houston • PhD in Political Science, University of Houston

Hinze, Jodey, JD Interim Dean, Smith College of Liberal Arts; Assistant Professor of Business

• Doctor of Jurisprudence, cum laude, University of Houston Law Center • Master of Arts in Philosophical Theology, summa cum laude, Criswell College • Bachelor of Arts, cum laude, Criswell College

Kuruvilla, Mohan, Ph.D. Dean, School of Business; Herman Brown Chair of Business & Economics; Associate Professor of Accounting

• MBA in Finance, University of Houston • PhD in Accountancy, University of Houston • Certified Public Accountant (CPA) • Chartered Accountant (ACA)

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 366 Schumann, Renae, PhD, RN Dean, School of Nursing and Allied Health; Associate Professor of Nursing

• BS in Nursing, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Nursing • MS in Nursing, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Nursing • PhD in Nursing Science, Texas Woman's University

Simpson, Cynthia, PhD Dean, College of Education and Behavioral Sciences; Professor of Education

• BS in Interdisciplinary Studies, Elementary Education, Texas State University • MEd in Elementary Education, emphasis in Special Education and Diagnostics, Sam Houston State University • PhD in Educational Human Resource Development, Texas A&M University

Warren, Doris, PhD Dean; Professor of Chemistry

• BS in Chemistry, Baylor University • MS in Chemistry, Baylor University • PhD in Analytical Chemistry, University of Houston

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 367 University Faculty Listing

Barksdale, W. Kevin, PhD Professor in Management; Director, Master of Science, Human Resources Management

• BBA, Georgia State University • Ph.D., Georgia State University

Bell, Shonta, RN, MSN Assistant Professor of Nursing

• BSN, • MSN, Union University

Benitez-Gucciardi, Barbara, PhD Assistant Professor of Mathematics

• BA in Mathematics, University of Houston • MS in Mathematics, University of Houston • PhD in Mathematics, University of Houston

Bermejo, Encarna, PhD Assistant Professor of Spanish

• BA in Business Administration, National Louis University • MA in Spanish Linguistics, University of Houston • PhD in Applied Spanish Linguistics (in progress), University of Houston

Blackwell, Ben, PhD Interim Chair, Department of Theology; Director, Master of Arts in Theological Studies; Assistant Professor of Christianity

• PhD, New Testament and Historical Theology, Durham University (England) • ThM, Historical Theology and Pastoral Ministries, Theological Seminary • MBA, Henderson State University • BA, Biblical Languages, Ouachita Baptist University • BA, Accounting, Ouachita Baptist University

Blado, Gardo, PhD Professor of Physics Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 368 • BS Physics, University of the Philippines • MS Physics, Purdue University • PhD in Physics, Purdue University

Blair, Joseph, ThD Professor of Christianity

• BS, Louisiana Tech University • BD, Theology, New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary • ThD in New Testament, New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary

Boyleston, Matthew, PhD Dean, School of Fine Arts; Assistant Professor of English and Writing

• BA in English and Philosophy, Furman University • MFA in Creative Writing, University of South Carolina • PhD in Literature and Creative Writing, University of Houston

Brezger, Jennifer, MN, RN Assistant Professor of Nursing

• BSN - Duquesne University • MN - University of Pittsburgh

Brookins, Tim , PhD Assistant Professor of Classics

• B.S. in Communications, James Madison University • M.Div. in Biblical Languages, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary • Post-Bacc in Classics, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill • Ph.D. in Religion, minor in Classics, Baylor University

Brooks, Jr., John R. (Rusty), DBA Associate Dean, Undergraduate Programs in Business; Professor of Marketing

• BBA in Advertising, Texas Technological College • MBA in Marketing, Texas Tech University • DBA in Marketing, Texas Tech University

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 369

Brownlee, Avin, PhD Professor of Biology

• BS in Biology, West Texas State University • MCS in Biology and Chemistry, University of Mississippi • PhD in Biology, University of Mississippi

Brupbacher, Linda, EdD Chair, Department of Curriculum and Instruction; Professor of Education

• BA in Elementary Education and Sociology, HBU • MEd in Elementary Education, Stephen F. Austin University • EdD in Curriculum and Instruction, The University of Houston

Busby, James, MFA Associate Professor of Art; Artist-in-Residence

• BA in Art, Sam Houston State University • MA in Art, New Mexico Highlands University

Busiek, Kaye, EdD Assistant Professor of Education

• BA, Houston Baptist University • MEd, Arizona State University • EdD in Curriculum and Instruction, Northern Arizona University

Bussell, Valerie, PhD Associate Professor of Psychology

• BS in Art Education, TX all level certification, University of Houston • MA in Social Psychology, University of Houston • PhD in Social Psychology, University of Houston

Capes, David, PhD Professor of Christianity; Thomas Nelson Research Professor

• BA in Religion, Mercer University

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 370 • MDiv, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary • PhD in New Testament, SWBTS

Casebier, K. Diane, MLS Assistant Professor of Library Science

• BA in Communication, University of Texas at Arlington • Masters of Library Science, University of North Texas-Denton

Clardy, Ellen, PhD Assistant Professor of Economics

• BA in Economics, Trinity University • MA in Economics, Rice University • PhD in Economics, Rice University

Claycomb, James, PhD Associate Professor of Physics

• BS in Physics University of Houston • MS in Physics University of Houston • PhD in Physics University of Houston

Collins, Michael, MFA Chair, Department of Visual Arts; Artist-in-Residence; Director, Master of Fine Arts; Associate Professor of Art

• BFA in Art, University of Houston, 1978 • MFA in Art-Painting, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX. Recipient of the Meadow Scholarship and Teaching Assistantship. 1996-98.

Cook, Susan, PhD Director, Health Profession Programs; Professor of Biology

• BS in Biology, University of Texas at Arlington • PhD in Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine • Post-Doctoral Fellowship funded by the National Kidney Foundation, Baylor College of Medicine

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 371

Cox, Donna, RN, MS Assistant Professor of Nursing

• Bachelor of Science in Nursing, McKendree College, Lebanon, Illinois • Master of Science in Community Health Nursing, State University of New York at Binghamton • Additional studies at Frontier School of Midwifery and Family Health and Case Western University

Craig, William Lane, PhD, DTheol, DLitt Professor of Philosophy

• BA in Communications, Wheaton College • MA in Philosophy of Religion, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School • MA in Church History, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School • PhD in Philosophy, University of Birmingham, England • D. Theol, Universität München, Germany

Crider, Bonita, MLS Assistant Professor of Library Science

• BA in Radio and Television, University of Houston • MLS (Masters of Library Science), University of North Texas

Davids, Peter, PhD Visiting Professor of Christianity

• B.A. in Psychology, Wheaton College • M.Div., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School • Ph.D., University of Manchester

Davis, David J., PhD Director of MLA; Assistant Professor of History

§ BGS, University of Texas at Tyler § MA, Cardiff University § PhD, University of Exeter

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 372 Delaquis, Esther, MFA Assistant Professor of Art

• BFA in Painting, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana. West Africa • MFA, Major in Painting, Minor in printmaking from Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas

Dixon, Rosemary, RN, MSN Testing Coordinator

• BSN from University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio, TX • MSN (nursing education and administration) from University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, TX

Dominguez, Patricia, RN, MSN Assistant Professor of Nursing

• BS in Nursing, University of Texas, Houston • MSN in Nursing, University of Texas, Houston

Edwards, James, MFA Gallery Director-Curator, UAC; Artist/Curator-in-Residence; Associate Professor of Art

• BFA, MFA in Painting, San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco, Ca. • Rockefeller Fellowship in Museum Education and Community Studies, Fine Arts

Elliott, Barbara, DLitt Assistant Professor of Liberal Studies

• PhD, Great Books Honors College, Faulkner University, in progress • DLitt, Dominican School of Philosophy and Theology • MA, Theology, University of St. Thomas • BA, English Literature and Fine Arts, Ohio Wesleyan University

Ellis, Stephanie, PhD Chair, Department of Educational Leadership and Counseling; Assistant Professor of Psychology

• Ph.D., Counseling Psychology; Louisiana Tech University • M.A., Counseling and Guidance; Louisiana Tech University

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 373 • B.A., Psychology & Speech Communication; Texas A&M University

Estrada, Miguel, PhD Chair, Department of English and Modern Languages; Associate Professor of Spanish

• BA in Secondary Education and Spanish, The University of Texas at El Paso • MA in Spanish, The University of New Mexico • MA in School Administration, Houston Baptist University • PhD in Spanish American Literature, The University of New Mexico

Fabre, Taiya, PhD Associate Professor of Chemistry

• BS in Chemistry, Xavier University of Louisiana • PhD in Chemistry, Louisiana State University

Fance, Kristin, MLIS Associate Professor of Library Science

• BA in Plan II Honors Program and English, University of Texas at Austin • Masters in Library and Information Science, University of Texas at Austin

Fiese, Richard, PhD Professor of Music Education

• Bachelor of Science in Music Education with teaching certification, University of Wisconsin • Master of Music, University of Miami • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Miami

Flores-Mejorado, Dina, EdD Assistant Professor of Education

• B.A. in Business Administration/Finance, Texas A&I University • M.A. in Counseling, Prairie View A&M University • Ed.D in Educational Leadership, Sam Houston State University

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 374 Fontenot, Charlotte, EdD Assistant Professor of Special Education

• BS in Education, Curriculum and Instruction; Elementary Self Contained and Elementary Math, Texas Southern University • MEd in Generic Special Education, Texas Southern University • MEd in Education Administration, Prairie View A & M University • EdD in Educational Leadership, Sam Houston State University

Frear, Sara, PhD Assistant Professor of History

• BA in East Asian Studies, Yale University, 1982 • MA in Early American History, Auburn University, 2007 • PhD in Early American History, Auburn University, 2007

Furr, Rhonda, DMA Professor in Music

• BSEd in Music, Western Carolina University • MMEd, Western Carolina University • DMA, Southern Seminary, Louisville, KY

Garbarino, Collin, PhD Assistant Professor of History

• PhD in History, Louisiana State University • MA in History, Louisiana State University • MDiv in Biblical and Theological Studies, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary • BA in History, Louisiana Tech University

Gebuhr, Ann K., PhD Professor of Music

• BMus in Piano Performance, Indiana University • MMus in Music Theory, Indiana University • PhD in Music Theory, Indiana University

George, Jessie, CPA Assistant Professor of Accounting

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 375 • BBA in Accounting, Texas A&M University • MS in Management Information Systems, Texas A&M University • Certified Public Accountant (CPA) • Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA)

Getz, Evan, PhD Assistant Professor of Literature

• BA in Philosophy, University of California, San Diego • MA in Philosophy, Baylor University • PhD in English, Baylor University

Gillson, Suzanne, RN, MSN Assistant Professor of Nursing

• BSN, University of Central Oklahoma, May, 1996 • MSN, University of Houston-Victoria, May 2012

Givens, Melissa, DMA Assistant Professor of Music; Area Coordinator, Vocal Studies

• BA in Music, Davidson College • MM in Vocal Performance, Shepherd School of Music, Rice University • DMA in Music Performance, University of Houston

Gordon, Bruce, PhD Associate Professor of History and Philosophy of Science

• Ph.D., History and Philosophy of Science (Physics), Northwestern University • M.A.R., Systematic Theology and Apologetics, Westminster Theological Seminary • M.A., Analytic Philosophy, University of Calgary • B.Sc., Applied Mathematics, University of Calgary • A.R.C.T., Piano Performance, Royal Conservatory of Music, University of Toronto

Green, Jeffrey, PhD Dean, School of Christian Thought; Assistant Professor of Philosophy

• BA in History and Philosophy, Southern Methodist University • MA in Philosophy, University of Notre Dame • PhD in Philosophy, University of Notre Dame

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 376

Halton, Charles, PhD Assistant Professor of Theology • PhD, Bible and Ancient Near Eastern Studies with Emphasis in Cuneiform Studies, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion • M.Phil, Hebrew and Cognate Studies, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion • M.Div, Biblical and Theological Studies, Southern Seminary • B.B.A., Marketing, Texas A&M University

Hammons, Christopher, Ph.D. Dean, School of Humanities; Professor of Government

• BA in Government, University of Texas at Austin • MA in Political Science, University of Houston • PhD in Political Science, University of Houston

Hartenburg, Gary, PhD Director of the Honors College; Assistant Professor of Philosophy

• PhD in Philosophy, University of California–Irvine • MA in Philosophy, University of California–Irvine • MA in Philosophy of Religion and Ethics, Biola University • BA in Bible and Theology, Moody Bible Institute

Hatchett, Randy, PhD Professor of Christianity

• BA in Religion and Philosophy, Dallas Baptist College, 1978. • Masters of Div. at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1982. • PhD Philosophy of Religion at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, May 1989.

Hawley, Darby, PhD Assistant Professor of Psychology

• Ph.D., Development and Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Houston • M.A., Development and Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Houston • B.A. in Biopsychology, Randolph-Macon College

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 377 Hayrapetyan, Levon, PhD Professor of Business

• BS in Applied Mathematics, Yerevan State University, Armenia • MS in Applied Mathematics, Yerevan State University, Armenia • PhD in Computer Science, Kiev State University, Ukraine.

Hemati, Russell, PhD Chair, Department of Philosophy; Assistant Professor of Philosophy

• BA in Philosophy, Dallas Baptist University • MA in Philosophy, Baylor University • Ph.D in Philosophy, Baylor University

Henderson, Curtis, PhD Associate Professor of Biology

• BS in Biology and Chemistry, • PhD in Biology, Texas Tech University

Hesse, Shannon, DMA Assistant Professor of Music

• BM, Westminster Choir College, Rider University • MM, The Catholic University of America • DMA, Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester

Hinze, Jodey, JD Interim Dean, Smith College of Liberal Arts; Assistant Professor of Business

• Doctor of Jurisprudence, cum laude, University of Houston Law Center • Master of Arts in Philosophical Theology, summa cum laude, Criswell College • Bachelor of Arts, cum laude, Criswell College

Hopp, Rachel, PhD Professor of Biology; Academic SACSCOC Officer

• BS in Zoology, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio • PhD in Cellular and Structural Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 378

Horn, Jacqueline Peltier, PhD Chair, Department of Biology; Professor of Biology; Athletics Certification Officer

• AS in Sciences, Alvin Community College • BS in Biochemistry, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas • PhD in Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

Hughes, Eloise, EdD Professor of Education

• BSE in English, Speech Communications and Education, Abilene Christian University • MEd in Curriculum and Instruction, Houston Baptist University • EdD in Curriculum and Instruction, Teacher Education, University of Houston

Jones, Steven L., PhD Chair, Department of Classics and Biblical Languages; Director, Master of Arts in Biblical Languages; Assistant Professor of Classics

• PhD in Classics, The University of Texas at Austin • MA in Greek, Latin, and Classical Studies, Bryn Mawr College • BA in Greek/Latin, Baylor University

Joseph, Anthony, PhD Associate Professor of History

• BA in Plan II Honors Program, University of Texas at Austin • PhD in History, Princeton University

Kennedy, Tom, EdD Associate Professor of Psychology

• Ed.D. in Counseling, Texas Tech University • M.R.E. in Counseling, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary • M.Div. in Theology, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary

Kramlich, Daniel L., DMA Professor of Music

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 379 • B.A. (Piano performance) Lebanon Valley College • MM with distinction (Music Theory major, piano minor) Indiana University • DMA (Composition major, Music Theory minor) University of Houston • PhD coursework completed (Music Theory major, Piano and Comp. minors) Indiana Univ.

Kuruvilla, Mohan, Ph.D. Dean, School of Business; Herman Brown Chair of Business & Economics; Associate Professor of Accounting

• MBA in Finance, University of Houston • PhD in Accountancy, University of Houston • Certified Public Accountant (CPA) • Chartered Accountant (ACA)

Lewis, Sharon, EdD Associate Professor of Education

• BA in Education, Louisiana State University • MS in C&I-Reading, Texas A & M • EdD in C&I - Reading, University of Houston

Lewis, Jr., Paul W. , PhD Assistant Professor of Mathematics

§ BS in Mathematics, University of Tennessee § PhD in Mathematics, University of Tennessee

Liang, Ernest, PhD Associate Professor of Finance; Director, Center for Christianity in Business

• MBA, Ph.D., The University of Chicago

Licona, Mike, PhD Associate Professor of Theology

• M.A. in Religious Studies, • PhD. in New Testament Studies, University of Pretoria

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 380

Llizo, Robert, PhD Associate Professor of History

• PhD, History (Medieval and Early Modern Studies), Claremont Graduate School • MA, History (Medieval and Renaissance), California State University • BA, History, Biola University

Luksetich, Sharon, RN, MSN, CNE Chair, Department of Undergraduate Nursing, Assistant Professor of Nursing

• BS in Nursing, University of Texas Medical Branch • MS in Nursing, University of Texas at Tyler

Markos, Louis, PhD Robert H. Ray Chair of Humanities; Scholar-in-Residence; Professor of English,

• BA in English and History from Colgate University (Hamilton, NY) • MA and PhD in English from the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI)

Marshall, Phillip, PhD Assistant Professor of Christianity

• Undergraduate Studies in Russian Language, Linguistics, and Soviet Politics, Georgetown University • B.A. in Biblical Studies, The Master’s College • M.Div., Westminster Theological Seminary in California • Ph.D. in Old Testament Studies, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Martinez, Richard J., PhD Chair, Department of Management, Marketing, and Business; Associate Professor of Management

• B.S. Political Science, Arizona State University • MBA, Baylor University • PhD in Management, Texas A&M University

Massanova, Heather, MAT Instructor of Kinesiology

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 381 • BS, Athletic Training and Physical Education, University of West Alabama • MAT, Physical Education and Exercise Science, University of West Alabama

Mater, Marie A., PhD Associate Professor of Speech Communications

• BA in Communication Studies & Political Science, Washburn University • MA in Rhetorical Studies, University of Iowa • PhD in Sociology, University College Cork-National University of Ireland

Mattix, Micah, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of English; Review Editor, The City

• B.A. in Economics, North Carolina State University • M.A. in English, North Carolina State University • Dr. des lettres. English, University of Fribourg

McGaughey, Carol, EdD Chair, Department of Special Populations; Professor of Education

• BS in Education, Illinois State University • MEd in Education, Counseling and Guidance, University of Miami • EdD in Curriculm and Instruction, Technology in the Classroom, Baylor University

McNeil, Cheryl, RN, MSN, MBA Assistant Professor of Nursing

• ADN, Eastern Kentucky University • BSN, UT Health Science Center, Houston • MBA, Houston Baptist University • MSN (Leadership), Regis University, CO

Molzberger, Hans, Assistant Professor of Art

• BFA equivalency for professional art activities in Germany.

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 382 Moore, Brenda, RN, MSN Assistant Professor of Nursing

• MSN, Michigan State University, May, 2009 • BSN, University of Alabama, August, 2006 • ASN, Houston Community College, May, 1988

Moore, Patrick, MM Assistant Professor of Music; Director of Bands; Director of Instrumental Studies

• BM, University of Arkansas • MM, Texas Tech University

Morton-King, Karen S., PhD Assistant Professor of Management

• BBA in Management, The University of Texas at Austin • MBA, University of Houston at Clear Lake • PhD in Organizational Behavior, Support Area Public Administration, Florida State University

Neill, Jeremy, PhD Assistant Professor of Philosophy

• BA in English and Philosophy, Wheaton College (IL) • PhD in Philosophy, Saint Louis University

Nero, Renata, PhD Chair, Department of Psychology; Director, Graduate Studies in Psychology; Professor of Psychology

• BA in Psychology, Fisk University • MA in Afro-American Studies, University of California at Los Angeles • MS and PhD in Clinical Psychology, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Noble, Ann, MLS Director, Moody Library, Professor of Library Science

• BA in History, Baylor University • Masters of Library Science, University of Texas, Austin

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 383

Ordway, Holly, PhD Chair, Department of Apologetics; Director, Master of Arts in Apologetics; Professor of English • BA in English, University of Massachusetts Amherst • MA in English, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill • MA in Christian Apologetics, Biola University • PhD in English, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Painter, Jared, PhD Assistant Professor of Mathematics

• BS in Mathematics, University of Texas at Tyler • MS in Mathematics, University of Texas at Tyler • PhD in Mathematics, University of Texas at Arlington

Pearcey, Nancy, MA Director of the Francis Schaeffer Center for Worldview and Culture; Scholar in Residence; Professor of Apologetics

• BA Iowa State University • MA in Biblical Studies, Covenant Theological Seminary, St. Louis • Additional study at the Institute for Christian Studies, Toronto

Potter, Evelyn, PhD Assistant Professor of Mathematics

• BS, Mathematics, Texas Lutheran University • MS, Mathematics, Iowa State University • PhD, Applied Mathematics, Iowa State University

Priest, Susan , MSN, RN, CNS Assistant Professor of Nursing

• BSN, University of Texas Health Science Center • MSN with a focus in Emergency Nursing, University of Texas Health Science Center

Pyle, Ernest, PhD Chair, Department of Mathematics and Physics; Director, Pre-Engineering Program; Professor of Mathematics

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 384 • BA in Mathematics, Southern Arkansas University (formerly Southern State College) • MS in Mathematics, The University of Texas at Austin • PhD in Mathematics, The University of Texas at Austin

Reed, Dianne, EdD Professor of Education

• BS in Education, Prairie View A&M University • MA in Education, Prairie View A&M University • EdD in Education, Texas A&M University

Rexilius, Ronald J. , PhD Chair, Department of History and Classics; Associate Professor of History

• BA in History, Crown College • MA in History, University of Nebraska-Lincoln • PhD in History, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Reynolds, John Mark, PhD University Provost; Professor of Philosophy

Riefkohl, Roxanne (Roxy), PhD Assistant Professor of Education

• BA in Education, Sam Houston State University • MA in Counseling, Prairie View A&M University • PhD in Counselor Education, Sam Houston State University

Riley, Dean, MALS Professor of Library Science

• BME, University of Texas at San Antonio • MA, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary • MALS, University of Missouri-Columbia

Schneider, Susan, RN, MSN Assistant Professor of Nursing

• BSN – Mankato State University - Mankato, MN

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 385 • MSN – UT El Paso – Medical/Surgical Nursing with an emphasis in Teaching

Schumann, Renae, PhD, RN Dean, School of Nursing and Allied Health; Associate Professor of Nursing

• BS in Nursing, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Nursing • MS in Nursing, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Nursing • PhD in Nursing Science, Texas Woman's University

Serrato, Darlene, PhD Associate Professor of Accounting; Program Coordinator, Accounting

• BS in Math, University of Houston-Central • MBA, University of Houston-Central • PhD in Accounting, University of Houston-Central

Sharp, Mary Jo, MA Assistant Professor of Apologetics; Director, Social Media, School of Christian Thought

• BME, University of Oklahoma • MA in Apologetics, Biola University

Short, Kylee J. , PhD Assistant Professor of Kinesiology

• B.S. in Health and Sports Studies, Miami University • M.A.in Sport and Exercise Humanities, The Ohio State University • PhD in Sport and Exercise Humanities, The Ohio State University

Sikora, Joshua, Director of Cinema & New Media Arts; Assistant Professor of Cinema & New Media Arts

• BA in Film / Television / Radio, Biola University • MFA in Studio Art, Houston Baptist University, in progress

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 386 Simpson, Cynthia, PhD Dean, College of Education and Behavioral Sciences; Professor of Education

• BS in Interdisciplinary Studies, Elementary Education, Texas State University • MEd in Elementary Education, emphasis in Special Education and Diagnostics, Sam Houston State University • PhD in Educational Human Resource Development, Texas A&M University

Sloan, Jr., Robert B. , PhD University President; Professor of Theology

Snell, Micah, MDiv Instructor of English

• PhD, Theology, University of St. Andrews, St. Mary's College, The Institute for Theology, Imagination and the Arts, in progress • MDiv, Nashotah House Theological Seminary • PBC, Classics, University of California Los Angeles • BA, Humanities (Magna Cum Laude), Biola University

Sorgwe, Felisi, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Christianity; Director, Center for Exploring Ministry Careers

• B.S.Ch.E. (Chemical Engineering), University of Washington (Seattle, WA), 1978 • B.A. (Math), University of Washington (Seattle, WA), 1978 • Master of Divinity, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1981 • M.A.R.E. (Religious Education), Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1982 • Ph.D. (Religion, Biblical Studies), Baylor University, 1991

Speller, Emily, PhD Assistant Professor of Literature

§ BA in English, Hillsdale College § MA in English, § PhD in Literature, University of Dallas

Stacey, Robert, PhD Associate Provost; Associate Professor in Government

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 387 Strobel, Lee, MS Professor of Christian Thought

• University of Missouri: Bachelor of Journalism degree. • Yale Law School: Master of Studies in Law degree.

Thompson, Betty, PhD Professor of Biology

• BS in Biology, Texas Tech University • PhD in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of California, Irvine • She completed postdoctoral work at University of California, San Francisco in Molecular Biology and at Children's Hospital Medical Center in Oakland, California, in Developmental Biology, Physiology and Enzymology.

Towery, Robert, PhD Professor in Chemistry

• BS in Chemistry, Belhaven College • PhD in Analytical Chemistry, The University of Southern Mississippi

Travis, Melissa , MA Assistant Professor of Apologetics

• BS in Biology, • MA in Science and Religion, Biola University

Trevino, Elizabeth (Polly), PhD Director, Onlline Programs, CoEBS; Assistant Professor of Education

• BA in English, Texas A&M University • MEd in Educational Psychology, emphasis in Bilingual Education, Texas A&M University • PhD in Educational Psychology, emphasis in Bilingual Education, Texas A&M University

Trevino, Saul, PhD Assistant Professor of Chemistry

• BS in Biochemistry, Texas A&M University

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 388 • PhD in Medical Sciences (emphasis in protein chemistry), Texas A&M University System Health Science Center

Tyler, Jr. , John O., PhD Associate Professor of Government

• BA in Philosophy, Summa Cum Laude, Texas A&M University (1975) • JD in Law, SMU Law School (1978) • PhD in Philosophy, Texas A&M University (2012)

Upton, Stacey, RN, MSN Assistant Professor of Nursing

• Bachelor of Science in Nursing – University of Texas at Austin • Master of Science with an emphasis on Nursing Education – Texas Woman’s University, Houston, TX

Valdez, J. Marie, MFA Director, Undergraduate Studies in Art; Assistant Professor of Art

• BA, Psychology, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi • BFA, Studio Art, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi • MFA, Painting, Boston University

Van Caemelbecke, Eric, PhD Professor of Chemistry

• BS from l'Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie et Physique de Bordeaux, France (engineering school) • PhD in Chemistry, The University of Houston

Walls, Jerry, PhD Professor of Philosophy; Scholar-in-Residence

• BA in Religion and Philosophy, Houghton College • MDiv, Princeton Seminary • STM, Yale Divinity School • PhD in Philosophy, Notre Dame

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 389

Ward, Michael, PhD Professor of Apologetics • BA, English Language and Literature, University of Oxford • MA, English Language and Literature, University of Oxford • MA, Theology, University of Cambridge • PhD, Divinity, University of St Andrews

Warren, Doris, PhD Dean; Professor of Chemistry

• BS in Chemistry, Baylor University • MS in Chemistry, Baylor University • PhD in Analytical Chemistry, University of Houston

Whaley, Brenda, PhD Professor of Biology

• BS in Biology and Chemistry, Houston Baptist University • MS in Chemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology • PhD in Biochemistry, University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences - Houston

Wilkinson, Jeffrey, Ph.D. Program Coordinator, JMC; Professor of Journalism and Mass Communications; Faculty Advisor for "The Collegian"

• BS in Broadcasting, University of Florida • MA in Journalism, University of Georgia • PhD Mass Communication, University of Georgia, Athens, GA

Wilson, D.R. (Randy), PhD Chair, Department of Law and Society; Professor of Sociology

• BA in Religion, Baylor University • MA in Educational Psychology, University of Texas at San Antonio • PhD in Sociology, The University of North Texas

Wilson, Dawn, EdD

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 390 Associate Professor of Education; Director, Master of Education, Cohort Operations; Director, Master of Education, HBU Campus

• BS in Education, Baylor University • MA in Curriculum and Instruction, Specialization in Instructional Technology, Houston Baptist University • EdD in Curriculum and Instruction in the area of Instructional Technology

Wilson, Doni, PhD Associate Professor of English

• Baylor University, BA in History • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, MA & PhD in English

Wingate, Hannah, PhD Assistant Professor of Biology

• BS in Biology, University of New Mexico • MS in Immunology, University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center • PhD in Cancer Biology, University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center

Wiseman, Melissa, PhD Chair, Department of Accounting, Economics, and Finance; Associate Professor of Economics

• BBA in Finance, University of Texas at El Paso • MA in Economics, University of Texas at El Paso • PhD in Economics, Texas Tech University

Woods, Treacy, PhD Chair, Department of Chemistry; Professor of Chemistry

• BS in Chemistry, Mankato State College • BS in Mathematics, Mankato State College • Graduate Coursework in Chemistry, Iowa State University • PhD in Chemistry, Rice University

Yan, Allen, PhD Associate Professor of Finance; Program Coordinator, Finance

• BA in Business Education, Xuzhou University, China

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 391 • MBA, University of Alaska Fairbanks • PhD in Business Administration-Finance, University of Houston

Yarrington, John, DMA Chair, Department of Music; Area Coordinator, Choral Music; Faculty Athletics Representative; Professor of Music

• BMus Ed, University of Oklahoma • MSM, Union Theological Seminary • DMA, University of Oklahoma

Yatsenko, Yuri, PhD Professor of Business

• MS in Physics, Kiev State University (Kiev, Ukraine) • PhD in Computer Sciences, Kiev State University (Kiev, Ukraine) • Dr.Sci. in Mathematics, Presidium of the Academy of Sciences of USSR (Moscow)

Houston Baptist University Catalog 2013-2014 Page 392 

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - ART HISTORY

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS ART 1303 Art Methods and Materials 3 ART 1313 Design 2D 3 ART 1323 Design 3D 3 ART XXXX Choose 1 of the following: 3 ART 3330, ART 3331, ART 3332 Gallery and Museum Practices ART 3353 Art History 1 - Prehistoric through Gothic 3 ART 3363 Art History 2 – Renaissance through Modern 3 ART XXXX Choose 1 of the following: ART 2387, 3387, 4487, 4488 Life Drawing ART 3335 Color Theory ART 3373 History of Modern Art 3 / 4 ART 3375 Art of the Renaissance ART 3380 American Art ART 3383 European Heritage in Art History ART XXXX Choose 1 of the following: Studio Art: Ceramics, Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture, Water Media-Painting, Introduction to Applied Arts, 3 / 4 Applied Arts: Fiber Arts, Experimental Drawing, Experimental Painting or Apprenticeship Total Hours in Minor 24 - 26

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HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - BIBLICAL LANGUAGES

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS HEBR 2312 Hebrew Grammar I 3 HEBR 2322 Hebrew Grammar II 3 GREK 2312 Greek Grammar I 3 GREK 2322 Greek Grammar II 3 ELECTIVES: Choose any 2 courses (6 hrs) from the following: 6 HEBR 3311 Hebrew Reading and Syntax I GREK 3311 Greek Reading and Syntax I HEBR 4351 Hebrew Reading and Syntax II (Prerequisite: Hebrews Reading & Syntax I) GREK 4351 Greek Reading and Syntax II (Prerequisite: Greek Reading & Syntax I) Total Hours in Minor 18

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HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - BIOLOGY

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

LACC REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGY MINOR MUST INCLUDE: MATH 1313 CHEM 2415 & 2416

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS BIOL 2454 General Biology I - prerequisite 1040 SAT 4 BIOL 2455 General Biology II – prerequisite BIOL 2454 4 BIOL 3301 Cell and Molecular Biology – prerequisites BIOL 2454, BIOL 2455 & CHEM 2415 3 Choose 2 of the following: 8 BIOL 3404 Environmental Science (4 hrs) BIOL 3414 Microbiology (4 hrs) – prerequisite BIOL 3301 BIOL 3444 Genetics (4 hrs) – prerequisite BIOL 3301 Total Hours in Minor 19

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HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - CHEMISTRY

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

LACC REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMISTRY MINOR MUST INCLUDE: MATH 1313 OR Higher

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS CHEM 2415 General Chemistry I 4 CHEM 2416 General Chemistry II – prerequisite CHEM 2415 4 CHEM 2423 Quantitative Analysis – prerequisite CHEM 2416 4 CHEM 3131 Organic Chemistry I Lab – prerequisite CHEM 3313 or concurrent 1 CHEM 3132 Organic Chemistry II Lab – prerequisite CHEM 3131 completed / CHEM 3333 or concurrent 1 CHEM 3313 Organic Chemistry I – prerequisite CHEM 2416 3 CHEM 3333 Organic Chemistry II – prerequisite CHEM 3313 3 ELECTIVE Any 3000 or above Chemistry Course (min. 3 hrs) for which student has completed prerequisites. 3 Total Hours in Minor 23

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR – CHRISTIANITY BIBLICAL STUDIES

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS CHRI 3311 Hermeneutics 3 CHRI 3301 or Old Testament Theology OR CHRI 3302 New Testament Theology 3 CHRI 3314 or History of Christianity OR CHRI 4335 Systematic Theology 3 CHRI XXXX Choose any 3 CHRI courses in Biblical Studies (3 hrs each) 9 Biblical Studies include but are not limited to the following: CHRI 3333 Jesus and His Teachings – prerequisite CHRI 1313, 1323 CHRI 3344 Paul and His Letters – prerequisite CHRI 1313, 1323 CHRI 4343 Old Testament Prophets - – prerequisite CHRI 1313, 1323 CHRI 4381 Special Topics Total Hours in Minor 18

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HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR – CHRISTIANITY CHRISTIAN STUDIES

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS CHRI 3311 Hermeneutics 3 CHRI 3301 or Old Testament Theology OR CHRI 3302 New Testament Theology 3 CHRI 3314 or History of Christianity OR CHRI 4335 Systematic Theology 3 CHRI XXXX Choose any 3 Additional Upper Level (3000 or 4000) CHRI courses at 3 hours each 9 Total Hours in Minor 18

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HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR – CHRISTIANITY PRACTICAL THEOLOGY

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS CHRI 3311 Hermeneutics 3 CHRI 3301 or Old Testament Theology OR CHRI 3302 New Testament Theology 3 CHRI 3314 or History of Christianity OR CHRI 4335 Systematic Theology 3 CHRI XXXX Choose any 3 upper level CHRI courses in Practical Theology (3 hrs each) 9 Practical Theology includes, but are not limited to the following: CHRI 3303 Spiritual Formation CHRI 3325 The Christian Vocation CHRI 3336 Christian Leadership CHRI 3353 Homiletics CHRI 3363 Evangelism CHRI 3371 Christian Worship and Music CHRI 3377/3378 Supervised Ministry Practicum (church / hospital) CHRI 4333 Sociology of Religion CHRI 4334 Psychology of Religion CHRI 4381 Special Topics Total Hours in Minor 18

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR – CHRISTIANITY THEOLOGY

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS CHRI 3311 Hermeneutics 3 CHRI 3301 or Old Testament Theology OR CHRI 3302 New Testament Theology 3 CHRI 3314 or History of Christianity OR CHRI 4335 Systematic Theology 3 CHRI XXXX Choose any 3 CHRI courses in Theology Studies (3 hrs each) 9 Theology Studies include but are not limited to the following: CHRI 3310 Introduction to Judaism – prerequisite CHRI 1313, 1323 CHRI 4320 The Bible and Religion in America – prerequisite CHRI 1313, 1323 CHRI 4345 Christian Ethics - prerequisite CHRI 1313, 1323 CHRI 4353 World Religion - prerequisite CHRI 1313, 1323 CHRI 4383 Baptist History - prerequisite CHRI 1313, 1323 CHRI 4381 Special Topics Total Hours in Minor 18

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HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - ECONOMICS

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS BUSA 2320 Legal Environment of Business 3 BUSA 3320 Business Ethics 3 ECON 2311 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ECON 2312 Principles of Macroeconomics (ECON 2311) 3 ECON 4312 Global Economy (ECON 2311, ECON 2312) 3 ECON 4330 Seminar on Law and Economics 3 ECON 4335 History of Economic Thought 3 Total Hours in Minor 21

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HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - ENGLISH

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS ENGL 3313 or CHOOSE ONE: 3 ENGL 3323 English Literature I OR English Literature II ENGL 3331 or CHOOSE ONE: 3 ENGL 3332 American Literature I OR American Literature II ENGL XXXX Any 12 hours(4 classes) from any Upper Level (3000 OR 4000) English courses. 12 Total Hours in Minor 18

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR – FAMILY STUDIES

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS SOCI 1313 Principles of Sociology 3 SOCI 3393 Childhood & Adolescence 3 SOCI 4373 The American Family 3 PSYC 2330 Human Sexuality 3 PSYC 3313 Human Growth & Development 3 COMM 4323 Interpersonal Communication 3

Total Hours in Minor 18

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - FINANCE

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS ECON 2311 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ACCT 2301 Principles of Accounting I 3 BUSA 2311 Quantitative Methods I (MATH 1313 or equivalent) 3 FINA 3315 Security Markets and Financial Institutions (FINA 3320) 3 FINA 3320 Corporate Finance (ACCT 2301, ECON 2311, BUSA 2311) 3 FINA 3330 or International Finance (FINA 3320) OR 3 FINA 4318 Corporate Financial Management (FINA 3320) FINA 4307 Investment Principles (FINA 3320) 3 Total Hours in Minor 21

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HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - GENERAL BUSINESS

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS ECON 2311 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ACCT 2301 Principles of Accounting I 3 BUSA 2311 Quantitative Methods I (MATH 1313 or equivalent) 3 BUSA 2320 Legal Environment of Business 3 FINA 3320 Corporate Finance (ACCT 2301, BUSA 2311, ECON 2311) 3 MGMT 3302 Principles of Management 3 MKTG 3301 Principles of Marketing (ECON 2311) 3 Total Hours in Minor 21

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HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - GOVERNMENT

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS GOVT 2334 American and Texas Government II : Campaigns, Elections and Political Behavior 3 GOVT 2343 Public Policy 3 GOVT 2360 Understanding Politics 3 GOVT 3348 American Political Thought 3 Six additional hours in upper-division GOVT courses. 6

Total Hours in Minor 18

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR – GREAT TEXTS

CATALOG YEAR: 2013-2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS ENGL 3373 Shakespeare 3 LATN 3301 Classical Mythology 3 HIST 3375 Great Texts in History 3 9 HOURS OF GREAT TEXTS ELECTIVES 9 Electives may include 3000 & 4000 level courses in English and History, or any courses that study great works in SPAN, LATN or Classics rubrics. Up to 6 hours can be taken from sub- 3000 level foreign language courses (in addition to the 6 hour Foreign Language LACC requirement). Alternative electives (up to 6 hours) in other disciplines include: ART: 3375, 3380 PHIL: 2333, 3344 SOCI: 4373 GOVT: 3345, 3348, 3353 Total Hours in Minor 18

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HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - HISTORY

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS Elective History Courses (12 hours) 12 HIST ALL existing upper level HIST courses including HIST 2303 Introduction to Historical Methods 3XXX/4XXXX Elective History and History Related Courses (6 hours) as approved by Advisor/Chair 6 3XXXX & 4XXXX All existing upper level HIST, GOVT, ENGL, and LATN courses, including additional lower / upper level language only courses.

Total Hours in Minor 18

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HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS ACCT 2301 Principles of Accounting I 3 ECON 2311 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ECON 4312 Global Economy (ECON 2311, ECON 2312) 3 MKTG 3301 Principles of Marketing (ECON 2311) 3 MGMT 3302 Principles of Management 3 MGMT 4335 Managing the Global Enterprise (MGMT 3302) 3 MKTG 4330 International Marketing (MKTG 3301) 3 ELECTIVE: Choose 1 course (3 hrs) from the following: GOVT 4353, BUSA 4301 or BUSA 4340 3 Total Hours in Minor 24

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HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - JOURNALISM & MASS COMMUNICATIONS

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS JMC 1313 History of American Journalism 3 JMC 1323 The Press and Democracy 3 JMC 1324 Fundamentals of Broadcasting 3 JMC 2414 Reporting and Writing I 4 ELECTIVES: Choose 2 courses (3 hrs) from the following: 6 JMC 3325 Principals of Public Relations JMC 3365 Video Production I JMC 3366 Video Production II JMC 4314 Feature Writing JMC 4315 Public Affairs Reporting JMC 4336 Principals of Advertising JMC 4367 Non-Linear Editing JMC 4373 Internship in Journalism and Mass Communication JMC 4392 Media Law JMC 4393 Media Ethics COMM 1323 Rhetoric and Public Speaking Total Hours in Minor 19

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HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - KINESIOLOGY

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS KINE 2202 Creating a Wellness Lifestyle 2 KINE 2310 Foundations of Kinesiology (This is a prerequisite for all 2000 & 4000 level KINE courses.) 3 KINE 2340 Health Psychology 3 KINE 2336 Strategies and Principles of Coaching 3 KINE 3210 Exercise Prescription (Must be taken along with KINE 3393) 2 KINE 3360 Administration in Sports and Kinesiology 3 KINE 3393 Physiology of Exercise (Prerequisite BIOL 2404 with a “C” or better) 3 Total Hours in Minor 19

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HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR – LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS Nine (9) hours of SPAN courses 9 HIST 3346 The History of Latin America 3 GOVT 4363 The Political Economy of Latin America 3 GOVT 4333 United States Foreign Policy 3 Total Hours in Minor 18

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HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - LATIN

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS LATN 2311 Intermediate Latin 3 Additional 3 LATN 3000-4000 courses (excluding LATN 3301) 9 ELECTIVES: Choose 2 courses (6 hrs) from the following list: 6 Any LATN 3000-4000 course (including LATN 3301) CHRI 3301 New Testament Theology CHRI 3310 Introduction to Judaism CHRI 3311 Hermeneutics CHRI 3314 History of Christianity CHRI 3333 The Teachings of Jesus CHRI 3344 Paul and His Letters ENGL 2366 Masterworks: The Epics GOVT 3345 Ancient / Medieval Political Thought HIST 3377 Ancient Greece HIST 3378 Ancient Rome HIST 3379 Late Antiquity LING 3310 General Linguistics PHIL 3323 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy PHIL 3350 Philosophy of Tragedy PHIL 4390 Great Philosophers and Their Works Total Hours in Minor 18

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - MANAGEMENT

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS ECON 2311 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ACCT 2301 Principles of Accounting I 3 MGMT 3302 Principles of Management 3 MGMT 3305 Organizational Behavior (MGMT 3302) 3 MGMT 3322 Human Resources Management (MGMT 3302) 3 MGMT 4323 Transformational Leadership & Change 3 ELECTIVE: Choose 1 course (3 hrs) from the following: BUSA 4301, BUSA 4340 or any upper level Business elective 3 Total Hours in Minor 21

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - MARKETING

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS ECON 2311 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ACCT 2301 Principles of Accounting I 3 MKTG 3301 Principles of Marketing (ECON 2311) 3 MKTG 3310 Consumer Behavior (MKTG 3301) 3 MKTG 4360 Marketing Strategy 3 ELECTIVES: BUSA 4301 + Any 1 MKTG class (3 hrs) 6 Total Hours in Minor 21

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HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - MATHEMATICS

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS MATH 1451 Calculus I – prerequisite MATH 1434 4 MATH 1452 Calculus II – prerequisite MATH 1451 4 MATH 2451 Calculus III – prerequisite MATH 1452 4 Choose 3 more MATH courses at 3000 or above (3 hrs each) not including MATH 3302, 3401, 4201, or special topic courses; but including at least one course in either Track 1 or Track 2. (See Math Major for Track 1 and Track 2 requirements.) 9 Total Hours in Minor 21

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - MUSIC

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS MUSI 1422, 1022** Theory I and Theory I Lab 4 MUSI 1423, 1023 Theory II and Theory II Lab 4 MUSI 2331, 2332, 3333, Choose 9 Hours from: Music Literature I & II; History I & II OR 3334 9 MUSI X11X Ensembles (at least 2 semesters) 2 MUSI 1143 Class Piano I 1 MUSI XXXX Additional 6 hours of upper level (3000 / 4000) MUSI electives (may NOT be Applied lessons or ensembles). 6 ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS: MUSI 0001 Forum Attendance (Must Pass at Least 3 semesters). Transfer students should review 0 current SoM Handbook policies for specific details. TOTAL HOURS IN MINOR 26

**Audition Theory Entrance Exam required….Depending on result of diagnostic exam administered prior to first day of class, students may need to enroll in and pass a Fundamentals of Theory course (MUSI 0222 or an approved course taken on-line or elsewhere) prior to eligibility for MUSI 1322 Theory I and MUSI 1122 Theory I Lab.

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - PHILOSOPHY

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS PHIL 3323 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy 3 PHIL 3344 Modern and Contemporary Philosophy 3 ELECTIVES: Any 4 Additional Upper Level PHIL courses (3000 or 4000) at 3 hrs each from PHIL 12 Total Hours in Minor 18

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - PHYSICS

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

LACC REQUIREMENTS FOR PHYSICS MINOR INCLUDE: MATH 1451 CHEM 2415 & 2416

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS PHYS 2413 Principles of Physics I – prerequisite MATH 1451 4 PHYS 2423 Principles of Physics II – prerequisite PHYS 2413 4 PHYS 2343 Introductory Theoretical Physics – prerequisite PHYS 2423, concurrent MATH 1452, consent of 3 instructor PHYS 3413 Modern Physics I – prerequisite PHYS 2343 or consent of instructor 4 PHYS 3313 Mechanics – prerequisite PHYS 2343, MATH 1452 3 PHYS 3323 Electricity and Magnetism – prerequisite PHYS 2343, MATH 1452 3 Total Hours in Minor 21

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - PSYCHOLOGY

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

NOTE: Psychology minors should take Biology as their natural science + lab in LACC.

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS PSYC 1313 General Psychology 3 PSYC 2364 Abnormal Psychology - prerequisite PSYC 1313 3 PSYC 3313 Human Growth and Development - prerequisite PSYC 1313 3 PSYC 4310 History and Theoretical Systems - prerequisite PSYC 1313 3 Choose 1 of the following: 3 PSYC 4322 Cognitive Psychology – prerequisite PSYC 1313 & BIOL PSYC 4353 Physiological Psychology – prerequisite PSYC 1313 & BIOL ELECTIVES: Choose 2 courses (6 hrs) from below (1 must be upper level & 1 must be lower level): 6 PSYC 2325 Dating & Intimate Relationships PSYC 2330 Human Sexuality PSYC 2340 Health Psychology – Also offered as KINE 2340 PSYC 3305 Psychology of Personality- prerequisite PSYC 1313 PSYC 4316 Child Psychopathology - prerequisite PSYC 1313 PSYC 4323 Theories of Counseling - prerequisite PSYC 1313 PSYC 4326 Psychology of Dying, Bereavement & Counseling PSYC 4330 Psychology of Learning PSYC 4332 Social Psychology PSYC 4334 Psychology of Religion PSYC 4360 Cultural Psychology - prerequisite PSYC 1313 Total Hours in Minor 21

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - SOCIOLOGY

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS SOCI 1313 Principles of Sociology 3 SOCI 3320 Social Change 3 SOCI 3323 History of Sociological Thought 3 SOCI 4332 Social Psychology 3 SOCI 4373 The American Family 3 COMM 4323 Intercultural Communications 3

Total Hours in Minor 18

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - SPANISH

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS SPAN 2314 Spanish Proficiency III 3 SPAN 2324 Spanish Proficiency IV 3 SPAN 3314 Advanced Spanish Proficiency I 3 SPAN 3324 Advanced Spanish Proficiency II 3 Choose 2 courses (6 hrs) from below: 6 SPAN 3046 Latin-American Literature SPAN 3047 The Art of Translation SPAN 3048 Medical Spanish I: Communication and Culture SPAN 3305 Individualized Spanish Proficiency SPAN 3306 Individualized Spanish Proficiency 2 SPAN 3307 Individualized Spanish Proficiency 3 SPAN 3308 Business Spanish SPAN 3321 Special Topics SPAN 3335 Spanish Writing Workshop SPAN 3336 Advanced Spanish Writing Workshop SPAN 3360 Spain in the Americas SPAN 3372 Spanish Film Studies SPAN 3374 Hispanic Popular Music SPAN 3376 Hispanic Women Writers SPAN 3378 Fantastic Literature SPAN 3380 Contemporary Drama SPAN 4305 Masterworks of Hispanic Literature and Culture SPAN 4306 Masterworks of Hispanic Literature and Culture 2 SPAN 4307 Masterworks of Hispanic Literature and Culture 3 SPAN 4313 Literature of Peninsular Golden Age Century SPAN 4324 Contemporary Spanish-American Literature SPAN 4343 Hispanic Cultural Perspectives SPAN 4344 Hispanic Cultural Perspectives Total Hours in Minor 18

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR – SPEECH COMMUNICATION

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS COMM 1323 Rhetoric & Public Speaking (or COMM 1313 The Communication Process) 3 (This is a prerequisite for all courses in this minor.) ELECTIVES: Choose 15 hrs from the following classes: 15 COMM 1101,2101,3101,4101 – Forensic Workshop (for Participation in Mock Trial-4 hrs/1 hr each) COMM 3324 Legal Communication COMM 3334 Argumentation and Advocacy COMM 4304 Interpersonal Communication COMM 4314 Great American Speeches COMM 4315 Political Communication COMM 4323 Intercultural Communication Total Hours in Minor 18

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - STUDIO ART

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS ART 1303 Art Methods and materials 3 ART 1313 Design 2D 3 ART 1323 Design 3D 3 ART 3353 Art History 1 - Prehistoric through Gothic 3 ART 3363 Art History 2 – Renaissance through Modern OR ART 3383 – European Heritage in Art History 3 ART XXXX Studio Art: (Choose 3 courses @ 3 hrs each / 4 hrs = 4000 level) ART 2391, 3391, 3392, 3393, 4491, 4492, 4493 Ceramics ART 2394, 3394, 3395, 3396, 4494, 4495, 4496 Drawing 10 / 11 ART 2397, 3397, 3398, 3399, 4497, 4498, 4499 Painting ART 2380, 3370, 3374, 3376, 4480, 4482, 4483 Printmaking ART 2384, 3384, 3386, 3389, 4484, 4485, 4486 Sculpture ART 2372, 3372, 4472 Water Media-Painting ART 3335 Color Theory ART 2387, 3387, 3388, 4487, 4488 Life Drawing ART 3355 Experimental Drawing ART 4464 Experimental Painting Total Hours in Minor 25 / 26

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN MINOR - WRITING

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

MINOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within Minor must be completed with a “C” or above. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS Choose 6 courses (18 hrs) from the following: (only 3 hrs. from JMC allowed) ENGL XXXX Any 1 Literature Courses (3 hours) from ENGL 2000, 3000, 4000 JMC 2414 Reporting and Writing I JMC 3414 Reporting and Writing II (JOUR 3314) JMC 3325 Principals of Public Relations (JOUR 3325) JMC 4314 Feature Writing (JOUR 4314) JMC 4336 Principals of Advertising (JOUR 4336 / MKTG 4336) WRIT 3121/ 3221/ 3321 Special Topics WRIT 3303 Elements of Professional Writing WRIT 3345 Technical Writing WRIT 3334 Life Writing WRIT 3350 Creative Writing: Non-fiction WRIT 3354 Creative Writing: Poetry WRIT 3355 Creative Writing: Fiction WRIT 3356 Playwriting and Screenwriting WRIT 3383 Advanced Grammar WRIT 4353 - 4358 Advanced Creative Writing WRIT 4364 Advanced Poetry Writing-prerequisite WRIT 3354, 3355 or permission of instructor WRIT 4365 Advanced Fiction Writing WRIT 4370 Grant Writing WRIT 4372 Information Design WRIT 4374 Rhetoric for Technical and Professional Writers WRIT 4376 Promotion & Persuasive Writing 18

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HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BBA) ACCOUNTING MAJOR

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I 3 PHIL 1310 Logic 3 GOVT 2313 American and Texas Government I 3 ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II 3 PHIL 1313 Introduction to Philosophy 3 GOVT 2320 Political Thought - Freedom’s Foundations 3 ENGL 2315 Great Works of Literature I or PSYC 1313 General Psychology or ART 2343 Art Appreciation or 3 3 3 ENGL 2325 Great Works of Literature II SOCI 1313 Principles of Sociology MUSI 1331 Music Appreciation CHRI 1313 Old Testament 3 HIST 2311 Western Civilization I 3 HIST 2313 U.S. History to 1877 3 CHRI 1323 New Testament 3 HIST 2312 Western Civilization II 3 HIST 2323 U.S. History from 1877 3 CHRI 2373 Christian Theology & Tradition 3 Natural Science and Lab (BIOL, CHEM, PHYS) 4 ECON 2310 History of Economic Thought 3 MATH 1313 College Algebra (required) 3 Total Hours in Liberal Arts Core 58

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within major must be completed with a “C” or higher. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS ACCT 2301 Principles of Accounting I 3 ACCT 2303 Principles of Accounting II (prerequisite ACCT 2301) 3 BUSA 1305 The World of Business 3 BUSA 2301 Business Math (prerequisite MATH 1313 or equivalent) 3 BUSA 2311 Quantitative Methods I (prerequisite MATH 1313 or equivalent) 3 BUSA 2320 Legal Environment of Business 3 BUSA 3320 Business Ethics 3 ECON 2311 Micro Economics 3 ECON 2312 Macro Economics (prerequisite ECON 2311) 3 FINA 3320 Corporate Finance (prerequisite ACCT 2301, BUSA 2311, ECON 2311) 3 MIS 2330 Principles of Business Technology (prerequisite ACCT 2301) 3 MGMT 3302 Principles of Management 3 MKTG 3301 Principles of Marketing (prerequisite ECON 2311) 3 BUSA 4399 Global Business Strategy (prerequisite FINA 3320, MGMT 3302 & MKTG 3301) 3 Total BBA Core Hours 42 ACCT 3303 Cost Accounting 3 ACCT 3304 Individual Income Tax 3 ACCT 3311 Intermediate Accounting I 3 ACCT 3312 Intermediate Accounting II 3 ACCT 3317 Accounting Information Systems 3 ACCT 4301 ** Advanced Accounting 3 ACCT 4302 ** Auditing 3 ACCT 4306 Government and Nonprofit Accounting 3 ACCT 4314 ** Taxation for Corporations and Other Entities 3 ACCT 4322 ** Advanced Auditing Issues 3 BUSA 4320 Business Law – Required only if accepted to enter the Master of Accountancy Program. ** If approved to enter the Master of Accountancy program these courses will be taken at the Masters level. Total Hours in Accounting 30 Total Hours 130

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (BS) ALL LEVEL ART WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATION

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I 3 PHIL 1310 Logic 3 MATH 1305 Math for Critical Thinking or higher 3 ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II 3 PHIL 1313 Introduction to Philosophy 3 GOVT 2313 American and Texas Government I 3 ENGL 2315 Great Works of Literature I or PSYC 1313 General Psychology or 3 3 ART 2343 Art Appreciation 3 ENGL 2325 Great Works of Literature II SOCI 1313 Principles of Sociology CHRI 1313 Old Testament 3 HIST 2311 Western Civilization I 3 HIST 2313 U.S. History to 1877 3 CHRI 1323 New Testament 3 HIST 2312 Western Civilization II 3 HIST 2323 U.S. History from 1877 3 CHRI 2373 Christian Theology & Tradition 3 Natural Science and Lab (BIOL, CHEM, PHYS) 4 Total Hours in Liberal Arts Core 52

ALL LEVEL ART WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATION: (All courses within major must be completed with a “C” or higher.) COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS PRE-EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: EDUC 2320 Learning and Development 3 EDUC 2330 Foundations of American Educational Thought 3 COURSES TAKEN AFTER ADMISSION TO TEACHER CERTIFICATION PROGRAM: EDBI 4304 Methods of Teaching English as a Second Language 3 EDRE 4330 Teaching Content Area Reading Skills 3 EDSP 4302 Survey of Exceptional Children 3 EDSP 4311 Diagnostic & Prescriptive Teaching for Exceptional Children 3 EDUC 4100 TExES State Certification Exam Preparation Seminar 1 EDUC 4301 Curriculum & Instruction for Elementary School 3 EDUC 4306 Educational Applications of Technology 3 EDUC 4320 Teaching Methodology for Secondary Teachers 3 EDUC 4400 Student Teaching Seminar 4 EDUC 4493/96 Student Teaching in Elementary Art AND Secondary Art (with appropriate placements) 8 All Level Art: ART 1303 Art Methods & Materials 3 ART 1313 Design I 3 ART 1323 Design II 3 ART 2380 Printmaking I 3 ART 2384 Sculpture I 3 ART 2391 Ceramics I 3 ART 2394 Drawing I 3 ART 2397 Painting I 3 ART 3305 Art for the Secondary School 3 INDC 4385 Essential Elements of the Fine Arts 3 Choose 3 additional classes (9 hrs) from the following Art History: ART 3353, 3363, 3373 or 3383 9 TOTAL HOURS 131

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (BS) KINESIOLOGY WITH ALL-LEVEL TEACHER CERTIFICATION

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I 3 PHIL 1310 Logic 3 MATH 1305 Math for Critical Thinking or higher 3 ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II 3 PHIL 1313 Introduction to Philosophy 3 GOVT 2313 American and Texas Government I 3 ENGL 2315 Great Works of Literature I or PSYC 1313 General Psychology or ART 2343 Art Appreciation or 3 3 3 ENGL 2325 Great Works of Literature II SOCI 1313 Principles of Sociology MUSI 1331 Music Appreciation CHRI 1313 Old Testament 3 HIST 2311 Western Civilization I 3 HIST 2313 U.S. History to 1877 3 CHRI 1323 New Testament 3 HIST 2312 Western Civilization II 3 HIST 2323 U.S. History from 1877 3 CHRI 2373 Christian Theology & Tradition 3 BIOL 2404 Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 Total Hours in Liberal Arts Core 52

KINESIOLOGY WITH ALL-LEVEL TEACHER CERTIFICATION: (All courses within major must be completed with a “C” or higher.) COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS PRE-EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: EDUC 2320 Learning and Development 3 EDUC 2330 Foundations of American Educational Thought 3 COURSES TAKEN AFTER ADMISSION TO TEACHER CERTIFICATION PROGRAM: EDBI 4304 Teaching English as a Second Language 3 EDRE 4330 Content Area Reading 3 EDSP 4302 Survey of Exceptional Children 3 EDSP 4311 Diagnostic & Prescriptive Teaching for Exceptional Children 3 EDUC 4100 TExES State Certification Exam Preparation Seminar 1 EDUC 4306 Educational Applications of Technology 3 EDUC 4301 Curriculum & Instruction for Elementary School 3 EDUC 4320 Teaching Methodology for Secondary Teachers 3 EDUC 4400 Student Teaching Seminar 4 EDUC 4484/85 Student Teaching in Elementary PE AND Secondary PE (with appropriate placement) 8 All-Level Kinesiology: KINE 2202 Creating a Wellness Lifestyle 2 KINE 2310 Foundations of Kinesiology 3 KINE 2334 Tests & Measurements in Kinesiology 3 KINE 2335 Sports and Fitness Activities 3 KINE 2336 Strategies & Principles of Coaching 3 KINE 3210 Exercise Prescription (Must be taken with KINE 3393) 2 KINE 3301 Prevention and Treatment of Sports Injuries 3 KINE 3393 Physiology of Exercise (Prerequisite BIOL 2404) 3 KINE 3395 Kinesiology: Applied Biomechanics (Prerequisite KINE 3393) 3 KINE 3398 Foundations of Health Instruction 3 KINE 4323 Motor Learning (Prerequisite KINE 3393) 3 KINE 4328 Wellness and Fitness in EC-12 Schools (requires field experience) 3 Total Hours 126

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN Master of Arts Degree Plan In Theological Studies Accelerated Degree Plan Concurrent with BA/BS degree with Undergraduate Major in Christianity

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

To earn an Accelerated Master of Arts in Theological Studies, 30 semester hours are required. Degree Requirements HOURS First 9-12 semester hours taken during your last 3 semesters of undergraduate studies at HBU may be from any of the following courses, with priority courses including 3 hours from CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURES I, II, III OR IV, 6 hours in Greek or Hebrew, or 6 – 9 hours in History, Theology and/or Philosophy. CHRI 5310 Christian Scripture I (Pentateuch and Wisdom Literature) 3 CHRI 5311 Hermeneutics 3 CHRI 5315 Christian Scripture II (Gospels and Acts) 3 CHRI 5330 History of Christianity 3 CHRI 5340 Biblical and Systematic Theology 3 CHRI 5350 The Theology of the New Testament 3 CHRI 5360 The Theology of the Old Testament 3 CHRI 6311 Philosophy and the Christian Faith 3 CHRI 6312 Church Ministry 3 CHRI 6313 Pastoral Care and Spiritual Formation 3 CHRI 6314 Missions and Evangelism 3 CHRI 6315 Christian Scripture III (Prophets) 3 CHRI 6320 Christian Scripture IV (Paul and His Letters; Hebrews to Revelation) 3 CHRI 6330, 6340, 6350 Christian Reading (Not to exceed 9 hours in Christian Reading) 3 – 9 CHRI 6333 Historical and Moral Theology 3 GREK 5301, 5302, 6301, 6303 Greek Studies (Not to exceed 6 hours in Greek Studies) 3 - 6 HEBR 5301, 5302, 6301, 6303 Hebrew Studies (Not to exceed 6 hours in Hebrew Studies) 3 - 6

In the remaining 18-21 hours, the student will fill out the core requirements of the program overall by taking 6 hours of biblical studies, 6 hours of theological studies, and 3 hours of philosophical or historical studies. Courses taken in the 9-12 hours as an undergraduate that correspond to the core requirements will be counted as meeting the core requirements. CHRI 6392 Thesis 3 CHRI 6393 Thesis 3 TOTAL HOURS 30 

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN BACHELOR OF ARTS (BA) CINEMA & NEW MEDIA ARTS MAJOR

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I 3 PHIL 1310 Logic 3 MATH 1305 Math for Critical Thinking or higher 3 ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II 3 PHIL 1313 Introduction to Philosophy 3 GOVT 2313 American and Texas Government I 3 ENGL 2315 Great Works of Literature I or 3 ART 2343 Art Appreciation or 3 3 HIST 2313 U.S. History to 1877 ENGL 2325 Great Works of Literature II MUSI 1331 Music Appreciation CHRI 1313 Old Testament 3 HIST 2323 U.S. History from 1877 3 One Foreign Language 6 CHRI 1323 New Testament 3 HIST 2311 Western Civilization I 3 Natural Science and Lab (BIOL, CHEM, PHYS) 4 CHRI 2373 Christian Theology & Tradition 3 HIST 2312 Western Civilization II 3 Total Hours in Liberal Arts Core 55

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within major must be completed with a “C” or higher. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS CNMA 1301 Cinematic Core Principles 3 CNMA 1302 The Art of Cinema & New Media 3 CNMA 1303 Collaboration & Problem-Solving 3 CNMA 2300 Faith & Culture in cinema & New Media 3 Choose a minimum of 6 hours (2 classes) from the following Specialized Courses: CNMA 2301 Writing for Cinema & New Media CNMA 2310 Cinematography & Production 6 CNMA 2303 Directing for Cinema & New Media CNMA 2312 Editing & Post-Production CNMA 2305 Producing for Cinema & New Media CNMA 2316 Production Design & Art Direction Choose a minimum of 16 hours from Media Studies: CNMA 3151 – CNMA 3199 Media Studies 16 Choose a minimum of 5 hours from the following Advanced Courses: CNMA 3301 Advanced Writing CNMA 3110, 3210, 3310 Cinematography Practicum CNMA 3303 Advanced Directing CNMA 3112, 3212, 3312 Sound / Visual Effects Practicum 5 CNMA 3305 Advanced Producing CNMA 3116, 3216, 3316 Production Design Practicum CNMA 3307 Advanced Editing CNMA 3125, 3225, 3325 Casting Practicum CNMA 3309 Documentary Filmmaking CNMA 3145, 3245, 3345 Internship Choose up to 4 hours from the following Electives: CNMA 4151 World-Building & Non-Linear Storytelling JMC 4392 Media Law CNMA 4152 Developing Technologies JMC 4393 Media Ethics CNMA 4325 Principles of Acting WRIT 3354 Creative Writing – Poetry 4 CNMA 4350 Advanced Film Theory WRIT 3355 Creative Writing – Fiction ART 3335 Color Theory WRIT 3356 Playwriting & Screenwriting JMC 4336 Principles of Advertising WRIT 4353-4358 Advanced Creative Writing Workshop CNMA 4300 Entertainment Business 3 CNMA 4390 Senior Project I 3 CNMA 4395 Senior Project II 3 Total Hours in Cinema & New Media Arts Major 52

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN BACHELOR OF ARTS (BA) MANAGERIAL STUDIES WITH A CONCENTRATION IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I 3 PHIL 1310 Logic 3 GOVT 2313 American and Texas Government I 3 ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II 3 PHIL 1313 Introduction to Philosophy 3 GOVT 2320 Political Thought - Freedom’s Foundations 3 ENGL 2315 Great Works of Literature I or PSYC 1313 General Psychology or ART 2343 Art Appreciation or 3 3 3 ENGL 2325 Great Works of Literature II SOCI 1313 Principles of Sociology MUSI 1331 Music Appreciation CHRI 1313 Old Testament 3 HIST 2311 Western Civilization I 3 HIST 2313 U.S. History to 1877 3 CHRI 1323 New Testament 3 HIST 2312 Western Civilization II 3 HIST 2323 U.S. History from 1877 3 CHRI 2373 Christian Theology & Tradition 3 Natural Science and Lab (BIOL, CHEM, PHYS) 4 ECON 2310 History of Economic Thought 3 MATH 1313 College Algebra (required) 3 Total Hours in Liberal Arts Core 58

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within major must be completed with a “C” or higher. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS ACCT 2301 Principles of Accounting I 3 BUSA 1305 The World of Business 3 BUSA 2311 Quantitative Methods I (prerequisite MATH 1313 or higher; CPE or CISM 1321) 3 BUSA 2320 Legal Environment of Business 3 BUSA 3320 Business Ethics 3 ECON 2311 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ECON 2312 Principles of Macroeconomics (prerequisite ECON 2311) 3 FINA 3320 Corporate Finance (prerequisite ACCT 2301, BUSA 2311, ECON 2311) 3 MIS 2330 Principles of Business Technology (prerequisite ACCT 2301) 3 MGMT 3302 Principles of Management 3 MKTG 3301 Principles of Marketing (prerequisite ECON 2311) 3 Total Hours in BBA Core 33 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS CONCENTRATION: BUSA 4301 International Business Trip Course 3 Choose 3 (9 hrs) from the following: 9 MGMT 4335 Managing the Global Enterprise MGMT 4315 Power & Negotiation FINA 3330 International Finance ECON 4312 Global Economy MKTG 4330 International Marketing Total Hours in International Bus Concentration 12 TOTAL HOURS IN MAJOR 103 Electives: To Total Required 125 hrs.

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN BACHELOR OF ARTS (BA) MANAGERIAL STUDIES WITH A CONCENTRATION IN MANAGEMENT

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I 3 PHIL 1310 Logic 3 GOVT 2313 American and Texas Government I 3 ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II 3 PHIL 1313 Introduction to Philosophy 3 GOVT 2320 Political Thought - Freedom’s Foundations 3 ENGL 2315 Great Works of Literature I or PSYC 1313 General Psychology or ART 2343 Art Appreciation or 3 3 3 ENGL 2325 Great Works of Literature II SOCI 1313 Principles of Sociology MUSI 1331 Music Appreciation CHRI 1313 Old Testament 3 HIST 2311 Western Civilization I 3 HIST 2313 U.S. History to 1877 3 CHRI 1323 New Testament 3 HIST 2312 Western Civilization II 3 HIST 2323 U.S. History from 1877 3 CHRI 2373 Christian Theology & Tradition 3 Natural Science and Lab (BIOL, CHEM, PHYS) 4 ECON 2310 History of Economic Thought 3 MATH 1313 College Algebra (required) 3 Total Hours in Liberal Arts Core 58

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within major must be completed with a “C” or higher. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS ACCT 2301 Principles of Accounting I 3 BUSA 1305 The World of Business 3 BUSA 2311 Quantitative Methods I (prerequisite MATH 1313 or higher; CPE or CISM 1321) 3 BUSA 2320 Legal Environment of Business 3 BUSA 3320 Business Ethics 3 ECON 2311 Micro Economics 3 ECON 2312 Macro Economics (prerequisite ECON 2311) 3 FINA 3320 Corporate Finance (prerequisite ACCT 2301, BUSA 2311, ECON 2311) 3 MIS 2330 Principles of Business Technology (prerequisite ACCT 2301) 3 MGMT 3302 Principles of Management 3 MKTG 3301 Principles of Marketing (prerequisite ECON 2311) 3 Total Hours in BBA Core 33 MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION: Choose 4 (12 hrs) from the following: MGMT 3305 Organizational Behavior MGMT 3316 Innovation & New Offering Development MGMT 3322 Human Resource Management MGMT 3336 Organizational Theory MGMT 4323 Transformational Leadership & Change MGMT 4335 Managing the Global Enterprise MGMT 4315 Power & Negotiation Total hours in Management Concentration 12 TOTAL HOURS IN MAJOR 103 Electives: To Total Required 125 hrs.

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN BACHELOR OF ARTS (BA) MANAGERIAL STUDIES WITH A CONCENTRATION IN MARKETING

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I 3 PHIL 1310 Logic 3 GOVT 2313 American and Texas Government I 3 ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II 3 PHIL 1313 Introduction to Philosophy 3 GOVT 2320 Political Thought - Freedom’s Foundations 3 ENGL 2315 Great Works of Literature I or PSYC 1313 General Psychology or ART 2343 Art Appreciation or 3 3 3 ENGL 2325 Great Works of Literature II SOCI 1313 Principles of Sociology MUSI 1331 Music Appreciation CHRI 1313 Old Testament 3 HIST 2311 Western Civilization I 3 HIST 2313 U.S. History to 1877 3 CHRI 1323 New Testament 3 HIST 2312 Western Civilization II 3 HIST 2323 U.S. History from 1877 3 CHRI 2373 Christian Theology & Tradition 3 Natural Science and Lab (BIOL, CHEM, PHYS) 4 ECON 2310 History of Economic Thought 3 MATH 1313 College Algebra (required) 3 Total Hours in Liberal Arts Core 58

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within major must be completed with a “C” or higher. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS ACCT 2301 Principles of Accounting I 3 BUSA 1305 The World of Business 3 BUSA 2311 Quantitative Methods I (prerequisite MATH 1313 or higher; CPE or CISM 1321) 3 BUSA 2320 Legal Environment of Business 3 BUSA 3320 Business Ethics 3 ECON 2311 Micro Economics 3 ECON 2312 Macro Economics (prerequisite ECON 2311) 3 FINA 3320 Corporate Finance (prerequisite ACCT 2301, BUSA 2311, ECON 2311) 3 MIS 2330 Principles of Business Technology (prerequisite ACCT 2301) 3 MGMT 3302 Principles of Management 3 MKTG 3301 Principles of Marketing (prerequisite ECON 2311) 3 Total Hours in BBA Core 33 MARKETING CONCENTRATION: MKTG 3310 Consumer Behavior 3 MKTG 4350 Marketing Research 3 MKTG 4360 Marketing Strategy 3 Choose 1 (3 hrs) from the following: 3 MKTG 3360 Professional Sales MKTG 3380 Online Marketing MKTG 4336 Principles of Advertising MKTG 4330 International Marketing MKTG 4340 Internship Total Hours in Marketing Concentration 12 TOTAL HOURS IN MAJOR 103 Electives: To Total Required 125 hrs.

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN BACHELOR OF ARTS (BA) MUSIC MAJOR

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I 3 Natural Science and Lab (BIOL, CHEM, PHYS) 4 ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II 3 MATH 1305 Math for Critical Thinking or higher 3 ENGL 2315 Great Works of Literature I 3 HIST 2313 U.S. History to 1877 3 ENGL 2325 Great Works of Literature II 3 HIST 2323 U.S. History from 1877 3 CHRI 1313 Old Testament 3 HIST 2311 Western Civilization I 3 CHRI 1323 New Testament 3 HIST 2312 Western Civilization II 3 CHRI 2373 Christian Theology & Tradition 3 One Foreign Language 6 PHIL 1313 Introduction to Philosophy 3 Upper Level General Education Electives (non-music) 9 GOVT 2313 American and Texas Government I 3 Total Hours in Liberal Arts Core 61

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within major must be completed with a “C” or higher. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS CORE REQUIREMENTS: 28 MUSI 1422, 1022 Theory I and Theory I Lab 4 MUSI 1423, 1023 Theory II and Theory II Lab 4 MUSI 2422, 2022 Theory III and Theory III Lab 4 MUSI 2423, 2023 Theory IV and Theory IV Lab 4 MUSI 2331 & 2332 Music Literature I & II 6 MUSI 3333 Music History I 3 MUSI 3322 or 3334 Theory V: Contemporary or Music History II 3 MAJOR APPLIED HOURS: 12 Primary: 12 Primary Applied (4 hours must be upper level) 12 Secondary: -- 0 COGNATE REQUIREMENTS: Skills, Literature, History, Pedagogy 16 MUSI 1143 Class Piano I 1 MUSI 1144 Class Piano II 1 MUSI 2XXX / 3XXX / 4XXX Music electives (12 hours, but at least 9 hours must be upper level—3XXX or 4XXX) (may NOT be Applied Lessons) 12 MUSI 4299 Senior Capstone 2 ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS: Transfer students should review current SoM Handbook policies for specific details. 8 MUSI 0001 Forum / Recital Attendance (Enroll EVERY Semester after declaring a BA Music major—Must Pass ALL but 1 semester) 0 MUSI 0003 Sophomore Review (Must Pass Before Earning 60 Credit Hours) 0 MUSI X11X Ensembles (Enroll EVERY Semester) 8 MUSI 3090 Performance Recital 0 Total Hours in Music Major 64

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN BACHELOR OF ARTS (BA) STUDIO ART MAJOR

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I 3 PHIL 1310 Logic 3 MATH 1305 Math for Critical Thinking or higher 3 ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II 3 PHIL 1313 Introduction to Philosophy 3 ECON 2310 History of Economic Thought 3 ENGL 2315 Great Works of Literature I 3 HIST 2313 U.S. History to 1877 3 ART 2398 Art Appreciation 3 ENGL 2325 Great Works of Literature II 3 HIST 2323 U.S. History from 1877 3 MUSI 1331 Music Appreciation 3 CHRI 1313 Old Testament 3 HIST 2311 Western Civilization I 3 GOVT 2313 American and Texas Government I 3 CHRI 1323 New Testament 3 HIST 2312 Western Civilization II 3 GOVT 2320 Political Thought-Freedom’s Foundations 3 CHRI 2373 Christian Theology & Tradition 3 Natural Science and Lab (BIOL, CHEM, PHYS) 4 One Foreign Language 6 Total Hours in Liberal Arts Core 67

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within major must be completed with a “C” or higher. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS ART 1303 Art Methods and Materials 3 ART 1313 Design 2-Dimensional 3 ART 1323 Design 3-Dimensional 3 ART 3353 Art History I – Prehistoric through Gothic 3 ART 3363 Art History II – Renaissance through Modern 3 ART 3373 History of Modern Art 3 ART XXXX Studio Art: (Choose 9 courses @ 3 hrs/4 hrs each) 27-36 ART 2391, 3391, 3392, 3393, 4491, 4492, 4493 Ceramics ART 2394, 3394, 3395, 3396, 4494, 4495, 4496 Drawing ART 2397, 3397, 3398, 3399, 4497, 4498, 4499 Painting ART 2380, 3370, 3374, 3376, 4480, 4482, 4483 Printmaking ART 2384, 3384, 3386, 3389, 4484, 4485, 4486 Sculpture ART 2372, 3372, 4472 Water Media-Painting ART 3335 Color Theory ART 2387, 3387, 3388, 4487, 4488 Life Drawing ART 3355 Experimental Drawing ART 4464 Experimental Painting ART 4392 Senior Seminar 3 Total Hours in Studio Art Major 48 - 57

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN BACHELOR OF ARTS (BA) INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES MAJOR

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I 3 PHIL 1310 Logic 3 GOVT 2313 American and Texas Government I 3 ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II 3 PHIL 1313 Introduction to Philosophy 3 GOVT 2320 Political Thought-Freedom’s Foundations 3 ENGL 2315 Great Works of Literature I or 3 PSYC 1313 General Psychology or 3 ART 2343 Art Appreciation or 3 ENGL 2325 Great Works of Literature II SOCI 1313 Principles of Sociology MUSIC 1331 Music Appreciation CHRI 1313 Old Testament 3 HIST 2311 Western Civilization I 3 HIST 2313 U.S. History to 1877 3 CHRI 1323 New Testament 3 HIST 2312 Western Civilization II 3 HIST 2323 U.S. History from 1877 3 CHRI 2373 Christian Theology & Tradition 3 Natural Science and Lab (BIOL, CHEM, PHYS) 4 ECON 2310 History of Economic Thought 3 MATH 1305 Math for Critical Thinking or higher 3 Total Hours in Liberal Arts Core 58

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within major must be completed with a “C” or higher. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS Total of 42 hours 42 At least 12 total upper level hours in chosen concentration(s) (3000 or 4000 level courses) Minimum of 18 hours in chosen concentration(s). Choose one or two concentrations. Concentration 1: Humanities (For Example: Communications, English, Languages, Journalism, Christianity, History, Geography, Philosophy, Government, Art, Music) Concentration 2: General Math & Science (For Example: Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Sociology, Math, Psychology, Nursing, Kinesiology, Education, Criminal Justice, Social Work, Military Science) Concentration 3: Business (For Example: Accounting, Business, Economics, Management, Marketing, Finance) Electives to make up 125 hours. Total Hours in Major 42

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (BS) BIOCHEMISTRY/MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (BCMB) MAJOR

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I 3 PHIL 1310 Logic 3 GOVT 2313 American and Texas Government I 3 ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II 3 PHIL 1313 Introduction to Philosophy 3 GOVT 2320 Political Thought-Freedom’s Foundations 3 ENGL 2315 Great Works of Literature I or PSYC 1313 General Psychology or ART 2343 Art Appreciation or 3 3 3 ENGL 2325 Great Works of Literature II SOCI 1313 Principles of Sociology MUSI 1331 Music Appreciation CHRI 1313 Old Testament 3 HIST 2311 Western Civilization I 3 HIST 2313 U.S. History to 1877 3 CHRI 1323 New Testament 3 HIST 2312 Western Civilization II 3 HIST 2323 U.S. History from 1877 3 CHRI 2373 Christian Theology & Tradition 3 CHEM 2415 General Chemistry I 4 ECON 2310 History of Economic Thought 3 MATH 1451 Calculus I 4 Total Hours in Liberal Arts Core 59

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within major must be completed with a “C” or higher. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS CHEM 2415 General Chemistry I (Taken as part of LACC) -- CHEM 2416 General Chemistry II (Pre-Req. CHEM 2415) 4 CHEM 3313 Organic Chemistry I (Pre-Req. CHEM 2416) 3 CHEM 3131 Organic Chemistry I Lab 1 CHEM 3333 Organic Chemistry II (Pre-Req. CHEM 3313) 3 CHEM 3132 Organic Chemistry II Lab 1 CHEM 4373 Biochemistry (Pre-Req. CHEM 3333) 3 MATH 1451 Calculus I (Taken as part of LACC) -- PHYS 2413 Physics I (Pre-Req. MATH 1451) 4 PHYS 2423 Physics II (Pre-Req. PHYS 2413) 4 BIOL 2454 General Biology I (SAT 1040) 4 BIOL 2455 General Biology II (Pre-Req. General Bio I) 4 BIOL 3301 (2353) Cell & Molecular Biology (Pre-Req. General Bio I, Gen Bio II & General Chem I) 3 BIOL 3444 Genetics (Pre-Req. Cell & Molecular Biology) 4 BCMB 3414 Microbiology (Pre-Req. Cell & Molecular Biology) 4 BCMB 4424 Molecular Biology (Pre-Req. Cell & Molecular Biology and Genetics) 4 BCMB 4111 Bioanalytical Methods (CHEM 4373 or concurrent, Cell & Molecular Biology) 1 BCMB 4272 Integrating Biological Concepts (Pre-Req. Genetics, Microbiology) 2 BCMB Electives (Choose 7 or 8 hours from the following) - All require Pre-Req. Cell & Mol. Bio, Genetics 7 / 8 BCMB 4324, 4363, 4375, 3375, 4444, 4464 BCMB Lab Techniques (Choose one of these @ 2 hours) - All require Pre-Req. Genetics, Microbiology 2 BCMB 4292, 4294, 4297(cross-list BIOL 4297) Electives: To Total Required 125 hrs. Total Hours in BCMB 58 - 59

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS (BFA) STUDIO ART MAJOR

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I 3 PHIL 1310 Logic 3 MATH 1305 Math for Critical Thinking or higher 3 ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II 3 PHIL 1313 Introduction to Philosophy 3 GOVT 2313 American and Texas Government I 3 ENGL 2315 Great Works of Literature I or 3 ART 2343 Art Appreciation or 3 3 HIST 2313 U.S. History to 1877 ENGL 2325 Great Works of Literature II MUSI 1331 Music Appreciation CHRI 1313 Old Testament 3 HIST 2323 U.S. History from 1877 3 One Foreign Language 6 CHRI 1323 New Testament 3 HIST 2311 Western Civilization I 3 Natural Science and Lab (BIOL, CHEM, PHYS) 4 CHRI 2373 Christian Theology & Tradition 3 HIST 2312 Western Civilization II 3 Total Hours in Liberal Arts Core 55

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within major must be completed with a “C” or higher. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS ART 1303 Art Methods and Materials 3 ART 1313 Design 2-Dimensional 3 ART 1323 Design 3-Dimensional 3 ART 333_ (ART 3330, 3331 or 3332) Gallery and Museum Practices 3 ART 3353 Art History I – Prehistoric through Gothic 3 ART 3363 Art History II – Renaissance through Modern 3 ART 3373 History of Modern Art 3 ART 3375 Art of the Renaissance OR ART 3383 – European Heritage in Art History 3 ART 3380 American Art 3 ART XXXX Studio Art: (Choose 14 courses @ 3 hrs/4 hrs each) 42 - 56 ART 2391, 3391, 3392, 3393, 4491, 4492, 4493 Ceramics ART 2394, 3394, 3395, 3396, 4494, 4495, 4496 Drawing ART 2397, 3397, 3398, 3399, 4497, 4498, 4499 Painting ART 2380, 3370, 3374, 3376, 4480, 4482, 4483 Printmaking ART 2384, 3384, 3386, 3389, 4484, 4485, 4486 Sculpture ART 2372, 3372, 4472 Water Media-Painting ART 3335 Color Theory ART 2387, 3387, 3388, 4487, 4488 Life Drawing ART 3355 Experimental Drawing ART 4464 Experimental Painting ART 4461 Apprenticeship I, ART 4462 Apprenticeship II, ART 4463 Apprenticeship III – Courses require prior approval. ART 4392 Senior Seminar 3 Total Hours in Studio Art Major 72 - 98

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN BACHELOR OF ARTS (BA) BIBLICAL LANGUAGES MAJOR

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I 3 PHIL 1310 Logic 3 MATH 1305 Math for Critical Thinking or higher 3 ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II 3 PHIL 1313 Introduction to Philosophy 3 ECON 2310 History of Economic Thought 3 ENGL 2315 Great Works of Literature I 3 HIST 2313 U.S. History to 1877 3 ART 2343 Art Appreciation 3 ENGL 2325 Great Works of Literature II 3 HIST 2323 U.S. History from 1877 3 MUSI 1331 Music Appreciation 3 CHRI 1313 Old Testament 3 HIST 2311 Western Civilization I 3 GOVT 2313 American and Texas Government I 3 CHRI 1323 New Testament 3 HIST 2312 Western Civilization II 3 GOVT 2320 Political Thought-Freedom’s Foundations 3 CHRI 2373 Christian Theology & Tradition 3 Natural Science and Lab (BIOL, CHEM, PHYS) 4 One Foreign Language 6 Total Hours in Liberal Arts Core 67

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within major must be completed with a “C” or higher. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS HEBR 2312 Hebrew Grammar I 3 HEBR 2322 Hebrew Grammar II 3 HEBR 3311 Hebrew Reading & Syntax I 3 HEBR 4351 Hebrew Reading & Syntax II 3 HEBR 4352 Directed Studies in Hebrew 3 LING 3310 General Linguistics 3 GREK 2312 Greek Grammar I 3 GREK 2322 Greek Grammar II 3 GREK 3311 Greek Reading & Syntax I 3 GREK 4351 Greek Reading & Syntax II 3 GREK 4352 Directed Studies in Greek 3 HEBR 4393 Senior Seminar : Advanced Reading 3 Total Hours in Biblical Languages Major 36

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (BS) BIOLOGY MAJOR

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I 3 PHIL 1310 Logic 3 GOVT 2313 American and Texas Government I 3 ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II 3 PHIL 1313 Introduction to Philosophy 3 GOVT 2320 Political Thought-Freedom’s Foundations 3 ENGL 2315 Great Works of Literature I or PSYC 1313 General Psychology or ART 2343 Art Appreciation or 3 3 3 ENGL 2325 Great Works of Literature II SOCI 1313 Principles of Sociology MUSI 1331 Music Appreciation CHRI 1313 Old Testament 3 HIST 2311 Western Civilization I 3 HIST 2313 U.S. History to 1877 3 CHRI 1323 New Testament 3 HIST 2312 Western Civilization II 3 HIST 2323 U.S. History from 1877 3 CHRI 2373 Christian Theology & Tradition 3 CHEM 2415 General Chemistry I 4 ECON 2310 History of Economic Thought 3 MATH 1313 College Algebra or higher 3 Total Hours in Liberal Arts Core 58

COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS: CHEM 2415 General Chemistry I (taken as part of LACC) --- CHEM 2416 General Chemistry II 4

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within major must be completed with a “C” or higher. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS BIOL 2454 General Biology I (Pre-Req. 1040 SAT) 4 BIOL 2455 General Biology II (Pre-Req. General Biology I) 4 BIOL 3301 (2353) Cell & Molecular Biology (Pre-Req. Gen Bio I, Gen Bio II & Gen Chem I ) 3 BIOL 3414 Microbiology (Pre-Req. Cell & Molecular Biology) 4 BIOL 3444 Genetics (Pre-Req. Cell & Molecular Biology) 4 BIOL 4272 Integrating Biological Concepts (Pre-Req. Genetics, Microbiology) 2 BIOL 4297 Research in Biology (Pre-Req. Genetics, Microbiology) 2 BIOLOGY ELECTIVES (18-20 HRS) CHOOSE 5 FROM THE CATEGORIES AS INDICATED. 18 / 20 3 OF THE 5 MUST CONTAIN LABS: Systems Category (Choose 1) – All Require Pre-Req. General Biology II, Cell & Molecular Biology BIOL 3433, BIOL 3454, BIOL 3456, BIOL 3464 – 4 Hours Each Advanced Microbiology Category (Choose 1) – All Require Pre-Req. Cell & Molecular Biology and Genetics BIOL 4363 – 3 Hours BIOL 4424, BIOL 4444, BIOL 4464 – 4 Hours Each Biology Specialties Category (Choose 2) – All Require Pre-Req. of Cell & Molecular Biology BIOL 3335, 3375, 4324, 4325, 4375– 3 Hours Each BIOL 3434, 4423, 4425, 4433, 4443 – 4 Hours Each Choose 1 additional elective from any of the above categories for a total of 5. Electives: To Total Required 125 hrs. Total Hours in Biology 45 - 47

HOUSTON BAPTIST UNIVERSITY DEGREE PROGRAM PLAN BACHELOR OF MUSIC (BM) CHURCH MUSIC MAJOR

CATALOG YEAR: 2013/2014 HBU.edu/catalog

COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs COURSES Hrs ENGL 1320 Writing for Wisdom I 3 Natural Science and Lab (BIOL, CHEM, PHYS) 4 ECON 2310 History of Economic Thought 3 ENGL 1330 Writing for Wisdom II 3 MATH 1305 Math for Critical Thinking or higher 3 PHIL 1313 Introduction to Philosophy 3 ENGL 2315 Great Works of Literature I OR HIST 2311 Western Civilization I 3 GOVT 2313 American and Texas Government I 3 ENGL 2325 Great Works of Literature II 3 HIST 2312 Western Civilization II 3 GOVT 2320 Political Thought - Freedom’s Foundations 3 CHRI 1313 Old Testament 3 CHRI 2373 Christian Theology & Tradition 3 One Foreign Language 6 CHRI 1323 New Testament 3 Total Hours in Liberal Arts Core 49

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: All courses within major must be completed with a “C” or higher. COURSE NO. COURSE NAME HOURS CORE REQUIREMENTS: 28 MUSI 1422, 1022 Theory I and Theory I Lab 4 MUSI 1423, 1023 Theory II and Theory II Lab 4 MUSI 2422, 2022 Theory III and Theory III Lab 4 MUSI 2423, 2023 Theory IV and Theory IV Lab 4 MUSI 2331 & 2332 Music Literature I & II 6 MUSI 3333 & 3334 Music History I & II 6 MAJOR APPLIED HOURS: 19 Primary: