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COMMUNICATIONS

A CONTINUING BIBLIOGRAPHY

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NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION .J I I, i

This bibliography was prepared by the Scientific and Technical Information Facility operated for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration by Documentation Incorporated ~ ~~~

NASA SP-7004 (01)

COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES

A CONTINUING BIBLIOGRAPHY

A selection of annotated references to unclas- sified reports and journal articles that were introduced into the NASA Information System during the period May 1964-January 1965.

Scientific and Technical In formotion Division NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION WASHINGTON, D.C. APRIL 1965 This document is available from the Clearinghouse for Federal Scientific and Technical Information (OTS), Springfield, Virginia, 22 1 5 1 , for $1 .OO INTRODUCTION

With the publication of this first supplement, NASA SP-7004 (Ol), to the Continuing Bibliography on “Communications Satellites” (SP-7004), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration continues its program of distributing selected references to reports and articles on aerospace topics that are currently under intensive study. The references are assembled in this form to provide a convenient source of information for use by scientists and engineers who need this kind of specialized compilation. Continuing Bibliographies are updated periodically by supplements which can be appended to the original issue. All references included in SP-7004 (01) have been announced in either Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (STAR)or International Aerospace Abstracts (IAA) and were introduced into the NASA information system during the period May, 1964-January, 1965. The transmission of information by means of communications satellites is a new tech- nique that promises to be a powerful stimulus for effective international cooperation in the investigation of space. In their flexibility of design, communications satellites also offer a multitude of opportunities for commercial and industrial development. The contents of this bibliography exemplify this diversity by including references to such topics as television , telemetry, outer-space systems, multistation systems, and medium-height, random- systems. The economic and legal implications of communications systems are represented. References are also included which describe the history and opera- tion of individual satellites such as Advent, Courier, Echo, Relay, Score, Syncom, and Tel- star, as well as several satellites used for meteorological studies. Each entry in the bibliography consists of a citation and an abstract. The listing of en- tries is arranged in two major groups. Report literature references are contained in the first group and are subdivided according to their date of announcement in STAR. The second group includes journal and book references, subdivided according to their date of announce- ment in IAA. A subject index and a personal author index are included.

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STAR Series (N64, N65)

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IAA Series (A64, A65) All articles listed are available from the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astro- nautics, Technical Information Service. Individual and Corporate AI AA Members in the United States and Canada may borrow publications without charge. Interlibrary loan privileges are extended to the libraries of government agencies and of academic non- profit institutions in the United States and Canada. Loan requests may be made by mail, , telegram, or in person. Additional information about lending, photocopying, and reference service will be furnished on request. Address all inquiries to:

Technical Information Service American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc. 750 Third Avenue, New York 17. New York For further details please consult the Introductions to STAR and IAA, respectively. TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page 1964 STAR Entries (N64 Series) ...... 1 1965 STAR Entries (N65 Series) ...... 10 1964 IAA Entries (A64 Series) ...... 13 1965 IAA Entries (A65 Series) ...... 29

Subject Index ...... 1-1 Personal Author Index ...... 1-17

... Ill COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES a continuing bibliography APRIL 1965

H R Erhardt G Gerson and D C Mead In IEEE New Links to New Worlds 1963 Natl Space Electron Symp 119631 33 p refs (See N64 16151 08 08) The Advanced SYNCOM Communication Sys- tem approaches the optimum antenna pattern for a synchro nous satellite while maintaining the control system simplicity of spin stabilization This pattern a cone which lust covers 1964 the earth is achieved by the use of a 16 element The beam which is used for transmitting from the satellite to the earth is held stationary in earth-satellite coordinates by N64-15864' National Aeronautics and Space Administration electronically spinning the beam at spin speed in Marshall Space Flight Center Huntsville Ala a direction opposite to spacecraft rotation For the power MOTION OF THE SUB-SATELLITE POINT FOR 24-HOUR levels used in the SYNCOM system the power put into the phased array control circuits gives an increase in effective Walter H Stafford Carmen R Catalfamo and Sam H Harlin radiated power that is an order of magnitude greater than 22Aug 1963 50p refs could be obtained by putting the same power directly into the transmitters Author (NASA TM X-54564 MTP-P&VE F-63-13] OTS $460 ph $1 70 mf The effects of small changes in eccentricity inclination N64-16161 Corp of America New York N Y and argument of perigee on the motion of the subsatellite TECHNIQUES FOR DIGITAL COMMUNICATION VIA SATEL- point for 24-hour orbits were investigated The eccentricity LITES was varied from 00 to 0 1 inclination from 20" to 90" and F Assadourian and E M Bradburd In IEEE New Links to New argument of perigee from 0" to 90" Two additional values for Worlds 1963 Natl Space Electron Symp 119631 8 p refs the argument of perigees 135" and 180" were used in one (See N64 16151 08 08) case for comparison The results show graphically the delta Synchronization techniques are treated for digital trans longitude and latitude of the subsatellite point Author mission over subsynchronous and synchronous satellite links that form a part of general communication networks intercon- necting several nodes that perform functions The N64-16156 BellTelephone Labs, Inc , Murray Hill. N J primary emphasis is on bit synchronization and identification ELECTRONICS IN THE SATELLITE on a link basis A bit transport equation is developed to relate R C Chapman and E J Reid In IEEE New Links to New numbers ot transmitted and received pulses with variable Worlds 1963 Natl Space Electron Symp [19631 7 p refs path delays taken into account When differences between (See N64-16151 08-08) clocks at the ends of a link are included the result is useful The telemetry and command portions of the TELSTAR in determining storage requirements for time buffering that system provide necessary support functions for the basic com- can be inserted to maintain bit synchronization In the case munications experiment and the radiation experiment The of subsynchronous satellites handover techniques are dis telemetry system uses a VHF carrier to transmit encoded cussed for the preservation of bit integrity during switching information from the satellite Data on 112 items are provided from one satellite to the next Author once each minute By means of the command system the states of 9 magnetic latching relays in the satellite are con- trolled from the ground Commands are sent to the satellite N64-16163 Philco Corp Philadelphia Pa by coded modulated on a carrier also in the VHF RANDOM ACCESS STATIONARY SATELLITE RELAY COM- band This paper describes the overall telemetry and command MUNICATION SYSTEM systems and discusses in some detail the design of the com- Z Prihar In IEEE New Links to New Worlds 1963 Natl Space mand decoder It also describes the command malfunction of Electron Symp 119631 21 p ref (See N64 16151 0808) the first TELSTAR satellite and its subsequent recovery A (PCE R 11 52 0020A condensed] brief description of the operation of the second TELSTAR The paper discusses a method of operation of a random satellite is also included Author access communication system via active stationary satellite relays Following a discussion of the proposed instructions and their flow the operation of the Control Center is analyzed

N64-16157 Hughes Aircraft Co , Culver City. Calif Two service channel transmission speeds have been con THE ADVANCED SYNCOM COMMUNICATION ANTENNA sidered-50 bits per second and 1 200 bits per second Using SYSTEM- A DIRECTIVE ARRAY FOR A SPIN-STABILIZED an assumed list of channel requirements the predicted number SATELLITE of service channels has been computed Queuing (waiting line)

1

N64-21141

N64-19618' Radiation Inc Melbourne Fla The nature of the conflict between establishing and operat REFLECTIVITY CHARACTERISTICS OF ECHO BALLOONS ing international communications satellites and establishing Final Report and operating commercial domestic industries is examined The Oct 1962 66 p ref economic factors of differing cost and price are stressed A W (NASA Contract NAS5 890) (NASA CR 53827) OTS $6 60 ph Scale-model techniques were used to measure the bi- N64-20511 RAND Corp Santa Monica Calif static response to the Echo I and ll balloons with the primary AIDS FOR THE GROSS DESIGN OF SATELLITE COM- effort being devoted to Echo II Test frequencies of 3 000 and MUN ICATION SYSTEMS 9 600 mc/s simulate data at 55 5 178 and 890 mc/s Meas G M Northrop Aug 1963 43 p refs urements were made using vertical and horizontal polarizations (P 2785) for several bistatic angles and three model orientations The re A malority of the computational aids such as charts sults of the measurements indicate that in general the Echo II and nomographs that are applicable to the gross design of balloon is a good bistatic reflector at the frequencies simulated satellite communication systems are presented Pertinent de Monostatic and bistatic measurements were made on the sign equations are introduced and discussed briefly with Dodecahedron balloon at 9 600 mc's The results indicate a special emphasis placed on the limitations of the equations highdegiee of scintillation and a large variation of median and ranges of the parameters The utility of these computa cross section for both monostatic and bistatic measurements tional aids is demonstrated in the solutions of some simple the Dodecahedron did not increase the average radar cross satellite communication system design and analysis prob section over the response of a comparable sphere Prelimi lems RTK nary efforts on a spherical cap type reflector for the purpose of determining the feasibility of using a segment of a sphere to simulate the whole sphere indicate that any conducting N64-21136' National Aeronautics and Space Administration structure behind the cap can be expected to change the response Washington D C of the cap The possibility exists of dimensioning the cap to PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONFERENCE ON THE LAW OF provide a response greater than that possible using a sphere SPACE AND OF SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS of the same radius if proper stabilization could be provided 1964 212 p refs A Part of the 3rd Natl Conf on the Peaceful and the frequency band is restricted R LK Uses of Space, Chicago May 1-2 1963 held in co-operation with Northwestern U (NASA-SP-44) GPO $1 50 N64-19971 IlTCommunication Systems Inc Paramus N J PARAMETRIC ANALYSIS OF MEDIUM-ALTITUDE ACTIVE CONTENTS AND PASSIVE COMMUNICATION SATELLITES 20 Sep 1963 21 1 p refs Prepared by General Electric Co PART I THE LAW OF SPACE Syracuse N Y 1 THE EMERGING CUSTOMARY LAW OF SPACE (Contract AF 19(626)-5) Myres S Mc Dougal (Yale U ) p 2-33 refs (See N64-21137 (ICs 63 TR 250 ESD TDR-63-677 AD 42831 1) 14 01) Medium altitude active and passive satellite communication 2 THE FREEDOM OF OUTER SPACE SOME systems are compared technically and economically for use in PROBLEMS OF SOVEREIGNTY CONTROL AND JURIS a military communications network Factors considered are DICTION John A Johnson p 34-57 refs (See N64-21139 current technology operational complexity and information 14-01) transfer capability Active and passive satellite models repre- 3 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION AND SPACE sentative of the current state-of-the art are defined and simple mathematical models provide weight and cost variations for the Abram Chayes (State Dept) p 58-76 (See N64-21140 14- models as a function of satellite capabilities Satellite perform- 01) ance orbital altitude and inclination angle are allowed to vary It appears that networks having a small number of ground PART II COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES AND THE LAW stations favor passive systems As the number of ground sta- 4 IMONOPOLY AND ANTITRUST ASPECTS OF COM- tions is increased active systems are likely to be more advan- MUNICATIONS SATELLITE OPERATIONS Bennett Boskey tageous Small satellites seem to be favored for both active (Volpe and Boskey) p 80-1 10 refs (See N64-21141 14 01) and passive systems R LK 5 REGULATION IN ORBIT ADMINISTRATIVE ASPECTS OF 1HE ACT OF 1962 Victor G Rosenblum (Northwestern U) p 111-153 N64-20005' National Aeronautics and Space Administration refs (See N64-21142 14 01) Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt Md 6 SOME INTERNATIONAL ASPECTS OF COMMUNI- STEREO PHOTOGRAPHY OF THE ECHO II BALLOONS CATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEMS Samuel D Estep (Mich- NUMBERS 9. 11, AND 13 AT LAKEHURST, NEW JERSEY igan U ) p 154-196 refs (SeeN64-21143 14-01) Sol H Genatt Nov 1963 23 p 7 APPENDIX COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE ACT (NASATMX-51654 X 524-63-259) OTS $2 60 OF 1962 p 197 A description is given of the equipment and technique used to determine the deviation from sphericity of the skin of three Echo I1 balloon satellites at varying skin pressures Diagrams and photographs illustrate the instrumental setup N64-21141" Volpe and Boskey Washington D C and the results of the stereophotography Author MONOPOLY AND ANTITRUST ASPECTS OF COMMUNI- CATIONS SATELLITE 0 PER AT1 ONS Bennett Boskey In NASA Washington Proc of the Conf N64-20273 RAND Corp Santa Monica Calif on the Law of Space and of Satellite Communications 1964 JOINT COST AND PRICE DISCRIMINATION: THE CASE p80 110 refs (See N64 21136 14 01) GPO S1 50 OF COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES The monopoly and antitrust aspects of activities to be Leland L Johnson Jul 1963 32 p refs carried out under the Communications Satellite Act of 1962 are (P-2753.1) discussed The aspects of this legislation that are likely to give

3 , N64-21142 i - rise to controversy are outlined Also discussed are the regu The transportable terminal consists of a van mounted latory system checks and balances procurement matters 10 kw X band transmitter and an S band tracking-communi- foreign negotiations service rates and the role of Congress cations receiver with related auxiliary equipment This in- in respect to this legislation RTK cludes antenna pedestal servodrive equipment an optical tracker-director data recording equipment etc The antenna is a sectionalized demountable 30-ft paraboloid with pedestal N64-21142' Northwestern U Evanston Ill and integral trailer bed for road transportability The feed R E u LAT I 0 i\i i i\i 0 ii B iT AD ivi i ii i SiFi AT i V E ASP E CiS sysieim of ihe Cabbeyidiii type employs d 5 ii dial-1-1 hypeibuiuid OF THE COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE ACT OF 1962 mirror with disc-on rod feed elements located near the parab- Victor G Rosenblum In NASA Washington Proc of the oloid vertex Unit tests and integration tests have been made Conf on the Law of Space and of Satellite Communications to determine the capabilities of the equipment supplied Such 1964 p 111 153 refs (See N64 21136 1401) GPO $1 50 data are included in this report Author Examination of the Communications Satellite Act from administrative perspectives suggests three broad problem areas for analysis The first relates to clarity of draftsman N64-22020' National Aeronautics and Space Administration ship and demands a detailed exploration of the ambiguities Langley Research Center Langley Station Va intentional and otherwise that are found in the act The second THE ECHO I INFLATION SYSTEM focuses on the role of the Executive who is given unprece Dewey L Clemmons Jr Washington NASA Jun 1964 56 P dented power in a peacetime measure The third centers on the refs conflicts that may arise among the various agencies and de (NASA TN D 2194) OTS $1 50 partments that nave a role to play in the administration of the A study was made to determine the feasibility and selec act RTK tion of a subliming compound to be used as an inflation sys tem for the Echo I satellite Primary considerations were given to the compatibility of such a system wlth payload weight limitations storage in satellite internal pressure requirements N64-21143' Michigan U Ann Arbor and the minimum length of time that the inflation need be sus SOME INTERNATIONAL ASPECTS OF COMMUNICA- tained Calculations were made to determine the temperature TIONS SATELLITE SYSTEMS variations of the satellite while in sunlight and shadow the Samuel D Estep In NASA Washington Proc of the Conf deforming loads present in the environment of space the on the Law of Space and of Satellite Communications 1964 effects of micrometeoroids with regard to holes punctured in p 154 196 refs (See N64 21136 14-01) GPO $1 50 the satellite the method of selecting the proper subliming Some of the problems that will be faced in making policy compound and the pressure time history and mass flow rate decisions concerning establishment of the communications of the inflation vapors Subliming organic compounds lend Satellite system are presented Some of the legal problems themselves very well to the initial inflation of large thin wall that may arise from the international negotiations necessary spherical configurations in orbit above the earth s atmosphere to establish this service are discussed Various legal economic and pressure sustenance can be achieved for periods of the and political aspects of the communications satellite system order of a few weeks A comparison between the predicted are also discussed RTK performance of the inflation system and that inferred by experi mental scattering of signals by the satellite is dis cussed the sphericity of the satellite began to degrade after a period of 6 to 12 days after launch Author N64-21264' National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt Md THE RANGE AND RANGE RATE SYSTEM AND DATA N64-23728 Schleldahl (G T ) Co Northfield Minn ANALYSIS FOR SYNCOM I (1963 4A) DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF INFLATABLE AND H W Shaffer W D Kahn W J Bodin Jr G C Kronmiller R I G ID I2A B LE PASSIV E COMM U N I CAT ION SAT E LLlT ES P D Engles et al Washington NASA Jun 1964 24 p refs (ECHO I AND ECHO 11) (NASA TN D 2139) OTS $075 In AFSC Aerospace Expandable Struct Mar 1964 p 576 A range and range rate system similar to the Goddard 604 (See N64 23701 16 01) Range and Range Rate System was used to track the Syn A study is made of the design and fabrication of inflatable com I through the transfer ellipse until the apogee kick motor and rigidizable passive communication satellites (Echo I and fired This report discusses the Syncom Range and Range Rate Echo II) Further study to reduce the weight of these com System operation and the data processing The standard devia munication satellites is under way One technique employs tions achieved were 15 49 m in range and 0 05 m/sec in range a lenticular shape reflector that is oriented by means of gravi rate with respect to the calculated orbital elements Analysis tational gradients The simplicity service life and antilamming of the data over short continuous intervals shows the data to characteristics of passive communication satellites make them have an accuracy better than 20 m in range with either the a very reliable communication tool JRC 100 or 20 kc ranging tone and a range rate accuracy within 0 05 m/sec Author

N64-23730 Schleldahl (G T ) Co Northfield Minn N64-21412 General Electric Co Syracuse N Y Defense ADVANCED RlGlDlZED MEMBRANE MATERIAL DE Systems Dept VELOPMENT TRANSPORTABLE PASSIVE SATELLITE COMMUNICA- F H Bratton S J Stenlund and Alfred J Wendt In AFSC TIONS TERMINAL Final Technlcal Report Aerospace Expandable Struct Mar 1964 p 613 652 refs R W Kille et al Jan 1963 164 p (See N64 23701 16 01) (Contract AF 30(602) 2603) The requirements for an inflatable rigidizing passive (RADC-TDR 62 502 AD 297950) communication satellite are separated into those concerned

4 N64-24281 with (1) structural requirements (2) availability (3) process 4 COMMENTS ON STATIC RADAR REFLECTIVITY ability of the materials and (4) the basic radiofrequency re MEASUREMENTS TECHNIQUES W F Bahret (AFSC quirements JRC Wright Patterson AFB) p 25 36 (See N64 24284 17 08) 5 RADAR CROSS SECTION MODEL MEASUREMENTS W E Blare R I Primich R A Hayarni P E Robillard and H M Musal (GMC Santa Barbara Calif) p 37 49 refs N64-23920' National Aeronautics and Space Administratian (See N64 24285 17 08) Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt Md 6 STATE OF THE ART ANECHOIC BACKSCATTER ANALYSIS OF NON LINEAR IN FDM TELEPHONY RANGES W H Emerson and F P Brownell (B F Goodrich) TRANSMISSION OVER AN SSB-PM SATELLITE COM p 50 65 refs (See N64 24286 17 08) MUN ICATION SYSTEM 7 SCATTERING RANGE M J Paul S Hefferman Washington NASA Jul 1964 30 p refs Gans (M8 Associates) p 66 76 refs (See N64 24287 17 08) (NASA TN D 2365) OTS $1 00 8 AN EFFECT OF WALL ILLUMINATION UPON MI This report analyzes the noise produced by dynamic non CROWAVE ANECHOIC CHAMBER PERFORMANCE R J linearity in elements of the SSB up link spacecraft phase modu Garbacz and J L George (Ohio U ) p 77-92 refs (See N64 lator and ground receiver demodulator Worst case channel 24288 17 08) to nonlinear noise power ratios are developed in terms 9 COMPLETE RADAR CROSS SECTION MEASURE of the coefficients of a puwer series expressing the nonlinear MENTS J R Huynen (LMSC Sunnyvale Calif) p 93 109 characteristic The group delay problem is not treated Dis refs (See N64 24289 17 08) cussed in detail are the calculation of the autocorrelation func 10 A COMPARISON BETWEEN LONGITUDINAL BAF tion the evaludtion of spectral convolutions the determination FLING AND TRANSVERSE FENCE FOR REDUCING RANGE of the oower series coefficients and CClR terminology and GROUND SCATTERING A F Kay (JPL) p 110 126 refs multichdnnel loading procedures for FDM telephony Author (See N 64 24290 17 08) 11 AN ANALYSIS OF REFLECTION MEASURING SYS TEMS R G Kouyoumjian (Ohio State U ) p 127-145 refs (See N64 24291 17 08) N64-23935' National Aeronautics and Space Administration 12 MEASURING THE PHASE AND THE AMPLITUDE Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt Md OF BACKSCATTERED RADAR ENERGY ON A STATIC DETERMINATION OF THE TRlAXlALlTY OF THE EARTH RANGE N R Landry (RCA Moorestown N J) p 146-163 FROM OBSERVATIONS ON THE DRIFT OF THE SYNCOM refs (See N64 24292 17 08) II SATELLITE 13 SURFACE CURRENTS IN THIN CONDUCTING C A Wagner Apr 1964 57 p refs SHEETS R Magoulas and P A Matthews (Univ Call (NASA TM X 55003 X 621 64 90) OTS $5 60 London) p 164-191 refs (See N64 24293 17 08) The triaxiality of the earth is studied from observations on 14 CW MEASUREMENTS OF AN ECHO II BALLOON the drift of the Syncorn II satellite The earth must be con IN THE NEAR ZONE R K Ritt and A W Wren Jr (Con sidered a triaxial ellipsoid for the purpose of a 24 hour satellite ductron Carp ) p 192 204 refs (See N64 24294 17 08) design and the difference between the major and minor 15 APPLICATION OF SURFACE FIELD MEASURE equatorial radii of the ellipsoid is not less than 200 ft nor MENTS TO RADAR CROSS SECTION STUDIES T B A greater than 225 ft The location of the major equatorial axis Senior (Michigan U ) p 205 215 refs (See N64 24295 of the triaxial geoid is between 13" and 25" west of Greenwich 17 08) The study of simulated 24 hour satellite drift in a triaxial 16 THE TERRAIN SCATTERING PROBLEM R C Taylor earth field influenced also by sun and moon gravity and by (Ohio State U ) p 216 225 refs (See N64 24296 17 08) sun radiation pressure perturbations shows that the theory of 17 STUDIES IN RADAR CROSS SECTION MEASURE MENTS P H Ware (Douglas Aircraft Co Inc) p 226-232 longitude drift presented IS substantially unaffected by all per- turbation except that due to the earth s ellipt:cal equator and (See N64 24297 17 08) possible higher order longitude dependent earth-gravity anom- 18 PRECISION MEASUREMENT OF THE RADAR SCATTERING MATRIX J A Webb and W P Allen (Lock alies JRC heed Georgia Co ) p 233 245 refs (See N64 24298 17 08) 19 VERY SMALL RADAR CROSS SECTION MEASURE MENTS AT UHF P J Willcox (Goodyear Aerospace Carp) N64-24281 Air Force Systems Command Griffiss AF8 N Y p 246 256 refs (See N64 24299 17 08) Rome Air Development Center 20 INDOOR RANGE DESIGN R J Wohlers (Cornell SYMPOSIUM ON RADAR REFLECTIVITY MEASUREMENTS Aeron Lab Inc ) p 257-286 (See N64 24300 17 08) Apr 1964 557 p refs Papers Presented at Symp Held at 21 AN ANALYSIS OF THE POLARIZATION CAPA Lincoln Lab (MITI. Lexington. 2-4 Jun 1964 BlLlTlES OF A GROUND PLANE CROSS SECTION RANGE (RADC-TDR-64-25.Val I. AD-601364) A W Wren Jr J A Green and C M Mc Dowell (Conductron Carp) p 287-300 refs (See N64 24301 17 08) CONTENTS SECTION Ill SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FOR REFLECTIVITY SECT1 0 N I REF LECTl VI TY M E ASU R EM ENTS-- PAST. RANGES PRESENT. FUTURE 22 PULSED BACKSCATTER RANGE INSTRUMENTA 1 SOME NOTES ON THE HISTORY OF RADAR RE TlON A J Cann (Advanced Develop Labs Inc) p 301- FLECTIVITY MEASUREMENTS USING MODELS G Sinclair 31 1 refs (See N64 24302 17 08) (Toronto U ) p 1 23 THE HUGHES BACK SCATTER MEASUREMENT 2 METHODS OF MEASURING SCATTERED FIELDS RADAR AND RECORDING EQUIPMENT J D Carlson K liruka (Harvard U ) p 2-22 refs (See N64-24282 17 08) (Hughes Aircraft Co p 312 322 (See N64 24303 17 08) 3 FUTURE TRENDS IN RADAR CROSS SECTION 24 A METHOD OF PHASE MEASUREMENT FOE MEASUREMENT K M Siege1 (Conductron Carp) p 23 (See PULSED RADAR SYSTEMS B Falk (Gen Dyn/Fort Worth N64-24283 17-08) Tex ) p 323-329 (See N64 24304 17 08) 25 RF PHASE STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR BAL SECTION I1 REFLECTIVITY RANGES, THEIR GEOMETRY ANCED CW REFLECTOMETERS W D Fortner (Teledyne AND TECHNIQUES FOR THEIR USE Systems Corp ) p 330 343 ref (See N64 24305 17 08)

5 N64-24294

26 NANOSECOND PULSE SCATTERING SYSTEMS R K Ritt and A W Wren Jr ln AFSC Griffiss AFB N Y R R Hively (Teledyne Systems Corp) p 344-348 refs Symp on Radar Reflectivity Meas Apr 1964 p 192 204 refs (See N64 24306 17 08) (See N64 24281 17 15) 27 THE AUTOMATIC RECORDING OF EFFECTIVE During the months of June and July 1963 radar reflec RADAR CROSS SECTION C W Matthis Jr (Boeing Co tivity measurements were performed on a full scale Echo II Wichita Kan ) p 349 355 refs (See N64 24307 17 08) balloon at the main diriyible hangar Lakehurst Naval Station 28 A METHOD OF STATIC RADAR CROSS SECTION The problems connected with efficiently instrumenting for CW M:AS!JRE~AE~!T FOR PULSED RADAR SVSTEhJS I h.A measurements tn a near zcne sitojaticn 2nd the treafmpnt of MLrchison (Gen Dyn/Fort Worth Tex) p 356 364 (See the data were unique and are briefly described in this paper N64 24308 17 08) A description of the measurement procedure is included R T K 29 POLARIZATION ASPECTS OF RADAR REFLEC TlVlTY MEASUREMENTS R D Tompkins (Naval Res Lab Washington D C ) p 365 374 refs (See N64 24309 17 08) N64-24858 Radio Corp of America Princeton N J THE POTENTIALS OF HIGH POWER SATELLITES FOR SECTION IV MODELS MODEL SUPPORTS SPECIAL COMMUNICATIONS MATER I ALS A C Gay and J S Greenberg ln RCA Camden N J Sys 30 REFLECTING PROPERTIES OF AIRCRAFT MATE tems Eng and Space Technol 119641 p 40-49 refs (See RIALS AT 06943 AND 106 MICRONS USING PULSED N64 24851 17 01) LASERS S E Barber (Naval Ordnance Test Station) p 375 Major design considerations for a satellite communication 381 refs (See N64 74310 17 08) system are the number of satellites and the orbital parameters 31 MICROWAVE BACK SCATTERING FROM SUPER Most studies to date have been based on the simplest pos SONIC LABORATORY PLASMA STREAMS A I Carswell sible satellite configurations so as to enhance the life of the and M P Bachynski (RCA Victor Co Ltd I p 382 399 refs system and reduce the total cost of launch vehicles and satel (See N64 24311 17 08) lites In the near future it will be necessary to evaluate the 32 THE SPIN DROP METHOD OF MEASURING MODEL trade off possibilities between low-powered satellites with RADAR CROSS SECTION P C Fritsch (Lincoln Lab MIT) large costly ground terminals versus high powered satellites p 400 409 (See N64 24312 17 08) with small less costly ground terminals High power in the 33 A METHOD OF MEASURING SMALL RADAR CROSS satellite for two way point to point communications is dis SECTIONS BY DIGITAL VECTOR FIELD SUBTRACTION cussed GDB F E Heart and P C Fritsch (Lincoln Lab MITI p 410 414 (See N64 24313 17 08) 34 RADAR CROSS SECTION MODEL FABRICATION N64 24859 Radio Corp of America Princeton N J AT CORNELL AERONAUTICAL LABORATORY J E Hopkins OVERSEAS COMMERCIAL COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE (Cornell Aeron Lab I p 415 418 (See N64 24314 17 08) SYSTEMS 1965-1975 35 METAL SPRAYED FIBERGLASS RADAR TARGET J S Greenbery S Gubin and M Handelsinan ln RCA Cam MODELS F M Hudson (Hughes Aircraft Co ) p 419 425 den N J Systems Eny and Space Technol I19641 p 44 48 (See N64 24315 17 08) refs (See N64 24851 17 01) A study was made of commercial communication systems 36 ANTENNA SCATTERING MEASUREMENTS D L using active repeaters in earth satellites for planning purposes Moffatt (Ohio State U ) p 426 439 refs (See N64 24316 for RCA as an international conimon carrier and a supplier of 17 08) electronic hardware Discussed are traffic predictions launch 37 THE EFFECT OF FINITE CONDUCTIVITY ON RADAR vehicles satellite population user rates and other pertinent CROSS SECTIONS L Peters Jr (Ohio State U ) p 440- subiects GDB 455 refs (See N64 2431 7 1 I 08) 38 DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES DATA AND MEASURE MENTS TECHNIQUES P E Rowe E J Luoma and E F N64 25047 Hughes Aircraft Co Los Angeles Calif Space Buckley (Emerson and Cuming Inc p 456-474 refs (See Systems Div N64 24318 17-25) SYNCOM 2 ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM 39 NANOSECOND PULSE SCATTERING FROM EX P S Du Pont N Y AlAA 119641 8 p Presented at the 1st TENDED LABORATORY TARGETS H S Rothman H Gut AlAA Ann Meeting Washington D C 29 Jun 2 Jul 1964 hart and T Morita (Stanford Res lnst I p 475 502 refs (See (AIAA Paper 64 456) AlAA $0 50 members $1 00 non N64 24319 17 08) members The electrical power system for SYNCOM 2 is performing 40 SURFACE ROUGHNESS AND TOLERANCES IN perfectly having already logyed over 11 000 commands and MODEL SCATTERING EXPERIMENTS T B A Senior over 2 000 hours of communications time Experiments have (Michigan U) p 503 520 refs (See N64 24320 17 08) included voice facsimile and television transmission Dis 41 ESTIMATES OF THE VOLUME RETURN FROM cussion includes power system design criteria air mass one STYROFOAM T B A Senior and E F Knott (Michigan U I to air mass zero extrapolation and actual and predicted spacial p 521 526 refs (See N64 24321 17 08) performance Analysis of the equivalent radiation environment 42 THE NEAR FIELD OF A STYROFOAM CYLINDER is shown The electriLal power system differences between T B A Senior and E F Knott (Michigan U 1 p 527 541 SYNCOMS 1 and 2 and SYNCOM C (scheduled for launch dur (See N64 24322 17 08) iny the third quarter of 1964) are outlined Author 43 MODELING OF RAM COVERED COMPLEX BODIES A S Thomas (A S Thomas Inc) p 542 548 refs (See N64 24323 17 08) N64-25913' National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center. Langley Station. Va BUCKLING OF THE ECHO-A-12 PASSIVE COMMUNICA- TIONS SATELLITE N64-24294 Conductroii Corp Ann Arbor Mich Wilber B Fichter. Harvey G Mc Comb. Jr , and Robert W CW MEASUREMENTS OF AN ECHO II BALLOON IN THE Leonard Washington. NASA. Jul 1964 39 p refs NEAR ZONE (NASA TN-D 2353) OTS $1 00

6 N64-28670

Experimental and theoretical studies have been con N64 27262' T, ChntLal Operations Research Washington D C ducted to obtain an estimate of the buckling strength of the Washinyroq RPsearch Ctiiter Echo A-12 passive communications satellite Results of ex COMMUNICATlOh; SATELLITE SYSTEMS A COM perimental investigations of buckling of complete spherical PUTER MODEL AND RELATED ANALYSIS VOLUME II shell specimens having very high radius-thickness ratios ex- THE MODEL AND ITS USE tend considerably the scope of existing experimental informa J A Bancroft D E Muir M M Spierer E H Kingsley T W tion Experimental results are extrapolated by means of the Schwenke et al Washington NASA 12 Sep 1964 44 p refs classical linear theory to obtain estimates of the buckling (Contract NASw 546) strength of the full-scale Satellite Author (NASA CR 55888 TOR W63 1) The Technical Operations communications satellite model programed for the IBM 7090/7094 consists of six major rou tines and one associated subroutine The major routines are the Launch Orbit Coverage Assignment Queue and Cost N64-26543' National Aeronautics and Space Administration The subroutine is the Demand routine Also discussed IS a Langley Research Center Langley Station Va Ground Location Model the purpose of which is to define a MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ECHO II LAMINATE minimum cost ground network RTK Howard L Price and George F Pezdirtz Washington NASA Aug 1964 40p refs N64-27757' National Aeionautics and Space Administration. (NASA TN-D 2367) OTS $1 00 Washington. D C Mechanical properties are presented of the aluminum NASA's SYNCOM C SATELLITE IS SET FOR LAUNCHING polylethylene terephthalate] aluminurn laminate used to fabri News Release No. 64-193 cate the Echo I1 passive communications satellite and of the 13 Aug 1964 21 p Available from the Scientific and Techni- aluminum foil and poly[ethylene terephthalate] film that consti cal Information Division tute the laminate Tensile strength Young s modulus and According to NASA, an attempt to achieve the first truly elongation of 1/2 in -wide samples were obtained for strain stationary orbit will be made when NASA launches Syncom C. rates from 002 in/in per minute to 4 in /in per minute the third synchronous-orbit communications satellite If suc- Tensile stress relaxation of the laminate was determined for cessful, Syncom C will appear to remain over one spot on times up to 1000 minutes The flexural stiffnesses of the earth rather than moving back and forth over the Equator laminate the aluminum foil and the poly[ethylene terephthalate] The choice of the equatorial orbit. Syncom C improvements. film were measured by the heavy elastica method The effects and the TAD (Thrust Augmented Delta) are of fabrication and handling loads on the tensile strength Young s among the topics discussed RTK modulus elongation and flexural stiffness of the laminate were examined Author N64-28247 Gt Brit Dept of Scientific and Industrial Re- search Glasgow Radio Research Station OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS OF SATELLITES RECEIVED N64-27249' National Aeronautics and Space Administration BY THE PREDICTION SERVICE. APRIL 1964 Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt Md SYNCOM ELECTRONIC PARTS RELIABILITY CONSID- 119641 42p ERATIONS Orbital data from optical observations of satellites during April 1964 are tabulated by satellite for a large number of Harry W L Street Dec 1963 89 p ref satellites The coordinates of three new observing stations (NASA-TM-X-55012 X 600 63-2601 OTS $8 10 ph reporting to the Prediction Service are also given M P G This report briefly descrlbes the Syncom I satellite and the manufacturer s parts reliability program and lists the elec tronic parts used in its construction GDB N64-28670 Aerospace Corp El Segundo Calif Electronics Div MOMENTUM BIAS ATTITUDE CONTROL FOR A SYN- N64-27252' National Aeronautics and Space Administration CHRONOUS COMMUNICATION SATTELLITE Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt Md A C Barker 30 May 1964 75 p EXPERIMENT-TIME SYNCHRONIZATION OF REMOTE (Contract AF 04(695) 269) STATIONS USING SYNCOM SATELLITE (TOR 269(4540 70) 1 AD 601807) Raymond L Granata Peter D Engles and Paul F Mc Caul This study establishes the analytic feasibility of achieving Jan 1964 6p adequate long life attitude stabilization using only the gyro (NASA TM X-55016 X 531 64 7) OTS $1 10ph scopic effect of a large pitch momentum for attenuation of The accurate transfer of time between two remote stations roll and yaw errors In addition it is shown that momentum is discussed The transfer of corrected Universal Time UT-2 buildup in pitch will be small enough so that all corrections in time from one Syncom station to a remote Syncom station pitch attitude can be made by varying the wheel speed Thus was accomplished with the aid of Goddard Range and Range the entire system can operate for the required 3 years after Rate equipments The proposed system will be capable of initial acquisition without the use of gas and with only a single achieving time synchronization to an accuracy of 0 5 micro active control loop Two special but easily implemented second or less Included in this experimen IS a method of maneuvers will be required to achieve these results First verifying the time synchronization measuring the system un during lifetime station keeping operations it will be neces certainty and maintaining accurate synchronization The ex sary to add one half the velocity increment at to and to add the periment was divided into two phases (1) the transfer and other half 12 hours later Second the execution of a daily maintenance of time from the United States Naval Observatory 180" yaw turn alternating the direction of vehicle rotation each to the master station and (2) the transfer and maintenance of day must be implemented The damper mechanization defined time between the two Syncom ground stations via the Syncom in this study is simple and provides for very rapid decay of satellite The time synchronization was accomplished by the vehicle nutation The appendixes present coordinate systems use of a portable clock that was transferred between the sta and transformation matrices and the equations of motion tions in question ALB IVL

7 N64-28682

N64-28682' RAND Corp. Santa Moriica. Calif Predicted damage io the unshielded silicon cells on Relay I THE LINK FROM A COMMUNICATION SATELLITE TO A agreed fairly well, in time and amount, with observed data SMALL GROUND TERMINAL PVE N E Feldman Mar 1964 30p refs (Contract NASr-21(021) N64-29161' Naval Research Lab, Washington D C 1P 2884) EFFECTS OF SHIELDING ON ELECTRON DAMAGE TO This report deals with low capacity point to~pointvoice SOLAR CELLS ii I d I 1011s Consist e iit w i t ti re Idt ively simp I e. sm a I I c u in ni u c F J Campbell In Penn U Proc of the 4th Photovoltaic grouiid teriiiiiials. calculations were made based on 10-ft~ Specialists Conf Vol I Radiation Effects on Solar Cells and ilidiiieter aiiteiiiias aiid 150 K uricooled parametric Photovoltaic Devices Aug 1964 16 p refs (See N64-29152 Tlie resultiiiy coiniiitiiiicatioii bandwith of one 4-kc voice 21 06) OTS $23 50 ph clirliiiiel b is J coiiveiiieiit bdse from wliich to scale for other A study to determine what effect the darkening of the diiteiiiid didiiicters diid system iioise teniperature Tabular cover glass used to protect the solar cells used on the SYNCOM data are presented that summarize the significant parameters I1 satellite had on the solar energy conversion efficiency of the for providiiig such a link and illustrate the possibility of ob^ solar cell assembly is outlined The study was conducted by taiiiiiiy uiic voice chdiiiiel witli oiily sinall yiuiiiid terriiinals irradiating the individual components with 1 Mev electrons These data give the values of the following parameters sat el^ and by measuring the individual parameters by various methods lite radiatec niicrowave power. satellite antenna gain. maxi- PV E iiiuin slaiit rdiige for 0 db gain. system losses, ground re-

ce i v i ii$1 a ii t e ii11 J d i a iii e t er , g ruci iid re ce i v i ii g a ii t e ii iia e f f ic ie n cy systeiii iiuise temperdture. frequency index. feed N64-29553' Stanford Research lnst Menlo Park Calif back fdctor 110 loglo F2. C,N in the IF i4b) for one 4~kc TECHNICAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH COMMER- clidiiiiel tlidt allows for a 6511) margin above the RC filter CIAL COMMUNICATION SATELLITES PART E ECO- threshold, output S/N. 3m2(k)2bfor test tone, and average NOMIC ASPECTS OF SATELLITE COMMUNICATION S/ N for the average talker IVL SYSTEMS Final Report Ernest D Wenrick Nov 1963 36 p refs (Contract NASr 49(08)) N64-28752' Nationdl Aeronautics and Space Adniinistration (NASA-CR 58031) OTS $360ph Langley Research Ceiiter. Laiiyley Station. Va The purpose of this report is to examine the economic AMORPHOUS PHOSPHATE COATINGS FOR THERMAL feasibility of commercial communication satellites The exam CONTROL OF ECHO II ination was based largely on the results of a survey of avail Dewey L Clernrnons. Jr and John D Camp Repr from Elec- able literature The following conclusions were drawn (1) No trocliem Techno1 , v 2. no 7 8. Jul Aug 1964 p 221 232 accurate method for forecasting overseas refs previously published as N64-12597 06~33 traffic exists at this time (2) A period of several years will (NASA RP 303) elapse from the initial operational date of a satellite communi The al)sorptaiice diid eiiiittance ClidrdCteristics of suine cation system until the system becomes profitable (3) Ulti diiiorphous pliosplidte codtiiigs applied to an aluninuin foil mate preference on economic grounds will be accorded the siilxtrdte have been investigated to determine their usefiiliiess system utilizing synchronous orbit satellites (4) The key to as thermal coritrol coatings for the Echo II satellite The suec- system costs IS reliability as expressed by the probability of tral absorptance was measured over the range 0 22p to 15p a successful launch and by the mean time to failure (5) Voice aiid the total hemispherical emittance was deternined for speci~ communications will take up the bulk of overseas circuits (be men temperatures in the range 0 to 100 C for coating surface tween 80% and 95%) for at least the next decade (6) Television densities up to 400 mg/ft2 The equilibrium temperature con- is unlikely to be a major factor in the demand for overseas trol parameter (is/(,varies over the range 7 5 to 0 82 for the communication circuits IVL surface densities investigated The tliermal rddiation stdbility of the coatin(] is presented for periods up to 1,250 tir in a simulated space environment Author N64-29572' Goodyear Aerospace Corp Akron Ohio PHOTOMETRIC MEASUREMENTS OF SURFACE CHARAC- TERISTICS OF ECHO I SATELLITE Final Report N64-29153' National Aeronautics and Space Administration Richard H Emmons et al 19 Jun 1964 87 p refs Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt Md (Contract NASl 31141 RADIATION DAMAGE TO SOLAR CELLS ON RELAY I AND (NASA-CR 58290 GER-11648) OTS $8 10 ph RELAY II The results and techniques of a program that exploited Ramond C Waddel In Penn U Proc of the 4th Photovoltaic the realistic test specimen represented by the nearly 4 year Specialists Conf Vol I Radiation Effects on Solar Cells and old Echo I Satellite by measuring its present surface charac Photovoltaic Devices Aug 1964 18 p (See N64 29152 21- teristics are described For this purpose the classical astronomi 06) OTS $2350ph cal techniques of photometric measurement were employed The results of solar cell radiation damage experiments by developing and utilizing equipment and procedures for on board the Relay I and Relay II satellites are reported and the measurement of satellite-reflected The data obtained the degree of agreement between predictions of radiation were analyzed to derive and evaluate the desired characteristics damage based on laboratory damage studies and flux data Changes in specularity reflectance degradation overall size and that observed in the spacecraft experiments are indicated and present shape of the Echo I satellite are derived by this Conclusions drawn from the data of the Relay I and Relay I1 means Photographic and photoelectric photometry were experiments include the following (11 Unshielded silicon and used simultaneously Author gallium arsenide solar cells degrade to 75% initial short-cir cult response level in less than 1 day (2) Shields equivalent to 3 mils of Corning 0211 glass or greater extend time to N64-29609 Lincoln Lab Mass lnst of Tech, Lexington 75% initial response by at least a factor of 100. compared to PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION OF ANTENNA GAIN FOR unshielded cells (3) Heavily shielded n-p silicon cells last SATELLITE WITH SWITCHED ANTENNA SYSTEM Techni- about 10 times as long as similarly shielded p-n Cells (4) cal Report No. 347

8 c N64-33073

R N Assaly 4 Feb 1964 50 p ref This paper formulates the problem of simultaneous sig- (Contract AF 19(628)-500) naling through a hard limiter with spread spectrum sources as (ESD TDR 64 28 AD 602484) OTS $3 00 applied to the communications Satellite The Central Limit For a communication system using satellites carrying Theorem is liberally applied to yield approximate answers, antennas tied to a switching system the probability distribution but the framework of a more precise analysis is also outlined of angles between the pointing directions of the axis of the A critique of the analytical assumptions and techniques con operating antenna and of a ground receiving station is found cludes the paper Author This study is based on the condition that the antenna pointing most nearly in the direction of a sensing signal is switched on In the determination of the characteristics of this system N64-30847' Consultants and Designers Inc Arlington Va geometries of pointing directions are found which are optimum SIMULTANEOUS TRACKING OF THE BALLOON-SATELLITE or near optimum for the cases of 4 6, 8 12 16 24 32 48 ECHO-1 FOR GEODETIC PURPOSES [SINKHRONNYYE and 60 antennas Consideration is also given to determining NABLY U DEN IYA IS2 "E KHO-1 " DLY A G EO D EZlCH ES KI KH an optimum antenna pattern to be med with any geometry TSELEY] For any pattern a conversion from probability distribution of D E Shchegolev A G Masevich and B G Afanas yev 4 Sep angles to probability distribution of gains is straightforward 1964 7 p Trans1 into ENGLISH from Vestnik Akad Nauk The results of this study are summarized in a chart Author SSSR (Moscow). no 7 Jul 1964 p 74-77 (Contract NAS5-3760) (NASA TT F 8954 ST SSA 10201) OTS $1 00 fs $0 50 mf N64-30037 Lincoln Lab Mass lnst of Tech Lexington One of the most promising methods of solving a series of CROSS-SECTION MEASUREMENTS OF THE ECHO II problems of higher geodesy is that of cosmic triangulation SATELLITE BY THE MILLSTONE L-BAND RADAR Group In cosmic triangulation if only one of the summits of each re- Report 1964-16 solvable triangle does not lie on the earth s surface, it coin- R F JulianandD P Hynek 7Apr 1964 12p cides, at a specific moment of time. with the position of a satel- (Contract AF 19(628)-500) lite. at the same time the sides of the triangles can be equal (ESD-TDR-64-43 AD-602751) OTS $1 00 to thousands of kilometers Author All cross section measurements beginning with Rev 4 the first observable at Millstone display a fading pattern indicating that the balloon had not attained full sphericity or at least contained significant surface irregularities No N64-32836* National Aeronautics and Space Administration essential change in the fading pattern was noted throughout Langley Research Center Langley Station Va the period that measurements were taken except for per EFFECT OF ELECTRON IRRADIATION ON SOME PROP- haps more frequent fading during the later passes Starting ERTIES OF THE ECHO II LAMINATE with Rev 5 the first complete horizon to horizon measure Thomas G James Washington NASA Oct 1964 25 p refs ment made a periodicity of approximately 104 sec was ob (NASA TN D 2207) OTS $075 served This periodicity was also apparent during the later Samples of the Echo II laminate composed of 035-mil passes The estimated average radar cross section during thick plastic with 0 18 mil thick aluminum glued on both sides theseobservations was about one half the theoretical 1 330 m2 were irradiated with electrons with nominal energies of 0075 Author 0 15 026 041 066 092 and 120 MeV Incident fluxes up to 2 X 1013 electrons/cm2/sec were used The relative percent changes in the modulus of elasticity ultimate strength National Aeronautics and Space Administration N64-30342' percent elongation at break burst strength hardness and Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt. Md weight per square centimeter were used as measures of damage COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE TECHNOLOGY The changes in these properties are given as a function of flux Albert L Hedrich ln NASA Washington Proc of the 4th Natl electron energy and total integrated flux The results show Conf on the Peaceful Uses of Space 1964 p 155-170 (See that the plastic substrate receives the primary damage The N64-30326 22-01) GPO $1 50 aluminum outer coating was affected only at very high total The advantages and disadvantages of active and passive integrated fluxes and then primarily because of outgassing satellite systems are compared The versatility of the passive within the laminate Author system is demonstrated by Echo II Commercial advantages indicate the use of active satellites The technology and the communications subsystems of Relay I and Syncom I1 are N64 33073 Bendix Corp Baltimore Md Bendix Radio Div described in detail A major accomplishment has been the SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS TRANSPORTABLE developing of scheduling and operating procedures for the GROUND TERMINAL VOLUME I COMMUNICATIONS Relay satellite The Syncom program has demonstrated the EQUIPMENT Final Report, 9 Dec 1961-1 Sep 1963 feasibility of a spin-stabilized, synchronous-orbit, active- G E Sanner Sep 1963 384 p refs communications satellite Orbital control was achieved without (Contract DA 36 039 SC 87504 Pro] SYNCOM) difficulty The launch by the Thor-Delta booster and the apogee (SYN 52 07 01 AD 444240) motor boost resulted in the expected near-synchronous orbit This report describes the design construction and test Velocity corrections and spacecraft orientation were made by ing of the SYNCOM ground terminal The the spacecraft control subsystem in a predicted manner equipment for Project SYNCOM is located in trailer vans R LK thus making the system road and air transportable A 7 Gc signal is transmitted at 20 kW received and retransmitted N64-30797 Institute For Defense Analyses Washington at 2 Gc by the satellite and returned to the ground where it is D C Research and Engineering Support Div amplified by the low noise receiving equipment The satellite MULTIPLE ACCESS CAPABILITY OF A HARD-LIMITING is located acquired and tracked automatically by the ground COMMUNICATION SATELLITE REPEATER WITH SPREAD- antenna The system can be operated in one of three modes- SPECTRUM SIGNALS manual remote or auto acquire System power is provided Joseph M Aein Apr 1964 43 p refs by three diesel engine generator vans each supplying 200 kW (ARPA SD 50) of cw power Thus the entire ground terminal is completely (IDA/HQ 64 2498. P-121. AD 603027) OTS $200 self sufficient Author

9 N64-33 123

N64 33123' California U La Jolla RELAY I TRAPPED RADIATION MEASUREMENTS C E Mc llwain R W Fillius J Valerio and A Dave Mar 1964 1965 56 p refs (Contracts NAS5 1683. NASr 116) (NASA CR 59023) OTS $3 00 fs $0 50 mf lnstrumentsaboard the Relay I satellite have measured the intensities of geomdgrieuLdiiy rrdpped eieLiroii5 witii energies N65-10240~ Goooyear Aerospace Corp Akioii Ohio greater than 045 MeV and of protons in four energy ranges STUDY, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF PASSIVE between one and 60 MeV over the region between 1 2 and 2 3 SATELLITE MODELS, GRID-SPHERE TYPE Technical earth radii during the year 1963 The equatorial intensity of Documentary Report, May 1963-May 1964 electrons (E 045 MeV) was found to decrease monoton Wright-Patterson AFB Ohio Systems Eng Group. Aug 1964 ically from a maximum intensity of about 0 7 X 10' at 1 3 127 p refs earth radii down to lo5 sec-tcm-2srC1 at 2 3 earth radii The (Contract AF 33(657) 11537) principal maximum in the proton intensities was found to occur (GER-11568, SEG-TDR 64 52 AD-607273) on consistently higher lines of force and with increasing in The approximate vector potential solution for thin dielec- tensities toward lower energies such that a maximum intensity tric shells modified for a complex dielectric constant served of about 3 X lo6 protons (E > 1 1 MeV) sec-tcm-2sr-1 as the theoretical approach A solved the equations. ocLurs at about 2 3 earth radii compared with the maxlmum of and the results showed strong reflection at certain frequencies 195 x lo3 protons (E - 40 to 110 MeV) secC'cm-2sr-1 at The empirical investigation covered impedance measurements 1 5 earth radii Author of flat grid panels, and backscattering tests of a 20-inch and an inflatable 14-ft grid sphere The tests confirmed enhanced reflectivity. but did not fully agree with the theory Scintilla- N64-33371' National Aeronautics and Space Administration tions showed up in all cases whereby a trend toward decreas- Washington. D C ing scintillations for Increasing backscattering could be ob- AMERICAN PROGRESS AND GOALS IN SPACE News served True behavior of a grid sphere can only be obtained Release empirically by tests or theoretically by the induced currents James E Webb Available from the Scientific and Technical method Author Information Division 119641 18 p Presented at the Inventors Congr and Space Symp Little Rock Ark 30 Oct 1964 Major achievements and plans of the NASA space program are briefly discussed by James E Webb New scientific know1 N65 10534# Joint Publications Research Service Washing edge with wide application is stated to be produced rapidly ton D C and technological advances are said to be tremendous in all RADIO COMMUNICATION AND SATELLITES areas as a result of the space program The key roles of in In ICS Trans1 on Communist Chinas Sci and Techno1 No ventors and inventions in this program are emphasized and 120 5 Nov 1964 p 54-56 (See N65 10533 01 08) OTS the regional economic impact of the program is reviewed $4 00 DEW A general discussion of the problems encountered in using vhf and microwave frequencies for communication networks is presented The feasibility and advantages of using station- N64 33641 Bendix Corp Baltimore Md Bendix Radio Div ary satellites for relay stations are outlined PVE SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS TRANSPORTABLE GROUND TERMINAL VOLUME II ANTENNA EQUIP MENT Final Report, 9 Dec 1961-1 Sep 1963 Sep 1963 229p refs N65-11860# Birdair Structures, Inc, Buffalo. N Y (Contract DA 36 039 SC 87504) LARGE AIR SUPPORTED RADOMES FOR SATELLITE (SYN 52 07 01 AD 444241) COMMUNl CATIONS GROUND STATION The SYNCOM ground antenna is a 30 ft diarn parabolic Walter W Bird In Ohio State U Res Found Proc of the reflector with prime focus feed mounted on a trailer Two OSU-RTD Symp on Electromagnetic Windows. 2-4 Jun 1964, functionally independent feed systems with separate rf trans Vol V 119641 12 p (See N65-11852 02-07) mission lines provide communications (1) Transmission is Three large air-supported radomes, two with a diameter accomplished by the shf feed consisting of a stationary finned of 210 feet and one with a diameter of 160 feet, have been circular waveguide horn with polarizer (2) Reception is pro put into service for periods ranging up to 2 years These vided by a uhf finned circular waveguide feed that surrounds radomes, having generally high rf performance and low cost. the shf horn The antenna control system can be operated in prove the practicality of air supported radomes where superior one of three modes-manual remote or auto acquire by de performance is required The development of new materials. pressing one of the main mode selector switches The para fabrication techniques. and equipment required for radome metric provides 40 dB of gain over a 10 M bandcenter manufacture is described Equipment reliability and the erec- around 1817 Mc and has an excess noise temperature of tion of large radomes are also discussed DSG 120 K maximuin Three nondegenerate one port circulator coupled stages are used and the temperature of the diode mounts and CirLulators is mdiiitained at 125 F The pump N65-12605'# National Aeronautics and Space Administration sourLe at 10 46 Gc features controlled environinent and d solid state leveler circuit to miiiiiiiizc qdiil instability Autllur Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt Md ELECTRONICALLY STEERABLE ANTENNAS FOR COM- MUNICATION SATELLITES N64-33847 Defense D~~~~iii~iltdti~ilCi:iiter. Alexciiidrid. Vd Dennis L Backus Oct 1964 15 p refs Presented at the 8th ECHO COMMUNICATION SATELLITE Bibliography. Dec Intern Conv on Mil Electron Mil E Con 8 Washington 1959-Nov. 1963 16 Sep 1964 Esther E Thompson. coinp Nov 1963 24 p rels (NASA-TM X 55106 X-625 64 208) OTS Prices HC $1 OO/ (AD 422849) MF $0 50

10 N64-12895

This paper presents several electronically steerable antenna te(,liriiciues which for frequencies from 1 to 35 Gc show promise for applicdtion to communications satellites Selected bedm forming techniques are presented and many steerable antenna designs are derived from these basic techniques An exdmindtion of the circuitry required to implement the design is utilized to prove that the dntenna is no lonyer solely an input or output to d yiveii system but becomes now an insepara Me pdrt of the system Basic problem areas of beam forming self tracking and scanning are outlined Several promising techniques namely the retrodirective and transdirective are ~ippliedto edrth spdce edrth and space space communication links Author

N65 12812"// California U La Jolla RELAY I TRAPPED RADIATION MEASUREMENTS C E Mc llwain R W Fillius J Valerio and A Dave Washing ton NASA Dec 1964 37 p refs Previously announced as NASA CR 59023 see N64 33123 24 28 (Contracts NASr 116 NAS5 1683) (NASA TN D 2516 NASA CR 59023) OTS Prices HC $2 00/ MF $0 50 lristruments aboard the Relay I satellite measured the in teiisities of geomagnetically trapped electrons with energies greater than 045 MeV and of protons in four energy ranges between one and 60 MeV over the region between 1 2 and 2 3 edrtli radii during the year 1963 The equatorial intensity of electrons (E 045 MeV) was found to decrease monoton ically from a maximum intensity of about 0 7 X lo8 at 1 3 earth radii down to lo5 sec cm ster ' at 2 3 earth radii The principal maximum in the proton intensities was found to ouur on consistently higher lines of force and with increasing iiitviisities toward lower energies so that a maximum inten sityofalmut 3 X lo6 protons (E 1 1 MeV) sec cm ster ' curs dt dbout 2 3 earth radii compared with the maximum of 1 95 X lo3 protons (E 40to 110 MeV) sec ' cm * ster-' dt 1 5 edrth radii Author

N65-12895// Liiicoln Lab, Mass lnst of Tech. Lexington THE LINCOLN EXPERIMENTAL SATELLITE (LES) Group Report. 1964-55 D C Mac LeIl

specificiit ions for ecicli satellite subsy st e in, telemetry perf or 111 ~ iiiicc, and ail orbit that permits oiie or more hours of good visil)ility All satellites will be put into orbit as "piggybacks" 011 Titan Ill IaLiiicIics G G.

11 llOo. The powered flight of the Delta is such that the satellite in placed in a transfer ellipse whose apogee is 22, 752 nautical miles from the center of the Earth. Syncom I1 will be designed to be launched by the Atlas-D Agena-D . The initial Syncom I1 satellite, when placed over the Atlantic, will be able to communicate 1964 continuously with all the countriea of North America, South America, Africa, and Western Eurape. A second Syncom 11. placed over the Pacific Ocean, will be able to interconnect continuously the tele- phones of Japan, Western Asia, the Philippine Islands. Australia. AbC14983 Hawaii. the West Coast of South America, and the West Coast of ACTNITIES IN THE UNITED KINGDOM. the U. S. A third satellite, placed over the Indian Ocean, will C. R. S. Manders (British Embassy, Tokyo, Japan). overlap the ground coverage of the first two. In this way, a com- IN: INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSNM ON pletely world-wide mystem of satellites could be put in place before AND SCIENCE, TOKYO, JAPAN, AUGUST 27-31, 1962, 4th, the end of 1964. PROCEEDINGS. Edited by Tamiya Nomura. A64-15107 Tokyo, Japan and Rutland. Vt., Japan Publication8 Trading Co., THE WORLD OF THE COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE. 1963. p. 9-16. Arthur C. Clarke (Bristish Interplanetary Society, London, England). Brief description of Great Britain's activities in space research. Astronautics and Aeronautics, vol. 2, Feb. 1964, p. 45-40. 6 refs. Considered are the organization of the research program in the Discussion of future applications of communications satellites. United Kingdom. the cost of the current program. the Skylark The possibilities of rapid intercontinental tranarnission of mail, Program. the Anglo-American Satellite Program, the Communica- newspapers. and telephone messages via satellites are conBidered, tions Satellite. the tracking of space vehicles - radio and optical and the application of worldwide televimion for educational purposes astronomy. Also discussed are the European Space Research Or- is outlined. ganization (ESRO), the European Launcher Development Organiza- tion (ELDO), and Eurospace. A table summarizes the experiments designed within the scope of the Anglo-American Satellite Program - U. K. I. It is pointed out that two lines, radioastronomy andskylark, A6415501 have been followed up intensely and successfully. THE NATIONAL PHYSICAL LABORATORY - THE USE OF ARTIFICIAL SATELLITES FOR RELATING TIME AT DISTANT POINTS. A64-11051 V. T. Saunders. THE NASA COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE PROGRAM. Contemporary Physics. vol. 5, Lkc. 1963, p. 117-119. Leonard Jaffe (NASA, Office of Applications, Communications Description of experiments using the Telstar satellite for time Systems, Washington. D. C. ). synchronization between the U.S. and the United IGngdom. IN: INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON SPACE TECHNOLOGY The experiments were carried out on August 25 and 27, 1962, to AND SCIENCE, TOKYO, JAPAN, AUGUST 27-31, 1962, 4th, synchronize the master clocks of the Naval Observatory at PROCEEDINGS. Washington and the Royal Greenwich Observatory (RGO) at Herst- Edited by Tamiya Nomura. monceux. There are two noteworthy features of the experiments: Tokyo, Japan and Rutland, Vt., .Japan Publications Trading Co. , (I) the remarkably high precisian of the Telstar pulses as 1963, p. 528-540. propagated, and (2) the very close accordance of about 1 km between Survey of the NASA program of research and development in the ranges given by ephemeris E2 (hug. 31) and that obtained by communications satellites. and description of aome of the latest multiplying the travel time by the speed of light in free space. result8 of this program. The need for communications satellites is mentioned. and the experimental program discussed. A chart indicates the three major communications satellite ayatems which offer sufficient promise to warrant continued detailed investigation. A64-15651 Among the satellites reviewed in the passive reflector - the radio DESIGN OF THE TELSTAR COMMUNICATION SATELLITE. mirror in the sky which can take many forms and for which a num- R. H. Shennum (Bell Telephone Laboratones, Inc., Submarine ber of specific configurations have been suggested. The first test Cable Measurements Div., New York, N. Y. ). of NASA's passive satellite program was the Echo I project. Show IN: AIAA ANNUAL STRUCTURES AND M4TERIALS CONFERENCE, FIFTH. PALM SPRINGS, CALIF., APRlL 1-3, 1964 (AIAA Publica- is the procedure followed in teating'the Echo I1 sphere. the general tlO" CP-8). configuration of an active repeater, the Telstar satellite. the Relay New York, American Institute Aeronautics and Astronautics, satellite, an artist's view of an Earth terminal for Telntar, and of 1964, p. 139-145. Syncom. It is noted that the experiments currently planned will Discussion of the design. construction. and test the Telstar investigate elements of the various methods of using artificial of satellite spacecraft. Earth satellites to accomplish global communications. and they The basic philosophies which resulted in a particular program of design and construction are outlined and will explore the environment in various regions of space. From an examination 1s made how research and material and com- these experiments and others which will follow, engineering data of ponent development activities influenced the design to improve the will be obtained upon which to base operational system designs. reliability of the spacecraft.

AM-15053 THE HUGHES AIRCRAFT COMPANY'S SYNCOM SATELLITE ~6ci5aa PROGRAM. TELSTAR DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION AND EARLY RESULTS C. Gordon Murphy (Hughes Aircraft Co., Culver City, Calif. ). OF THE SCIENTIFIC SPACE EXPERIMENTS. IN INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON SPACE TECHNOLOGY H. 1. Maunsell and J. W. Stafford (Bell Telephone Laboratories. AND SCIENCE, TOKYO, JAPAN, AUGUST 27-31, 1962, 4th. Inc., Murray H111. N. J.). PROCEEDINGS. Edited by Tamiya Nomura. Tokyo, Japan and Rutland. Vt., Japan Publicationn Trading Co., 16-21. 1963. Pap<.r G-913.) 1963, p. 541-548. IEEE Transdcrion> "11 Communication and EleLtronic?. Jan. 1964, Description of NASA's Syncom Mark I and Syncom Mark I1 p. ws7. communication satellites. under development by Hughes Aircraft DcsLrtptlon 01 tlie Tvlatar s.Itcllxtc. a spherical spin-stab*- Compnny. Briefly deacribed is the method used to attain the syn- llzrd satellltc, whit h 1, a microwdvc repcatcr lor intercontinental chronous orbit, and to control the satellite, once successful injec- communications. It LS an cfficirnt "on-demodulating repeater with tion is carried out. The Syncom satellite will weigh 148 lbs when an ~ntt,rmc.d~atcfrrqucncy crntrrrd at 90 mc (mrgacycles). placed on top of the Delta booster. Included in this weight is an Telemetry data from thr communications circuLts and from the apogee motor with approximately 61 lbs of propellant. The apogee radiation rxpcrimrnt arc. transmitted 10 the ground statton. while motor is used to circularize the orbit at the synchronoun altitude. VHF (very-t,,fil,-fr~que"'s) hignala [rum the ground actuatc swttclws The Delta is launched in an azimuth direction of approximately to rrducr battrry dracn hctween passrs. The spherical shape of

13 A64- 1 5839

T<,lstar provldrs an isotropic solar cell array and permits a nearly A64-17773 lsotruplc mlcrowavc antcnna pattern. The clectromcs, whlch are SHADOWS PRODUCED BY SPIN-STABILIZED COMMUNICATION pack.lCrd lnstdr a hrrmctically sealed container. are ,solated SATELLITES. thert,,eliy with reapekt to conductive heat transfer and vlbratlonally B. Paul (Ingersoll-Rand Research Laboratories. Bedminster. N. J. ). fit,irt illy a*~rii~i<,:r LIIIIC. A iiwrrndiiy acrivarcd bciiows mechantsm AlAA Journal, vol. 2, May 1964, p. 924-931. 7 refs. controls thc tcmpcrature of the electronics chassis. A spin-stabilized satellite generally utilizes a so-called toroi- dal antenna that has a null cone surrounding the axis of symmetry (spin axls). The greatest gain isotropic antennas with ~64-15a~9 over occurs the widest possible null cone. However, wide null cones may cause TI15 I'ELSTAR COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE EXPERIMENT shadows the Earth and prohibit communication between mutually PLAN. on visible ground statLons and the satellite. It is shown how the size 5. B. Uc,nnvtt ;and L. C Thom.is (l',<,ll Tclephow L.iboratorlcs, and shape of the shadowed zones may be calculated for arbitrary Inc., Murr~yH111, N. J.) orientations of the spin axis. It ~9 also shown how to find the narrowest possible antenna beam, which avoids any null-cone shadow on Earth uhen the spin axis 1s maintained perpendicular to the ecliptic plane (desirable for thermal reasons). For neai polar orbits. it 1s not possible to escape null-cone shadow and still re- alize any appreciable antenna gain if the spin ax19 1s maintained Lk51 riptim, ul [hi, T~lstart~~p~'rtmvn1 plan ant1 objectives. exactly perpendicular to the ecliptic plane. However, it 1s shown TI,,, d<,s~gnuf thr co1ntnun1ci1~0nssyslcrn ~h dk,sat<,llitck,.ipabilities and ground station rrqulre shadow to an acceptable level or eliminate It entirely. The critical nirnte. The ininingthc initial orb11 .ind attlhldc, tilt angles. for complete elimination of null-cone shadow, and the trchniqurs for prvdiitinx satcllit~~position. attltudc, and eclipse effect of nodal regression due to Earth oblateness may be found time,, and attitude measurement and 'ontrol are discussed. Good from given curves. corrrlation betwcrn predicted and measured satellite attitude is shown. The plan for acquisition and command tracking of the satrllite, and a typital operations srhedule of the Andover ground station arc prcsentrd. A6417705 COMMENT ON "APPLICATION OF DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING TO OPTIMIZING THE ORBITAL CONTROL PROCESS OF A 24-HOUR A64-16346 COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE. " WOULD SYNCHRONOUS LUNAR SATELLITES BE STABLE AND Theodore N. Edelbaum (United Alrcraft Corp., Research Laborato- USEFUL? [DES SATELLITES SYNCHRONES DE LA LUNE ries, East Hartford, Conn.). SERAIENT-ILS STABLES ET UTILES?]. AIAA Journal. vol. 2, May 1964, p. 974, 975. S. Travers. Technique et Science Agronautiques et Spatiales. Sept. -0ct. 1963. p. 373-376. In French. A64-18246 General study of the feaslbtllty and utility of lunar satellttes for MUTUAL INTERFERENCE BETWEEN COMMUNICATION SATEL- interstation communication on the Moan. In view of the absence of LITES AND TERRESTRIAL LINE-OF-SIGHT RADIO-RELAY a lunar ionosphere, radlo wave communication systems are conflned SYSTEMS. to line -of-sight transmlsston. High towers are considered imprac- J. K. Chamberlain and R. G. Medhurst (General Electric Co., tical. hence the possibility of a synchronous lunar-orbiting satelllte Ltd., Hirst Research Centre. Wembley, England). becomes attractive, (International Conference on Satellite Communication, Nov. 22. 1962, Paper. ) A64-16612 Electronics Record, Apr. 1964, p. 524-534. 6 refs. SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS RELAY SYSTEM USING A RETRO- Examination of the mutual mterference to be expected between DIRECTIVE SPACE ANTENNA. the satellites of broadband frequency-modulated satellite communi- E. L. Gruenberg and C. M. Johnson (Internatlonal Business Ma- cation systems and high-capacity terrestrial line-of-sight radio- chines Corp.. Federal Systems Div , Bethesda, Md.). relay systems ~n the event of their sharing the 4- and 6-Gc communl- IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation, vol AP-12, cation bands. By comparing the resulting Interference noise power Mar. 1964, p. 215-223. 10 refs. in a 3.1-kc audio channel of a telephony system with the internation- Presentation of a system for relaylng messages vLa a satellite ally agreed upon total noise power for such a channel. maximum per- between points on the Earth. The satelllte employs an antenna of missible values are derived for the power flux arriving at the Earth's the Van Atta type which IS modulated by solld-state devices inserted surface from a satellite and far the effective radiated power of a in each of the paths that connect conjugate array elements. A ground terrestrial transmitter. which. if observed. would ensure that this station located anywhere within the held of view of the antenna can interference IS kept within acceptable bounds. receive information from the satelllte by lrradlating the modulated antenna. Methods of niodulatmg the retrodlrectlve array are dis- cussed with emphasls an those that facilitate communications among A64-11149 several ground statibns. Extremely high rellablllty is inherent in the design of the satelllte electronic system. which can be made ELECTRIC DRNE SYSTEM FOR A STEERABLE AERIAL AT A entirely from solid-state components. SATELLITE-COMMUNICATION EARTH STATION. H. A. Prlme, 0. A. Smith, D. F. Tilaley. and W. S. Tunnicliffe (Brush Electrlcal Engrneerlng Co., Ltd., Loughborough, Lelcs., A64-17091 England). TECHNIQUES FOR DIGITAL COMMUNICATION VIA SATELLITES. (International Conference on Satellite Communrcatlon. Nov. 22, F. Assadourian and E. M. Bradburd (Radro Corporatlon of America, 1962, Paper.) Communications Systems Dlv., New York. N. Y. ). Electronics Record. Apr. 1964. p. 556-564. RCA Review. vol. 25, Mar. 1964, p. 61-04. Dcmcriotion~.~~. of the control and motor-drive system for the Dtscussion of synchronization techniques for digital transrnls- steerable aerial located at the Post Office Earth station, Goonhilly sion over subsynchronous and synchronous satelllte links that are Downs, Cornwall. Specification, performance and control facilities part of a general communicatton network. The satellite links ~n- are detailed for the purpose of cmtabluhing the general design con- terconncct several nodes that perform multiplexing functions. B1t sideration. involved. The arrangement of the principal items of synchronization and ldentlflcatlon on a link basis are studied. and a the closed-loop Ward Leonard drive is given briefly. and particular blt-transport equation relating numbers of transmitted and received attention is then directed in the remaining mections of the paper to pulse3 is developed that takes into account variable path delays. the design and performance of the servo-sy8tem. The basic hear When differences between clocks at the ends of a link are included, equations of the mystem are developed for the major components. the result IS useful ~n determining storage requirements for time and the nonlinear restrictions are then introduced to establish the buffering that must be inserted to maintain bit synchronization. For complete analog network for the computer analysis. The simulatlon subsynchronous satellttes. handover techniques for the preservahon of the nonlinear elements is detailed for the particular cases of of bit integrity durmg switching from one satellite to the next are saturation limit., "dead band" and backlash; a useful method of discussed. derivative-network simulatlon is also outlined. The introduction

14 A64- 1 8805 of appropriate stabilizing networks, to counteract system instabili- data center via "DATA-PHONE'' and then reduced and analyzed on ties demonstrated by the computer study, is considered. and linear IBM 1401 and 7090. Short output tables of communica- networks are employed in this application. A brief review of the tion and tracking parameters are produced for each pass. Data commisironrng procedure and an example of operational perfor- from a 112-hr satellite pass require approxlmately 114 hr to be mance data are included. compressed, and about 314 hr to be transmitted. After a 114-hr edit on the IBM 1401, approximately 20 sec on the 1BM 7090 is re- quired to produce an analyzed output table containing one row for A64-18256 each minute of satellite pass. TECHNICAL ASPECTS OF THE DESIGN OF COMMUNICATION- SATELLITE SYSTEMS. ~64-1a421 W. J. Bray (Post Office, Engineering Dept., London, England). ADVANCES IN SPACE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. VOLUME 5. (International Conference on Satellite Communication. Nov. 22, Edited by Frederick I. Orduay, Ill (General Astronautics Research 1962, Paper. ) Corp., Washington. D. C., Space Science and Technology Informa- Electronics Record. Apr. 1964. p. 744-758. 12 refs. tion Center. Huntsville. Ala. ). Survey of some of the technical problems mvolved in the design New York, Academic Press, Inc., 1963. 334 p. of communication- satellite systems providmg substantially world- $13. wide coverage for the transmission of multichannel telephony and Collectian of papers on space problems covering' astronomical television signals. Factors affecting the choice of orbit and type investigations of the Sun. advances ~n communication rela) -satellite of satellite are discussed. and it is concluded that attitude-stabilized. technrque~,solid-propellant rocket technology, environmental con- station-keeping satellites in medium-altitude circular orbits repre- tral of manned space vehicles, terrestrial. lunar. and planetary ap- sent a desirable design objective. The ope-ational and performance plications of navigation and geodetlc satellites. and orbltal opera- requirements for multichannel telephony and television are con- tions. The advantages. disadvantages. and prospects of large solid- sidered in the light of the findings the International Radio Con- of propellant and the role of orbltal operations in astronautics sultative Committee at 11s 10th Plenary Assembly (Geneva. 19b3). are also discussed. Lists of references supplement the articles, Technical factors. ouch as the choice of frequency and modulation which are individually abstracted and indexed in this issue. method, are discussed, with particular reference to the problem of providing multistatxon access to satellites. The limitations on satellite and terrestrtal radio-relay system transmitter power rm- A64-18423 posed by the need to share the same frequency bands are examlned. ADVANCES IN COMMUNICATION RELAY SATELLITE TECH- and the advantages of using preferred radio-frequency channellng NIQUES. arrangements by both systems are discussed. Finally, an outline R. P. Haviland (General Electric Co., Missile and Space Dlv., given of one possible approach to the deslgn of a worldwide sys- Philadelphia, Pa. ). tem using twelve station-keeping, attitude-stabilized satellites in IN: ADVANCES IN SPACE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. a subsynchronous (8-hr) orbit a1 14,000-krn berght in the equalorla1 VOLUME 5. plane of the Earth. Edited by Frederick I. Ordway. 111. New York, Academic Press. Inc., 1963, p. 21-46. 23 refs. Discussion of the techniques and advantages of communication A64-18269 satellites and of selected specific system proposals. Considered A PLANETARY ORBITING RELAY COMMUNICATION LINK FOR are the need for long range communication, satisfaction of com- PROSECT VOYAGER. munication demand. basic satellite communication system tech- Donald L. Hagen (General Electric Co., Valley Forge Space niques, design factors in satellite systems. spetific system propos- Technology Center. Philadelphia, Pa. ). als, and the status of experimental communication satellite pro- IN: ANNUAL EAST COAST CONFERENCE ON AEROSP4CE AND grams. Two completed experimental satellite programs are dealt NAVIGATIONAL ELECTRONICS, IOTH, BALTIMORE, MD., wth, together with several others which are in progress. OCTOBER 21-23, 1963, PROCEEDINGS. Conference sponsored by the Baltimore Section of the Instltute of Electrical and Electronrcs Engineers and the Professional Tech- A64-18754 nical Group on Aerospace and NavLgational Electronics. PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF PROCESSING OF SYNCHRONOUS North Hollywood. Western Periodicals Co., 1963, p. 1.3.1-1 to PHOTOGRAPHIC OBSERVATIONS OF THE SATELLITE "ECHO-I. " 1.3.1-8. I. A. Kutuzov (Academy of Sciences. Moscow. USSR). Discussion of the Voyager spacecraft. whose launch to COSPAR. Meetmg, 7th. and Internatlonal Space Sclence Symposium. and M?ri is scheduled for the late 1960's. It 1s stated that these 5th. Florence. Italy. May 8-20. 1964. Paper. II p. spacecraft may contain both orbiting and Iandmg modules. Con- Presentation~ ~.~~~ of results of the Dhotonraphic observations of . I. sidered 18 the question of whether to transmit the data originating satellite Echo 1, conducted in the Fall of 1962 and Sprlng of 1963 wlth in the directly to Earth or to relay them through the arbiter. the method of synchronous photographic observations whlch permit The theoretical. operational and environmental aspects of the prob- the determination of the direction ~n space from ground stations to lem dealt with, and the conclusion made that a relay link 1s are IS the satell~t~.The following conclusions are drawn. (1) proof has definitely required for Venus and would be advantageous for Mars. been obtained of the possibility of synchronous obsprvations of A 100-Mc carrier frequency far the relay link 1s recommended, and bright artificial Earth satellites and of their application for geodet~c the results of comparisons of promising modulation and multiplexing purposes. (2) possibility of synchronous observations of satelhte techniques are presented. Echo I from stations located wtthin the territory up to 3, 000 km: (3) demonstration that the pract!cal accuracy of determ%nat%onof the satellite's position on negatives IS not more than i 4 sec. while the ~64-18292 accuracy of time recording IS approxtmately :0. 005 sec. (4) the ob- A DATA REDUCTION AND ANALYSIS PROGRAM FOR THE tained accuracy of determination of coordinates of space triangula- "TELSTAR" SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM. tion points of the ordpr of f 100 m provides for the solution of a David A. Aaronson (Bell Telephone Laboratories. Inc., Murray number of geodetic problems in the mapping of geodetically unmapped Hill. N. J. ). territories. IN ANNUAL EAST COAST CONFERENCE ON AEROSPACE AND NAVIGATIONAL ELECTRONICS. IOTH, BALTIMORE, MD., OCTOBER 21-23. 1963. PROCEEDINGS. A64-18805 Conference sponsored by the Baltimore Section of the Instltute of REDlSTRIBUTION OF TRAPPED PROTONS DURING A MAGNETIC Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the Proiessional Tech- STORM. nical Group on Aerospace and Navigational Electronics. Carl E. McIlwain (California, University, Dept. of Phyaica. La North Hollywood. Western Periodtcals Co., 1963. p. 2.3.5-1 to -ioiia .. .-, railr.- -... . , I. . 2.3.5-7. COSPAR, Meetmg. 7th. and International Space Science Symposium. Description of methods employed In the reduction of raw data 5th, Florence, Italy, May 8-20, 1964, Paper. 30 p. 9 refs. from the TELSTAR Communications Satelllte. Data from the satel- Contracts No. NAS 5-1683. No. NASr-116; No. NsG-538. lite and the Andover Earth Station are recorded In digital form on Observation of the first change In the distribution of high-energy 7-track magnetic tape at the Earth Station, compressed, sent to a geomagnetically trapped protons which can be definitely attributed

15 A64- 1 9690

to the breakdown of adiabatic motion. The work was accomplished The first station was flown to Rio de Janeiro, where it participated with the aid of a scrntillatlon detector aboard Relay 1 (1962 Beta In the early tests of the Relay satellite. Two additional stations in Upsilon 1) satellite. Most of the observed variatlon in proton fluxea the US are uorking uith Telstar, and a fourth station, capable of took place within 1 day centered on 0 hr UT Sept. 23, 1963. during immediate switching betueen Relay ~nrlT.-l.t;rr, 9- a+qrgnrd to the the occurrence oi the largest fluctuations in the Earth's magnetic Deutsche Bundespost (\Vest Germany). Station lifetime is estimated field in almost 2 years. The intensity of protons with energies at ten years. Future plans envision a fourfold increase in system greater than 34 Mev decreased by more than a factor of ten In the sensitivity through the incorporation of supercooled parametric am- region L > 2.50 Earth radii and B >0.05 gauss, but changed by less plifiers and the reduction of antenna temperature. than lOT0 rn the rcgion 1.80 >L >L.IO. Thc character ul tli~cliangch was surh that prev*ous eYrntb of 1h15 t,pc cuuld haVC prudu'cd thr anonlalous characteristics ol tlic ~nitiald~~tribution. A64-19901 SYSTEM CONFIGURATION OF TRANSPORTABLE SPACE- A64-19690 COMMUNICATION TERMINAL. EFFECTS OF ATMOSPHERIC REFRACTION ON RADIO WAVES D. Hershberg (International Telephone and Telegraph Corp., ITT IN THE EARTH-SATELLITE COMMUNICATION LINK. Federal Laboratories, Nutley. N. J. ). Hisashi Shibata (Ministry of Posts and , Electrical Communication. "01. 39, no. 1. 1964, p. 49-57. Radio Research Laboratories. Tokyo, Japan). Description of the system configuration of the transportable Radio Research Laboratories. Journal, vol. 10, Nov. 1963, space-communication terminal developed and constructed by the .p. 423-459. 5 refs. ITT Federal Laboratories. Nutley, N. J. The station is separable Study of the effects of atmospheric refraction on radio waves into four basic units mounted in semitrailer vans. A block diagram of the equipment layout is presented. and details of the construction under various tropospheric and ionospheric conditions. Calcula- tions of the wave path, elevation-angle error, and path-length and systems checkout instrur,entation are given. error are made within the framework of geometrical optics. The results are presented in figures and tables which are of use in practical work. A method of calculating the orientation of an A64-19903 antenna so that it will receive signals from a satellite of known MULTIFREQUENCY HIGH- POWER CASSECRAIN14N ANTENNA- position is presented. FEED SYSTEMS FOR SATELLITE GROUND STATIONS. H. Scheiner. W. Spanos, and R. Edwards (International Telephone and Telegraph Corp., ITT Federal Laboratories. Nutley, N. J. ). A64-19802 Electrical Communication, vol. 39. no. I, 1964, p. 73-79. A SPACE PROGRAMME FOR EUROPE Detailed description of the Cassegrainian system used with the A. V. Cleaver (Rolls-Royce, Ltd., Rocket Propulsion. Derby. transportable space-communication terminal developed and con- England). structed by the ITT Federal Laboratories, Nutley, N. J. The re- (Royal Aeronautical Society. Manchester Branch. Chadwtck ceiving iced 1s a four-horn cluster. On either side of the receiving Memorial Lecture. 9th. Manchester, England. Mar. 11. 1964.) cluster are placed two polyrod radiators, comprising the transmit- Royal Aeronautical Sorlety, Journal. "01. 68, June 1964, p. 374-382 ting feed. Data are grven for the polyrod design, and performance 12 refs. curves. includrng primary radiation patterns obtained with and with- Presentatlo" of views to support the case for a European space out reflectors. are presented. program. Three broad arguments are considered: philosophLcal, direct applications. and indirect applications. Current USSR and U: positions are discussed. WithLn Europe, the efforts of the Europear A64-19904 Space Research Organtzatlon (ESRO) and the European Launcher TRANSMITTER FOR SATELLITE GROUND STATION. Development Organization (ELDO) are reviewed. and comparison 1s H. Coldman, R. Graham. and L. Gray (International Telephone made of US and European space expenditures as percentages of the and Telegraph Corp., ITT Federal Laboratories, Nutley. N. J. ). gross national product, with the observation that Europe has the Electrical Communication, vol. 39, no. 1. 1964. p. 80-88. capability of larger expendltures. The implications of a division of Description of the transmitting system of the universal trans- effort between "pan-European" and "national" are considered. wlth portable space-communication terminal developed and constructed expression of the view that a 60140 ratio is a fair balance. Com- by the ITT Federal Laboratories. Nutley. N. J. The dual system ments are made on current and future European developments. is designed for operation at 2 and 6 Gc for the Relay and Telstar satellites. respectively. but other frequencies can be accoymodated. Through June 1963, nine transmitters of this type have been placed A64-19899 In operation. SP4CE-RESE XRCH GROUND STITION 8. Cooper and R McClure (International Telephone and Telegraph Corp., ITT Federal Laboratories, Nutle). N. J. ). A64-19907 Electrical Communication. "01. 39, no. 1. 1964, p. 25-36. TRANSPORTABLE-STATION OPERATION WITH TELSTAR AND Description of the e\per>mental ground station for satellite RELAY SATELLITES. communication developed at the ITT Federal Laboratories In J. E. Drucker (International Telephone and Telegraph Corp., ITT Nutley. N J., and completed In 1960. Thls fired station uas Federal Laboratories, Nutley, N. J. ). used for design studies toward the development of an air-transport- Electrical Communication, "01. 39, no. 1. 1964, p. 113-122. able, medium-capacit), space-communication terminal. Tables USAF-sponsored research. are given for the station performance with active and passive satel- Discussion of technical parameters and operational experience lites and the performance of the communication-receiver and an- with the transportable space-communication terminal developed and tenna-tracking systems in the Telstar and Relay satellite programs constructed by the ITT Federal Laboratories, Nutley. N. J. Tests and in experiments using the Moon as a pas9ive reflector. show that the prxmary causes of variation in signal level are the range and spin modulation of the satellite. Tracking error3 are said to Lie within i 0.03O and pointing errors within i 0.3'. even A64-19900 in winds as high as 58 mph. MEDIUM-CAPACITY SPACE -COMMUNICATION TERMINAL. L. Pollack, W. Clumb. and L. Gray (Intrrnational Telephone and Telegraph Corp., ITT Federal Laboratories. Nutley. N. J. ). A64-19910 Electrical Communication, "01. 39, no. 1. 1964. p. 37-48. GRIPHlC htETl4ODS FOR C \LCUL \TINC COVERAGE ,\'IT \IN.\nLE Descripcon of the transportable space-communication terminal WITH COMhlUNlCATlON SZTELLITES. designed and produced by the ITT Federal Laboratories, Nutley. R. Hepl" (Inlcrnatlon.il Tc.Ic1hunc .~ndTelcgr.iph Curp. , I? T N. J. The c6nsiderations of economy, physlcal and operational re- Intelcom, Inc., Fdlls Church, Va. ). quirements, and technological limitatlons are discussed at length. Electrical Comniiinir.,tion, "01. 3Y, no. 1. 1Yb-l. p. 132-1 $3.

16 i L

A64-21717

Review and extension of graphic methods used to determine A64-20784 the percent of time one or more satellites in various orbits will EARLY REALIZATION OF SPACE BROADCASTING. be usable by a given link. For operations between t~oground sta- R. P. Haviland (General Electric Co., Satellite and Space Systems, tions a satellite must be visible to both simultaneously. Curves Philadelphia, Pa. ). are given for the probability that a single sate:hte in circular polar American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Annual Meeting, orbit will be in a mutual-visibility region. It 1s indicated how simi- lst, Washington, D.C., June 29-July 2, 1964, Paper 64-422. 12 p. lar charts may be prepared for equatorial, inclined, and elliptical 9 refs. orbits. Consideration is given to the question of equispaced vs Members, $0. 50; nonmembers. $1. 00. randomly spaced satellite groups, and it is shown that failures Description of the technical features which must be incorporated penalize the random group less although the cost IS higher. in an existing satellite In order to produce a demonstration broad- casting satellite for a space broadcasting system. The Nimbus meteorological satelhte was chosen as the one which corn15 reason- ably close to satisfying basic requirements of power level, weight, A64-19911 transmitting power capability, and attitude control. Important as- SPACECRAFT TECHNOLOGY FOR SATELLITE COMMUNICATION pects of the Nimbus design are examined, and the capability In SYSTEMS. space broadcasting is developed, as are methods of using the satel- M. E. Brady (International Telephone and Telegraph Corp., IT? lite. A suitable orbit IS selected, and the design of the major equip- Intelcom. Inc., Falls Church, Va. ). ment is discussed. It 1s seen that, to adopt theNimbus satellite for Electrical Communication, vol. 39, no. 1, 1964, p. 144-154. use as a demonstration broadcast satellite, the following gross Discussion of the variety of choice and the optimum technical changes must be made: deletlon of the meteorological sensors, approach in the estahlishment of a satellite communication system. installation of the relay receiver and broadcast transmitter, instal- Covered are synchronous and medium-altitude systems, spin vs lation of a folding transmitting antenna, and installation of additional gravity gradient stabilizatLon, spacecraft transmitter po\\er systems batteries. On the basis of the study, it is suggested that the dem- and the problems associated with precise spacing in orbital rings, onstration broadcast satellite is withm present technical capabilities, launch- success probability, and component reliability. Economic and that the use of an existing platform will allow an early dem- factors are considered. It 1s expected that the launch-vehicle por- onstration. tion of overall costs will decline sharply in the near future as large1 carriers, such as the Atlas-Centaur and Titan 111-C, become available. A64-21188 SYNCOM SATELLITE PROGRAM. Rlrhnrd M. Dcntley and Albert T. Ouens (Hughes Aircraft Co., El Scgundo, Calif. ). A64-19996 (Anicrican Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Summer Moeting. Los Angclrs. Calif., June 16-20, 1963, Paper 63-264. ) SYNCOM 2 ELECTPJCAL POWER SYSTEM. Jutirn.11 of Spacecraft and Rockets, vol. 1, July-Aug. 1964, P. S. DuPont (Hughes Aircraft Go.. Space Systems Div., Los p. 395-399. Angeles. Calif.). Discussion of the results of the SYNCOM satellite experimental American Institute of AeronautiLs and Astronautics, Annual Meeting program and a summary of the design improvements incorporated 1st. Washington, D.C., June L9-July 2, 1964, Paper 64-456. 8 p. into each successive vehicle as a result of space flight experience. Members, $0.50, nonmembers, $1.00. SYNCOM 1s a spin- stabili,.cd, active-repeater communications Discussion of the electrical power system for Syncom 2 (1963 satellite utilizing redundant transponders, telemetry. command, 31A). NASA's first synchronous altitude active communication satel aid control systems. No problems were encountered in the opera- lite. The Syncom 2, launched from Cape Kennedy with a Thor- tion of the command and control systems. Studies of orbital ma- Delta booster on July 26, 1963, performing perfectly, having IS neuvers demonstrated that: hydrogen peroxide control systems show already logged over 11,000 commands and over 2000 hours of com- excellent promise for extended operational use in space, adequate munications time. Experiments have included voice, facsimile and control 1s achievable with the SYNCOM pulsejet control system. television transmission. The discussion includes power system less than 10 ftlsec velocity control 1s adequate to maintain orbital design criteria, air-mass 1 to air-mass zero extrapolation, and synchronization for 1 yr, and corrections to the spin axis are es- actual and predicted spatial performance. An analysis of the equlva timated to be less than ZO/yr. Performance of the solar cell and lent radiation environment 1s shown. The electrical power system battery, and the design features of communications satellites now differences between Syncom I (1963 4A). S)ncom 2 (1963 31A). and under development are also discussed. Syncorn C (scheduled for launch during the third quarter of 1964) are outlined.

A64-21673 THE NASA RELAY 1 EXPERIMENTAL COMMUNICATION SATEL- A64-20110 LITE. DESIGN DIFFERENCES BETWEEN MILITARY AND COMMERCIAL J. D. Kiesliny (Radio Corporation of America, Astro-Electronics COMMUNICATION SATELLITES. Div. , Princeton. N. J. ). Wilbur L. Pritchard and Neil MacGregor (Aerospace Corp., Com- RCA Review. vol. 25. June 1964. p. 232-261. munications Satellite Systems, El Segundo, Callf. ). Discussion of the Relay communications satvllites that are American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Annual Meeting! deslgned to explore the terhnological prublems of long haul micro- 1st. Washington, D. C., June 29-July 2, 1964, Paper 64-416. 15 p. wave communications using rnrdlum-altitude. active satellites. 17 refs. These technological problems. whtch include the envtrontnent of Members, $0. 50; nonmembers, $1.00. outer space. ground station performance. and compatibility with Discussion of factors influencing the design of communication existing communication facilities are discussed in relation to satel- satellite Systems, with emphasis on the differences between military lite design trade-offs. The operatlng functions of the Relay satel- and commercial approaches. A single communication satellite is Ittes are: the relaying of wlde-band miCrowave signals by means of first considered, and it is shown that military needs for security a heterodyne repeater; the telemetering of data indicating the status and survivability lead to a lower requirement for communication of circuits, components, and eiivironment; and the transmission of capacity than do commercial. Also discussed are relative-frequen- signals to assist in the acquisition and tracking of the satel- cy selection, ground-station configuration. and data processing re- lite. The various subsystems of the Relay satellite are descrlbed, quirements. Major system aspects are examined, including cover- and the in-orbit experience with Relay I and Relay I1 is reviewed. age, survivability, reliability, multiple access, and launch eco- nomics. Typical system calculations are presented. The growth potentials and future interests of military and commercial systems A64-21717 are briefly discussed. COMMUNICATION OPERATIONS WITH SYNCOM 11.

17 A64-2 1 7 19

William T. Tobias, Rollin C. Keyeb. and Thomas R. Gleason IN: NATIONAL CONVENTION ON WL~TARYELECTRONICS, (U.S. Army Satellite Communications Agency, Fort Monmouth, 7TH. WASHINGTON, D. C., SEPT. 9-11, 1963, PROCEEDINGS. N.J.). Conference sponsored by the Professional Technical Group on (Institute of Electncal and Electronics Engineers, Intrrnatlonal Military Electronics, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Convention, New York, N.Y., Mar. Lj-Lb, [email protected]+.i Errg~lrccr~. IEEE International Convention Record, vol. 12, pt. 6. 1961, Edited by B. J. Goldfarb. p. 71-106. I1 refs. New York, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. 1963, Revlrw of operational experience with the L4-hr communica- p. 121-125. tLons system established uaith the Syncom 2 (1963 31A) active satel- Description of the Defense Communications Agency. an agency lite m synchronous orbit. The Syncom satellite and Its supporting of the Department of Defense under the direction, authority, and ground system are described, and results of the first 1600 hrs of control of the Secretary of Defense. It has responsibilltles in the demonstration and performance tests are discussed. These tests areas of operations. engineering, planning, programming. and include the successSu1 use of echo suppressors to overcome delay research and development, as well as specific responsibility for afie'ts fur voiLc communilrlt:ons. operational direction of the Defense Communications System, and other assigned rebponsibilities. The Communications Satellite Project Office, working directly with the Army and Air Force, will ensure compatibility and program coordination in meeting the objectives of the DOD Communications Satellite Program. which are to provide a means of meeting critical and survlval communica- tion needs and also to provide another means of iervice to all users of DCS.

A64-22514 A DETERMINISTIC APPROACH TO SYSTEMS OF COMMUNI- CATION SATELLITEb. M. Mannos, B. A. Forest. and R. H. Greene (MITRE Corp., Bedfard, Mass.). IN: NATIONAL CONVENTION ON MILITARY ELECTROKICS, 7TH. WASIIINGTON. D. C., SEPT. 9-11, 1963. PROCEEDINGS. Cunference sponsured by thr Pri>fessicrnalTrchn)ial Croup un Military Electronics Institute 01 Elcc trii.il and Electronic b Engineers. A64-21720 Edited by B. J. G~~Idf~irb, RESULTS OF SYNCOM COMMUNICATION EXPERIMLN IS. New Yurk, Inst>tutcut Ele

A64-21721 DESIGN OF Tiik VOICE PORTION OF THE SYNCOM GROUND STATION. N. W. F'eldman and C. P. rripp (U.S. Army. EleLtroniL, Re3earih and D~~velopmenlLaboratury, Communications Dept., Fort Mun- mouth. N.J.).

A64-22500 THE IIEFENSE COMMUNICATIONS AGENCY - A PANKI, DISCUS S13N.

18 A64-2 2 7 96

A6422539 PLASMA-MICROWAVE INTERACTIONS. James Vollmer ATTITUDE CONTROL FOR COMMUNICATION SATELLITES. (Radio Corporatlon of Amerlca, Camden, N. J, ), p. 61-64. 16 refs. J. E. Metnger (Internatlonal Telephone and Telegraph Corp. I [See A64-22800 19-24] Intelcom, Inc., Bailey's Cross Roads, Va.). IN NATIONAL CONVENTION ON MILITARY ELECTRONICS, 7TH, WASHINGTON, D.C., SEPT. 9-11, 1963, PROCEEDINGS. Conference sponsored by the Professlonal Technical Group on Military Electronics, Institute of Electrical and Electronics A64-22792 Engineers. THE DYNAMICAL DESlGN OF THE RELAY SATELLITE. Edited by B. J. Goldfarb. C. C. Osgood (Rad10 Corporation of America. Dcfcnsc Electronic New York, Institute of Electrical and Electronlcs Englneers, 1963, Products, Astro-Electronics Div. I Princeton, N. J. ). p. 443-446. IN: SYSTEMS ENGIKEERIKG AND SPACE TECHKOLOGY. Presentation of the approach to improve the gam of the critical New York, Radio Curporation of America. 1964, p. 21-25, link In a satellite communlcatlon system through the use of attitude Discussion of the dynamlcal dcslgn cons>deratlonslor the control to permit directive satellite antennas. The following con- RELAY (1962 Beta Upsilon I) satcllitr ,~c

CONTENTS: THE ENGINEER AND THE CORPORATION - SYSTEMS ENGI- NEERING. I - THE ROLE OF SYSTEMS ENGINEERING AT RCA. A64-22795 N. I. Korman (Radio Corporation of America, Princeton, N. J. ), THE POTENTIALS OF HIGH-POWER SATELLITES FOR COM- MUNICATIONS. D. 2, 3. THE ENGINEER AND THE CORPORATION - SYSTEMS ENGI- A. C. Gay and J. S. Greenberg (Radio Corporation of America, NEERING. I1 - COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS ENGINEERING. Advanced Military Systems. Princeton, N. J. ). R. Guenther (Radio Corporation of America. Camden, N. J. ), p. IN: SYSTEMS EKGINEERIKG AND SPACE TECHNOLOGY. 4-9. New York, Radio Corporation of America, 1964. p. 40-43. 6 refs. SYSTEMS CONSIDERATIONS FOR ICBM COMMAND AND Consideration of the feasibility and rcqnirements fur high- CONTROL. C. G. Arnold (Radio Corporation of America, New powered synchronous communication satclhtes. The system model York, N. Y. ), p. 10-13. 7 refs. [See A64-22791 19-08] discussed IS shown in a chart, and the signal powcr, jammer power, DESIGN OF A DATA COMMUNICATIONS COMPUTER SYSTEM. and noise power received at the satellite are calculatcd. It 1s W. A. Levy and A. E. DiMond (Radio Corporation of America, shown that, because all traffic must pass through thc satellite, 300 Camden, N. J.), p. 14-20. mobtle terminals, each with a single channel capablllty, will requlre THE DYNAMICAL DESIGN OF THE RELAY SATELLITE. a satellite capable of radiating about 200 watts or approxtmatcly I to 2 kw of pr~mcpower. This puwcr rLx~utrvmentis indcpcndcnt C. C. Osgood (Radio Corporation of America, Princeton, N. J. ), p. 21-25. [See A64-22792 19-32] of the type of ground transmitter terminal. One hundred portable REVIEW OF ELECTRIC PROPULSION. T. T. Reboul and S. terminals, each wlth a single channel capability, require a satel- Lite capability of only 50 watts of radiated or 250 to 500 watts oi Fairweather (Radio Corporation of America, Princeton, N. J. ), p. 26-33. 25 refs. [See A64-22793 19-27] prime power. It is concluded that high power LII the satellite 1s a SEER - SYSTEMS ENGINEERING, EVALUATION, AND distinct advantage when small terminals are rcquircd. RESEARCH. D. Shore (Radio Corporation of America, Moorestown, N. J. ), p. 34. TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES FOR SPACE SURVEILLANCE STUDIES. J. Breckrnan, A. Franz, and S. G. Mlller (Radio Corporation of America, Moorestown, N. J. ), p. 35-39. [See 864-22796 A64-22794 19-29] OVERSEAS COMMERCIAL COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE THE POTENTIALS OF HIGH-POWER SATELLITES FOR COM- SYSTEMS - 1965-1975. MUNICATIONS. A. C. Gay and J. S. Greenberg (Radio Corporation J. S. Greenberg, S. Gubin, and M. Handelsman (Rad10 Corporation of America, Princeton, N. J. ), p. 40-43. 6 refs. [See A64-22795 of America, Advanced Military Systems. Princeton, N. J. ). 19-32] IN: SYSTEMS ENGINEERING AND SPACE TECHNOLOGY. OVERSEAS COMMERCIAL COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE New York, Radio Corporation of America, 1964. p. 44-48. 25 refs. SYSTEMS 1965-1975. J. S. Greenberg, S. Gubin, and M. Review of a study of commercial communication systems using Handelsman (Radio Corporation of America, Princeton. N. J. ), active repeaters In Earth satellites. Briefly discussed is an p. 44-48. 25 refs. [See A64-22796 19-08] analysis of satellite configurations. orblt injection. stabilization, A HIGH-RESOLUTION RANGE COUNTER. L. C. Drew (Radio station-keeping, capability and availability of launch vehicles, and Corporation of America, Burlington. Mass. ), p. 49-51. ground terminal equipment. This analysis shows that imtial [See A64-22797 19-15] operation by 1966 is possible for two configurations: a synchronous SOME TRENDS IN ADVANCED RANGE INSTRUMENTATION. system which employs satellites orbiting in the equatorial plane at L. E. Mertens (RCA Service Co., Patrick AFB. Fla. 1, p. 52-55. 36, 000-km altitude, and a medium-altitude system in which the [See A64-22798 19-15] satellites are in random orbits at altitudes of about 11, 000 km. The EVOLUTION OF THE HIGHEST-PRECISION RADAR - THE SSB modulation, proposed for the synchronous system. is seen to STORY OF MIPIR. J. W. Bornholdt and W. J. Rose (Rad10 provide direct access to all users. Available test data indicate that Corporation of America, Moorestown, N. J. ), p. 56-60. 8 refs. the synchronous system should pose no major problem to voice [See A64-22799 19-08] communications.

19 A6422878

H. P. Strickberger and G. D. Gordon (Rad10 Corporation oi America, Defense Electronic Products, Astro-Electronics Div., Princeton, N. J. ). IN: INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES, ANNUAL TECHNICAL MEETlNG. PHILADELPHIA. PA., APRIL 13-15, 1961, PROCEEDINGS. MI. Prospect, Ill. , Institute of Environmental Sciences, 1964. p. 631-636. Contr,~~t Nu. NAS5-1'72. Discussion of tests pcrfornird on the Relay comniiinlcation s.itrllitr. using rl soldr simul.itor c onsisring a1 IN" carhon arc . The solution^ to practiral prohlcms developed in setting up and conducting the test are prcscnted, including the necessity for measuring, monitoring, and adjusting the absolute Intensity, and the dttficulty in obtaining tiill olectrir~lpo~er from the space- craft volar < rlls. Thv mcthorl of calltirating the intensity of the carbon arc riniulntor and the .~ccur,+ciesattained are discussed. Bascd on <,xpericn

A64-23244 Ab4-24550 THERMAL GRADIENT SPACECRAFT VACUUM CHAMBER TESTS. G. D. Gardon and H. P. Strickberger (Radio Corporation af SEVEN NATIONS INTO SPACE America, Astro-Electronics Dlv., Princeton, N. J. ). Hawker Siddrlcy Rcvicw, Summer 1964. p. 1-48. IN: INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES. ANNUAL Discussion of the European rffurt to orbit a communications satellite. Thc organlzatlons involvcd are described. Considered TECHNICAL MEETING, PHILADELPHIA, PA. ~ APRIL 13-15, 1964, PROCEEDINGS. arc thc satellite 1~31vehicle, being dcvelopud under the auth,,rity Mt. Prospect. 111., Institute of Environmental Sciences. 1964, of the Italian gnvrrnmcnt. thr thrce-stngc rocket to launch 11, whlch p. 625-630. consists of a first-stage Blue Ztrcak IRBM hull1 by Great Britain. Contract No. NAS5-1272. and a second and third stag,., to hc' hull1 by Franrr and Germany, Description of a steady-state vacuum chamber test for space- respectively. Thc firing rangc as well as the down range guidance craft In whlch the walls surrounding the vehxcle are maintained at system and thc long-range telemetry system, thc contributions of different tempcratures. To simulate flight temperatures in the Belgium and the Nethcrlands, arc discussed. Communication vacuum chamber, the spacecraft's external surfaces are subjected satellite problems and prospects are mentloned along with the to thermal inputs that are identical to those expected for chosen impact of on world industry. orbits and spacecraft attitudes. The test does not make use of any predicted temperatures within the spacecrait. The vacuum chamber has hIittrd irradlnnce. The method of data London, Iliffr Books, Lid.; Englewood Cliffs, N. J., Prentice-Hall. analysis and the sourc~~s01 crror such as intensity varlatlon and Inc., 1964. 441 p. extrveous r'tdiation arr dlsrussd. The terhnlques used ln per- $14.50. forming thls test wlth the Rrlay runiniiinications satellite. lncludlng the computations requirrd .ind the gromptry of the vehlrle In the CONTENTS: rhambrr. are explained. PKEFACE. Krnnrth W. Gatland, p. 7. 8. FOREWORD. Robert Renwick. p. 9, 10. BACKGROUND AND PROSPECTS. Krnnrth W. Catland, p. I- [Srr A64-24574 20-08] A64-23245 COMMUNlCATIONS ORBITS. W. F. Hilton. p. 14-51. 5 refs. SOLAR SlMU LATION FOR THERMAL VACUUM TESTING. [Sce A64-24575 20-291

20 i

A64-24579

PROJECT TELSTAR. Staff of Bell Telephone Laboratories, communications. distribution of demand by place and time, use of Inc., Murray Hill, N. J., p. 52-83. [See A6444576 20-321 larger rockets for launching, demand on television relays, the THE SPACECRAFT OF THE RELAY PROJECT. Raymond M. 24-hr stationary orbit and its periodic time and coverage, telephonic Wilmotte (Radio Corporation of America, Camden, N. J. ), p. 84- lag or delay times and echo, launching into equatorial and stationary 129. [See A64-24577 20-321 orbits, outage and spare satellites, equatorial. circular orbits, and SYNCOM. Donald D. Williams and Roger W. Cole (Hughes attitude stabilization by gravity gradient. Other subjects treated Aircraft Co., Culver City, Calif.), p. 130-155. [See A64-24578 are polar and inclined circles, representation of coverage circles 20-321 on maps, optimum numbers of satellites and ground stations, equa- THE COURIER COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM. torial ellipses, and elliptical orbits in the 63O slot. James E. Bartow, Thomas P. Mottley, and Walter P. Teetsel (U.S. Army, Fort Monmouth, N.J.). p. 156-183. [See A64-24579 20-321 A6624576 PROSPECTS FOR EUROPE THE UNITED KINGDOM GROUND - PROJECT TELSTAR. STATION AND THE TELSTAR AND RELAY TESTS AND DEMON- Staff of Bell Telephone Laboratories. Inc., Murray H111, N. J. STRATIONS. W. J. Bray (General Post Office, London, England), IN: TELECOMMUNICATION SATELLITES. p. 184-205. [See A64-24580 20-081 Edited by Kenneth W. Gatland. DESIGN OF GROUND STATIONS. H. A. Prime (Brush Elec- Landon, lliffe Books, Ltd.; Englewood Cliffs, N. J., Prentice-Hall, trical Engineering Co., Ltd., Loughborough, England), p. 206-241. Inc., 1964, p. 52-83. 9 refs. [See A64-24581 20-081 Description of the objectives and results of Project Telstar. A DESIGN STUDY FOR AN EQUATORIAL, CIRCULAR-ORBIT, The aspects of (1962 Alpha Epsllon 1) considered include COMSAT SYSTEM (GPOIRAE). A. W. Lines. E. G. C. Burt, and power supply, electronics chassis. broadband communications A. G. Earl (Ministry of Aviation, Farnborough, Hants., England), circuit, radiation and solar aspect measurement, telemetry, p. 242-282. [See A64-24582 20-321 command, test program, orbit, ground stations, communications A DESIGN STUDY FOR AN EQUATORIAL, CIRCULAR-ORBIT, results, analysis of initial breakdown, radlation measurements, COMSAT SYSTEM (BSDC). G. K. C. Pardoe (British Space and radiation in space. A short paragraph describing Telstar 2 Development Co., Ltd., London, England), p. 283-317. [See A64- (1963-13A) 1s included. It is stated that Telstar 2, externally 24583 20-321 similar to Telstar 1, was made more resistant to radiation damage POWER UNITS AND PROPULSION PROBLEMS IN TELE- by isolating transistors in the command circuit. The transistors COMMUNICATI?NS SATELLITES. M. Vernet-Lozet and G. de concerned were evacuated of gas that might otherwise be ionized by Clavibre (Societe d'Etude de la Propulsion par Rgaction, Villejuif, radiation in the Van Allen belts. Seine, France), p. 318-345. [See A64-24584 20-061 THE ECONOMICS OF SATELLITE SYSTEMS. Alan H. Stratford (Hawker Siddeley International, Ltd. , London, England), p. 346- 364. 10 refs. [See A64-24585 20-081 A64-24577 ECONOMICS OF SATELLITE DESIGN - AN AMERICAN AS- THE SPACECRAFT OF THE RELAY PROJECT. SESSMENT. Samuel Gubin and Joel S. Greenberg (Radio Corpora- Raymond M. Wilmotte (Radio Corporation of America. Advanced tion of America, Camden, N. J.), p. 365-410. 28 refs. [See A64- Space Communications Systems, Camden, N. J. ). 24586 20-081 IN: TELECOMMUNICATION SATELLITES. THE FUTURE OF SATELLITE TELECOMMUNICATIONS. Edited by Kenneth W. Gatland. N. I. Korman and M. Handelsman (Radio Corporation of America, London. lliffe Books, Ltd.; Englewood Cliffs, N. J., Prentice-Hall, Camden, N. J.), p. 411-431. 14 refs. [See A64-24587 20-321 Inc., 1964, p. 84-129. INDEX, p. 433-441. Description of the Relay (1962 Beta Tau 1) experimental communications spacecraft designed for measurements of the behavior of communications equipmint in a space environment. The subjects treated include requirements for Relay spacecraft, A6424574 overall system, design approach, areas of ignorance and confidence, BACKGROUND AND PROSPECTS. power supply. microwave repeater, traveling-wave tube, telemetry, Kenneth W. Gatland. tracking and command, microwave antenna, and antenna system. IN: TELECOMMUNICATION SATELLITES. Other aspects discussed are testing of spacecraft and subassemblies. Edited by Kenneth W. Gatland. initial orbits, relay operation, spacecraft components, horizon London, Iliffe Books, Ltd.; Englewood Cliffs, N. J., Prentlce-Hall, scanner and Sun-aspect indicator, and measurements and tests in Inc., 1964, p. 1-13. the spacecraft. Review of the launches of the various communications satellites, and discussion of the Communications Satellite Act of 1962. It is stated that, so far, in terms of televlslon, a type of communications A64-24578 satellite has been discussed which depends on a ground receiving SY NCOM. station to acquire and process the incoming signals before channeling Donald D. Williams and Roger W. Cole (Hughes krcraft Co., them Lnto the established national networks for retransmission to Syncom Project Office, Culver Clty. Calif. ). home receiver$. The big hope for the future is that communications IN: TELECOMMUNICATION SATELLITES. satellites can be established in synchronous orbit which have Edited by Kenneth W. Gatland. sufficient broadcasting power to rediffuse sound and vision direct London, Iliffe Books, Ltd.; Englewood Cliffs, N. J., Prentice-Hall. to domestic aerials. It is noted that not only will this bring tele- Inc., 1964, p. 130-155. vision more cheaply to a world audience by eliminating expensive Description of the first series of Syncom satellites. The ground stations, but it has the prospect of opening up enormous topics considered include synchronous orbit, transfer orbit, effects opportunities in the underdeveloped countries. of errors on the orbit, perturbations of a synchronous orbit, control-system objectives, operation of the control system, attitude sensing, and Syncom 1 (1963 4A) and 2 (1963 31A). It is stated that future plans are proposed for an advanced synchronous AM2457S communications satellite which will have an 8:l increase in volume COMMUNICATIONS ORBITS. and mass over the present Syncom type of satellite. W. F. Hilton. IN: TELECOMMUNICATION SATELLITES. Edited by Kenneth W. Gatland. AM-24579 London, Iliffe Books, Ltd. ; Englewood Cliffs, N. J., Prentice-Hall, THE COURIER COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM. Inc., 1964, p. 14-51. 5 refs. James E. Bartow, Thomas P. Mottley, and Walter P. Teetsel Consideration of the worldwide demand for communications (U.S. Army, Electronics Research and Development Laboratory, satellites. The topics discussed include demand for intercontinental Fort Monmouth, N. J. ).

21 A64-24580

IN: TELECOMMUNICATION SATELLITES. IN: TELECOMMUNICATION SATELLITES. Edited by Kenneth W. Gatland. Edited by Kenneth W. Gatland. London, Iliffe Books, Ltd. ; Englewood Cliffs, N. J., Prentice-Hall, London, Iliffe Books, Ltd. ; Englewood Cliffs, N. J., Prentice-Hall. Inc., 1964, p. 156-183. Inc., 1964, p. 242-282. nncrrln+7nnnf syqtem ronsiderations the Couri~v I-__-.?he design of I------Description of a complete study of a satellite communications (1960 Nu I) communications satellite system. designed as an ex- system. involving the satellite, as well as launching and communica- penmental system to demonstrate the feasibility of using satellites tions problems. in all their pssible aspects, to satisfy the require- for providing a solution to global communications problems. It ment for a worldwide civil telephone and cornmunlcat~on~sys - was designed to store teletype messages and transmit them at high tem. The topics considered include the civil communications re- speed while the satellite is in view of a ground station, The system quirement, consideration of satellite orbits to fulfill the requirement, used an active repeater satellite, approximately 500 lb in mass, circular polar and equatorial orbits, elliptical orbits at 63.4O. orbiting the Earth at an altitude of 690 miles. The orbit achieved attitude stabilization using naturally occurring control torques, was almost circular and was inclined with respect to the equator at attitude stabilization by active control, some factors affecting an angle of 28O. The Thor-Able Star booster configuration was used satellite design, and conclusions on the main factors in system to launch the satellite into orbit on Oct. 4, 1960. It is stated that design. Other subjects discussed are a possible system and satellite the results obtained during orbital tests indicated a sharp threshold design, the station-keeping accuracy to be achieved, overall deslgn for error-rate measurements which was correlated to the received of the satellite, design of the control system, proposed development signal level. In addition, error-rate bursts were observed which program, proposed operational system, the communicatlons re- could be correlated to satellite spin rate. An average error rate of quirement, cost of the operational system, and future system approximately 1/3000 characters was observed. development.

AM24583 A64-24580 A DESIGN STUDY FOR AN EQUATORIAL, CIRCULAR-ORBIT, PROSPECTS FOR EUROPE - THE UNITED KINGDOM GROUND COMSAT SYSTEM (BSDC). STATION AND THE TELSTAR AND RELAY TESTS AND DEMON- G. K. C. Pardoe (British Space Development Co., Ltd., London, STRATIONS. England). W. J. Bray (G,ncral Post Office. Post Office Research Station, (International Astronautical Federation, Congress, 13th. Varna. London, England). Bulgaria, Sept. 1962. )

IN: TELECOMMUNICATION SATELLITES.~~ IN: TELECOMMUNICATION SATELLITES. Edited by Kcnncth W. Gatland. Edited by Kenneth W. Gatland. London. Iliffe Books, Ltd. ; Englrwood Cliffs, N. J., Prrntice-Hall, London. lliffe Books, Ltd. ; Englewood Cliffs, N. J., Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1964, p. 184-205. Inc., 1964, p. 283-317. Discussion of European participation In satellitr communications Description of Investigations of the entire problem of communi- systems and expcrlmrntal tcstlng. Thc subjrcts considered lnrludc cations satellites, performed by the British Space Development a coopcrativt, program witti thr US, thr Brltlsh Post Offlcc satel1,te Company since 1961, with a view to providing full global service, conimun>cationssystrm ground station, prrlirninary results of with emphasis on British Commonwealth and European Interests. tests and demonstrations using Tclstar (1962 Alpha Epsilon I, and The subjects treated are Commonwealth and European requirements. 1963 13A). and prcliminary results of tcsts and dcmonstrations system and performance standards, launch vehicle and launching using Rrlay (1962 Beta Tau 1). It 1s concluded that the results site, factors affecting choice of orbit, equatorial systems, world obtained from thesc tests and dcmonstratlons to date have confirmed trunk route, orbit height, the North Atlantic route, summary of the expectation that communications satrllitcs could provide hrgh- satellite network, system mechanics, analysis of traffic and satel- quality stable circuits both for television and multichannel telephony. lite loading, and satellite requirement. Other sL5jects considered The good results obtained with the transmission of color television are modulation and telecommunications system, general criteria of signals, and in the tests involving 600 simulated telephone circuits, telecommunications performance. characteristics of telecommunica- are said to be particularly noteworthy. tions design, coexistence of the system with current microwave services, ground station aerials, ground stations and facilities, master technical control center, zone control stations, factors affecting satellite design, satellite configuration, and control system. A64-24581 The discussion includes solar-cell array, telecommunications re- DESIGN OF GROUND STATIONS. peaters, system costs and revenue, and expansion of system with H. A. Prime (Brush Electrical Engineering Co., Ltd., Lough- synchronous system. borough, England). IN: TELECOMMUNICATION SATELLITES. Edited by Kcnnrth W. Gatland. AM24584 London, Iliffe Books, Ltd.; Englewood Cliffs, N. J., Prentice-Hall, POWER UNITS AND PROPULSION PROBLEMS IN TELECOMMUNI- Inc., 1964, p. 206-241. 9 refs. CATIONS SATELLITES. Assessment of thc characteristics of a satellite communications M. Vernet-Lozet and G. de Claviere (Soci;t; d'Etude de la Propul- system whlch are relevant to the specification of thc ground-station sion par Rgaction, Villejuif, Seine, France). facility and to the station equipment necessary to fulfill the opera- IN: TELECOMMUNICATION SATELLITES. tional requirement. The topics considered include operational Edited by Kenneth W. Gatland. limitations, communications -system data, antenna-system data, London, Iliffe Books, Ltd. ; Englewood Cliffs, N. J., Prentice-Hall, orbital, strurhire, and drive and control characteristics, digital Inc.. 1964, p. 318-345. control requirc'rnrnts, auto-tracking rcquirements, installed Discussion of the problems connected with the establishment of equipment, antcnna and mechanical cquipment, drive equipmrnt, a telecommunications satellite. The subjrcts considered are point- control morlcb, sc.rvo cquipn>t'nt. digit.il cqulpnic'nt, .ind pv rior- to-point telecommunications, production of electrical energy, rn,~ncc,. An ,ippendi\ prov~di~b.m an.11ysrs oi orbit.il tr'irlung rc- chemical-energy generators, electrical-energy storage systems, q,,, r,~,n,'!,t>, solar-energy generators, photoelectric generators, thermodynamic cycle generators, conclusions about solar-energy generators, nuclear-energy generators. radionuclides, fission reactors, and orbiting problems for telecommunications satellites. AM24582 A DESIGN STUDY FOR AN EQUATORIAL, CIRCULAR-ORBIT. COMSAT SYSTEM (GPOJRAE). A64-24585 A. W. Lines, E. G. C. Burt. and A. G. Earl (Ministry of Aviation. THE ECONOMICS OF SATELLITE SYSTEMS.

Royal Aircraft Establishmrnt. Space Dept., Farnborough, Hants., Alan H. Stratford (Hawker Slddelry International, Ltd. ~ London, England). England).

22 A64-25030

IN: TELECOMMUNICATION SATELLITES. J. P. Houssin (Centre National d' Etudes des TEl~communications, Edited by Kenneth W. Gatland. Issy-les-Moulinraux, Seinr. France). London, Iliffe Books, Ltd.; Englewood Cliffs, N. J., Prentice-Hall, (International Conference on Satellite Communlcatlon, Nov. 26, In<., 1964, p. 346-364. 10 refs. 1962, Paper 4237 E. ) Survey of the principal lines of thought being pursued in the Electronics Record, Aiig. 1964, p. 1107-1410. economics study of communications satellites both in Europe and in Review of the principal results of telecommunications tests thc US. The topics considered inrlude prospects for Europe. wlth Telstar 1 conducted at the French Pleumeur-Uodou satellite- estimating the growth of telecommunications, comparison of satellitc tracking station. The acquisition and tracking equipment of the repeaters and underwater cables, principles of the economics station. which uses a 20-ni-diam. horn reflector antenna, are analysis, influence of parametric changes, operating costs and described. Experiments concernlng the received slgnal power, possible improvements In economy, traffic potential and the pros- noise power at radio frequencies, thermal nolse generated In the pects for growth, and assessment of future telecommunications transmission channel. and distortion are discussed. demand. It is concluded that studies in th? U. K. and US suggvst that a very adequate and expanding market for the use of hlgh- quality telecommunications facilities of all kinds exists an the North A6424722 Atlantic and between Europe and British Commonwealth and other ESTABLISHMENT AND REPLENISHMENT COMPARISON OF SYN- overseas terrltorles which, up until now, have not enjoyed hlgh CHRONOUS AND MEDIUM ALTITUDE SATELLITE SYSTEMS. standards of communicatlons service. I - SIMULATION APPROACH. G. C. Sponsler (Internatlonal Business Machlnes Corp., Federal Systems Div., Rockville, Md. ), R. J. Heppe (International A64-24586 Telephone and Telegraph Corp., Intelcom, Inc., Falls Church, Va. ), A. Gilbert (USAF, Systems Command, Research and ECONOMICS OF SATELLITE DESIGN - AN AMERICAN ASSESS- R. Technology Div., Weapons Laboratones, Klrtland AFB, N. Mex. ), MENT. M. H. Stripling (U. S. Naval Ordnance Laboratory, Washington. Samuel Gubin and Joel S. Greenherg (Radio Corporation of America, D. C. ), and W. C. Thompson (Control Data Corp., Rockville, Md.). Defense Electronic Products, Advanced Military Systems, Camden. I ANALYTIC APPROACH. J. Heppe (Internatlonal Tlephone N. J.). - R. IN: TELECOMMUNICATION SATELLITES. and Telegraph Corp., Intelcom, lnc., Falls Church, Va. ) Edited by Kenneth W. Gatland. IEEE, Proceedings, vol. 52, July 1964, p. 756-769. 8 refs. Presentation of equations and graphs which relate the growth London, Iliffe Books, Ltd.; Englewood Cliffs, N. J., Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1964, p. 365-410. 28 refs. and replenishment of a population of unrepairable equipments to the mean time before failure. replacement strategy, and other Study of the economics of a commercial satellite system. The following conclusions are made: (1) the projected traffic exceeds significant variables involved. Results are presented in a satellite installed and presently planned facilities by 1965. A satellite system system context, but it is believed that they may readily be general- can provide for this growing transoceanic traffic load thereafter: ized to other applications. In Part I, results are given which were obtained by simulation of various systems on digital computers. (2) the synchronous system will be more economical than the Part contains not only analytical equations and approximations medium-altitude system, or any other hown means of communica- I1 relating the quantities interest but also a discussion of an alter- tions including the overseas cables; (3) if system toll rates are of native computer approach. Results of the analytical approach are determined by large ground terminals, profitable operations by said to confirm concluslons arrived at by the Monte Carlo method small terminals competing for the same traffic may not be possible presented in the first part, with minor differences. for either system, particularly for the medium-altitude system; (4) the periods for the Initial investment and traffic growth are such that the better part of a decade may elapse before the Satcorp shows reasonable earnings; and (5) unrestricted access for all users into A64-24870 the satellite communications system is best provided by single-side - band modulation for transmission from the ground to the satellite; ATTITUDE DETERMINATION AND PREDICTION OF SPIN- STABILIZED SATELLITES. worldwide connectivity between users is better provided by the synchronous system. L. C. Thomas (Bell Telephone Laboratories, lnc., Murray Hill, N.J.) and J. 0. Cappellari (Bellcomm, Inc., New York, N. Y. ). Bell System Technical Journal, vol. 43, July 1964, p. 1657-1726. 22 refs. A64-24507 Presentation of techniques for both attitude determination and THE FUTURE OF SATELLITE TELECOMMUNICATIONS. prediction for spin-stabilized satellites. Their use 1s demonstrated N. I. Korman and M. Handelsman (Radio Corporation of America, using Telstar I and I1 satellite data. It is shown that an inclined Defense Electronic Products, Advanced Mditary Systems, Camden, dipole model of the Earth's magnetic field and the method of aver- N. J. ). aging the gravitational and magnetic torques over each anomalistic IN: TELECOMMUNICATION SATELLITES. period of the satellite permit attitude predictions to within a few Edited by Kenneth W. Catland. tenths of a degree of determined values In most instances. In the London, lliffe Books, Ltd. ; Englewood Cliffs. N. J., Prentice-Hall, fey cases where departures are above lo. explanations are pre- Inc., 1964, p. 411-431. 14 refs. sented to show the reason for such discrepancies. The usefulness Discussion of the likelihood that some sort of communications of combining optical-flash and solar-sensor data for attitude deter- satellite system will be put into use in the latter part of the 1960 mination and their inherent accuracy are demonstrated. It IS decade for transoceanic telephone traffic. The subjects considered stated that optical-flash data can provide loci with a resolution of include the high-power communications satellite, application to 0.1'. Solar-sensor loci are resolved to within 1'. It is noted that point-to-point communications, application to television broad- all techniques described have been consolidatzd into working com- casting, other uses for the 1970 high-power communications satellite, puter programs which follow closely the mathematical analysis and communications satellites beyond the 1970 decade. It is stated presented. that, whereas in the 1960's only the more wealthy nations will be able to afford communicatlons by satellite, in the 1970's smaller nations and large cities can be served, and in the 1980's and beyond, smaller and smaller communities will progressively have direct Ab4-25030 access to this service. EXOSPHERIC DENSlTIES DEDUCED FROM SATELLITE DRAG DATA. M. Roemer (Bonn, Unlversitat. Universltats-Sternwarte, Bonn, \Vest Grrmany). A64-24658 IN: SPACE RESEARCH IV; INTERNATIONAL SPACE SCIENCE SOME RESULTS AT PLEUMEUR-BODOU DURING TRANSMISSION SYMPOSIUM, 4TH, WARSAW, POLAND, JUNE 4-10, 1963, TESTS USING THE TELSTAR SATELLITE. PROCEEDINGS.

23 A64-25301

Organized by the Committee on Spare Research (COSPAR) and the technology, as well as the many natural capabilities of passive Polish Academy of Sciences. communication satellites, such as: long life, wide communications Edited by P. Muller. , stxtion keeping, high radio reflectivity to Amsterdam, North-Holland Publishing Co. ; New York, Interscience weight ratio, and terminal sharing. Information concerning gravity Publishers. 1961, p. 241-256. 30 refs. gradient stabiiizatiw and orbit position controi by soiar sailing 1s Presentation of exospheric densities In the altitude range of also presented. Parametric curves and tables relating link band- '900-1500 km derived from Echo I drag data taking full account of thc width, SNR, transmitter power, antenna gains, receiver noise tem- diurnal density \ariation. A diurnal drprndcnce of the amplitude of perature. path length, and satellite weight and diameter are in- thc 27-day drnbity varllition duc to thc solar activity effect 1s found. cluded. Low (2000 nautical miles) and synchronous orbit applica- lor this .iltitude rangt'. and an cnipirLcal correlation formula IS prt~ tions are discussed that use passive satellites in the 50- to sc.ntt,d. The dc,nsitlvs dcrivcd are higher than those of thc appro- 1100-It dlam. range. The expectation 1s expressed that the system prirltc' li.lrris-Pricstcr mod~~lby a factor of about 3, The !nost could fulfill most of the satellite communicatlon requirements on prubdblc. c\pl,ination fur this discrcpdncy 1s seen in a h1ghL.r COIIC~.II- this planet for the rest of the century. trdtiull vi hc,liun?. If thc anivunt of h~~liurnLS ~ncrcast.dby a factor of 2. 5 rlt th~.bc,iinrldry ut I20 kiri, thc agrccn\vnt of the oliscr\<,d data .iird th~.t~arri>-Pr>~~\lt~r i11od<,1 1s fiiiiiid to bv very good. A64-26202 ORBlTAL ASPECTS OF NONSYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATION SATELLITE SYSTEMS. A64-25301 Hans K. Karrenberg and R. Davld Luders (Aerospace Gorp., As- TORQUES AND ATTITUDE SENSING IN SPIN-STABILIZED trodvnamics Dept., El Segundo, Calif. ). SYNCHRONOUS SATELLITES. (An,erLt,in lnstitutr of Acr~n.~111. i and Astrunaurlcs, Astrodynanllcs Donald D. Williams (Hughes Aircraft Co. , Project Syncom, Conirrrnce. Neu Haven. Conn., ,lug. 19-21, 1963. Pclper b3-397. ) Systcm Design Dupt. , Culvcr City, Calif.). IN: CELESTI hl LLECHANICS AND ASTR0i)YNruIICS (PROCRESS IN: 'TORQUES AND ATTITUDE SENSING IN EkRTH SATELLITES. IN ASTROPqAUTICS AND AERONAUTICS. VOLUME 14). Edited by S. Fred Stnper. Edited by Vlctor G. Szebehely. rNeiv Yurk, Academic Press, lnc., 1964, p. 159-174. 5 refs. New York, Academlc Press, Inc., 1964, p. 203-255. 7 refs. Description of the dttitudc-control proccdurcs for the spln- Contract No. AF 04(695)-169. stabiIiAcd Syncum satellites. Thc launch procedures and subsequunt [For abstract see Accession no. A63-21714 21-29] operations of thc synchronous Syncom are outlined. The Syncom attitud~-scns~ngsystcn, IS rcvicwvd, and consists of a solar sensing systrm on thc sattllitt~,and RF scns~ngfroirt thc ground. The nutation, or frcc-body turqu-frcc dv\l,itiu,r from un~fortnspln A64-26242 0 for Syncom. is deriv<,d, and thv Synroin nutdtiun dimprr IS descrlbrd. SYNCHRONOUS OBSERVATIONS OF THE "ECHO-1" ARTIFICIAL Thi prcc~'bs~onrffects duc to jc't pulsing for .rttltude control are EARTH SATELLITE FOR GEODETIC PURPOSES [SINKHRONNYE exainin<.d. 0tlit.r disturbing ttjrqurs. includtng g.ravlty-gradlent NABLIUDENIIA ISKUSSTVENNOGO SPUTNIKA ZEMLI "EKHO-I" c.ifects, dr,' also collsrdrred. DLIA CEODEZICHESKIKH TSELEI]. D. E. Shchegolev. A. G. Masevlch, and B. G. Afanas'ev (Akademlla Nauk SSSR, Astronomlcheskli Sovet, USSR). Akadrmira Nauk SSSR, Vpstnlk, July 1964. p. 74-77. In A64-25485 Russian. COMMUNICATION SATELLITES. Outline of the design principles and descriptlon of the technique G. E. Mueller and E. R. Spangler (Space Technology Laboratories, used in observatlon of the American satelllte early in May 1961, by Inc., Redondo Beach, Calli. ). the Pulkovo, Tashkent, Kharkov, and Nlkolayev photographrc sta- New York, John Wlley and Sons, Inc.. 1964. 280 p. tions. The method developed and used by the stations permits an $10. accuracy in time measurements of *2 millisec. The stations follow A general review IS made of the available technology for the a single program so that wlthln fixed tlme intervals a sequence of establishment of conimunication satellite systems. The technical photographs LS made with one film. The moments of all photographs feasibility 1s granted and is found to rest on elght factors: rocket are translated into a system of standard time ldentlcal Lor all sta- vehicle hardware and techniques which have been deve.loped largrly tions. The observatlons of the satelllte were repeated in 1963 on a in the ballistic missile programs; the improvement of performance larger scale to determine the accuracy of improved techniques. and reliability through advanced rocket~developmentprograms, the experience in building, launching, and communicatmg with satellites In space; a gradually improving knowledge of the space environment and its effects on equlpment, electrlc power supplles whlch drrlvc A64-26278 their energy either from the Sun or from nuclear or chemical fuels; EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF THE NIGHT EXTINCTIOh very low-noise receivers; techniques for sensing and controlling FROM BRIGHTNESS OBSERVATIONS OF THE ECHO 1 (1960) ARTI- vehlcle attitude In space; and the ground tracklng equipment and FICIAL SATELLITE [VER~UCHZUR BESTIMMUNG DER NACHT- higli-speed computers needed for accurate ephemeris determination LICHEN EXTINKTION AUS HELLlGKEITSBEOBACHTUNGEN DES and control. Topics covered include actlve vs passlve satellltes. K~NSTLICHENSATELLITEN ECHO 1 (1960)]. orbit coverage and control, structure and temperature control. H. Wiirner. choice of frequency, telemetry. tracklng, and command, rellabllity, Astronomie und Raumfahrt, no. 2, 1964, p. 60-68. 6 refs. In and costs. German. Derivation oi extinction values from photographlc brightness measurements of the Echo I satellite in Potsdam in 1960. On the basis of the results obtained, Lt 1s shown that the extinction has Its A6425901 maximum In the southeast azimuths and eabt wind directions. The POTENTIAL PASSIVE SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM results of earlier measurements on stars and solar radiation are FOR ALL NATIONS. Lonfirnied qualitatively. Some requirements are imposed on the Charles M. Kelly (Goodyear Arrospace Gorp., Astronautir~ future brightness measurements of satellites in order to obtain Systems Dept., Akron, Ohio). extinction fluctuations. Intrrnntinnal Astronautical Congress, 15th. Warsaw, Poland, __~ ~~ ~ __ Sept. 1964. Paper. 45 p. 8 refs. Presentation of d.ita concerning thp growth potential and char- acteristics 01 the lenticular gravity-gradienl-stabilized passive A64-26329 comnnrnrcation satellites that are presently being developed by CONFERENCE ON SPACE SCIENCE AND , UNIVER- NASA and Goodyear Aerosparc. A wtnmunirdtion system IJ de- SITY OF OKLAHOMA, NORMAN, OKLA., JUNE 18-20. 1963, scribed that exploits recent advances Ln space and communications PROCEEDINGS.

24 A64-26335

Conference sponsored by the College of Law of the University of Eugene F. O'Neill (Bell Telephone Laboratories, Inc. , Satellite Oklahoma; the Business and Industrial Servlces of the University Communications Laboratory. Murray Hill, N. J. ). of Oklahoma Extension Div. ; the Frontiers of Sclence Foundation IN: CONFERENCE ON SPACE SCIENCE AND SPACE LAW, of Oklahoma, Inc. ; the Liberty National Bank and Trust Co. ; and UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA, NORMAN, OKLA., JUNE 16-20, the Oklahoma Bar Association. 1963, PROCEEDINGS. Edited by Mortlmer D. Schwartz (Oklahoma, University, Dept. of Conference sponsored by the College of Law of the University of Law, Norman, Okla. ). Oklahoma; the Business and Industrial Services of the University South Hackensack, N. J., Fred B. Rothman and Co., 1964. 176 p. of Oklahoma Extension Div. ; the Frontiers of Science Foundation 56. 75. oi Oklahoma, Inc., the Liberty National Bank and Trust Co. ; and the Oklahoma Bar Association. CONTENTS: Edited by Mortimer D. Schwartz. SESSION 1 - INTRODUCTION. South Hackensack, N. J., Fred B. Rothman and Co., 1964, p. 42-47. SCIENCE, THE SCIENTIST AND SPACE. Lloyd V. Berkner Presentation of 18 photographs, diagrams, and drawings. wlth (Southwest Center for Advanced Studles, Dallas, Tex. ), p. 1-13. descriptive text for each. The first six Illustrations and their text [See A64-26330 22-01] outline the principles of communications satelhtes. The Telstar 2 THE IMPLICATIONS OF SPACE ACTNITIES. Howard J. (1963 13 Alpha) satellite and its equipment are described, with three Taubenfeld (Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Tex. ), p. 14-26. photographs: a general view, the interior of the electronics canister, [See A64-26331 22-01] and the sensors for Van Allen radiation. A map and an aerial photo- graph give details of the Andover, , ground station. The SESSIONS 2 AND 3 - THE PEACE SIDE. horn reflector antenna and the command and telemetry antenna are THE REVOLUTION IN METEOROLOGY. Walter J. Saucier examined. The Britleh Goonhilly Downs antenna, the French station (Oklahoma. University. Norman, Okla. ), p. 27-41. [See at Plumeur-Bodou, and the Italian statlon at Fu'cino recelve attention. A64-26332 22-21] The Tclstar orbit 1s depicted by R drawing, and a Tvlstar-transmitted SCIENTIFIC ASPECTS OF COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES. photograph 15 presented. Eugene F. O'Neill (Bell Telephone Laboratories, Inc., Murray Hill, N. J. ), p. 42-47. [See A64-26333 22:08] COMMUNICATION BY SATELLITE. George J. Feldman A64-26334 ' (Communications Satellite Corp., Washington, D. C. ), p. 48-53. COMMUNICATION BY SATELLITE. [See A64-26334 22-08] Gcorge J. Feldman (Communlcatlons Satellite Corp., Washington, D. C. ). SESSIONS 4 AND 5 - THE CONFLICT SIDE. IN: CONFERENCE ON SPACE SClENCE AND SPACE LAW, WEAPONS AND SPACE. W. E. Berg (U.S. Navy, Washington, UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA, NORMAN, OKLA., JUNE 16-20, D. C. ), p. 54-59. [See A64-26335 22-01] 1963, PROCEEDINGS. WEAPONS AND SPACE. Kenneth W. Schultz (USAF, Conference sponsored by the College of Law of the University of Washington, D. C.), p. 63-67. [See A64-26336 22-01] Oklahoma; the Business and Industrial Services of the University WHY A MILITARY SPACE PROGRAM? Benjamln Forman of Oklahoma Extension Div. ; the Frontiers of Science Foundation (Department of Defense, Washington, D. C. ), p. 68-77. [See af Oklahoma, Inc. ; the Liberty Natlonal Bank and Trust Co. ; and A64-26337 22-01] the Oklahoma Bar Association. AVOlDINd CONFICT IN AND OVER SPACE. Leonard C. Ed1tt.d by Mortimrr D. Schwartz. Meeker (Department of State, Washington, D. C. ), p. 78-81. South Hackensack, N. J., Fred B. Rothman and Co., 1961, p. 48-53, [See A64-26338 22-01] Discussion of progress in extending successful experiments to SESSIONS 6 AND 7 - THE COOPERATIVE SIDE. the level of a worklng lnternatlonal communlcatlons system. The CO-OPERATION IN SPACE SCIENCE - THE GOVERNMENTAL Declaration of Policy and Purpose of the Communications Satellite SIDE. Arthur L. Levme (NASA, Goddard Space Fllght Center, Act of 1962, setting forth the guidelines for the US effort, is quoted N. Y. ), p. 82-88. [See A64-26339 22-01] verbatim, and various present and future aspects of 11s executlon INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION IN SPACE SCIENCE. are discussed. The roles of Europe, the USSR, and the UN are Ross C. Peavey (Southwest Center for Advanced Studies, Dallas, briefly e.ramlned. Some particulars of the Conimunlratlons Satel- Tex. ), p. 89-101. [See A64-26340 22-01] lite Corporation are presented. ASTRONOMY FROM SPACE. Thomas D. Nicholson (Amerlcan Museum of Natural History, New York, N. Y. ), p. 102-109. [See A64-26341' 22-05] A64-26335 e WEAPONS AND SPACE. SESSIONS 8 AND 9 - THE NATIONAL SIDE. W. E. Berg (U. S. Navy, Office of Chief of Naval Operations, SOME SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS OF ORGANIZING FOR A SPACE Astronautics and Range Div. , Astronautics Branch, Washington, EFFORT. Robert L. Barre (NASA, Headquarters, Washington, D. C. ). D. C. ), p. 110-119. [See A64-26342 22-01] IN: CONFERENCE ON SPACE SCLENCE AND SPACE LAW, SPACE AND THE NATIONAL ECONOMY. Edward C. Welsh UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA, NORMAN, OKLA., JUNE 18-20, (National Aeronautlcs and Space Council. Washington, D. C. ), 1963, PROCEEDINGS. p. 120-126. [See A64-26343 22-01] Conference sponsored by the College of Law of the University of Oklahoma; the Business and Industrial Services of the University SESSION 10 - LEGAL PROBLEMS. of Oklahoma Extension Div. ; the Frontiers of Science Foundation FORMULATION OF SPACE LAW. Martin Menter (USAF, of Oklahoma, Inc. ; the Liberty National Bank and Trust Co. ; and Washington, D. C. ), p. 127-137. [See A64-26344 22-01] the Oklahoma Bar Association. FREEDOM AND CONTROL IN OUTER SPACE. John A. Edited by Mortimer D. Schwartz. Johnson (NASA, Headquarters, Washington, D. C. ), p. 138-145. South Hackensack, N. J., Fred B. Rothman and Co., 1964, p. 54-59. [See A64-26345 22-01] General discussion of military aspects of space science. but CRIMINAL RESPONSIBILITY IN OUTER SPACE. Edward W. with exclusion of ballistic missiles. The importance of meteoro- Haughney (U. S. Army, Washington, D. C. ), p. 146-150. [See logical, communications, navigational, geodetic, and other data- A64-26346 22-01] gathering satellites in military planning is examined in some detail. The concept of using unmanned, orbiting, data readout stations to KEYNOTE ADDRESS. measure sea conditions. water and air temperatures, cloud cover, LAW AND PUBLIC ORDER IN SPACE. Myres S. McDougal and precipitation in remote areas is discussed. In discussing the (Yale University, New Haven, Conn. ), p. 151-176. 19 refs. [See A64-26347 22-01] evolution of space law, it 1s considered that this will be governed by the characteristics of the space envlronment. Parallels wlth maritime l,aw are discussed. Comment is made that it is difficult A6426333 e to classify all military space systems as weapons and all non- SClENTIFIC ASPECTS OF COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES, military satellites as peaceful tools.

25 A64-26336

A64-26336 WEAPONS AND SPACE. Kenneth W. Schultz (USAF, Directorate of Development Planning, Space Development Plans Div., Washington, D. C. ). 5:CO?!FE"E?!CE C?! S,D"CE SCKNCE AXE SFACE LAW, UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA, NORMAN, OKLA., JUNE 18-20, 1963, PROCEEDINGS. Conference sponsored by the College of Law of the University of Oklahoma; the Business and Industrial Services of the University of Oklahoma Extension Div. ; the Frontiers of Sclence Foundation of Oklahoma, Inc.; the Liberty Natlonal Bank and Trust Co. ; and the Oklahoma Bar Association. Edited by Mortimer D. Schwartz. South Hackensack, N. J., Fred B. Rothman and Co., 1964, p. 60-67. Discussion of the military implications of space and the nuhtary spact systrlri poss~bllllteswhich are considered lo be of interest from the aspect of space law. Effort 1s being made to satisfy two broad objectives: (1) to develop space systems whlch will augment present military capabilltles on land, sea,and in the alr. and (2) to seek r.ipabilities prrmlttlng man to conduct operations in space itself. The first objectlve involves communications sys- tems and reconnaissance systems, a military mrteorologlcal sur- vey system, a ballistic missile defense. and an early warning sys- tem. The second objective involves detection and tracking of objects in space, satellite inspection, satelhte Interception, and space en- vironment monitoring. Also discussed are the problems of man in space, the Gemini 2-man spacecraft, the X-20 space glider, the military orbital devplopment eysteni, the Titan Ill buostrr. and certain camplcx space systems of the future.

A64-26402 COMMUNICA'TION SYSTEMS USING SATELLITES. W. J. Bray (G<.neral Post Office, Post Ofli'c Res~,.irchStation, L ondo 11, England). (nrltisilA~~~~ tilc. ~d~~~~~ L.I)lC.lltof SCI~~U~.sC.ct1un G

Eng~t~~~~~ring,Mc,t,tii,g, Suuth.in-,n. . ~ Engl.inr1. !tie. -St.pt.~ ~ ~ ~~~~I PJprr.) Enginccrmk, "01. 198, Sepl. 11. 19b4, p. 344-346. Brirf suriry 01 thc. technical problerns Invol\cd In the design of a worldwide satellite coniniuni~ations systcm. Serrral alternative approachrs to the dcsign of such a system are exanuned. The possibility of providing a flvxible highly efficient transmission system IS demonstrated by eramplrs of the Trlstar. Rrlay, and Syncom satellitrs. A worldwide system using 12 aatellites in an cquaturial 14, 000-km (8-hr) urbit 1s discussed, and a schcniatic diagram ai satellilt, conimunicationS equipment 1s presc.ntrd.

26 A64-26778

CO,~~~~~~~~~~C~~~~UIIsatc.llites 1s ilidrac terizcd by ~nultiplc satcllitcs , trackcd from ground stations and uscd to iiialntaln onc or inore links 0~1.rthose. p~rt~oiisof the>=individual orbits when mutual visibility- exists. It 1s deterin>ned that bctween 18 and 33 satellltcs are rt.- quirtd for such a system - the actual number depcndtng on the number of links desired and the degrre of continuity dcscred. Re- quirements of effective radiated po\\er and bandnldth ~I-Coutlined, and limitation and vifrcts of payload wright and radiation damage are considcrcd. A nuinher of graphs dlsplay data including: \ rhicle capacity \s altitude, effective radlated po-er 1s \OICC channrl capacity, and wcight of solar cell shLeldlng YS altitude. A power-sys- tcwn block diagram 1s prcscnted. D. H.

A64-26766 ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY FOR SYNCHRONOUS SATELLITES. H. A. Roscn (Hughes Aircraft Co. , Space Systems DIL., Culver City, Calli. ). IN: INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION ON MILITARY ELECTRONICS. BTH. WASHINGTON, D. C., SEPT. 14-16, 1964. CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS. Confercncr sponsorcd by the Mtlitary Electronics Group of the Institute of Elcctrical and Elrctronics Engineers. Editcd by B. J. Goldfarb. Nurth Holl)\\ood, Wcstcrn Pcnodicals Co. , 1964, p. 248-250.

Rc, L(IW uf thv Syn~oniaiid Adia,r< Syn~oinprograr~is. Syn"~m LS rrportl.d to be B spin-stabiltzed, synchronous conimun1catlons b.ttrllite de\cloped by Hughes Aircrait Company for KASA. As a rcsult of dciclopmcntal work (concentrated on reducing the \\clght iiid incrcascng the cificieniy of thc rcpcater ahoard these satellites) and the fa\orablc conditions at the o1xratlng altitude, synchronous coiiiiiiuni~,ition satrllites (as rxempllficd by S)niom 2 - 1963 31.4) irv said to bc pro\cn practical. It is ir1dicatc.d that tlii, launch < ost tirib becn rcduced to that of a siiiylr medium altitude satellitc of equi\alent pcrforinanrc. and the a\ailahdit) of Syncon, for handlinp A64-26764 upcrational traffic, niilitary or coniiiirrclal, has come inlore qunckly THE SEARCH FOK LONG-LIFE COXllfUNlCATION SATELLITES. than that oi any othcr system. An outsro\\tli 01 the S)niuni and Roy H. Bcaton (Gencral Electric Co. , Miisile and Spec DLL., Hd\anic.d S)n~oni~progranis, the Early Bird or HS-303 satcllltc, Spacecraft Dept. , Vallvy Forge, Pa. ). 1s also dtsrusscd. Tcn illutrations are Incluc!<.d \\hich shon thr IN: INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION ON XfILITARY ELECTRONICS, twtlol~ui thl, subs,ttrilitc pount for Syncom 2, 1<2-02 stahtlization HTH, WASHINGTON, D. C., SEPT. 1-1-16, 1964, CONFERENCE and antenna systunis for HS-303, and dctdllcd \ LUWS of Syncom sub- PROCEEDINGS. systvnls. D. H. Confcrcnrc spowsor~dby the .Military Elrctronics Group of thc Institutc of Elcctrical and Eltctronics Englneers. Edited by B. J. Goldfarh. North Holly\vood, Westcrn Periudicals Co. , 1964, p. 241-244. Rc,port of a study of ways to achieie a 3- to 5-yr ~iii.dntime to failurrs (MTTF) for nonnraintainable CoiiiinunLcationS satrll,.:s and thercby improve ronimunication-satelllte economics so that ach systems becomc competitive wlth ground-based systems. Basic principles applic,d to the problem ire: drsign s>niplsfication.re- dundancy of critical components, use of high-reltabtlity parts, stringcnt quality control, and rigorous tcsting. Grabity gradient stabilization techniques and a system utilizing a Sun sensor are described, and xarious quality control procedures are outli led. The effects of hlgh vacuum and solar radiation on components are studlrd \vith thc GE space environmental siniulator. It 1s bc,lie\ed that the work nvs being done will have provcd its bborth when oprrat.inal communications s)-stclns ulth satellites ha\ ~nglifetimes of 3, 5, or even 10 ycars arc devrlopcd. D. H.

A64-26765 FACTORS IN SYSTEM DESIGN OF MEDIUM ALTITUDE RANDOM COMMUNICATION SATELLITES. J. D. Aronson (Radio Corporation of America, Defense Elrctronics Products. Astro-Electronics DLV., Princeton, N. J. ). IN: INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION ON MILITARY ELECTRONICS, XTH, WASHINGTON, D. C., SEPT. 14-16, 1964, CONFEEENCE PROCEEDINGS. A64-26778 Contc.rvnce sponsored by the Military Elrctronics Group of the ELECTRONICALLY STEERABLE ANTENNAS FOR COMhlUNICA- Institutr of El<,ctr>caland Electronics Engineers. TION SATELLITES. Edited by 8. J. Goldfarb. D~,nnisL. BLr

27 A64-26779

A64-16916 APPLICATIONS OF SATELLITES [APPLICATIONS DES SATELLITES 1. M. Thue (Crntre National d' Etude des T61~comrnumcatlons. Issy-les-Moulineaux, Seine. France) and J. Voge (Centre National d' Etude des T&lecornmunlcatlons, Issy-Ies-Moullneailr. Selne, Centre National d' Etudes Spatiales, Parls, France). IN: ASTRONAUTIQUE ET RECHERCHE SPATULE. Edlted by Henri Moureu and Mlchel Yves Bernard. Paris. Dunod, 1964. p. 246-269. 5 refs. In French. Discu4sion of the various apphcatlons of satelhtes. The sub- ject- considered are the different categories of cornmunicatlon satel lites. random-distribution satellites. synchronized and stationary satellites. experiments undrr\r,ij or contemplated, meteorologrcal satellites. international cooperation, r.idiu navigation satellites. geodt.tic satellites. and satellite Anna. A table gives a forecast for 1970 and LWO of telephone comrnunlcatlons, including cables and messages, between the U. S., Europe, South America, Africa, and Asia. M. M.

28 A65-11131 aitc, appli

A65-11109 =r LARGE AIR SUPPORTED RADOMES FOR SATELLITE COMMUNICA- 1965 TIONS GROUND STATION. Walter W. Bird (BIRDAIR Structures, Inc., Buffalo, N.Y.). IN: OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY AND USAF, RESEARCH AND TECH- NOLOGY DIVISION (OSU-RTD), SYMPOSIUM ON ELECTROMAG- NETIC WINDOWS, 7TH, OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY, COLLIMBUS, A65-10073 IZ OHIO, JUNE 2-4, 1964, PROCEEDINGS. VOLUME 5. COOPERA? ION OF THE USSR \hD THE US 1N SPICE EX Columbus, Ohio State University. 1964. 12 p. PLORATION [SOTRUDNICHESTVO SSSR I SSHA V KOSMI- Discussion of the deslgn and development of Telstar radomes. CHESKIKH ISSLEDOVANIIAKH]. The history of the development of air-supported radomes, from A. A. Blagonravov. their beginnings in 1946 at the Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory, LS Akademlia Nauk SSSR, Vrstnik, iol. 34, Oct. 1%4, p. 82-M4. given as an introduction into the topic. The problems associated In Russian. with the Telstar radome are then considered. Material development, Brief review of the Geneva talks brtvcen the USSR and the fabrication techniques, and equipment reliability are studied, and US, on the peaceful use of ,pace ~ontlu~tetlsince IYbL. Con>miin~- the approach to the erectlon of large radomes is discussed. cations, magnetic and meteorological observations vla satellites, M. L. and technical problems of cooperation are nlentioned. .Agreement IS reached on the rxchange of data on the magnetic ohser\ations. A65-11131 = Recommendations are made for joint ~~OJECIS,arid iliture rfforts SELECTED STUDIES OF SPACE BROADCASTING. are outlined. v. 7.. R. P. Haviland (General Electric Go., Philadelphia, Pa. ). International Astronautical Federation, International Astronautical Congress, 15th, Warsaw, Poland, Sept. 7-12, 1964, Paper. I1 p. 15 refs. A65-11003 Discussion of the problems and possibilities of space broad- RADlATION DAMAGE TO SOLAR CELLS ON RELAY I AND RELAY casting. In particular, three groups of problems are considered: 11. (1) the technical problem of providing a high-quality broadcast ser- Ramond C. Waddel (NASA, Goddard Space Flight Cenrer, vice from space; (2) the problem of providing a compatible service, Greenbelt, Md. ). which arises from differences in broadcast standards around the IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science, vol. NS-11, Nov. 1964, world; and (3) the problem of assuring equitable operatlon. The p. 60-68. study 1s limited to television broadcasting. To show the differences Analysis of data monitored aboard the Relay 1 (1962 Beta in the problems, a developed and a developing area are examined Upsilon 1) and Relay 2 (1964 3A). The data monitored and analyzed first; the mainland US and the subcontinent of India are used as include the short-circuit currents from 1 ohm-cm silicon NIP, examples. This 1s followed by an examination of a multinational silicon PIN, and gallium arsenide solar cells - which had shields area, Africa being chosen as an example. In each case, attention up to 60 mils thick. The currents from all cells decreased because IS given to the present situation, to factors affecting the problem, of damage by the trapped particles in the Van Allen radiation belts. and to the requirements of suitable coverage. J. R.

29 A65-11335

A65-11335 A65-11467 MULTIPLE ACCESS TECHNIQUE FOR COMMERCIAL COMMUNI- A STUDY OF MULTIPLE ACCESS TO AN ACTIVE COMMUNICA- CATION SATELLITES. TION SATELLITE EMPLOYING HARD LIMITING. W. B. Garner and H. R. Mathwich (Radio Corporation of America, H. M. Glbbons (Sylvanla Electric Produrts. Inc., Sylvania Elec- !.~:~~.E:cc:roa~cs 2:v. , F’rlnc=tx, N. :. i. tronic Systems Div., Williamsville, N. Y. ). IN: NATIONAL ELECTRONICS CONFERENCE, ZOTH, CHICAGO, IN: INTERNATIONAL SPACE ELECTRONICS SYMPOSIUM, LAS ILL., OCTOBER 19-21, 1964, PROCEEDINGS. VOLUME 20. VEGAS, NEV., OCTOBER 6-9, 1964, RECORD. Chicago, National Electronics Conference. Inc. , 1964, p. 460-465. New York, Institute of Electrical and Elcctronlcs Engineers, Space I2 refs. Electronlcs and Telemetry Group, 1961, p. 6-c-l to 6-C-9. Consideration of the problem of multiple access In plannlng for Analysis of the problem of sxmultaneously relaying two wide- the commercial use of communication satellites. The system re- band phase-coded binary signals and onr CW signal by means of a qulrements and applicable evaluation criteria are briefly discussed, hard Iimitlng satellite. A direct time-domaln form of analysls 1s and sevcral of the solutions which are currently being proposed are used. An rxprc~~~onfor the conditional prohablllty of blt errors listed. One specific technique, by which several ground stations at a wtdehand correlation r~celver1s derived. The expresslon IS can simultaneously use one satellite repeater, 1s described and evaluated numerically for an assumed TW product of 100. The illustratud. This technique consists of passing a numher of in- resultant bit-error ratcs are diagramed vs slgnal power levels. dependent carriers on different frequenc L~Sthrough a wideband The diagrams also demonstrate a slgnlflrant dependence of error active repeater. Each carrier 1s frequency-modulated w>th fre- rate upon thc relative timing between two wideband slgnals and the quency division multiplex and voi~echannrl traffic. It LS noted that relative phase angles of each of the signals. v. z. this multiple carrier FDM-FM system has multiple carr’ier ef- ficiencies (in the 2- to IO-channel examples for the large-channel case1 which vary between 83 and 58%. For the small-channel rase the rfflrtencv varttls be1wsr.n k8 and 24%. M. M. A65-11468 OPTIMUM DESIGN OF A SATELLITE COMMUNICATION NET. 5. S. Yau (Northwcstern University. Evanston, Ill. ). A65-11336 IN: INTERNATIONAL SPACE ELECTRONICS SYMPOSIUM, LAS k-~RROADCASTI~YG FROM SATELLITES - PRELIMINARY CON- VEGAS, NEV., OCTOBER 6-9, 1964, RECORD. SIDERATION OF STANDARDS AND SHARING. New York, Institute of Electrical and Electronlcs Engineers, Space R. P. Haviland (General Electric Co. , Philadclpbia, Pa. ). Electronlcs and Telemetry Group, 1964, p. 6-d-l to 6-d-ti. 8refs. IN: NATIONAL ELECTRONICS CONFERENCE, LOTH. CHICAGO, Grant No. AF AFOSR 98-63. ILL., OCTOBER 19-21. 19~4,PROCEEDINGS. VOLUME LO. Presentatlon of a mm~rnum-costtechnique for deslgnlng a satel- C171, ago, Natlonal El~ctl-~n~~sCmlrrrn<.r, In<. , 1964. p. 470-471. lite communication net, consisting of three SUCC~SSIY~operational I1 rc.fs. steps nnninilzlng: (a) the number ol satellites used in the satellite Rer FM comniunicatlon net, (b) thc capacitirs of all thc satellite relay sta- br,lndcastlng frmii artill, IBI satt.11htc.s: (a) rura1~art.ncuvc.raCr tions, and (c)the caparrties of all the ground terminal stations. ll - 30 pV/m. (b) urli.in-ar~~acovvragt: - 250 pV/m. It 1s stated that 1s shown that a satell~tecommun1catlon nrtwork, satisfylng a spccl- both ai-c ~ntt.ndvdtii priivirlr at lc.ast SO dl~signal-nussv raliu5 w1ic.n fled flou matrix, normally provid~smor? coniniitnlcatlon capacities

11.1 ~.ivvdi,n standard FM TCCFIVCTS, us~ngoutdoor antennas. Shar- for certain pairs of stations than speclfled in thc flow matrlx. This log 1x.twrrn ~onvc1nt~onaland space FM broadcasting IS found tu be redundancy 1s analyzed and expressed as the so-called terminal feasil,lc under lhv fi,llow~ngconrlit3ons: (I) co-channel sharing IS capacity matrlx. The technique proposed 1s believed to give the frasibltt for tbr 50-~V/msignal, with full FCC prutetllon ratios to most economlc solution provided that the cost of setting up a satel- the urban < ov~ragrzone of the terrestrial station; (21 adjarrnt lite relay statlon 1s much higher than that of increasing the capaci- channel sharing is fras>bli. for the ZSO-pV/m signal with full protrc- ties of a satellite relay station which, in turn, 1s much higher than tion to the urban

A65-11510 THE MEASUREMENT OF THE TOTAL HEMIhPHERICAL EMIS- SIVITY OF MATERIALS USED IN TELSTAR. A M. Wittcnberg (Bell Telephonc Laboratorirs. Inc. , Whlppany, N. J.).

30 A65- 13541

IN: SOCIETY OF AFROSPACE MATERIAL AND PROCESS ENGI- A65-12120 NEERS, NATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON MATERIALS FOR SPACE MULTIPLE-CARRIER BEHAVIOR OF A FREQUENCY -SELECTIVE VEHICLE USE, 6TH, SEATTLE, WASH., NOVEMBER 18-20, 1963. FERRITE LIMITER. VOLUME 3. A. L. Bcrman (Radio Curporatmn uf Amcrica. DcIcnsc Elcctronlc Seattle, Society of Acrohpace Material and Process Engineers, Products, Astro-Electronids Div., Princeton, N.J. ). 1963. 37 p. 15 refs. IEEE Transactions on Communications Systems, "01. CS-12, June Description of a calorimetric method for determining total 1964, p. 138-150. hemispherical emissivity for the Telstar program. It consists of Communications Satellite Corp. Contract No. CSC-CS-103. placing a sample at the center of an evacuated enclosure whose Description of a frequency-selective ferrite limiter, its limiting walls arc blackened and cooled. The sample 1s heated from its action, and mode of operation in a commercial or military communi- interior, and the emissivity 1s determined at equilibrium tempera- cations satellite. The measurements made to determine the comniu- ture with the aid of the Stefan-Boltzmann radiation law. The method iiiCatioilS performance oi the devicc are sumnlarlzcd. SprcLfically , is capable of giving results which should be accurate to better than measurements covering the steady-state and dynamic bandwidth, the 3% for most samples. Its accuracy has been found to he dependent limiting action for one and two FM carriers, the phase linearity, on the emissivity, size, and thermal conductivity of the samples. and the between two FM carriers are presented. The M. M. measured performance oi the device is found to be in reasonable aerccn>cnt\bith thu pcrformancc predtctcd irum a s~mpllfledanalyt- ic modcl. The dc\Ice is shov.~~tu be csscntially distortionless for A65-11684 It a single widehand FM signal. With two carriers present, the limit- SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS AND NOISE. ing factor of performance 15 found to be coherent crosstalk. Francis E. 0'Meara (Douglas Aircraft Co., Inc., Missile and J.R. Space Systems Div., Santa Monica, Calif. ). International Astronautical Federation, International Astronautical Congress, 15th, Warsaw, Poland, Sept. 7-12. 1964, Paper. 24 p. 5 refs. A65-13098 Computation of SNR in satellite communications by accounting LUNAR COMMUNICATIONS. for all noise sources from the telephone transmitter to the receiver. Eberhardt Rechtin (California Institute of Technology. Jet Propul- Assuming that there is a fixed optimum ratio between power and sion Laboratory, Deep Space Instrumentation Facility, Pasadena, antenna area, the antenna gain vs frequency and the consequent sys- Calif. ). tem losses are computed. The useable RF bandwidth and noise level IN: LUNAR MISSIONS AND EXPLORATION. due to the Sun and sky background are calculated for two reprcsen- Edited by C. T. Leondes and R. W. Vance. tative types of modulation: single sideband and frequency modula- New York, John Wlley and Sons, Inc., 1964, p. 425-451. tion with feedback. The behavior of four representative types of Analysis of lunar communication theory and the application of teletype systems is estimated in the presence of noise from con- existing engineering technology, leading to the following concluslons: sideration of their basic characteristics. The systems considered (I) communication to and from the Moon 1s practical with data rates are amplitude modulation, frequency modulation, phase modulation, and quality comparable to those between points on the Earth; (2) and synchronous amplitude modulation. The binary error rate vs communication from the far side of the Moon 1s probably best signal-to-noise ratio 1s calculated using a simple phasor analysis. achieved with five or more lunar satellites In a lunar orbit of From these binary error rates, machine character error rates are 3500 miles or greater; (3) communication along the lunar surface derived from semiempirical observations of the teletype machine for distances of more than about 10 mlles 1s probably easlest via behavior. The effect of error-correcting coding on these machine a lunar satellite, particularly if a link also exists between the teletype systems is considered. The limiting characteristics of lunar satellite and the Earth; (4) In 1963, a standard FM system binary modulation systems are derived starting from information- IS probably best for a maximum frame rate from the Moon; by theory requirements. It is then possible to estimate the loss of 1968, SSB may be better; however, the choice of modulation tech- channel capacity in the presence of noise,how much of this channel nique is strongly influenced by operational constralnts; and (5) capacity is useable in terms of acceptable reliability, and finite optical frequencies are presently noncompetltlve for lunar com- times for transmission and decoding. T.V.Y. munications and nil1 probably remain so, with the possible ex- ception of applications requiring extreme directivity and very small antennas. (Author) M. M.

A65-12119 CRITERIA FOR THE CHOICE OF SYNCHRONOUS OR MEDIUM- ALTITUDE SYSTEM. A65-13541 Wilbur L. Pritchard (Aerospace Corp., El Segundo. Calif.). EXPANDABLE STRUCTURES. IEEE Transactions on Communications Systems. vol. CS-12, June F. W. Forbes (USAF, Systems Command, Technical Support 1964, p. 131-137. Div. , Aero Propulsion Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio). Examination of the peculrar requirements of a military communi- SpaceIAeronautlcs, vol. 42, bec. 1964, p. 62-68. cations satellite system as distinguished frpm a commercial one. Discussion of seven techniques of varying the volume of struc- The effects on the system of requiring It to operate with transport- tures so that they may he orbited In nose cones or cannlsters and able ground stations, to bc Jan,-reslstant, and to dcgradc gracefully then deployed in suhstantlally larger configurations. The seven are discussed. The choice of orbit inclination and altitude along techniques and typical applicatlons of each are: varlable geometry wlth the number of satellites 1s shown to be a function of booster with rigid components (panels and sensors), variable geometry payload capability, geometric coverage, and the cOmmunications with elastic recovery (crew transfer tunnel), inflatable balloon power budget. The effect of altitude on antljammlng is also con- (paraglider). alrmatt (lifting -body re-entry vehicle), rigldlzed sidered. It is shown that the choice of a communications satellite membrane (Echo Z), foamed-in-place (solar collector), and ex- system is critically dependent on the reliability of the booster mis- pandable honeycomb (expandable Mol). Propertles of the various SLOII, the possibility 01 multiple launching, and the tncaii tlinc-to-fall- structural materials are investigated and rated accordlng to struc- ure of the satellite. A booster I?IISSLOII for a medium-altitude systcln tural merit, rehability, heat resistance, shelf hfe, contour ac- IS dcscribcd ~n dctail, as arc thc li,Jectlon and random dispcrslon oi curacy, and flexlblllty In the cholce of conilguratlon. D. H. satellites into a common orbit. Typical communications link calcu- lations are shown to demonstrate the effects of key parameters on performance. A short discussion of the dependence of performance on weather, especially for very low-temperature receivers, 1s given. The growth of satellites irom a spin to gravity-gradient stabilization without serious changes In either dispenser or spacecraft is des- scrlbcd. Thc Implications of thls growth to systrm pcrformance drc outlined. (Author) .I.R.

31 Subject Index I COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES / a con tinu ing bib I io g raph y APRIL 1965

Listing of Subject Headings of Reports LTMOSPHERIC REFRACTION ATMOSPHERIC REFRACTION EFFECT ON RADIO WAVES IN EARTH-SATELLITE COMMUNICATION LINK UNDER VARIOUS A Notation of Content. rather than the title of the document. appears under TROPOSPHERIC AND IONOSPHERIC CONDITIONS each subject heading. it is listed under Several headings to provide multiple A64-19690 access to the subject content The accession number is located beneath and to the right of the Notation of Content e g N64-12345 Under any one subject ATTITUDE CONTROL heading the accession numbers are arranged in sequence MOMENTUM BIAS ATTITUDE CONTROL FOR SYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATIONS /SYNCOM/ SATELLITE TDR-269/4540-70/-1 ~64-28670

ATTITUDE INDICATOR ATTITUDE SENSING AND CONTROL FOR SPIN STABILIZED SYNCHRONOUS COMlKINICATIONS /SYNCOM/ SATELLITES A64-25301 B BACKSCATTER GRID-SPHERE PASSIVE SATELLITE MODELS - THEORETICAL AN0 EMPIRICAL STUDY OF GRID-SPHERES, INFLATABLE MODEL FABRICATION, DESIGN IN SPACE ENVIRONMENT A GER-11568 N65-10240 ACTIVE SATELLITE BALLOON SOUNDING PARAMETRIC ANALYSIS OF MEDIUM ALTITUDE ACTIVE AND RADAR REFLECTION CHARACTERISTICS OF ECHO I1 PASSIVE SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS SATELLITE, DODECAHEDRON BALLOONS AND SPHERICAL CAP ICS-63-TR-250 N64-19971 NASA-CR-53827 N64- 196 18

AMPLI F IER BIBLIOGRAPHY AMPLIFIER PUMP SOURCE UNIT OF ANTENNA SYSTEM FOR BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ECHO COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS TRANSPORTABLE GROUND AD- 42 2 849 N64-33847 TERMINAL SYN-52-07-01, VOL. 2 N64-33641 BINARY DATA SIMULTANEOUS RELAY OF TWO WIDEBANO PHASE CODE0 ANTENNA BINARY SIGNALS AN0 ONE CW SIGNAL BY MEANS OF HARD COMMUNICATIONS RELAY SYSTEM USING VAN ATTA TYPE LIMITING SATELLITE A65-11467 RETRODIRECTIVE SATELLITE ANTENNA MODULATED BY SOLID STATE DEVICE A64-1 6 612 BUCKLI N6 BUCKLING OF ECHO A-12 PASSIVE COMMUNICATIONS MULTIFREPUENCY HIGH POWER CASSEGRAIN SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR TRANSPORTABLE SATELLITE GROUND STATIONS NASA-TN-0-2353 N64-25913 A64-19903

COMMUNICATION LINKS AN0 ELECTRONICALLY STEERABLE C ANTENNAS FOR COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES WITH CARRIER FREQUENCY VARIOUS DEGREES OF STABILIZATION AND ORBITS SIMULTANEOUS RELAY OF TWO WIDEBAND PHASE CODED A64-26718 BINARY SIGNALS AN0 ONE CY SIGNAL BY MEANS OF HARD LIMITING SATELLITE A65-11461 ANTENNA POINTING SYSTEM EQUIPMENT AND METHODS TO ACHIEVE ACCURACY FOR TELSTAR EXPERIMENT CASSEGRAIN ANTENNA A64-28525 MULTIFREQUENCY HIGH POWER CASSEGRAIN ANTENNA FEE0 SYSTEM FOR TRANSPORTABLE SATELLITE GROUND STATIONS AMPLIFIER PUMP SOURCE UNIT OF ANTENNA SYSTEM FOR A64-19903 SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS TRANSPORTABLE GROUND TERMINAL CELESTIAL GEODESY SYN-52-07-01, VOL. 2 N64-33641 SIMULTANEOUS TRACKING OF ECHO I SATELLITE FOR GEODETIC PURPOSES - CELESTIAL TRIANGULATION ANTENNA. -. .. ARRAY ...... NASA-TT-F-8954 ~64-30847 ADVANCE0 SYNCOM SATELLITE COMMUNICATION N64-16 157 CHANNEL CAPACITY SIGNAL TO NOISE RATIO IN SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION OF ANTENNA GAIN FOR COMPUTED, TAKING INTO ACCOUNT ALL NOISE SOURCES SATELLITES WITH SWITCHED ANTENNA SYSTEMS FROM TRANSMITTER TO RECEIVER ~65-11684 ESD-TOR-64-28 N64-29609 CHRONOLOGY ASTRONOMICAL PHOTOMETRY REVIEW OF 1963 AT GOODARD SPACE FLIGHT.CENTER - PHOTOMETRY OF SURFACE PROPERTIES OF ECHO I CHRONOLOGICAL INOEX NA SA-CR-58290 N64-29572 N AS A-TM- X- 5 1626 Nb4-19598

ATMOSPHERIC DENS1TY CIRCULAR ORBIT ANNUAL, SEMIANNUAL AND 21 DAY VARIATIONS OF SUBSATELLITE PATH FOR 24-HOUR ORBITS AFFECTED BY EXOSPHERIC DENSITIES FROM ECHO I DRAG DATA, NOTING CHANGES IN ECCENTRICITY. INCLINATION. AN0 ARGUMENT HELIUM CONCENTRATION INCREASE A64-25030 OF PERIGEE - ORBITAL PATH OF SYNCOM I1 NASA-TM-X-54564 N64-15864

1-1 COATING SUBJECT INOEX

COATING EARTH-SATELLITE COMMUNICATION LINK UNDER VARIOUS ABSORPTANCE AN0 EMITTANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF TROPOSPHERIC AN0 IONOSPHERIC CONDITIONS AMORPHOUS PHOSPHATE COATINGS APPLIED TO ALUMINUM A64-19690 FOIL SUBSTRATE - THERMAL CONTROL OF ECHO I1 SATELLITE GROUND STATION FOR SATELLITE COMMUNICATION NASA-RP-303 Nb4-28752 DEVELOPED FOR SPACE RESEARCH Ab4-19899

COMMAND SYSTEM GQAPEIC YETUOCS F3R CAiiUiAiiNG COVERAGE ELSTAR SATtLLITE TELEMETRY AN0 COMMAND SYSTEMS ATTAINABLE WITH COMMUNICATION SATELLITES Nb4-1b15b Ab4-19910

COMMUNICATIDN SYSTEM SPACECRAFT TECHNOLOGICAL APPROACH TO SATELLITE LIGHTWEIGHT TRANSPORTABLE GROUND LINK TERMINAL FOR COMMUNICATION SYSTEM Ab4-19911 SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Ab4-21719 DESIGN OIFFERENCES IN MILITARY AN0 COMMERICAL COMMUNICATION SYSTEM COMMUNICATION SATELLITES CHARACTERISTICS INCLUDING USABLE FREQUENCY BANDS AIAA PAPER 64-416 Ab4-20110 AN0 FIGURES OF MERIT A64-27138 NIMBUS METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE TO MEET POWER SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS. OISCUSSING TRANSPORTABLE CAPABILITY AN0 ATTITUDE CONTROL REQUIREMENTS FOR GROUND EQUIPMENT TO BE USE0 WITH ACTIVE AN0 SPACE BROADCASTING SYSTEM PASSIVE SATELLITES Ab4-28430 AIAA PAPER 64-422 Ab4-20784

RANDOM ACCESS STATIONARY SATELLITE RELAY RESULTS AN0 DESIGN IMPROVEMENTS OF SYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATION SYSTEM COMMUNICATIONS /SYNCOM/ PROJECT PC E-R- 1152-0020A Nb4-16163 AIAA PAPER 63-264 A64-21188

DESIGN OF COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS UTILIZING LONG HAUL MICROWAVE COMMUNICATIONS USING MEOIUM- SATELLITES AS RELAY POINTS ALTITUDE ACTIVE SATELLITES Ab+-21b73 P-2785 Nb4-20511 DEFENSE COMMUNICATIONS AGENCY RESPONSIBLE FOR NONLINEAR NOISE TRANSMISSION IN FREQUENCY-DIVISION DEFENSE COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM AN0 COMMUNICATIONS MULTIPLEX TELEPHONY OVER SSB-PM SATELLITE SATELLITE PROGRAM A64-22500 COMMUNICATION SYSTEM NA SA-TN-D-2365 Nb4-23920 COMPUTER PROGRAM TO DETERMINE COMMUNICATION POTENTIAL OF SYSTEM OF SATELLITES FOR ANY STATION HIGH POWER COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE POTENTIAL - PAIR COMBINATIONS ON GROUND AN0 IN SPACE COST REDUCTION AN0 LIFETIME EXTENSION Ab4-22514 Nb4-24858 ATTITUDE CONTROL FOR IMPROVING GAIN OF CRITICAL OVERSEAS COMMERCIAL COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE LINK IN SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM SYSTEMS- 1965 TO 1975 Nb4-24859 Ab4-22539

COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE DESIGN REQUIREMENTS AN0 FEASIBILITY OF HIGH POWER COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES AN0 THEIR APPLICATIONS SYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES Ab4-15207 Ab4-22795

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF TELSTAR COMMUNICATION EQUATORIAL PLANE AN0 MEOIUM ALTITUDE SYNCHRONOUS SATELLITE TO IMPROVE ITS RELIABILITY SATELLITE SYSTEMS FOR COMMERCIAL OVERSEAS Ab4-15651 COMMUN ICAT IONS A64-22796

TELSTAR SPHERICAL SPIN-STABILIZED SATELLITE, RELAY COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE DESIGN, RELIABILITY DESCRIBING ELECTRICAL AN0 MECHANICAL SYSTEMS AN0 QUALITY CONTROL PROGRAMS TO MEET MISSION Ab4-15838 REQUIREMENTS Ab4-2 3648

TELSTAR SATELLITE EXPERIMENTS, OISCUSSING EUROPEAN EFFORT TO ORBIT COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM, ORBIT AN0 ATTITUDE ASPECTS CONSIDERING LAUNCH VEHICLE Ab4-24550 IEEE PAPER 63-952 Ab4-15839 BOOK ON TELECOMMUNICATION SATELLITES INCLUDING SYNCHRONOUS LUNAR ORBITING SATELLITE EVALUATED FOR THEORY. PRACTICE, GROUND STATIONS* SATELLITES AN0 INTERSTATION COMMUNICATION ON MOON ECONOMICS Ab4-24573 164-1 6346 COMMUNICATION SATELLITES IN SYNCHRONOUS ORBITS COMMUNICATIONS RELAY SYSTEM USING VAN ATTA TYPE WITH SUFFICIENT BROADCASTING POWER FOR DIRECT RETROOIRECTIVE SATELLITE ANTENNA MODULATED BY TRANSMISSION TO DOMESTIC AERIALS SOLIO STATE DEVICE A64-16612 Ab4-24574

REDUCTION OF NULL CONE SHADOWS OF TOROIDAL ANTENNA ORBIT CALCULATION AN0 COVERAGE FOR COMMUNICATIONS BY SPIN-STABILIZING COMMUNICATION SATELLITES SATELLITES Ab4-24575 Ab4-17 773 PROJECT TELSTAR COVERING POWER SUPPLY* CIRCUIT. COMMUNICATION SATELLITE SYSTEM DESIGN FOR OREITt RAOIATION AN0 SOLAR ASPECTS WORLOWIOE COVERAGE FOR TRANSMISSION OF Ab4-24576 MULTICHANNEL TELEPHONY AND TELEVISION SIGNALS Ab*-1 8255 RELAY SATELLITE DESIGN FOR SPACE ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING OF COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE EQUIPMENT PLANETARY ORBITING RELAY COMMUNICATION LINK FOR Ab4-24577 PROJECT VOYAGER Ab4-18269 COURIER COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR GLOBAL COLLECTION OF PAPERS COVERING COMMUNICATION RELAY COMMUNICATIONS 464-24579 SATELLITE TECHNIQUES, SOLIO PROPELLANT ROCKET TECHNOLOGY AN0 ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL OF MANNED EUROPEAN PARTICIPATION IN TELSTAR AN0 RELAY SPACE VEHICLES Ab+-1 8421 COMMUNICATIOYS SATELLITE PROGRAMS Ab4-24580 LONG RANGE COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENTS THAT DETERMINE DESIGN FACTORS FOR COMMUNICATION RELAY GROUND STATION DESIGN AN0 EQUIPMENT FOR SATELLITE SYSTEMS Ab4-18423 COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEMS Ab4-24581 ATMOSPHERIC REFRACTION EFFECT ON RADIO WAVES IN

1-2 SUBJECT INDEX COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE

EQUATORIAL CIRCULAR ORBIT COMSAT COMMUNICATIONS A64-26764 SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR EUROPEAN CIVIL COMMUNICATIONS ~64-245~~ MEDIUM ALTITUDE RANDOM ORBIT COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM DESIGN FOR CONTINUOUS SERVICE EQUATORIAL, CIRCULAR ORBIT, COMSAT COMMUNICATIONS A64-26765 SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR FULL GLOBAL COVERAGE A64-24583 ADVANCED SPIN-STABILIZED SYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE PROGRAMS. INCLUDING ORBITING PROBLEMS AND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS HS-303 /EARLY BIRD/ SATELLITE A64-26766 FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES Ab4-24584 FEASIBILITY OF UTILIZING ONE SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR BOTH COMMERCIAL AN0 MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS ECONOMICS AN0 COST ESTIMATES FOR A64-26767 TELECOMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM A64-24585 COMMUNICATION LINKS AN0 ELECTRONICALLY STEERABLE ANTENNAS FOR COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES WITH COST ESTIMATES AN0 ECONOMICS FOR COMMUNICATIONS VARIOUS DEGREES OF STABILIZATION AN0 ORBITS SATELLITE SYSTEMS AN0 OPERATION A64-2677 B A64-24586 DIRECT MICROWAVE TO MICROWAVE SATELLITE HIGH POWER COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES FOR FUTURE TRANSPONDERS FOR RECEPTION, AMPLIFICATION AN0 TE LECOMMUNI CAT1ONS A64-24587 RETRANSMISSION OF INFORMATION BEARING RF SIGNALS BETWEEN GROUNO TERMINALS A64-26779 SYNCHRONOUS AN0 RANDOM COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEMS COMPARED IN TERMS OF ESTABLISHMENT IN APPLICATION CATEGORIES OF SATELLITES INCLUDING ORBIT AND EQUIPMENT REPLENISHMENT 1970 AN0 1980 FORECAST OF INTERNATIONAL TELEPHONE 664-24722 COMMUNICATIONS Ab4-26916

BOOK ON PROBLEMS IN ESTABLISHING COMMUNICATIONS COMPARISON BETWEEN MILITARY AND COMMERCIAL SATELLITE NETWORK A64-2 5485 APPROACHES TO COMMUNICATION SATELLITE DESIGN A64-26949 LENTICULAR GRAVITY-GRADIENT STABILIZED PASSIVE SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM POTENTIAL AN0 OIGITAL RANGE MEASUREMENTS USE0 IN DESIGN OF CHARACTERISTICS, DISCUSSING LOW AN0 SYNCHRONOUS INSTANTANEOUS COMMUNICATIONS HANODVER SYSTEM FOR ORBIT APPLICATIONS A64-25901 MEDIUM ALTITUDE MULTISATELLITE SYSTEM A64-28247 LONGTERM AVERAGE PROBABILITY OF BEING ABLE TO COMMUNICATE BETWEEN VARIOUS PAIRS OF GROUND SYNCHRONIZATION FOR DIGITAL COMMUNICATION VIA TERMINALS BY MEANS OF SATELLITE RELAYS ARRANGED IN SATELLITE N64-16161 CERTAIN NONSYNCHRONOUS ORBITAL SYSTEMS AIAA PAPER 63-397 A64-26202 CONTROL SYSTEM USING SOLAR FLUX AS FORCE TO CHANGE ORBITAL PARAMETERS OF PASSIVE COMMUNICATIONS CONFERENCE ON SPACE SCIENCE AN0 SPACE LAW AT SATELLITE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA FROM JUNE 18 TO 20. 1963 N AS A-CR-5357 B N64-18440 Ab4-26329 PARAMETRIC ANALYSIS OF MEDIUM ALTITUDE ACTIVE AN0 PHOTOGRAPHS. DIAGRAMS AND DRAWINGS DEPICTING PASSIVE SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS PRINCIPLES OF COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES AN0 THEIR IC5-63- TR- 2 50 N64-19971 GROUND ANTENNA STATIONS A64-26333 COST & PRICE ESTIMATE RELATING TO COMMUNICATIONS PRESENT AND FUTURE ASPECTS OF COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES SATELLITE ACT OF 1962 Ab4-26334 P-2753-1 N64-20273

DATA GATHERING SATELLITES USE IN MILITARY PLANNING DESIGN OF COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS UTILIZING RELATED TO EVOLUTION OF SPACE LAW SATELLITES AS RELAY POINTS A64-26335 ~-2785 Nb4-205 11

COMMUNICATIONS AND RECONNAISSANCE SATELLITES, SPACE LAW AN0 COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES, FREE THEIR DETECTION AN0 MONITORING AN0 THEIR RELATION SPACE LOWER BOUNOARYt CONTROL OF SPACE, ORBITAL TO SPACE LAW A64-26336 REGULATION, AN0 INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION NASA-SP-44 N64-2 1136 WORLDWIDE SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM DESIGN WITH EMPHASIS ON ORBIT SELECTION MONOPOLY AN0 ANTITRUST ASPECTS OF COMMUNICATIONS A64-26402 SATELLITE OPERATIONS - SPACE LAW N64-2 1141 EVALUATION OF SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM CONSISTING OF RANDOMLY SPACE0 SATELLITES IN REGULATION IN ORBIT - ADMINISTRATIVE ASPECTS OF CIRCULAR ORBIT USING OIGITAL TECHNIQUE COMPUTER COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE ACT AN0 SPACE LAW AIAA PAPER 63-398 A64-26590 N64-21142

COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE TECHNOLOGY PROBLEMS PROBLEMS OF SPACE LAW AN0 POLICY RESULTING FROM DISCUSSING SYNCHRONIZATION OF ORBIT. ATTITUDE COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE ACT AN0 INHERENT IN STABILIZATION, LIFETIME AN0 POWER SUPPLY OPERATING SATELLITE SYSTEM N64-2 1143 A64-26623 PERFORMANCE OF TRANSPORTABLE PASSIVE SATELLITE INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION IN COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS TERMINAL SATELLITE PROGRAM A64-26683 RAOC-TOR-62-502 N64-2 1412

BELL SYSTEM USE OF COMSAT HS-303 /EARLY BIRD/ DESIGN AN0 FABRICATION OF INFLATABLE AN0 SATELLITE CIRCUITS FOR TRANSATLANTIC RIGIOIZABLE PASSIVE COMMUNICATION SATELLITES COMMUNICATIONS A64-26757 N64-23728

NASA COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE PROGRAMS DISCUSSING INFLATABLE MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PASSIVE ECHO, RELAY, SYNCOM AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGICAL COMMUNICATION SATELLITE N64-23730 SATELL ITE S A64-26758 HIGH POWER COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE POTENTIAL - NONMAINTAINABLE COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE OESIGNt COST REDUCTION AND LIFETIME EXTENSION DISCUSSING RELIABILITY CONTROL PROCEDURES TO N64-24858 ACHIEVE THREE TO FIVE YEAR MEAN TIME TO FAILURES

1-3 COMPONENT RELIABILITY SUBJECT INDEX

OVERSEAS COMMERCIAL COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE NASA-TM-X-55012 Nb4-27249 SYSTEMS- 1965 TO 1975 Nb4-24859 CDUPUTER PROGRAM I8M 7090 AN0 7094 PROGRAMS FOR COST ESTIMATES AN0 COMPUTER PROGRAM TO OETERMINE COMMUNICATION OPERATION OF COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEMS POTENTIAL OF SYSTEM OF SATELLITES FOR ANY STATION NA SA-CR-55880 Nb4-27262 PAIR COMBINATIONS ON GROUND AN0 IN SPACE Ah4-22514 LINK FROM COMMUNICATIONS SATELLLTE 70 SHALL GROUND STATION CONFERENCE P-2884 Nb4-28682 CONFERENCE ON SPACE SCIENCE AND SPACE LAW AT UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA FROM JUNE 18 TO 201 1963 COMMUNICATION SATELLITES FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS - Ab4-26329 ECONOMIC FEASI8 IL 1TY NA SA-CR-58031 Nb4-29553 CONFERENCE ON RADAR REFLECTION PROPERTIES - CROSS SECTION, BACKSCATTER, AND MEASUREMENT METHODS PROBABILITY DISTRI8UTION OF ANTENNA GAIN FOR RAOC-TOR-64-25. VOL. I N64-24281 SATELLITES WITH SWITCHED ANTENNA SYSTEMS €SO-TOR-64-28 Nb4-29609 CONTROL DEVICE CONTROL SYSTEM USING SOLAR FLUX AS FORCE TO CHANGE COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE TECHNOLOGY - ECHO, RELAY. ORBITAL PARAMETERS OF PASSIVE COMMUNICATIONS AND SYNCOM PROJECTS Nb4-30342 SATELLITE NASA-CR-53578 N64-10440 MULTIPLE ACCESS CAPABILITY OF HARD-LIMITING COMMUNICATION SATELLITE REPEATER WITH SPREAD- COST ESTIMATE SPECTRUM SIGNALS ECONOMICS AN0 COST ESTIMATES FOR IOA/HQ-64-2490 Nb4-30797 TELECOMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM Ab4-24585 BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ECHO COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE AD-422849 N64-33847 COST ESTIMATES AN0 ECONOMICS FOR COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEMS AND OPERATION EUROPEAN TELEVISION BROADCASTING SYSTEM USING Ab4-24586 CATAPHOTIC REFLECTING SATELLITE IN STATIONARY EQUATORIAL ORBIT Ab5-11012 COST h PRICE ESTIMATE RELATING TO COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES TECHNICAL, COMPATIBILITY AN0 EQUITABLE P-2753-1 Nb4-20 27 3 REQUIREMENTS OF SPACE TELEVISION BROADCASTING Ab5-11131 IBM 7090 AN0 7094 PROGRAMS FOR COST ESTIMATES AND OPERATION OF COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEMS MULTIPLE ACCESS TECHNIQUE FOR COMMERCIAL NASA-CR-55888 N64-27262 COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES. NOTING SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS AND SATELLITE REPEATER TECHNIQUE COURIER SATELLITE Ab5-11335 COURIER COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR GLOBAL COMMUNICATIONS A64-24579 F M BROADCASTING FROM SATELLITE, NOTING COVERAGE AND CHANNEL SHARING Ab5-11336 CYLINDER SUBSATELLITE PATH FOR 24-HOUR ORBITS AFFECTED BY SIMULTANEOUS RELAY OF TWO WIDEBAND PHASE CODE0 CHANGES IN ECCENTRICITY* INCLINATION. AN0 ARGUMENT BINARY SIGNALS AND ONE CY SIGNAL BY MEANS OF HARD OF PERIGEE - ORBITAL PATH OF SYNCOM I1 LIMITING SATELLITE Ab5-11467 NASA-TM-X-54564 Nb4-15864

COMMUNICATION NET DESIGNED WITH SATELLITES AS RELAY STATIONS AT MINIMUM COST A65-11460 D DATA CORRELATION SHARING OF SATELLITE OUTPUT POWER AMONG CARRIERS SIMULTANEOUS RELAY OF TWO WIOEBAND PHASE COOED f0 OVERCOME RANGE AN0 WEATHER DIFFERENCES BETWEEN BINARY SIGNALS AN0 ONE CW SIGNAL BY MEANS OF HARD LINKS 665-11469 LIMITING SATELLITE Ab5-11461

SIGNAL TO NOISE RATIO IN SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS DATA LINK COMPUTED. TAKING INTO ACCOUNT ALL NOISE SOURCES COMMUNICATION LINKS AN0 ELECTRONICALLY STEERABLE FROM TRANSMITTER TO RECEIVER A65-11684 ANTENNAS FOR COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES WITH VARIOUS DEGREES OF STABILIZATION AN0 ORBITS CRITERIA FOR CHOICE OF SYNCHRONOUS OR MEDIUM Ab4-26778 ALTITUDE MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM Ab5-12 119 SHARING OF SATELLITE OUTPUT POWER AMONG CARRIERS TO OVERCOME RANGE AND WEATHER DIFFERENCES BETWEEN MULTIPLE CARRIER BEHAVIOR OF FREQUENCY-SELECTIVE LINKS Ab5-11469 FERRITE LIMITER IN COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE Ab5-12 120 DATA REDUCTION DIGITAL DATA REDUCTION AND ANALYSIS FOR TELSTAR GRID-SPHERE PASSIVE SATELLITE MODELS - THEORETICAL SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM Ab4-18292 AN0 EMPIRICAL STUDY OF GRID-SPHERES, INFLATABLE MOOEL FABRICATION, DESIGN IN SPACE ENVIRONMENT SYNCOM I1 SINGLE AND MULTIPLE CHANNEL GER-11568 Nb5-10240 COMMUNICATIONS EXPERIMENT DURING EARLY OPERATIONt DESCRIBING DATA REDUCTION AN0 ANALYSIS ELECTRONICALLY STEERABLE ANTENNAS FOR Ab4-21720 COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE NASA-TM-X-55106 N65-12605 PRECISELY REDUCE0 OBSERVATIONS OF SATELLITES NASA-CR-53 78 3 Nb4-19350 LINCOLN EXPERIMENTAL COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE - LAUNCH PROGRAM, COMPONENTS* AN0 FUNCTION DATA TRANSUISSIDN €SO-TOR-64-559 N65-12895 SIGNAL TO NOISE RATIO IN SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS COMPUTEOI TAKING INTO ACCOUNT ALL NOISE SOURCES COMPONENT RELIABILITY FROM TRANSMITTER TO RECEIVER A65-11604 SPACE COMMUNICATIONS SUBSYSTEM REL IA8ILITY REV1EW OF SATELLITE TRANSPONDER COMPONENTS DEFENSE COMUUNICATIONS SYSTEM /DCS/ A64-26739 DEFENSE COMMUNICATIONS AGENCY RESPONSIBLE FOR DEFENSE COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM AN0 COMMUNICATIONS ELECTRONIC PARTS AN0 COMPONENT RELIABILITY FOR SATELLITE PROGRAM A64-22500 SYNCOM I SATELLITE

1-4 SUBJECT INDEX EXOSPHERE

DELTA LAUNCH VEHICLE ELECTRON RADIATION EFFECT ON PHYSICAL PROPERTIES SYNCOM C SATELLITE AND THRUST AUGMENTED DELTA OF ECHO I1 LAMINATE /TAD/ LAUNCH VEHICLE Nb4-2 157 NASA-TN-0-2207 N64-32836

DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM ECHO PROJECT SYNCHRONIZATION PROBLEMS IN DIGITAL COMMUNICATIOb COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE TECHNOLOGY - ECHO, RELAY. SYSTEMS USING SYNCHRONOUS AND SUBSYNCHRONOUS AN0 SYNCOM PROJECTS Nb4-30342 SATELLITE LINKS Ab4- 17091 ECHO SATELLITE DIGITAL RANGE MEASUREMENTS USEO IN DESIGN OF BUCKLING OF ECHO A-12 PASSIVE COHMUNICATIONS INSTANTANEOUS COMMUNICATIONS HANOOVER SYSTEM FOR SATELLITE MEDIUM ALTITUDE MULTISATELLITE SYSTEM NASA-TN-0-2353 Nb4-259 13 Ab4-28241 BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ECHO COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYNCHRONIZATION FOR DIGITAL COMMUNICATION VIA AD-422849 N64-33847 SATELLITE Nb4-16 Ibl ECONOMICS DIGITAL COMPUTER COST ESTIMATES AN0 ECONOMICS FOR COMMUNICATIONS EVALUATION OF SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM SATELLITE SYSTEMS AN0 OPERATION CONSISTING OF RANDOMLY SPACED SATELLITES IN Ab4-24586 CIRCULAR ORBIT USING DIGITAL TECHNIQUE COMPUTER AIAA PAPER 63-390 Ab4-26590 COMMUNICATION SATELLITES FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS - ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY DIGITAL DATA N AS A-CR- 58031 Nb4-29553 DIGITAL OATA REDUCTION AND ANALYSIS FOR TELSTAR SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM Ab4-18292 EL00 LAUNCH VEHICLE EUROPEAN SPACE PROGRAMr INCLUDING SUPPORTING ARGUMENTS, REVIEW OF ESRO AN0 ELOO PROJECTSI AN0 E COMPARISON OF EUROPEAN PROJECTS WITH REST OF WORLD EARTH SHAPE Ab4-19802 TRIAXIALITY OF EARTH FROM OBSERVATIONS ON DRIFT OF SYNCOM I1 SATELLITE - LONGITUDINAL DEPENDENCE OF EUROPEAN EFFORT TO ORBIT COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE EARTH GRAVITATIONAL FIELO CONSIDERING LAUNCH VEHICLE Ab4-24550 NASA-TM-X-55003 Nb4-23935 ELECTRON RADIATION ECHO I SATELLITE ELECTRON RADIATION EFFECT ON PHYSICAL PROPERTIES SYNCHRONOUS OBSERVATIONS BY RUSSIAN PHOTOGRAPHIC OF ECHO I1 LAMINATE STATIONS OF ECHO I FOR GEOOETIC PURPOSES NASA- TN-0- 2201 N64-32836 Ab4-26242 ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT NIGHT EXTINCTION VALUES FROM PHOTOGRAPHIC ELECTRONIC PARTS AN0 COMPONENT RELIABILITY FOR BRIGHTNESS OBSERVATIONS OF ECHO I ARTIFICIAL SYNCOM I SATELLITE SATELLITE Ab4-26218 N AS A-TM-X- 55012 N64-27249

FARADAY EFFECT ON ECHO I RADAR REFLECTIONS USEO TO ENERGY CONVERSION EFFICIENCY OBTAIN INTEGRATED IONOSPHERIC ELECTRON DENSITY EFFECT OF SHIELDING ON SOLAR ENERGY CONVERSION VARIATION S 164-21667 EFFICIENCY OF SYNCOM I1 SOLAR CELL ASSEMBLY N64-29161 ORBITAL ELEMENTS FOR EXPLORER AN0 VANGUARD SATELLITES AN0 ECHO I SATELLITE ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL NASA-CR-55853 Nb4-16721 COLLECTION OF PAPERS COVERING COMMUNICATION RELAY SATELLITE TECHNIQUES, SOLI0 PROPELLANT ROCKET SUBLIMING COMPOUND USED AS INFLATION SYSTEM FOR TECHNOLOGY AN0 ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL OF MANNED ECHO I SATELLITE SPACE VEHICLES Ab4-18421 NA SA-TN-0-2194 Nb4-22020 EQUATORIAL ORBIT PHOTOMETRY OF SURFACE PROPERTIES OF ECHO I EUROPEAN TELEVISION BROADCASTING SYSTEM USING NA SA-C R-5 0290 Nb4-29572 CATAPHOTIC REFLECTING SATELLITE IN STATIONARY EQUATORIAL ORBIT Ab5-11012 SIMULTANEOUS TRACKING OF ECHO I SATELLITE FOR GEOOETIC PURPOSES - CELESTIAL TRIANGULATION EUROPEAN SPACE PROGRAM NASA-TT-F-8954 Nb4-30041 SPACE RESEARCH PROGRAMS OF THE UNITE0 KINGDOM AN0 EUROPE Ab4-14983 ECHO I1 SATELLITE RADAR REFLECTION CHARACTERISTICS OF ECHO I1 EUROPEAN SPACE PROGRAMt INCLUDING SUPPORTING SATELLITEI OODECAHEORON BALLOONS AN0 SPHERICAL CAP ARGUMENTSI REVIEW OF ESRO AN0 ELOO PROJECTS, AN0 NASA-CR-53827 N64-19618 COMPARISON OF EUROPEAN PROJECTS WITH REST OF WORLD Ab4-19002 STEREOPHOTOGRAPHY OF ECHO I1 BALLOONS FOR DETERMINATION OF DEVIATION FROM SPHERICITY EUROPEAN EFFORT TO ORBIT COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE NASA-TM-X-51654 Nb4-20005 CONSIDERING LAUNCH VEHICLE 164-24550

MEASUREMENT OF RADAR REFLECTION PROPERTIES OF ECHO EUROPEAN PARTICIPATION IN TELSTAR AN0 RELAY PROJECT BALLOON - FULL-SCALE MODEL OF ECHO I1 COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE PROGRAMS SATELLITE Nb4-24294 Ab4-24500

MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ECHO I1 SATELLITE EQUATORIAL CIRCULAR ORBIT COMSAT COMMUNICATIONS LA MINA TES SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR EUROPEAN CIVIL COMMUNICATIONS NA SA-TN-0-2367 Nb4-26543 Ab4-24502

ABSORPTANCE AND EMITTANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF EQUATORIALt CIRCULAR ORBIT. COMSAT COMMUNICATIONS AMORPHOUS PHOSPHATE COATINGS APPLIED TO ALUMINUM SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR FULL GLOBAL COVERAGE FOIL SUBSTRATE - THERMAL CONTROL OF ECHO I1 A64-24583 SATELL ITE NASA-RP-303 Nb4-20752 EXOSPHERE ANNUAL, SEMIANNUAL AN0 27 DAY VARIATIONS OF CROSS SECTION MEASUREMENTS OF ECHO I1 SATELLITE EXOSPHERIC DENSITIES FROM ECHO 1 DRAG DATA, NOTING BY MILLSTONE L-BAN0 RADAR HELIUM CONCENTRATION INCREASE A64-25030 €SO-TOR-64-43 Nb4-30037

1-5 EXPANDABLE STRUCTURE SUBJECT INDEX

EXPANDABLE STRUCTURE GRID SEVEN TECHNIQUES AND TYPICAL APPLICATIONS FOR GRID-SPHERE PASSIVE SATELLITE MODELS - THEORETICAL EXPANOABLE SPACE STRUCTURES A65-13541 AND EMPIRICAL STUDY OF GRID-SPHERES, INFLATABLE MODEL FABRICATION, DESIGN IN SPACE ENVIRONMENT EXPLORER SATELLITE GER-11568 N65-10240 ORBITAL ELEMENTS FOR EXPLORER AND VANGUARD SATELLITES AND ECHO I SATELLITE GROUND STATION NA ZA-CR-55R53 N64-lbiii GROUND STAIIUN FOR SATELLITE COMMUNICATION DEVELOPED FOR SPACE RESEARCH A64-19899

F TRANSPORTABLE SPACE COMMUNICATION TERMINAL. FARADAY EFFECT NOTING WORK WITH RELAY AND TELSTAR SATELLITES FARADAY EFFECT ON ECHO I RADAR REFLECTIONS USEO TD A64-19900 OBTAIN INTEGRATE0 IONOSPHERIC ELECTRON DENSITY VARIATIONS A64-27667 SYSTEM CONFIGURATION OF TRANSPORTABLE SPACE COMMUNICATION TERMINAL A64-19901 FERRITE MULTIPLE CARRIER BEHAVIOR OF FREQUENCY-SELECTIVE MULTIFREQUENCY HIGH POWER CASSEGRAIN ANTENNA FEED FERRITE LIMITER IN COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR TRANSPORTABLE SATELLITE GROUND STATIONS 665-12120 A64-19903

FREQUENCY-DIVISION MULTIPLEXING TRANSMITTER FOR SATELLITE GROUND STATION USED IN NONLINEAR NOISE TRANSMISSION IN FREQUENCY-DIVISION RELAY AND TELSTAR OPERATION A64-19904 MULTIPLEX TELEPHONY OVER SSB-PH SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM TRANSPORTABLE GROUND STATION TECHNICAL PARAMETERS NASA-TN-0-2365 N64-23920 AND OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH TELSTAR AND RELAY SATELLITES A64-19907 MULTIPLE ACCESS TECHNIQUE FOR COMMERCIAL COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES. NOTING SYSTEM LIGHTWEIGHT TRANSPORTABLE GROUND LINK TERMINAL FOR REQUIREMENTS AND SATELLITE REPEATER TECHNIQUE SATELLITE COMMUNICATIDNS A64-21719 A65-11335 SYNCOM 11 GROUND STATION VOICE CHANNEL DESIGN, FREQUENCY MOOULATION USING CDMPANOOR TO IMPROVE TRANSMISSION AND F M BROADCASTING FROM SATELLITEr NOTING COVERAGE RECEPTION A64- 21721 AND CHANNEL SHARING A65-11336 GROUND STATION DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT FOR EARTH TO MOON AN0 LUNAR SURFACE-TO-SURFACE COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEMS COMMUNICATIONS USING LUNAR SATELLITES AND FM AND A64-24581 SSB MOOULATION TECHNIQUES A65-13098 SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONSI DISCUSSING TRANSPORTABLE FUEL CONSUMPTION GROUND EQUIPMENT TO BE USEO WITH ACTIVE AND OPTIMIZATION OF ORBITAL CONTROL OF 24-HOUR PASSIVE SATELLITES A64-28430 COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE, CONSIDERING CONSTRAINT ON FUEL CONSUMPTION A64-17785 ANTENNA POINTING SYSTEM EQUIPMENT AND METHODS TO ACHIEVE ACCURACY FOR TELSTAR EXPERIMENT G Ab4-28525 GEODESY LINK FROM COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE TO SMALL GROUND TRIAXIALITY OF EARTH FROM OBSERVATIONS ON DRIFT OF STAT ION SYNCOM I1 SATELLITE - LONGITUDINAL DEPENDENCE OF P-2884 N64-28682 EARTH GRAVITATIONAL FIELD NASA-TM-X-55003 N64-23935 TRANSMITTING AND RECEIVING EQUIPMENT FOR SYNCOM GROUND STATION GEODETIC S AT ELLI T E SYN-52-07-01. VOL. 1 N64- 3 307 3 PROCESSING OF SYNCHRONOUS PHOTOGRAPHIC OBSERVATIONS OF SATELLITE ECHO I INDICATES AMPLIFIER PUMP SOURCE UNIT OF ANTENNA SYSTEM FOR POSSIBLE GEOOETIC APPLICATIONS A64-18754 SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS TRANSPORTABLE GROUND TERMINAL GEOMAGNETICALLY TRAPPED PARTICLE SYN-52-07-01. VOL. 2 N64-33641 REDISTRIBUTION OF HIGH ENERGY GEOMAGNETICALLY TRAPPED PROTONS DURING MAGNETIC STORM OBTAINED CDMMUNICATIDN NET DESIGNED WITH SATELLITES AS WITH AI0 OF SCINTILLATION DETECTOR ABOARD RELAY I RELAY STATIONS AT MINIMUM COST A65-11468 SATELL ITE A64-18805 LARGE AIR SUPPORTED RADOMES FOR SATELLITE RADIATION MEASUREMENTS OF GEOMAGNETICALLY TRAPPED COMMUNICATIONS GROUND STATION N65-11860 ELECTRONS BY INSTRUMENTS ON RELAY I SATELLITE IN 1963 NASA-TN-0-2516 N65-12812 H GRAVITATIONAL FIELD PHUTOGRAPHS. DIAGRAMS AND DRAWINGS DEPICTING TRIAXIALITY OF EARTH FROM OBSERVATIONS ON DRIFT OF PRINCIPLES OF COMMUNICATIOhS SATELLITES AN0 THEIR SYNCOM 11 SATELLITE - LONGITUDINAL FEPENDENCE OF GROUND ANTCNNA STATIONS A64-26333 EARTH GRAVITATIONAL FIELD NASA-TM-X-55003 N64-23935 I GRAVITY GRADIENT SATELLITE IFJM 7090 COMPUTER LENTICULAR GRAVITY-GRADIENT STABILIZED PASSIVE IBM 7090 AND 7094 PROGRAMS FOR COST ESTIMATES AN0 SATELLITE CDMMUNICATIDN SYSTEM POTENTIAL AN0 OPERATION OF COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEMS CHARACTERISTICSI DISCUSSING LOW AND SYNCHRONOUS NASA-CR-55888 N64-27262 ORBIT APPLICATIONS Ab4-25901 INERTIALESS STEERABLE COMMUNICATIONS ANTENNA COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE TECHNOLOGY PROBLEMS PHOTOGRAPHS, DIAGRAMS AND DRAWINGS DEPICTING DISCUSSING SYNCHRONIZATION OF URBITe ATTITUDE PRINCIPLES OF COMMUNICATIDNS SATELLITFS AND THEIR STABILIZATION, LIFETIME AND POWER SUPPLY GROUND ANTENNA STATIONS A64-26333 A64-26623 INFLATABLE DEVICE GREAT BRITAIN SUBLIMING COMPOUND USED AS INFLATION SYSTEM FOR SPACE RESEARCH PROGRAMS OF THE UNITED KINGDOM AND ECHO I SATELLITE EUROPE A64-14983 NASA-TN-0-2194 N64-22020

1-6 SUBJECT INDEX ORBIT CALCULATION

INFLATABLE STRUCTURE METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE DESIGN AN0 FABRICATION OF INFLATABLE AN0 DATA GATHERING SATELLITES USE IN MILITARY PLANNING RIGIOIZABLE PASSIVE COMMUNICATION SATELLITES RELATE0 TO EVOLUTION OF SPACE LAW Nb4-23728 Ab4-26335

INFLATABLE MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PASSIVE APPLICATION CATEGORIES OF SATELLITtS INCLUDING COMMUNICATION SATELLITE Nb4-23730 1910 AN0 1980 FORECAST OF INTERNATIONAL TELEPHONE COMMUNICATIONS 664-26916 MATERIAL DEVELOPMENT, FABRICATION TECHNIQUES AN0 EQUIPMENT RELIABILITY FOR INFLATABLE TELSTAR MICROWAVE TRANSMISSION RADOMES Ab5-11109 LONG HAUL MICROWAVE COMMUNICATIONS USING MEOIUM- ALTITUDE ACTIVE SATELLITES Ab4-21613 LARGE AIR SUPPORTED RADOMES FOR SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS GROUND STATION Nb5-11860 MILITARY SPACECRAFT DESIGN DIFFERENCES IN MILITARY AN0 COMNERICAL INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION COMMUNICATION SATELLITES INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION IN COMMUNICATIONS AIAA PAPER 64-416 Ab4-20110 SATELLITE PROGRAM Ab4-26683 COMMUNICATIONS AN0 RECONNAISSANCE SATELLITES, APPLICATION CATEGORIES OF SATELLITES INCLUOING THEIR DETECTION AN0 MONITORING AN0 THEIR RELATION 1970 AN0 1960 FORECAST OF INTERNATIONAL TELEPHONE TO SPACE LAW Ab4-26336 COMMUNICATIONS Ab4-2 69 16 COMPARISON BETWEEN MILITARY AN0 COMMERCIAL SPACE LAW AN0 COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES, FREE APPROACHES TO COMMUNICATION SATELLITE DESIGN SPACE LOWER BOUNDARY. CONTROL OF SPACE, ORBITAL Ab4-26949 REGULATION, AN0 INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION NASA-SP-44 Nb4-21136 CRITERIA FOR CHOICE OF SYNCHRONOUS OR MEOIUM ALTITUDE MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM COOPERATION OF U. S. S. R. AN0 U. S. ON PEACEFUL Ab5-12119 USE OF SPACE SINCE 1962 665-10073 MILITARY TECHNOLOGV INTERNATIONAL LAN FEASIBILITY OF UTILIZING ONE SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR PRESENT AN0 FUTURE ASPECTS OF COMMUNICATIONS BOTH COMMERCIAL AN0 MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE ACT OF 1962 Ab4-26334 Ab4-26767

IONOSPHERIC ELECTRON DENSITY MOMENTUM FARADAY EFFECT ON ECHO I RADAR REFLECTIONS USE0 TO MOMENTUM BIAS ATTITUDE CONTROL FOR SYNCHRONOUS OBTAIN INTEGRATED IONOSPHERIC ELECTRON DENSITY COMMUNICATIONS /SYNCOM/ SATELLITE VA R IAT IONS Ab4-27 661 TOR-269/4540-10/-1 Nb4-28610 N NASA PROGRAM L NASA COMMUNICATION SATELLITE PROGRAMS INCLUDING L-BAND ECHO, RELAY, TELSTAR AN0 SYNCOM CROSS SECTION MEASUREMENTS OF ECHO I1 SATELLITE 664-15032 BY MILLSTONE L-BAN0 RADAR ESO-TOR-64-43 N64-30037 NASA COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE PROGRAMS DISCUSSING ECHO, RELAY, SYNCOM AN0 ADVANCE0 TECHNOLOGICAL LAMINATE SATELLITES Ab4-2675 8 MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ECHO I1 SATELLITE LAMINATES REVIEW OF 1963 AT GOOOARO SPACE FLIGHT CENTER - NA SA-TN-0-2367 Nb4-26543 CHRONOLOGICAL INDEX NASA- TM-X- 5 1626 Nb4-19598 ELECTRON RADIATION EFFECT ON PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ECHO I1 LAMINATE NASA PROGRAM - PROGRESS AN0 GOALS IN SPACE NASA-TN-0-2207 Nb4-32836 Nb4-33371

LUNAR COMMUNICATION NIMBUS SATELLITE SYNCHRONOUS LUNAR ORBITING SATELLITE EVALUATED FOR NIMBUS METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE TO MEET POWER INTERSTATION COMMUNICATION ON MOON CAPABILITY AN0 ATTITUDE CONTROL REQUIREMENTS FOR Ab4-16346 SPACE BROADCASTING SYSTEM AIAA PAPER 64-422 Ab4-20784 EARTH TO MOON AN0 LUNAR SURFACE-TO-SURFACE COMMUNICATIONS USING LUNAR SATELLITES AN0 FM AN0 NOISE MEASUREMENT SSB MODULATION TECHNIQUES Ab5-13098 MUTUAL INTERFERENCE BETWEEN COMMUNICATION SATELLITE AN0 LINE OF SIGHT RADIO RELAY SYSTEMS, WITH NOISE POWER MEASUREMENTS Ab4-18246

NOISE PROPAGATION M NONLINEAR NOISE TRANSMISSION IN FREQUENCY-DIVISION MAGNETIC STORM MULTIPLEX TELEPHONY OVER SSB-PM SATELLITE REDISTRIBUTION OF HIGH ENERGY GEOMAGNETICALLY COMMUN ICAT ION SYSTEM TRAPPED PROTONS DURING MAGNETIC STORM OBTAINED NASA-TN-0-2365 Nb4-23920 WITH AI0 OF SCINTILLATION DETECTOR ABOARD RELAY I SATELL ITE Ab4-16805 0 MANNED SPACECRAFT ORBIT COLLECTION OF PAPERS COVERING COMMUNICATION RELAY REGULATION IN ORBIT - ADMINISTRATIVE ASPECTS OF SATELLITE TECHNIQUES. SOLI0 PROPELLANT ROCKET COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE ACT AND SPACE LAW TECHNOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL OF MANNED Nb4-21142 SPACE VEHICLES Ab4-18421 ORBIT CALCULATION MECHANICAL PRDPERTV GRAPHIC METHODS FOR CALCULATING COVERAGE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ECHO I1 SATELLITE ATTAINABLE WITH COMMUNICATION SATELLITES LAMINATES Ab4-19910 NASA-TN-0-2367 Nb4-26543 ORBIT CALCULATION AN0 COVERAGE FOR COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES Ab4-24575

1-7 ORBITAL ELEHENT SUBJECT INDEX

ORBITAL ELEHENT PHOTOGRAPHIC MEASUREHENT OPTIMIZATION OF ORBITAL CONTROL OF 24-HOUR SYNCHRONOUS OBSERVATIONS BY RUSSIAN PHOTOGRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE, CONSIDERING CONSTRAINT STATIONS OF ECHO I FOR GEODETIC PURPOSES ON FUEL CONSUMPTION Ab4-17785 Ab4-26242

ORBITAL ELEMENTS OF SELECTED SATELLITES PHOTOGRAPHIC TRACKING NASA-CR-55851 Nb4-16720 NIGHT EXTINCTION VALUES FROM PHOTOGRAPHIC BRIGHINESS OBSERVATIONS OF ECHO I ARTIFICIAL ORBITAL ELEMENTS FOR EXPLORER AN0 VANGUARD SATELLITE Ab4-26278 SATELLITES AN0 ECHO I SATELLITE NA SA-CR-55853 Nb4-16721 PHYSICAL PROPERTY ELECTRON RADIATION EFFECT ON PHYSICAL PROPERTIES ORBITING SATELLITE OF ECHO I1 LAMINATE PLANETARY ORBITING RELAY COMMUNICATION LINK FOR NASA-TN-0-2207 Nb4-32836 PROJECT VOYAGER Ab4-10 269 POWER LIHITER LONGTERH AVERAGE PROBABILITY OF BEING ABLE TO SIMULTANEOUS RELAY OF TWO WIDEBAND PHASE COOED COHMUNICATE BETWEEN VARIOUS PAIRS OF GROUND BINARY SIGNALS AN0 ONE CW SIGNAL BY MEANS OF HARD TERMINALS BY MEANS OF SATELLITE RELAYS ARRANGE0 IN LIMITING SATELLITE Ab5-11467 CERTAIN NONSYNCHRONOUS ORBITAL SYSTEMS AIAA PAPER 63-397 Ab4-26202 MULTIPLE CARRIER BEHAVIOR OF FREQUENCY-SELECTIVE FERRITE LIMITER IN COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE P Ab5- 12120 PARTICLE DETECTOR POWER SUPPLY SILICON P-N JUNCTION OIOOE RADIATION DETECTOR SYNCOM I1 ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM DESIGNED FOR TELSTAR SATELLITE EXPERIMENTS AIAA PAPER-64-456 Nb4-25041 Ab4-22878 PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION PASSIVE SATELLITE PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION OF ANTENNA GAIN FOR TRANSPORTABLE TRACKING AN0 COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES WITH SWITCHED ANTENNA SYSTEMS TERMINAL FOR USE WITH PASSIVE SATELLITES €SO-TDR-64-28 Nb4-29609 Ab+-22516 PUMP LENTICULAR GRAVITY-GRADIENT STABILIZED PASSIVE AMPLIFIER PUMP SOURCE UNIT OF ANTENNA SYSTEM FOR SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM POTENTIAL AN0 SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS TRANSPORTABLE GROUND CHARACTERISTICS, DISCUSSING LOW AND SYNCHRONOUS TERMINAL ORBIT APPLICATIONS Ab4-25901 SYN-52-07-01. VOL. 2 Nb4-33641

CONTROL SYSTEM USING SOLAR FLUX AS FORCE TO CHANGE ORBITAL PkRAMETERS OF PASSIVE COMMUNICATIONS R SATELLITE RADAR BACKSCATTER NA SA-C R-535 78 Nb4-18440 CONFERENCE ON RADAR REFLECTION PROPERTIES - CROSS SECTION, BACKSCATTER, AN0 MEASUREMENT METHODS PARAMETRIC ANALYSIS OF MEDIUM ALTITUDE ACTIVE AN0 RAOC-TOR-64-25r VOL. I Nb4-24281 PASSIVE SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS IC5-63-TR-250 Nb4-19971 RADAR CROSS SECTION CROSS SECTION MEASUREMENTS OF ECHO I1 SATELLITE PERFORMANCE OF TRANSPORTABLE PASSIVE SATELLITE BY MILLSTONE L-BAND RADAR COMMUNICATIONS TERMINAL €SO-TOR-64-43 N 64- 300 3 7 RAOC-TOR-62-502 N64-21412 RADAR ECHO DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF INFLATABLE AND FARADAY EFFECT ON ECHO I RADAR REFLECTIONS USE0 TO RIGIOIZABLE PASSIVE COMMUNICATION SATELLITES OBTAIN INTEGRATED IONOSPHERIC ELECTRON DENSITY Nb4-23726 VARIATIONS Ab4-27667

INFLATABLE MATERIAL REPUIREMENTS FOR PASSIVE RADAR REFLECTION COMMUNICATION SATELLITE Nb4-23730 RADAR REFLECTION CHARACTERISTICS OF ECHO I1 SATELLITE, OODECAHEORON BALLOONS AN0 SPHERICAL CAP BUCKLING OF ECHO A-12 PASSIVE COMMUNICATIONS NASA-CR-53827 Nb4-19618 SATELL ITE NASA-TN-D-2353 Nb4-25913 CONFERENCE ON RADAR REFLECTION PROPERTIES - CROSS SECTION, BACKSCATTER, AN0 MEASUREMENT METHODS EUROPEAN TELEVISION BROADCASTING SYSTEM USING RAOC-TOR-64-25. VOL. I Nb4-24281 CATAPHOTIC REFLECTING SATELLITE IN STATIONARY EPUATORIAL ORBIT Ab5-11012 MEASUREMENT OF RADAR REFLECTION PROPERTIES OF ECHO PROJECT BALLOON - FULL-SCALE MODEL OF ECHO I1 GRID-SPHERE PASSIVE SATELLITE MODELS - THEORETICAL SATELLITE Nb4-24294 AN0 EMPIRICAL STUDY OF GRID-SPHERES, INFLATABLE MODEL FABRICATIONI DESIGN IN SPACE ENVIRONMENT RADIATION BELT GER-11568 Nb5-10240 LAUNCHING OF ELECTRON SPACE SYSTEMS FOR EARTH RADIATION BELT STUDY PHASE LOCK DEHODULATOR JPRS-23810 Nb4-17554 PHASE LOCKEO DEHOOULATION FOR MULTICHANNEL TELEPHONE TRAFFIC FROM SATELLITES RADIATION EFFECT Ab5-11338 ELECTRON RADIATION EFFECT ON PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ECHO I1 LAMINATE SHARING OF SATELLITE OUTPUT POWER AMONG CARRIERS NASA- TN-0- 2207 Nb4-32836 TO OVERCOHE RANGE AN0 WEATHER DIFFERENCES BETWEEN

LINKS~~ Ab5-11469 DECREASE0 CURRENT IN SOLAR CELLS ON RELAY I AN0 RELAY I1 DUE TO DAMAGE BY VAN ALLEN BELT PHOSPHATE RADIATION Ab5-11003 ABSORPTANCE AND EMITTANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AMORPHOUS PHOSPHATE COATINGS APPLIED TO ALUMINUM RADIATION HEATING FOIL SUBSTRATE - THERMAL CONTROL OF ECHO I1 HEMISPHERICAL EMISSIVITY OF TELSTAR MATERIALS SATELLITE MEASURE0 BY CALORIMETRIC METHOD NASA-RP-303 Nb4-28752 Ab5-11510

1-8 SUBJECT INDEX REPEATER

RADIATION MEASUREMENT RELAY SATELLITE TRAPPED RADIATION MEASUREMENTS BY RELAY I LONG RANGE COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENTS THAT SATELL ITE DETERMINE DESIGN FACTORS FOR COMMUNICATION RELAY NASA-CR-57018 N64-33123 SATELLITE SYSTEMS ~64-18423

RADIATION MEASUREMENTS OF GEOMAGNETICALLY TRAPPED REOISTRIBUTION OF HIGH ENERGY GEOMAGNETICALLY ELECTRONS BY INSTRUMENTS ON RELAY I SATELLITE TRAPPED PROTONS DURING MAGNETIC STORM OBTAINED IN 1963 WITH AI0 OF SCINTILLATION DETECTOR ABOARD RELAY I NASA-TN-0-2516 N65-12812 SAT ELLI TE 664-18805

RADIATION SHIELDING TRANSPORTABLE SPACE COMMUNICATION TERMINALI DAMAGE TO SOLAR CELL RADIATION SHIELDS IN RELAY I NOTING WORK WITH RELAY AN0 TELSTAR SATELLITES AN0 RELAY I1 SATELLITES N64-29153 A64-19900

RADIO COMMUNICATION TRANSPORTABLE GROUND STATION TECHNICAL PARAMETERS SATELLITE RADIO COMMUNICATION SYSTEM AN0 OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH TELSTAR AN0 RELAY CHARACTERISTICS INCLUDING USABLE FREQUENCY BANOS SATELLITES A64-19907 AN0 FIGURES OF MERIT A64-27 138 NIMBUS METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE TO MEET POWER RADIO INTERFERENCE CAPABILITY AN0 ATTITUDE CONTROL REQUIREMENTS FOR MUTUAL INTERFERENCE BETWEEN COMMUNICATION SPACE BROADCASTING SYSTEM SATELLITE AN0 LINE OF SIGHT RADIO RELAY SYSTEMS, AIAA PAPER 64-422 A64-20784 WITH NOISE POWER MEASUREMENTS A64-18246 LONG HAUL MICROWAVE COMMUNICATIONS USING MEOIUM- RADIO RELAY ALTITUDE ACTIVE SATELLITES A64-21673 MULTIPLE ACCESS TECHNIQUE FOR COMMERCIAL COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITESs NOTING SYSTEM DYNAMIC AN0 STRUCTURAL DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR REQUIREMENTS AND SATELLITE REPEATER TECHNIQUE RELAY SATELLITE A64-22792 A65-11335 FLIGHT TEMPERATURE SIMULATION IN SPACECRAFT VACUUM RADIO TRANSMITTER CHAMBER TEST USEO FOR RELAY COMMUNICATIONS TRANSMITTER FOR SATELLITE GROUND STATION USEO IN SATELLITE A64-23244 RELAY AND TELSTAR OPERATION A64-19904 SOLAR SIMULATION COMPARED TO THERMAL GRADIENT REFRACTION VACUUM TESTING. BASE0 ON RELAY COMMUNICATIONS ATMOSPHERIC REFRACTION EFFECT ON RADIO WAVES IN SATELLITE DATA A64-23245 EARTH-SATELLITE COMMUNICATION LINK UNDER VARIOUS TROPOSPHERIC AND IONOSPHERIC CONDITIONS RELAY COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE DESIGN, RELIABILITY Ab4-19690 AN0 QUALITY CONTROL PROGRAMS TO MEET MISSION REQUIRE MENTS Ab4-23648 RADIOTELEPHONY BELL SYSTEM USE OF COMSAT HS-303 /EARLY BIRD/ RELAY SATELLITE DESIGN FOR SPACE ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE CIRCUITS FOR TRANSATLANTIC TESTING OF COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE EQUIPMENT COMMUNICATIONS A64-26757 Ab4-24577

PHASE LOCKED DEMODULATION FOR MULTICHANNEL COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE TECHNOLOGY - ECHOI RELAY. TELEPHONE TRAFFIC FROM SATELLITES AN0 SYNCOM PROJECTS N64-30342 A65-11338 DECREASE0 CURRENT IN SOLAR CELLS ON RELAY I AN0 RADOME RELAY I1 DUE TO DAMAGE BY VAN ALLEN BELT MATERIAL DEVELOPMENT, FABRICATION TECHNIQUES AN0 RAD IAT1 ON A65-11003 EQUIPMENT RELIABILITY FOR INFLATABLE TELSTAR RADOMES A65-11109 COMMUNICATION NET DESIGNED WITH SATELLITES AS RELAY STATIONS AT MINIMUM COST A65-11468 LARGE AIR SUPPORTED RADOMES FOR SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS GROUND STATION N65-11860 RADIATION MEASUREMENTS OF GEOMAGNETICALLY TRAPPED ELECTRONS BY INSTRUMENTS ON RELAY I SATELLITE RANGE AND RANGE RATE TRACKING IN 1963 RANGE AND RANGE RATE SYSTEM AN0 DATA ANALYSIS FOR NASA- TN-0- 2 5 16 N65-12812 SYNCOM I SATELLITE NA SA-TN-0-2139 N64-2 1264 RELIABILITY RECONNAISSANCE SPACECRAFT DESIGN AN0 CONSTRUCTION OF TELSTAR COMMUNICATION COMMUNICATIONS AND RECONNAISSANCE SATELLITES, SATELLITE TO IMPROVE ITS RELIABILITY THEIR DETECTION AN0 MONITORING AN0 THEIR RELATION A64- 15651 TO SPACE LAW A64-26336 SPACE COMMUNICATIONS SUBSYSTEM RELIABILITY REVIEW REFLECTOR SATELLITE SYSTEM OF SATELLITE TRANSPONDER COMPONENTS EUROPEAN TELEVISION BROADCASTING SYSTEM USING A64-26739 CATAPHOTIC REFLECTING SATELLITE IN STATIONARY EPUATORIAL ORBIT A65-11012 RELIABILITY CONTROL RELAY NONMAINTAINABLE COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE DESIGN, RANDOM ACCESS STATIONARY SATELLITE RELAY DISCUSSING RELIABILITY CONTROL PROCEDURES TO COMMUNICATION SYSTEM ACHIEVE THREE TO FIVE YEAR MEAN TIME TO FAILURES PCE-R-1152-0020A N64-16 163 A64-26764 RELAY I SATELLITE DAMAGE TO SOLAR CELL RADIATION SHIELDS IN RELAY I AND RELAY I1 SATELLITES N64-29153 REPEATER MULTIPLE ACCESS CAPABILITY OF HARD-LIMITING TRAPPED RADIATION MEASUREMENTS BY RELAY I COMMUNICATION SATELLITE REPEATER WITH SPREAO- SA TELL ITE SPECTRUM SIGNALS NASA-CR-57018 N64-33123 IOA/HQ-64-2498 N64-30797

RELAY I1 SATELLITE MULTIPLE ACCESS TECHNIQUE FOR COMMERCIAL DAMAGE TO SOLAR CELL RADIATION SHIELDS IN RELAY I COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES, NOTING SYSTEM AN0 RELAY 11 SATELLITES N64-29153 REQUIREMENTS AN0 SATELLITE REPEATER TECHNIQUE

1-9 RIGID STRUCTURE SUBJECT INDEX

Ab5-11335 LONGTERM AVERAGE PROBABILITY OF BEING ABLE TO COMMUNICATE BETWEEN VARIOUS PAIRS OF GROUND RIGID STRUCTURE TERMINALS BY MEANS OF SATELLITE RELAYS ARRANGED IN DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF INFLATABLE AND CERTAIN NONSYNCHRONOUS ORBITAL SYSTEMS RIGIOIZABLE PASSIVE COMMUNICATION SATELLITES AIAA PAPER 63-397 Ab4-26202 Nb4-23728 WORLDWIDE SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM DESIGN ..--.niin EflPtinLIS ON ORBIT SELECTION s Ab4-26402 SATELLITE ATTITUDE CONTROL ATTITUDE CONTROL FOR IMPROVING GAIN OF CRITICAL EVALUATION OF SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM LINK IN SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM CONSISTING OF RANDOMLY SPACE0 SATELLITES IN Ab4-22539 CIRCULAR ORBIT USING DIGITAL TECHNIQUE COMPUTER AIAA PAPER 63-398 A64-26590 ATTITUDE DETERMINATION AN0 PREOICTION FOR SPIN- STABILIZED TELSTAR SATELLITES USING MEAN GRAVITY BELL SYSTEM USE OF COMSAT HS-303 /EARLY BIRD/ AN0 MAGNETIC TORQUE VALUES Ab4-24870 SATELLITE CIRCUITS FOR TRANSATLANTIC COMMUNICATIONS Ab+-26757 ATTITUDE SENSING AND CONTROL FOR SPIN STABILIZED SYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATIONS /SYNCOM/ SATELLITES FEASIBILITY OF UTILIZING ONE SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR Ab*-25 30 1 BOTH COMMERCIAL AN0 MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS Ab4-26767 COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE TECHNOLOGY PROBLEMS OISCUSSING SYNCHRONIZATION OF ORBIT, ATTITUDE APPLICATION CATEGORIES OF SATELLITES INCLUDING STABILIZATION. LIFETIME AN0 POWER SUPPLY 1970 AND 1980 FORECAST OF INTERNATIONAL TELEPHONE Ab4-26623 COMMUNICATIONS Ab4-26916

SATELLITE COMMUNI C AT1 ON SATELLITE RADIO COMMUNICATION SYSTEM COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES AND THEIR APPLICATIONS CHARACTERISTICS INCLUDING USABLE FREQUENCY BANDS Ab4-15207 AN0 FIGURES OF MERIT Ab4-27138

CLOCK SYNCHRONIZATION BETWEEN UNITEO STATES AN0 DIGITAL RANGE MEASUREMENTS USEO IN DESIGN OF UNITEO KINGOOM, USING TELSTAR SATELLITE INSTANTANEOUS COMMUNICATIONS HANOOVER SYSTEM FOR A64-15 501 MEDIUM ALTITUDE MULTISATELLITE SYSTEM Ab4-28247 COMMUNICATIONS RELAY SYSTEM USING VAN ATTA TYPE RETROOIRECTIVE SATELLITE ANTENNA MODULATED BY SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS. OISCUSSING TRANSPORTABLE SOLI0 STATE DEVICE Ab+-16612 GROUND EOUIPMENT TO BE USEO WITH ACTIVE AN0 PASSIVE SATELLITES Ab4-28430 MUTUAL INTERFERENCE BETWEEN COMMUNICATION SATELLITE AND LINE OF SIGHT RADIO RELAY SYSTEMS. TRANSMITTING AN0 RECEIVING EQUIPMENT FOR SYNCOM WITH NOISE POWER MEASUREMENTS Ab+-18246 GROUND STATION SYN-52-07-01. VOL. 1 Nb4-33073 CONTROL AN0 MOTOR DRIVE SYSTEM OF STEERABLE ANTENNA AT SATELLITE COMMUNICATION EARTH STATION AMPLIFIER PUMP SOURCE UNIT OF ANTENNA SYSTEM FOR Ab4-10249 SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS TRANSPORTABLE GROUND TERMINAL PLANETARY ORBITING RELAY COMMUNICATION LINK FOR SYN-52-07-01, VOL. 2 Nb4-33641 PROJECT VOYAGER Ab4-18269 F M BROAOCASTING FROM SATELLITE. NOTING COVERAGE DIGITAL DATA REDUCTION AN0 ANALYSIS FOR TELSTAR AN0 CHANNEL SHARING Ab5-11336 SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM A64-10292 PHASE LOCKED OEMOOULATION FOR MULTICHANNEL GROUND STATION FOR SATELLITE COMMUNICATION TELEPHONE TRAFFIC FROM SATELLITES DEVELOPED FOR SPACE RESEARCH Ab4-19099 Ab5-11338

TRANSPORTABLE SPACE COMMUNICATION TERMINAL, SATELLITE DESIGN NOTING WORK WITH RELAY AN0 TELSTAR SATELLITES NASA COMMUNICATION SATELLITE PROGRAMS INCLUDING Ab4-19900 ECHO, RELAY. TELSTAR AN0 SYNCOM Ab4-15032 SYSTEM CONFIGURATION OF TRANSPORTABLE SPACE COMMUNICATION TERMINAL A64-19901 SYNCOM MARK SATELLITES FOR WORLOWIOE COMMUNICATIONSI EMPHASIZING SYNCHRONOUS ORBIT TRANSMITTER FOR SATELLITE GROUND STATION USEO IN INJECTION AN0 CONTROL Ab4-15033 RELAY AND TELSTAR OPERATION Ab4-19904 TELSTAR SPHERICAL SPIN-STABILIZED SATELLITE, GRAPHIC METHODS FOR CALCULATING COVERAGE DESCRIBING ELECTRICAL AN0 MECHANICAL SYSTEMS ATTAINABLE WITH COMMUNICATION SATELLITES A64-15838 Ab4-19910 DESIGN DIFFERENCES IN MILITARY AN0 COMMERICAL SPACECRAFT TECHNOLOGICAL APPROACH TO SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SATELLITES COMMUNICATION SYSTEM Ab4-19911 AIAA PAPER 64-416 A64-20 110

LIGHTWEIGHT TRANSPORTABLE GROUND LINK TERMINAL FOR RESULTS AN0 DESIGN IMPROVEMENTS OF SYNCHRONOUS SATELL ITE COMMUNICATIONS 664-21719 COMMUNICATIONS /SYNCOM/ PROJECT AIAA PAPER 63-264 Ab4-21100 SYNCOM 11 SINGLE AN0 MULTIPLE CHANNEL COMMUNICATIONS EXPERIMENT DURING EARLY OPERATION. DYNAMIC AN0 STRUCTURAL DESIGN CONSIOERtiTIONS FOR DESCRIBING DATA REDUCTION AN0 ANALYSIS RELAY SATELLITE Ab4-22792 Ab4-21720 RELAY COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE DESIGN, RELIABILITY FOURTEEN PAPERS ON SYSTEMS ENGINEERING AN0 SPACE AN0 QUALITY CONTROL PROGRAMS TO MEET MISSION TECHNOLOGY BY RCA SCIENTISTS AN0 ENGINEERS REQUIREMENTS Ab+-23648 Ab4-22 790 PROJECT TELSTAR COVERING POWER SUPPLYw CIRCUITI LENTICULAR GRAVITY-GRADIENT STABILIZED PASSIVE ORBIT. RADIATION AND SOLAR ASPECTS SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM POTENTIAL AN0 Ab4-24576 CHARACTERISTICSt DISCUSSING LOW AN0 SYNCHRONOUS OR 0 I T APP L ICAT I ONS A64-25901 RELAY SATELLITE DESIGN FOR SPACE ENVIRONMENTAL

1-10 L SUBJECT INDEX SATELLITE TRANSMISSION

TESTING OF COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE EPUIPMENT HIGH POHER COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES FOR FUTURE A64-24577 TEL ECOMMUN ICAT IONS A64-24507

NONMAINTAINABLE COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE DESIGN, BOOK ON PROBLEMS IN ESTABLISHING COMMUNICATIONS DISCUSSING RELIABILITY CONTROL PROCEDURES TO SATELLITE NETWORK A64-25485 ACHIEVE THREE TO FIVE YEAR MEAN TIME TO FAILURES A64-26764 MEDIUM ALTITUDE RANDOM ORBIT COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM DESIGN FOR CONTINUOUS SERVICE COMPARISON BETWEEN MILITARY AN0 COMMERCIAL A64-26765 APPROACHES TO COMMUNICATION SATELLITE DESIGN Ab4-26949 COMMUNICATION NET OESIGNEO WITH SATELLITES AS RELAY STATIONS AT MINIMUM COST Ab5-11460 SATELLITE DRAG ANNUAL. SEMIANNUAL AN0 27 DAY VARIATIONS OF SATELLITE OBSERVATION EXOSPHERIC DENSITIES FROM ECHO I DRAG DATA, NOTING FARADAY EFFECT ON ECHO I RADAR REFLECTIONS USE0 TO HELIUM CONCENTRATION INCREASE A64-25030 OBTAIN INTEGRATED IONOSPHERIC ELECTRON DENSITY VARIATIONS A64-27667 SATELLITE GROUNO SUPPORT NETWORK 24 HR COMMUNICATIONS TEST OPERATIONS AN0 GROUND CATALOG OF PRECISELY REOUCEO SATELLITE SYSTEMS OF SYNCOM I1 ACTIVE SYNCHRONOUS SATELLITE OBSERVATIONS A64-21717 NASA-CR-55 843 N64-16719

GROUND STATION DESIGN AN0 EPUIPMENT FOR PRECISELY REOUCEO OBSERVATIONS OF SATELLITES COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEMS NASA-CR-53783 N64-19350 A64-24501 OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS OF SATELLITES PHOTOGRAPHSI DIAGRAMS AN0 DRAWINGS DEPICTING N64-28247 PRINCIPLES OF COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES AND THEIR GROUND ANTENNA STATIONS A64-26333 SATELLITE ORBIT TELSTAR SATELLITE EXPERIMENTS. DISCUSSING ANTENNA POINTING SYSTEM EQUIPMENT AND METHODS TO COMMUNICATION SYSTEM, ORBIT AN0 ATTITUDE ASPECTS ACHIEVE ACCURACY FOR TELSTAR EXPERIMENT IEEE PAPER 63-952 Ab4-15839 A64-28525 ORBIT CALCULATION AN0 COVERAGE FOR COMMUNICATIONS MATERIAL DEVELOPMENT* FABRICATION TECHNIPUES AN0 SATELLITES A 6 4- 24 5 7 5 EPUIPMENT RELIABILITY FOR INFLATABLE TELSTAR RADOMES A65-11109 SUBSATELLITE PATH FOR 24-HOUR ORBITS AFFECTED BY CHANGES IN ECCENTRICITY, INCLINATIONv AN0 ARGUMENT SATELLITE OF PERIGEE - ORBITAL PATH OF SYNCOM I1 TRANSPORTABLE TRACKING AND COMMUNICATIONS NASA-TM-X-54564 N64-15064 TERMINAL FOR USE WITH PASSIVE SATELLITES A64-22516 ORBITAL ELEMENTS OF SELECTED SATELLITES NASA-CR-55851 N64-16720 SATELLITE GUIDANCE SYNCHRONOUS ORBITSr TRANSFER ORBITS* ORBIT ERRORS ORBITAL ELEMENTS FOR EXPLORER AN0 VANGUARD AN0 PERTURBATIONS1 AN0 CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR SATELLITES AN0 ECHO I SATELLITE SYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATIONS /SYNCOM/ SATELLITES N AS A-CR-55 8 53 N64- 1672 1 A64-24570 CONTROL SYSTEM USING SOLAR FLUX AS FORCE TO CHANGE SATELLITE INSTRUMENTATION ORBITAL PARAMETERS OF PASSIVE COMMUNICATIONS SILICON P-N JUNCTION OIOOE RADIATION OETECTOR SATELLITE OESIGNEO FOR TELSTAR SATELLITE EXPERIMENTS NASA-CR-53578 N64-18440 A64-22678 SATELLITE PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECT MICROWAVE TO MICROWAVE SATELLITE PROCESSING OF SYNCHRONOUS PHOTOGRAPHIC TRANSPONDERS FOR RECEPTION, AMPLIFICATION AN0 OBSERVATIONS OF SATELLITE ECHO I INDICATES RETRANSMISSION OF INFORMATION BEARING RF SIGNALS POSSIBLE GEODETIC APPLICATIONS A64-10754 BETWEEN GROUND TERMINALS A64-26779 SATELLITE LAUNCHING EUROPEAN TELEVISION BROADCASTING SYSTEM USING SYNCHRONOUS AN0 RANDOM COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE CATAPHOTIC REFLECTING SATELLITE IN STATIONARY SYSTEMS COMPARED IN TERMS OF ESTABLISHMENT IN EQUATORIAL ORBIT 165-11012 ORBIT AN0 EQUIPMENT REPLENISHMENT A64-24722 TECHNICAL, COMPATIBlLITY AN0 EQUITABLE REQUIREMENTS OF SPACE TELEVISION BROADCASTING SATELLITE NETWORK A65-11131 SYNCHRONIZATION PROBLEMS IN DIGITAL COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS USING SYNCHRONOUS AN0 SUBSYNCHRONOUS SATELLITE TRACKING SATELLITE LINKS A64-17091 TRANSPORTABLE GROUND STATION TECHNICAL PARAMETERS AN0 OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH TELSTAR AN0 RELAY COURIER COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR GLOBAL SATELL ITES A64-19907 COMMUNI CA T IONS A64-24579 SYNCHRONOUS OBSERVATIONS BY RUSSIAN PHOTOGRAPHIC EUROPEAN PARTICIPATION IN TELSTAR AN0 RELAY STATIONS OF ECHO I FOR GEODETIC PURPOSES COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE PROGRAMS Ab4-26242 A64-24580 SATELLITE TRANSMISSION EPUATORIAL CIRCULAR ORBIT COMSAT CONMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATION SATELLITE SYSTEM DESIGN FOR SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR EUROPEAN CIVIL COMMUNICATIONS WORLDWIDE COVERAGE FOR TRANSMISSION OF A64-24502 MULTICHANNEL TELEPHONY AN0 TELEVISION SIGNALS A64-16255 EQUATORIAL, CIRCULAR ORBIT, COMSAT COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR FULL GLOBAL COVERAGE OISTORTION. SIGNAL AN0 NOISE POWER GENERATE0 IN A64-24503 TRANSMISSION TESTS OF TELSTAR I CONDUCTED AT FRENCH PLEUMEUR-BOOOU SATELLITE TRACKING STATION COST ESTIMATES AN0 ECONOMICS FOR COMMUNICATIONS A64-24650 SATELLITE SYSTEMS AN0 OPERATION A64-24586 RANDOM ACCESS STATIONARY SATELLITE RELAY COMMUNICATION SYSTEM

1-11 SCIENTIFIC SATELLITE SUBJECT INDEX

PC E-R- 1152-0020A Nb4-16163 SOLAR SIMULATION SOLAR SIMULATION COMPARED TO THERMAL GRADIENT SCIENTIFIC SATELLITE VACUUM TESTING, BASED ON RELAY COMMUNICATIONS APPLICATION CATEGORIES OF SATELLITES INCLUDING SATELLITE DATA A64-23245 1970 AN0 1980 FORECAST OF INTERNATIONAL TELEPHONE COMHUN ICA T IONS 664-26916 SOLIO PROPELLANT COLLECTION OF P.4DPEP.S CGVERiNG COnnUNiCAllON RELAY SCINTILLATION COUNTER SATELLITE TECHNIQUES, SOLIO PROPELLANT ROCKET REDISTRIBUTION OF HIGH ENERGY GEOMAGNETICALLY TECHNOLOGY AN0 ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL OF MANNED TRAPPED PROTONS DURING MAGNETIC STORM OBTAINED SPACE VEHICLES Ab4-18421 WITH AI0 OF SCINTILLATION DETECTOR ABOARD RELAY I SATELLITE Ab4- 18805 SPACE COMMUNICAT ION ATMOSPHERIC REFRACTION EFFECT ON RADIO WAVES IN SH IEL0 ING EARTH-SATELLITE COMMUNICATION LINK UNDER VARIOUS EFFECT OF SHIELDING ON SOLAR ENERGY CONVERSION TROPOSPHERIC AN0 IONOSPHERIC CONDITIONS EFFICIENCY OF SYNCOM I1 SOLAR CELL ASSEMBLY Ab4-19690 Nb4-29161 TRANSPORTABLE SPACE COMMUNICATION TERMINAL, SIGNAL NOTING WORK WITH RELAY AN0 TELSTAR SATELLITES MULTIPLE ACCESS CAPABILITY OF HARD-LIMITING Ab4-19900 COMMUNICATION SATELLITE REPEATER WITH SPREAO- SPECTRUM SIGNALS SYSTEM CONFIGURATION OF TRANSPORTABLE SPACE IOA/HQ-b4-2490 Nb4-30797 COMMUNICATION TERMINAL Ab4-19901

SIGNAL RECEPTION BOOK ON PROBLEMS IN ESTABLISHING COMMUNICATIONS SIMULTANEOUS RELAY OF TWO WIOEBANO PHASE COOED SATELLITE NETWORK Ab4-25485 BINARY SIGNALS AN0 ONE CW SIGNAL BY MEANS OF HARD LIMITING SATELLITE Ab5-11467 SPACE ERECTABLE STRUCTURE SEVEN TECHNIPUES AN0 TYPICAL APPLICATIONS FOR SIGNAL TO NOISE RATIO EXPANDABLE SPACE STRUCTURES Ab 5-13541 SIGNAL TO NOISE RATIO IN SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS COMPUTEO. TAKING INTO ACCOUNT ALL NOISE SOURCES SPACE EXPLORATION FROM TRANSMITTER TO RECEIVER Ab5-11684 NASA PROGRAM - PROGRESS AN0 GOALS IN SPACE Nb4-33371 SIGNAL TRANSMISSION COMMUNICATION SATELLITE SYSTEM DESIGN FOR COOPERATION OF U. S. S. R. AN0 U. S. ON PEACEFUL WORLDWIDE COVERAGE FOR TRANSMISSION OF USE OF SPACE SINCE 1962 Ab5-10073 MULTICHANNEL TELEPHONY AN0 TELEVISION SIGNALS Ab4-18255 SPACE LAW CONFERENCE ON SPACE SCIENCE AND SPACE LAW AT SHARING OF SATELLITE OUTPUT POWER AMONG CARRIERS UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA FROM JUNE ie TO 20. 1963 TO OVERCOME RANGE AN0 WEATHER DIFFERENCES BETWEEN Ab4-26329 LINKS Ab5-11469 PRESENT AN0 FUTURE ASPECTS OF COMMUNICATIONS SILICON SATELLITE ACT OF 1962 Ab4-26334 SYNCOM I1 ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM. DISCUSSING DESIGN, AIR MASS ONE TO AIR MASS ZERO DATA GATHERING SATELLITES USE IN MILITARY PLANNING EXTRAPOLATION AN0 SPATIAL PERFORMANCE RELATED TO EVOLUTION OF SPACE LAW AIAA PAPER 64-456 Ab4-19996 Ab4-26335

SILICON RADIATION DETECTOR COMMUNICATIONS AN0 RECONNAISSANCE SATELLITESv SILICON P-N JUNCTION DIODE RADIATION DETECTOR THEIR DETECTION AN0 MONITORING AN0 THEIR RELATION DESIGNED FOR TELSTAR SATELLITE EXPERIMENTS TO SPACE LAW Ab4-26336 Ab4-22078 SPACE LAW AN0 COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITESI FREE SINGLE-SIOEBAND MODULATION SPACE LOWER BOUNDARY, CONTROL OF SPACE, ORBITAL EARTH TO MOON AN0 LUNAR SURFACE-TO-SURFACE REGULATION, AN0 INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION COMMUNICATIONS USING LUNAR SATELLITES AN0 FM AN0 NASA-SP-44 Nb4-2 1136 sse MODULATION TECHNIQUES Ab5-13098 MONOPOLY AN0 ANTITRUST ASPECTS OF COMMUNICATIONS SOLAR CELL SATELLITE OPERATIONS - SPACE LAW SYNCOM 11 ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM, DISCUSSING Nb4-21141 DESIGN, AIR MASS ONE TO AIR MASS ZERO EXTRAPOLATION AN0 SPATIAL PERFORMANCE REGULATION IN ORBIT - ADMINISTRATIVE ASPECTS OF AIAA PAPER 64-456 164-1999b COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE ACT AN0 SPACE LAW Nb4-21142 DAMAGE TO SOLAR CELL RADIATION SHIELDS IN RELAY I AND RELAY I1 SATELLITES Nb4-29153 PROBLEMS OF SPACE LAW AN0 POLICY RESULTING FROM COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE ACT AN0 INHERENT IN EFFECT OF SHIELDING ON SOLAR ENERGY CONVERSION OPERATING SATELLITE SYSTEM Nb4-21143 EFFICIENCY OF SYNCOM I1 SOLAR CELL ASSEMBLY Nb4-29161 SPACE PROGRAM INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION IN COMMUNICATIONS DECREASED CURRENT IN SOLAR CELLS ON RELAY I AN0 SATELLITE PROGRAM Ab4-26683 RELAY 11 DUE TO DAMAGE ev VAN ALLEN BELT RADIATION Ab5-11003 SPACE SCIENCE SPACE RESEARCH PROGRAMS OF THE UNITED KINGDOM AN0 SOLAR FLUX EUROPE 664-14983 CONTROL SYSTEM USING SOLAR FLUX AS FORCE TO CHANGE ORBITAL PARAMETERS OF PASSIVE COMMUNICATIONS SPACE SIMULATION SATELLITE THERMAL PROPERTIES OF TELSTAR I AN0 I1 FROM SPAC NASA-CR-53518 Nb4-18440 SIMULATOR DATA COMPARE0 WITH THOSE TELEMETEREO FROM FLIGHT Ab+-23227 SOLAR RAOIATION NIGHT EXTlNCTION VALUES FROM PHOTOGRAPHIC SPACE STATION BRIGHTNESS OBSERVATIONS OF ECHO I ARTIFICIAL SEVEN TECHNIQUES AN0 TYPICAL APPLICATIONS FOR SATELLITE Ab4-26278 EXPANOABLE SPACE STRUCTURES Ab5-13541

1-12 SUBJECT INDEX SYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATIONS /SYNCOM-II/ SATELLITE

SPACE SYSTEMS ENGINEERING NASA-TH-X-51654 N64-20005 FOURTEEN PAPERS ON SYSTEMS ENGINEERING AN0 SPACE TECHNOLOGY BY RCA SCIENTISTS AN0 ENGINEERS STRUCTURAL DESIGN A64-22790 SEVEN TECHNIQUES AN0 TYPICAL APPLICATIONS FOR EXPANDABLE SPACE STRUCTURES A65- 13541 SPACECRAFT COMMUNICATIDN TRANSPORTABLE TRACKING AN0 COMMUNICATIONS SUBSTRATE TERMINAL FOR USE WITH PASSIVE SATELLITES ABSORPTANCE AND EMITTANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF A64-22516 AMORPHOUS PHOSPHATE COATINGS APPLIED TO ALUMINUM FOIL SUBSTRATE - THERMAL CONTROL OF ECHO I1 SPACECRAFT COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM SATELLITE COMMUNICATION LINKS AND ELECTRONICALLY STEERABLE NASA-RP-303 Nb4-28 752 ANTENNAS FOR COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES WITH VARIOUS DEGREES OF STABILIZATION AN0 ORBITS SURFACE PROPERTV Ab4-26778 PHOTOMETRY OF SURFACE PROPERTIES OF ECHO I NASA-CR-58290 N64-29572 SPACECRAFT CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL HEMISPHERICAL EMISSIVITY OF TELSTAR MATERIALS SWITCHING CIRCUIT MEASURE0 BY CALORIMETRIC METHOD PROBABILITY DISTRIBUTION OF ANTENNA GAIN FOR Ab5-11510 SATELLITES WITH SWITCHED ANTENNA SYSTEMS ESO-TOR-64-26 Nb4-29609 SPACECRAFT DESIGN SPACECRAFT TECHNOLOGICAL APPROACH TO SATELLITE SVNCHRONI ZATION COMMUNICATION SYSTEM A64-19911 CLOCK SYNCHRONIZATION BETWEEN UNITEO STATES AN0 UNITEO KINGOOM. USING TELSTAR SATELLITE SPACECRAFT ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT Ab4-15501 SPACE COMMUNICATIONS SUBSYSTEM RELIABILITY REVIEW OF SATELLITE TRANSPONDER COMPONENTS SYNCHRONIZATION FOR DIGITAL COMMUNICATION VIA A64-26739 SATELL ITE N64-16161

SPACECRAFT POWER SUPPLY SYNCHRONIZATION AND TIME MAINTENANCE BETWEEN ORBITING PROBLEMS AN0 ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS SYNCOM SATELLITE AN0 SYNCOM STATIONS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES NASA-TM-X-55016 N64-27252 A64-24584 SYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATIONS /SYNCOM/ SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE TECHNOLOGY PROBLEMS DESIGN REQUIREMENTS AN0 FEASIBILITY OF HIGH POWER DISCUSSING SYNCHRONIZATION OF ORBIT, ATTITUDE SYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES STABILIZATION, LIFETIME AND POWER SUPPLY Ab4-22795 164-26623 SYNCHRONOUS ORBITS, TRANSFER ORBITSI ORBIT ERRORS SYNCOM I1 ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM AN0 PERTURBATIONS. AND CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR AIAA PAPER-64-456 N64-25047 SYNCHRONOUS COMHUNICATIONS /SYNCOM/ SATELLITES A64-24578 SPACECRAFT RELIABILITV DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF TELSTAR COMMUNICATION RANGE AN0 RANGE RATE SYSTEM AN0 DATA ANALYSIS FOR SATELLITE TO IMPROVE ITS RELIABILITY SYNCOM I SATELLITE Ab4-15651 NASA-TN-0-2139 N64-21264

RELAY COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE DESIGN, RELIABILITY ELECTRONIC PARTS AN0 COMPONENT RELIABILITY FOR AN0 QUALITY CONTROL PROGRAMS TO MEET MISSION SYNCOM I SATELLITE REQUIREMENTS Ab4-23648 NASA-TH-X-55012 Nb4-27249

SYNCHRONOUS AN0 RANDOM COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYNCHRONIZATION AN0 TIME MAINTENANCE BETWEEN SYSTEMS COMPARED IN TERMS OF ESTABLISHMENT IN SYNCOM SATELLITE AN0 SYNCOM STATIONS ORBIT AN0 EQUIPMENT REPLENISHMENT NASA-TH-X-55016 Nb4-27252 664-24722 SYNCOM C SATELLITE AN0 THRUST AUGMENTED DELTA SPHERE /TAD/ LAUNCH VEHICLE N64-27757 GRID-SPHERE PASSIVE SATELLITE MODELS - THEORETICAL AN0 EMPIRICAL STUDY OF GRID-SPHERES, INFLATABLE MOMENTUM BIAS ATTITUDE CONTROL FOR SYNCHRONOUS MODEL FABRICATION, DESIGN IN SPACE ENVIRONMENT COMMUNICATIONS /SYNCOM/ SATELLITE GER-11568 N65-10 240 TOR-269/4540-70/-1 N64-28670

SPIN STABILIZATION SYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATIONS /SYNCOM-11/ SATELLITE REDUCTION OF NULL CONE SHADOWS OF TOROIDAL ANTENNA SYNCOM I1 ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM. DISCUSSING BY SPIN-STABILIZING COMMUNICATION SATELLITES OESIGNI AIR MASS ONE TO AIR MASS ZERO A64-17773 EXTRAPOLATION AN0 SPATIAL PERFORMANCE AIAA PAPER 64-456 A64-19996 ATTITUDE DETERMINATION AN0 PREDICTION FOR SPIN- STABILIZED TELSTAR SATELLITES USING MEAN GRAVITY 24 HR COMMUNICATIONS TEST OPERATIONS AND GROUND AND MAGNETIC TORQUE VALUES A64-24870 SYSTEMS OF SYNCOM I1 ACTIVE SYNCHRONOUS SATELLITE A64-2 17 17 STEERABLE ANTENNA CONTROL AN0 MOTOR DRIVE SYSTEM OF STEERABLE SYNCOM I1 SINGLE AN0 MULTIPLE CHANNEL ANTENNA AT SATELLITE COMMUNICATION EARTH STATION COMMUNICATIONS EXPERIMENT DURING EARLY OPERATION, Ab4-18249 DESCRIBING DATA REDUCTION AND ANALYSIS 664-21720 COMMUNICATION LINKS AN0 ELECTRONICALLY STEERABLE ANTENNAS FOR COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES WITH SYNCOM I1 GROUND STATION VOICE CHANNEL OESIGNI VARIOUS DEGREES OF STABILIZATION AN0 ORBITS USING COMPANOOR TO IMPROVE TRANSMISSION AN0 A64-26778 REC EP T ION Ab4-21721

ELECTRONICALLY STEERABLE ANTENNAS FOR SUBSATELLITE PATH FOR 24-HOUR ORBITS AFFECTED BY COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE CHANGES IN ECCENTRICITYI INCLINATION. AN0 ARGUMENT NASA-TM-X-55106 N65-12605 OF PERIGEE - ORBITAL PATH OF SYNCOM I1 NASA-TM-X-54564 N64-15864 STEREOSCOPIC PHOTOGRAPHY STEREOPHOTOGRAPHY OF ECHO I1 BALLOONS FOR TRIAXIALITY OF EARTH FROM OBSERVATIONS ON DRIFT OF DETERHINATION OF DEVIATION FROM SPHERICITY SYNCOM I1 SATELLITE - LONGITUDINAL DEPENDENCE OF

1-13 SYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE PROJECT SUBJECT INDEX

EARTH GRAVITATIONAL FIELD CATAPHOTIC REFLECTING SATELLITE IN STATIONARY NASA-TM-X-55003 N64-23935 EQUATORIAL ORBIT A65-11012

SYNCOH I1 ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM TECHNICAL, COMPATIBILITY AN0 EPUITABLE AIAA PAPER-64-456 N64-25047 REQUIREMENTS OF SPACE TELEVISION BROADCASTING A65-? 1 ?3? EFFECT OF SHIELDING ON SOLAR ENERGY CO"!E!?.S!C?! EFI-ILltNCY OF SYNCOM I1 SOLAR CELL ASSEMBLY TELSTAR I SATELLITE N64-29161 THERMAL PROPERTIES OF TELSTAR I AN0 XI FROM SPAC SIMULATOR DATA COMPARED WITH THOSE TELEMETERED SYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE PROJECT FROM FLIGHT A64-23227 ADVANCED SPIN-STABILIZED SYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE PROGRAMS, INCLUDING TELSTAR I1 SATELLITE HS-303 /EARLY BIRD/ SATELLITE A64-26766 THERMAL PROPERTIES OF TELSTAR I AND 11 FROM SPAC SIMULATOR DATA COMPARED WITH THOSE TELEMETERED TRANSMITTING AN0 RECEIVING EQUIPMENT FOR SYNCOM FROM FLIGHT Ab+-23227 GROUND STATION SYN-52-01-01, VOL. 1 N64-33073 TELSTAR SATELLITE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF TELSTAR COMMUNICATION SYNCHRONOUS SATELLITE SATELLITE TO IMPROVE ITS RELIABILITY SYNCHRONOUS LUNAR ORBITING SATELLITE EVALUATED FOR A64-15651 INTERSTATION COMMUNICATION ON MOON A64-16346 TELSTAR SPHERICAL SPIN-STABILIZED SATELLITEt DESCRIBING ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL SYSTEMS SYNCHRONIZATION PROBLEMS IN DIGITAL COMMUNICATION A64-15838 SYSTEMS USING SYNCHRONOUS AND SUBSYNCHRONOUS SATELLITE LINKS A64-17091 TELSTAR SATELLITE EXPERIMENTS, DISCUSSING COMMUNICATION SYSTEM. ORBIT AND ATTITUDE ASPECTS EQUATORIAL PLANE AND MEDIUM ALTITUDE SYNCHRONOUS IEEE PAPER 63-952 A64-15839 SATELLITE SYSTEMS FOR COMMERCIAL OVERSEAS COMMUNICATION5 A64-22796 TRANSPORTABLE SPACE COMMUNICATION TERMINALS NOTING WORK WITH RELAY AN0 TELSTAR SATELLITES COMMUNICATION SATELLITES IN SYNCHRONOUS ORBITS A64-19900 WITH SUFFICIENT BROADCASTING POWER FOR DIRECT TRANSMISSION TO DOMESTIC AERIALS TRANSPORTABLE GROUND STATION TECHNICAL PARAMETERS A64-24574 AN0 OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH TELSTAR AND RELAY SATELL I TES A64-19907 SYNCHRONOUS AN0 RANDOM COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEMS COMPARED IN TERMS OF ESTABLISHMENT IN SILICON P-N JUNCTION OIOOE RADIATION DETECTOR ORBIT AN0 EQUIPMENT REPLENISHMENT OESIGNEO FOR TELSTAR SATELLITE EXPERIMENTS A64-24722 164-22078

CRITERIA FOR CHOICE OF SYNCHRONOUS OR MEDIUM PROJECT TELSTAR COVERING POWER SUPPLY. CIRCUIT* ALTITUDE MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM ORBIT, RAOIATION AND SOLAR ASPECTS A65-12 119 A64-24576

SYSTEMS ENGINEERING DISTORTION, SIGNAL AN0 NOISE POWER GENERATED IN FOURTEEN PAPERS ON SYSTEMS ENGINEERING AND SPACE TRANSMISSION TESTS OF TELSTAR I CONDUCTED AT TECHNOLOGY BY RCA SCIENTISTS AN0 ENGINEERS FRENCH PLEUMEUR-BOOOU SATELLITE TRACKING STATION A64-22790 A64-24658

ATTITUDE DETERMINATION AN0 PREDICTION FOR SPIN- T STABILIZED TELSTAR SATELLITES USING MEAN GRAVITY TELECOMMUNICATION AN0 MAGNETIC TORQUE VALUES A64-24870 BOOK ON TELECOMMUNICATION SATELLITES INCLUDING THEORY, PRACTICE, GROUND STATIONSI SATELLITES AN0 ANTENNA POINTING SYSTEM EQUIPMENT AND METHODS TO ECONOM IC5 A64-24573 ACHIEVE ACCURACY FOR TELSTAR EXPERIMENT A64-28525 ORBITING PROBLEMS AN0 ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES TELSTAR SATELLITE TELEMETRY AND COMMAND SYSTEMS A64-24504 N64-16156

ECONOMICS AND COST ESTIMATES FOR MATERIAL DEVELOPMENT, FABRICATION TECHNIQUES AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM EQUIPMENT RELIABILITY FOR INFLATABLE TELSTAR A64-24585 RADOMES A65-11109

HIGH POWER COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES FOR FUTURE HEMISPHERICAL EMISSIVITY OF TELSTAR MATERIALS TELECOHMUNICATIDNS 664-24587 MEASURE0 BY CALORIMETRIC METHOD A65-11510 OISTORTION~SIGNAL AND NOISE POWER GENERATED IN TRANSMISSION TESTS OF TELSTAR I CONDUCTED AT TEMPERATURE GRADIENT FRENCH PLEUMEUR-BOOOU SATELLITE TRACKING STATION SOLAR SIMULATION COMPARED TO THERMAL GRADIENT A64-24658 VACUUM TESTINGI BASED ON RELAY COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE DATA A64-23245 COMMUNICATION SATELLITES FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS - ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY TERMINAL NA SA-CR-58031 N64-29553 PERFORMANCE OF TRANSPORTABLE PASSIVE SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS TERMINAL TELEMETRY RAOC-TOR-62-502 N64-21412 TELSTAR SATELLITE TELEMETRY AN0 COMMAND SYSTEMS N64-16156 THERMAL EMISSION HEMISPHERICAL EMISSIVITY OF TELSTAR MATERIALS TELEVISION TRANSMISSION MEASURE0 BY CALORIMETRIC METHOD COMMUNICATION SATELCITES IN SYNCHRONOUS ORBITS A65-11510 WITH SUFFICIENT BROAOCASTING POWER FOR DIRECT TRANSMISSION TO DOMESTIC AERIALS THERMAL SIMULATION A64-24574 THERMAL PROPERTIES OF TELSTAR I AN0 I1 FROM SPAC SIMULATOR DATA COMPARED WITH THOSE TELEMETEREO EUROPEAN TELEVISION BROAOCASTING SYSTEM USING FROM FLIGHT A64-2 322 7

1-14 SUBJECT INDEX VOYAGER PROJECT

FLIGHT TEMPERATURE SIMULATION IN SPACECRAFT VACUUM SATELLITES AND ECHO I SATELLITE CHAMBER TEST USED FOR RELAY COMMUNICATIONS NASA-CR-55853 Nb4-16721 SATELLITE Ab4- 2 3 244 VOICE COMMUNICATION TIME SYNCOM 11 GROUND STATION VOICE CHANNEL DESIGN, SYNCHRONIZATION AND TIME MAINTENANCE BETWEEN USING COMPANDOR TO IMPROVE TRANSMISSION AND SYNCOM SATELLITE AND SYNCOM STATIONS RECEPTION Ab4-21721 NA SA-TM-X-55016 N64-27252 VOYAGER PROJECT TRACK ING PLANETARY ORBITING RELAY COMMUNICATION LINK FOR SIMULTANEOUS TRACKING OF ECHO I SATELLITE FOR PROJECT VOYAGER Ab4-18269 GEODETIC PURPOSES - CELESTIAL TRIANGULATION NASA-TT-F-8954 Nb4-30847

TRACKING ANTENNA CONTROL AND MOTOR DRIVE SYSTEM OF STEERABLE ANTENNA AT SATELLITE COMMUNICATION EARTH STATION 664-1 8249

MULTIFREQUENCY HIGH POWER CASSEGRAIN ANTENNA FEED SYSTEM FOR TRANSPORTABLE SATELLITE GROUND STATIONS A64-19903

ANTENNA POINTING SYSTEM EQUIPMENT AN0 METHODS TO ACHIEVE ACCURACY FOR TELSTAR EXPERIMENT Ab4-28525

TRACKING STATION TRANSPORTABLE GROUND STATION TECHNICAL PARAMETERS AND OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH TELSTAR AND RELAY SATELL ITE S A64-19907

TRANSPORTABLE TRACKING AN0 COMMUNICATIONS TERMINAL FOR USE WITH PASSIVE SATELLITES A64-22 516

TRANSOCEANIC COMMUNICATION BELL SYSTEM USE OF COMSAT HS-303 /EARLY BIRD/ SATELLITE CIRCUITS FOR TRANSATLANTIC CDMMUN ICA T IONS A64-26751

TRANSPONDER SPACE COMMUNICATIONS SUBSYSTEM RELIABILITY REVIEW OF SATELLITE TRANSPONDER COMPONENTS Ab4-26739

DIRECT MICROWAVE TO MICROWAVE SATELLITE TRANSPONDERS FOR RECEPTION, AMPLIFICATION AND RETRANSMISSION OF INFORMATION BEARING RF SIGNALS BETWEEN GROUND TERMINALS Ab4-26779

TRARPED RADIATION TRAPPED RADIATION MEASUREMENTS BY RELAY I SATELLITE NASA-CR-51018 N64-33 123

TRIANGULATION SIMULTANEOUS TRACKING OF ECHO I SATELLITE FOR GEODETIC PURPOSES - CELESTIAL TRIANGULATION NA SA-TT-F-8954 N64-30847

TWENTY-FOUR HOUR ORBIT OPTIMIZATION OF ORBITAL CONTROL OF 24-HOUR COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE, CONSIDERING CONSTRAINT ON FUEL CONSUMPTION 164-11785

SUBSATELLITE PATH FOR 24-HOUR ORBITS AFFECTED BY CHANGES IN ECCENTRICITY, INCLINATION, AND ARGUMENT OF PERIGEE - ORBITAL PATH OF SYNCOM I1 NASA-TM-X-54564 Nb4-15864 V VACUUM CHAMBER FLIGHT TEMPERATURE SIMULATION IN SPACECRAFT VACUUM CHAMBER TEST USED FOR RELAY COMMUNICATIONS SATELL ITE Ab4-23244

SOLAR SIMULATION COMPARED TO THERMAL GRADIENT VACUUM TESTING, BASED ON RELAY COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE DATA Ab4-23245

VAN ALLEN BELT DECREASED CURRENT IN SOLAR CELLS ON RELAY I AN0 RELAY 11 DUE TO DAMAGE BY VAN ALLEN BELT RAD1AT ION Ab5-11003

VANGUARD SATELLITE ORBITAL ELEMENTS FOR EXPLORER AND VANGUARD

1-15 Personal Author Index

______~~ ~ COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES / a C 0 n t inU ing bib I i o g r uph y APRIL 1965

B Listing of Personal Authors of Reports BACKUS, 0. L. COMMUNICATION LINKS AND ELECTRONICALLY STEERABLE ANTENNAS FOR COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES WITH A Notation of Content rather than the title of the document appears VARIOUS DEGREES OF STABILIZATION AN0 ORBITS Ab4-26778 under each authors name The NASA or AIAA accession number IS located beneath and to the right of the Notation of Content e g N64 ELECTRONICALLY STEERABLE ANTENNAS FOR 12345 or A64 12450 Under any one authors name the accession COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE numbers are arranged in sequence NASA-TM-X-55106 Nb5- 12605

BANCROFT, J. A. IBM 7090 AN0 7094 PROGRAMS FOR COST ESTIMATES AN0 OPERATION OF COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEMS N AS A-CR-55888 N64-27262

BARKER, 4- C. MOMENTUM BIAS ATTITUDE CONTROL FOR SYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATIONS /SYNCOM/ SATELLITE TOR-269/4540-70/-1 ~64-2a.570

BARTOW, J. E. COURIER COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR GLOBAL A COMMUNI CATIONS Ab4- 24579 AARONSON, 0. A. BEATON. R. ti. DIGITAL DATA REDUCTION AND ANALYSIS FOR TELSTAR NON~AINTAINABLE COMMUNICATIONS SATELL I TE DESI GN, SA TELL ITE COMMUNI CAT1ON SYS TEM Ab4-18292 DISCUSSING RELIABILITY CONTROL PROCEDURES TO ACHIEVE THREE TO FIVE YEAR MEAN TIME TO FAILURES AEIN, J. M. A64-26764 MULTIPLE ACCESS CAPABILITY OF HARD-LIMITING COMMUNICATION SATELLITE REPEATER WITH SPREAO- BENNETT, S. 8. SPECTRUM SIGNALS TELSTAR SATELLITE EXPERIMENTS. DISCUSSING IDA/HQ-64-2498 Nb4-30797 COMMUNICATION SYSTEM. ORBIT AN0 ATTITUDE ASPECTS IEEE PAPER 63-952 Ab4-15839 AFANASYEV. 8. G. SYNCHRONOUS OBSERVATIONS BY RUSSIAN PHOTOGRAPHIC BENTLEY, R. M. STATIONS OF ECHO I FOR GEODETIC PURPOSES RESULTS AN0 DESIGN IMPROVEMENTS OF SYNCHRONOUS Ab4-26242 COMMUNICATIONS /SYNCOM/ PROJECT AIAA PAPER b3-264 A64-21188 SIMULTANEOUS TRACKING OF ECHO I SATELLITE FOR GEODETIC PURPOSES - CELESTIAL TRIANGULATION BERG. W. E. NA SA-TT-F-8954 Nb4-30847 DATA GATHERING SATELLITES USE IN MILITARY PLANNING RELATED TO EVOLUTION OF SPACE LAW ALLEN, W. I(. Ab+-26335 DIRECT MICROWAVE TO MICROWAVE SATELLITE TRANSPONDERS FOR RECEPTION, AMPLIFICATION AN0 BERMAN, A. L. RETRANSMISSION OF INFORMATION BEARING RF SIGNALS MULTIPLE CARRIER BEHAVIOR OF FREQUENCY-SELECTIVE BETWEEN GROUND TERMINALS 164-26779 FERRITE LIMITER IN COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE A65-12120 ALTMAN, F. J. SHARING OF SATELLITE OUTPUT POWER AMONG CARRIERS BIRD, W. W. TO OVERCOME RANGE AND WEATHER DIFFERENCES BETWEEN MATERIAL DEVELOPMENT, FABRICATION TECHNIQUES AND LINKS 665-1 1469 EQUIPMENT RELIABILITY FOR INFLATABLE TELSTAR RADOMES Ab5- 11109 ARONSDN, J. 0. MEDIUM ALTITUDE RANDOM ORBIT COMMUNICATIONS LARGE AIR SUPPORTED RADOMES FOR SATELLITE SATELLITE SYSTEM DESIGN FOR CONTINUOUS SERVICE COMMUNICATIONS GROUND STATION Nb5-11060 Ab4-26765 BLAGONRAVOV, A. A. ASSADOURIAN, F. COOPERATION OF U. S. S. R. AN0 U. S. ON PEACEFUL SYNCHRONIZATION PROBLEMS IN DIGITAL COMMUNICATION USE OF SPACE SINCE 1962 665-10073 SYSTEMS USING SYNCHRONOUS AND SUBSYNCHRONOUS SATELLITE LINKS Ab4-17091 BOOIN, W. Jar JR. RANGE AND RANGE RATE SYSTEM AND DATA ANALYSIS FOR SYNCHRONIZATION FOR OIGITAL COMMUNICATION VIA SYNCOM I SATELLITE SA TELL ITE Nb4-16161 NASA-TN-0-2139 Nb4-21264

ASSALY, R. N. BOSKEY, 8. PROBABILITY OISTRIBUTION OF ANTENNA GAIN FOR MONOPOLY AN0 ANTITRUST ASPECTS OF COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES WITH SWITCHED ANTENNA SYSTEMS SATELLITE OPERATIONS - SPACE LAW €SO-TOR-64-26 Nb4-29609 N64-21141

BRADBURD, E. M. SYNCHRONIZATION PROBLEMS IN DIGITAL COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS USING SYNCHRONOUS AN0 SUBSYNCHRONOUS

1-17 BRADY, M. E. PERSONAL AUTHOR INDEX

SATELLITE LINKS Ab4-17091 ECHO I SATELLITE NASA-TN-0-2194 Nb4-22020 SYNCHRONIZATION FOR DIGITAL COMMUNICATION VIA SA TELL ITE Nb4-16 161 ABSORPTANCE AND EMITTANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AMORPHOUS PHOSPHATE COATINjS APPLIEO TO ALUMINUM BRADY, M. E. FOIL SUBSTRATE - THERMAL CONTROL OF ECHO 11 SPACECRAFT TECHNOLOGICAL APPROACH TO SATELLITE SATELIITE tSEMUN:CA:ION SYjTEEI Ab4-19911 NASA-RP-303 Nb4-20752

BRATTON, F. H- COLE, R. W. INFLATABLE MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PASSIVE SYNCHRONOUS ORBITS, TRANSFER ORBITS, ORBIT ERRORS COMMUNICATION SATELLITE Nb4-23730 AN0 PERTURBATIONS, AN0 CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR SYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATIONS /SYNCOM/ SATELLITES BRAY, W. J. Ab4-24578 COMMUNICATION SATELLITE SYSTEM DESIGN FOR WORLDWIDE COVERAGE FOR TRANSMISSION OF COOPER, e. MULTICHANNEL TELEPHONY AN0 TELEVISION SIGNALS GROUND STATION FOR SATELLITE COMMUNICATION 164-18255 DEVELOPED FOR SPACE RESEARCH Ab4-19099

EUROPEAN PARTICIPATION IN TELSTAR AN0 RELAY COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE PROGRAMS D Ab4-24580 DAS, J. CRITERIA FOR CHOICE OF SYNCHRONOUS OR MEDIUM WORLDWIDE SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM DESIGN ALTITUDE MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM WITH EMPHASIS ON ORBIT SELECTION Ab5-12119 Ab+-26402 DAVE. A. BUCK, T. M. TRAPPED RADIATION MEASUREMENTS BY RELAY I SILICON P-N JUNCTION DIODE RADIATION DETECTOR SATELL ITE DESIGNED FOR TELSTAR SATELLITE EXPERIMENTS NASA-CR-57018 Nb4-33123 Ab4-22878 RADIATION MEASUREMENTS OF GEOMAGNETICALLY TRAPPED BURT, E. G. C. ELECTRONS BY INSTRUMENTS ON RELAY I SATELLITE EQUATORIAL CIRCULAR ORBIT COMSAT COMMUNICATIONS IN 1963 SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR EUROPEAN CIVIL COMMUNICATIONS NASA-TN-0-2516 Nb5-12812 Ab4-24582 DE CLAVIERE. G. ORBITING PROBLEMS AN0 ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS C FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES CAMP, J. 0. A64-24584 ABSORPTANCE AN0 EMITTANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AMORPHOUS PHOSPHATE COATINGS APPLIEO TO ALUMINUM OEVILLE, W. W. FOIL SUBSTRATE - THERMAL CONTROL OF ECHO I1 SPACE COMMUNICATIONS SUBSYSTEM RELIABILITY REVIEW SATELLITE OF SATELLITE TRANSPONDER COMPONENTS NASA-RP-303 Nb4-28752 664-26739

CAMPBELL, F. J. OOUGHERTY, J. J. EFFECT OF SHIELDING ON SOLAR ENERGY CONVERSION NASA COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE PROGRAMS OISCUSSING EFFICIENCY OF SYNCOM I1 SOLAR CELL ASSEMBLY ECHO, RELAY, SYNCOM AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGICAL Nb4-29161 SATELLITES Ab 4-267 58

CAPPELLARI, J. 0. DRUCKER. J. E. ATTITUDE DETERMINATION AN0 PREDICTION FOR SPIN- TRANSPORTABLE GROUND STATION TECHNICAL PARAMETERS STABILIZED TELSTAR SATELLITES USING MEAN GRAVITY AN0 OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH TELSTAR AND RELAY AN0 MAGNETIC TORQUE VALUES Ab4-24870 SATELLITES Ab4-19907

CATALFAHO, C. R. DUNPHY, R. P. SUBSATELLITE PATH FOR 24-HOUR ORBITS AFFECTED BY RELAY COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE DESIGN, RELIABILITY CHANGES IN ECCENTRICITYt INCLINATIONI AN0 ARGUMENT AN0 QUALITY CONTROL PROGRAMS TO MEET MISSION OF PERIGEE - ORBITAL PATH OF SYNCOM I1 REQUIREMENTS A64-23648 NASA-TM-X-54564 Nb4-15864 DUPONT, P. S. CHAMBERLAIN, J. K. SYNCOM I1 ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM, OISCUSSING MUTUAL INTERFERENCE BETWEEN COMMUNICATION DESIGN, AIR MASS ONE TO AIR MASS ZERO SATELLITE AN0 LINE OF SIGHT RADIO RELAY SYSTEMS. EXTRAPOLATION AND SPATIAL PERFORMANCE WITH NOISE POWER MEASUREMENTS 164-18246 AIAA PAPER 64-456 Ab4-19996

CHAPMAN. R. C.. JR. SYNCOM I1 ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM TELSTAR SATELLITE TELEMETRY AN0 COMMAND SYSTEMS AIAA PAPER-64-456 Nb4-25047 Nb4-16156

CITTADIND~J. C. E SYNCOM 11 SINGLE AN0 MULTIPLE CHANNEL EARL, A- G. COMMUNICATIONS EXPERIMENT DURING EARLY OPERATIONI EQUATORIAL CIRCULAR ORBIT COMSAT COMMUNICATIONS DESCRIBING DATA REDUCTION AN0 ANALYSIS SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR EUROPEAN CIVIL COMMUNICATIONS Ab4-2 1720 Ab4-24582

CLARKE, A. C. EDELBAUM, T. N. COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES AN0 THEIR APPLICATIONS OPTIMIZATION OF ORBITAL CONTROL OF 24-HOUR Ab4-15207 COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE, CONSIDERING CONSTRAINT ON FUEL CONSUMPTION Ab4-17785 CLEAVER, A. V. EUROPEAN SPACE PROGRAM, INCLUDING SUPPORTING EDWARDS. R. ARGUMENTS, REVIEW OF ESRO AN0 EL00 PROJECTSI AN0 MULTIFREQUENCY HIGH POWER CASSEGRAIN ANTENNA FEED COMPARISON OF EUROPEAN PROJECTS WITH REST OF WORLD SYSTEM FOR TRANSPORTABLE SATELLITE GROUND STATIONS Ab4-19802 Ab+-19903

CLEHHDNS. 0. La, JR. EMMONS, R. H. SUBLIMING COMPOUND USED AS INFLATION SYSTEM FOR PHOTOMETRY OF SURFACE PROPERTIES OF ECHO I

1-18 PERSONAL AUTHOR INDEX GREENBERG, J. S.

NASA-CR-56290 N64-29572 GENATT, 5. H. STEREOPHOTOGRAPHY OF ECHO I1 BALLOONS FOR ENGELS, P- 0. DETERMINATION OF DEVIATION FROM SPHERICITY RANGE AN0 RANGE RATE SYSTEM AND DATA ANALYSIS FOR NASA-TM-X-51654 N64-20005 SYNCOM I SATELLITE NA SA-TN-0-2 139 N64-21264 GERSDN. G. ADVANCE0 SYNCOM SATELLITE COMMUNICATION ANTENNA SYNCHRONIZATION AN0 TIME MAINTENANCE BETWEEN ARRAY N64- 16157 SYNCOM SATELLITE AND SYNCOM STATIONS NASA-TM-X-55016 N64-27252 GIBBONS, H. M. SIMULTANEOUS RELAY OF TWO WIOEBANO PHASE COOED ERHARDT, H. R. BINARY SIGNALS AN0 ONE CW SIGNAL BY MEANS OF HARD ADVANCE0 SYNCDM SATELLITE COMMUNICATION ANTENNA LIMITING SATELLITE A65-11467 ARRAY N64-16157 GILBERT. R. A. ESTER, S. 0. SYNCHRONOUS AN0 RANDOM COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE PROBLEMS OF SPACE LAW AN0 POLICY RESULTING FROM SYSTEMS COMPARED IN TERMS OF ESTABLISHMENT IN COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE ACT AN0 INHERENT IN ORBIT AND EPUIPMENT REPLENISHMENT OPERATING SATELLITE SYSTEM N64-21143 A64-24722

GITHENS, J. A. F ANTENNA POINTING SYSTEM EQUIPMENT AND METHODS TO FARLEY, P. J. ACHIEVE ACCURACY FOR TELSTAR EXPERIMENT INTERNATIONAL CODPERATION IN COMMUNICATIONS A64-28525 SATELLITE PROGRAM A64-26683 GLEASON. 1. R. FELDMAN. G. J. 24 HR COMMUNICATIONS TEST OPERATIONS AND GROUND PRESENT AN0 FUTURE ASPECTS OF COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS OF SYNCOM I1 ACTIVE SYNCHRONOUS SATELLITE SATELLITE ACT OF 1962 A64-26334 A64-21717

FELDMAN. N. E. GLOMB. W. LINK FROM COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE TO SMALL GROUNO TRANSPORTABLE SPACE COMMUNICATION TERMINAL. STAT ION NOTING WORK WITH RELAY AN0 TELSTAR SATELLITES P-2684 N64-26682 A64-19900

FELDMAN. N. W. GOLOMAN, H. SYNCOM I1 GROUND STATION VOICE CHANNEL OESIGNt TRANSMITTER FOR SATELLITE GROUND STATION USED IN USING COMPANOOR TO IMPROVE TRANSMISSION AN0 RELAY AN0 TELSTAR OPERATION A64-19904 RECEPTION A64-21721 GOROON. G. 0. FICHTER. W. 8. FLIGHT TEMPERATURE SIMULATION IN SPACECRAFT VACUUM BUCKLING OF ECHO A-12 PASSIVE COMMUNICATIONS CHAMBER TEST USED FOR RELAY COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SATELLITE 664-23244 NA SA-TN-0-2353 N64-2 59 13 SOLAR SIMULATION COMPARED TO THERMAL GRADIENT FILLIUS. R. W. VACUUM TESTING, BASED ON RELAY COMMUNICATIONS TRAPPED RADIATION MEASUREMENTS BY RELAY I SATELLITE DATA A64-23245 SATELL ITE NASA-CR-57018 N64-33123 GOUBEAUD, G. J. LIGHTWEIGHT TRANSPORTABLE GROUND LINK TERMINAL FOR RADIATION MEASUREMENTS OF GEOMAGNETICALLY TRAPPED SATELL ITE COMMUNICATIONS 164-2 1719 ELECTRONS BY INSTRUMENTS ON RELAY I SATELLITE IN 1963 GRAHAM, R. NASA-TN-0-2516 N65- 128 12 TRANSMITTER FOR SATELLITE GROUND STATION USED IN RELAY AND TELSTAR OPERATION A64-19904 FORBES. F. W. SEVEN TECHNIQUES AND TYPICAL APPLICATIONS FOR GRANATA. R. L. EXPANDABLE SPACE STRUCTURES A65-13541 SYNCHRONIZATION AND TIME MAINTENANCE BETWEEN SYNCOM SATELLITE AND SYNCOM STATIONS FOREST, B. A. NASA-TM-X-55016 N64-27252 COMPUTER PROGRAM TO DETERMINE COMMUNICATION POTENTIAL OF SYSTEM OF. SATELLITES FOR ANY STATION GRAY, L- PAIR COMBINATIONS ON GROUND AND IN SPACE TRANSPORTABLE SPACE COMMUNICATION TERMINAL, 664-22514 NOTING WORK WITH RELAY AN0 TELSTAR SATELLITES A64-19900 G TRANSMITTER FOR SATELLITE GROUND STATION USED IN GARNER, W. 8. RELAY AND TELSTAR OPERATION A64-19904 MULTIPLE ACCESS TECHNIPUE FOR COMMERCIAL COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES, NOTING SYSTEM GREENBERG. J. S. REPUIREMENTS AN0 SATELLITE REPEATER TECHNIPUE DESIGN REPUIREMENTS AND FEASIBILITY OF HIGH POWER A65-11335 SYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES A64-22795 GATLAND. K. W. COMMUNICATION SATELLITES IN SYNCHRONOUS ORBITS EQUATORIAL PLANE AN0 MEDIUM ALTITUDE SYNCHRONOUS WITH SUFFICIENT BROADCASTING POWER FOR DIRECT SATELLITE SYSTEMS FOR COMMERCIAL OVERSEAS TRANSMISSION TO DOMESTIC AERIALS COMMUNICATIONS A64-22796 A64-24574 COST ESTIMATES AND ECONOMICS FOR COMMUNICATIONS GAY, A. C. SATELLITE SYSTEMS AN0 OPERATION DESIGN REPUIREMENTS AND FEASIBILITY OF HIGH POWER A6 4- 2456 6 SYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES A64-22795 HIGH POWER COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE POTENTIAL - COST REDUCTION AN0 LIFETIME EXTENSION HIGH POWER COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE POTENTIAL - N64-24658 COST REDUCTION AN0 LIFETIME EXTENSION N64-24850 OVERSEAS COMMERCIAL COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEMS- 1965 TO 1975 N64-24859

I-19 PERSONAL AUTHOR INDEX

GREENE. R. H. HERSHBERG. 0. COMPUTER PROGRAM TO DETERMINE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM CONFIGURATION OF TRANSPORTABLE SPACE POTENTIAL OF SYSTEM OF SATELLITES FOR ANY STATION COMMUNICATION TERMINAL Ab4-19901 PAIR COMBINATIONS ON GROUND AN0 IN SPACE Ab4-22 514 HILTON, Y- F. ORBIT CALCULATION AN0 COVERAGE FOR COMMUNICATIONS GRUENBERG, E. L. SATELLITES Ab4-24575 tD!4MUP4:tATIDNS RELAY S'YSiiii iiSiEiG VAN ATTA TYPt RETRODIRECTIVE SATELLITE ANTENNA MODULATED BY HOUSSINt J. P. SOLID STATE DEVICE Ab4-1bb12 DISTORTION, SIGNAL AN0 NOISE POWER GENERATED IN TRANSMISSION TESTS OF TELSTAR I CONDUCTED AT GUBIN, 5- FRENCH PLEUMEUR-BOOOU SATELLITE TRACKING STATION EQUATORIAL PLANE AN0 MEOIUM ALTITUDE SYNCHRONOUS Ab4-24658 SATELLITE SYSTEMS FOR COMMERCIAL OVERSEAS COMMUNICATI ONS 664-22796 HYNER. 0. P. CROSS SECTION MEASUREMENTS OF ECHO I1 SATELLITE COST ESTIMATES AN0 ECONOMICS FOR COMMUNICATIONS BY MILLSTONE L-BAN0 RADAR SATELLITE SYSTEMS AN0 OPERATION ESD-TOR-64-43 Nb4-30037 Ab4-24586

OVERSEAS COMMERCIAL COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE I SYSTEMS- 19b5 TO 1975 Nb4-24859 IZSAK. 1. G. ORBITAL ELEMENTS OF SELECTEO SATELLITES H NA SA-CR-5585 1 Nb4-lb720 HABIBt E. J. ORBITAL ELEMENTS FOR EXPLORER AND VANGUARD RANGE AN0 RANGE RATE SYSTEM AN0 DATA ANALYSIS FOR SATELLITES AND ECHO I SATELLITE SYNCOM I SATELLITE NASA-CR-55853 Nb4-16721 NASA-TN-0-2139 Nb4-21264

HAGEN. 0. La J PLANETARY ORBITING RELAY COMMUNICATION LINK FOR JAFFE. Le PROJECT VOYAGER Ab4-18269 NASA COMMUNlCATION SATELLITE PROGRAMS INCLUDING ECHO. RELAY. TELSTAR AN0 SYNCOM HANDELSMAN, H. Ab4-15032 EPUATORIAL PLANE AN0 MEOIUM ALTITUDE SYNCHRONOUS SATELLITE SYSTEMS FOR COMMERCIAL OVERSEAS JAMES, T. G. COMMUNICATIONS Ab4-22796 ELECTRON RADIATION EFFECT ON PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ECHO 11 LAMINATE HIGH POWER COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES FOR FUTURE NASA-TN-0-2207 Nb4-32836 TELECOMMUNICATIONS Ab4-24587 JOHNSON. C. M. OVERSEAS COMMERCIAL COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS RELAY SYSTEM USING VAN ATTA TYPE SYSTEMS- 1965 TO 1975 Nb4-24859 RETROOIRECTIVE SATELLITE ANTENNA MODULATED BY SOLI0 STATE DEVICE Ab4-16612 HARLIN, S. H. SUBSATELLITE PATH FOR 24-HOUR ORBITS AFFECTED BY JOHNSON. L. L. CHANGES IN ECCENTRICITY, INCLINATION. AN0 ARGUMENT COST c PRICE EST\MATE RELATING TO COMMUNICATIONS OF PERIGEE - ORBITAL PATH OF SYNCOM I1 SATELL I TES NASA-TM-X-54564 Nb4- 15B 64 P-2753-1 N64-20273

HAVILAND. R. P. JULIAN. R. F. LONG RANGE COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENTS THAT CROSS SECTION MEASUREMENTS OF ECHO 11 SATELLITE DETERMINE DESIGN FACTORS FOR COMMUNICATION RELAY BY MILLSTONE L-BAND RADAR SATELLITE SYSTEMS Ab4-18423 €SO-TOR-64-43 Nb4-30037

NIMBUS METEOROLOGICAL SATELLITE TO MEET POWER CAPABILITY AND ATTITUDE CONTROL REPUIREMENTS FOR K SPACE BROADCASTING SYSTEM KAHN. W. 0. AIAA PAPER 64-422 Ab4-20784 RANGE AN0 RANGE RATE SYSTEM AN0 DATA ANALYSIS FOR SYNCOM I SATELLITE TECHNICAL, COMPATIBILITY AN0 EQUITABLE NASA-TN-0-2139 Nb4-21264 REQUIREMENTS OF SPACE TELEVISION BROAOCASTING Ab5-11131 KALASHNIKOV, N. I. SATELLITE RADIO COMMUNICATION SYSTEM F M BROADCASTING FROM SATELLITE. NOTING COVERAGE CHARACTERISTICS INCLUDING USABLE FREPUENCY BANDS AND CHANNEL SHARING Ab5-11336 AN0 FIGURES OF MERIT Ab4-27138

HEDRICH. A. L. KARRENBERG, H. K. COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE TECHNOLOGY - ECHOt RELAY. LONGTERM AVERAGE PROBABILITY OF BEING ABLE TO AN0 SYNCOM PROJECTS Nb4-30342 COMMUNICATE BETWEEN VARIOUS PAIRS OF GROUND TERMINALS BY MEANS OF SATELLITE RELAYS ARRANGE0 IN HEFFERHAN. P. J. CERTAIN NONSYNCHRONOUS ORBITAL SYSTEMS NONLINEAR NOISE TRANSMISSION IN FREQUENCY-DIVISION AIAA PAPER 63-397 Ab4-26202 MULTIPLEX TELEPHONY OVER SSB-PM SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM KELLY. C. M. NASA-TN-0-2365 Nb4-23920 LENTICULAR GRAVITY-GRADIENT STABILIZE0 PASSIVE SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM POTENTIAL AN0 HEPPE, R. J. CHARACTERISTICS, DISCUSSING Low ANO SYNCHRONOUS GRAPHIC METHODS FOR CALCULATING COVERAGE ORBIT APPLICATIONS Ab4-25901 ATTAINABLE WITH COMMUNICATION SATELLITES Ab4-19910 KELLY. H. P. ANTENNA POINTING SYSTEM EPUIPMENT AN0 METHODS TO SYNCHRONOUS AND RANDOM COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE ACHIEVE ACCURACY FOR TELSTAR EXPERIMENT SYSTEMS COMPARE0 IN TERMS OF ESTABLISHMENT IN Ab4-28525 ORBIT AND EPUIPMENT REPLENISHMENT Ab4-24722 KEYESt J. A. FEASIBILITY OF UTILIZING ONE SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR BOTH COMMERCIAL AN0 MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS

1-20 PERSONAL AUTHOR INDEX MUELLER, G. E.

A64-26767 MANNOS. M. COMPUTER PROGRAM TO DETERMINE COMMUNICATION KEYES. R. G. POTENTIAL OF SYSTEM OF SATELLITES FOR ANY STATION 24 HR COMMUNICATIONS TEST OPERATIONS AN0 GROUND PAIR COMBINATIONS ON GROUND AN0 IN SPACE SYSTEMS OF SYNCOM I1 ACTIVE SYNCHRONOUS SATELLITE A64-22514 A64-21717 MASEVICHt A. G. KIESLING. J. 0. SYNCHRONOUS OBSERVATIONS BY RUSSIAN PHOTOGRAPHIC LONG HAUL MICROWAVE COMMUNICATIONS USING MEOIUM- STATIONS OF ECHO I FOR GEODETIC PURPOSES ALTITUDE ACTIVE SATELLITES Ab*-21 673 Ab4-26242

KILL€, R. W. SIMULTANEOUS TRACKING OF ECHO I SATELLITE FOR PERFORMANCE OF TRANSPORTABLE PASSIVE SATELLITE GEODETIC PURPOSES - CELESTIAL TRIANGULATION COMMUNICATIONS TERMINAL NASA-TT-F-8954 N64-30847 RAOC-TOR-62-502 N64-21412 MATHWICHt H. R. KINGSLEV. E. H. MULTIPLE ACCESS TECHNIQUE FOR COMMERCIAL IBM 7090 AND 7094 PROGRAMS FOR COST ESTIMATES AN0 COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES, NOTING sYs.rEM OPERATION OF COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEMS REQUIREMENTS AN0 SATELLITE REPEATER TECHNIQUE NASA-CR-55888 N64-27262 A65-11335

KORMAN. N. I. MAUNSELLs H. 1. HIGH POWER COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES FOR FUTURE TELSTAR SPHERICAL SPIN-STABILIZED SATELLITE, TELECOMMUNI CATIONS A64-24587 DESCRIBING ELECTRICAL AN0 MECHANICAL SYSTEMS A64- 15 8 3 8 KRONMILLER. G. C.. JR. RANGE AN0 RANGE RATE SYSTEM AN0 DATA ANALYSIS FOR MAYDELL. W. V. SYNCOM I SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE TECHNOLOGY PROBLEMS NA SA-TN-0-2 139 N64-21264 DISCUSSING SYNCHRONIZATION OF ORBIT. ATTITUDE STABILIZATION. LIFETIME AND POWER SUPPLY KUTUZOV. 1. A. A64-26623 PROCESSING OF SYNCHRONOUS PHOTOGRAPHIC OBSERVATIONS OF SATELLITE ECHO I INDICATES MC CAUL. P. F. POSSIBLE GEODETIC APPLICATIONS Ab4-18754 SYNCHRONIZATION AN0 TIME MAINTENANCE BETWEEN SYNCOM SATELLITE AN0 SYNCOM STATIONS L NASA-TM-X-55016 N64-27252 LEONARD. R. W. MC CLUREt R. BUCKLING OF ECHO A-12 PASSIVE COMMUNICATIONS GROUND STATION FOR SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SA TELL ITE DEVELOPED FOR SPACE RESEARCH A64-19899 NASA-TN-0-2353 N64-25913 MC COMB. H. G-r JR. LINES. A. W. BUCKLING OF ECHO A-12 PASSIVE COMMUNICATIONS EQUATORIAL CIRCULAR ORBIT COMSAT COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR EUROPEAN CIVIL COMMUNICATIONS NASA-TN-0-2353 N64-25913 A64-24582 MC ILWAIN. C. E. LOCKETT. J. w. REOISTRIBUTION OF HIGH ENERGY GEOMAGNETICALLY SYNCOM I1 SINGLE AN0 MULTIPLE CHANNEL TRAPPEO PROTONS DURING MAGNETIC STORM OBTAINED COMMUNICATIONS EXPERIMENT DURING EARLY OPERATION. WITH AI0 OF SCINTILLATION DETECTOR ABOARD RELAY I DESCRIBING DATA REDUCTION AN0 ANALYSIS SATELLITE A64-18805 A64-21720 TRAPPED RADIATION MEASUREMENTS BY RELAY I LOZIER. J. C. SATELLITE ANTENNA POINTING SYSTEM EQUIPMENT AN0 METHODS TO NASA-CR-57018 N64-33123 ACHIEVE ACCURACY FOR TELSTAR EXPERIMENT A64-28 525 RADIATION MEASUREMENTS OF GEOMAGNETICALLY TRAPPED ELECTRONS BY INSTRUMENTS ON RELAY I SATELLITE LUEDERS. R. 0. IN 1963 LONGTERM AVERAGE PROBABILITY OF BEING ABLE TO NASA-TN-0-2516 N65-12812 COMMUNICATE BETWEEN VARIOUS PAIRS OF GROUND TERMINALS BY MEANS OF SATELLITE RELAYS ARRANGED IN MEAD. 0. C. CERTAIN NONSYNCHRONOUS ORBITAL SYSTEMS ADVANCED SYNCOM SATELLITE COMMUNICATION ANTENNA AIAA PAPER 63-397 A64-26202 ARRAY N64-16157

LUNOSTROM. A. A. MEOHURST. R. G. ANTENNA POINTING SYSTEM EQUIPMENT AN0 METHODS TO MUTUAL INTERFERENCE BETWEEN COMMUNICATION ACHIEVE ACCURACY FOR TELSTAR EXPERIMENT SATELLITE AN0 LINE OF SIGHT RADIO RELAY SYSTEMS* A64-28 525 WITH NOISE POWER MEASUREMENTS Ab4-18246

METZGER. J. E. M ATTITUDE CONTROL FOR IMPROVING GAIN OF CRITICAL MAC GREGOR. N. LINK IN SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM DESIGN DIFFERENCES IN MILITARY AN0 COMMERICAL Ab4-22539 COMMUNICATION SATELLITES AIAA PAPER 64-416 A64-20110 MILLMANS G. H. FARADAY EFFECT ON ECHO I RADAR REFLECTIONS USE0 TO COMPARISON BETWEEN MILITARY AN0 COMMERCIAL OBTAIN INTEGRATED IONOSPHERIC ELECTRON.0ENSITY APPROACHES TO COMMUNICATION SATELLITE DESIGN VARIATIONS A64-27667 A64-26949 MOTTLEYv T. P. MAC LELLAN. 0. C. COURIER COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR GLOBAL LINCOLN EXPERIMENTAL COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE - COMMUNICATIONS A6 4- 24 57 9 LAUNCH PROGRAM, COMPONENTS. AN0 FUNCTION €SO-TOR-64-559 N65-12895 MUELLER. G. E. BOOK ON PROBLEMS IN ESTABLISHING COMMUNICATIONS MANOERS. C. R. S. SATELLITE NETWORK A64-25485 SPACE RESEARCH PROGRAMS OF THE UNITE0 KINGDOM AN0 EUROPE A64-14983

1-21 MUIR. 0. E. PERSONAL AUTHOR INDEX

MUIR, 0. E. PRITCHARD. W. L. IEM 7090 AN0 1094 PROGRAMS FOR COST ESTIMATES AN0 DESIGN DIFFERENCES IN MILITARY AN0 COMMERICAL OPERATION OF COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEMS COMMUNICATION SATELLITES NA SA-CR-5 5888 Nb4-27262 AIAA PAPER 64-416 A64-20110

MURPHY. C. G- COMPARISON BETWEEN MILITARY AN0 COMMERCIAL SYNCOH MARK SATELLITES FOR WORLDWIDE APPROACHES TO COMMUNICATION SATELL!?€ DESIC?: COMMUNICATIONS: E!!PHAS!Z:NG SYNCHRONOUS OR6ii A64-26949 INJECTION AN0 CONTROL Ab4-15033 CRITERIA FOR CHOICE OF SYNCHRONOUS OR MEDIUM ALTITUDE MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM N A65-12 119 NDRTHROP, G. M. DESIGN OF COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS UTILIZING SATELLITES AS RELAY POINTS R P-2785 Nb4-20511 RAE, J. R. BELL SYSTEM USE OF COMSAT HS-303 /EARLY BIRD/ SATELLITE CIRCUITS FOR TRANSATLANTIC 0 COMMUNICATIONS 664-26757 OMEARAS F. E. SIGNAL TO NOISE RATIO IN SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS RECHTIN. E. COMPUTEOt TAKING INTO ACCOUNT ALL NOISE SOURCES EARTH TO MOON AN0 LUNAR SURFACE-TO-SURFACE FROM TRANSMITTER TO RECEIVER Ab5-11684 COMMUNICATIONS USING LUNAR SATELLITES AN0 FM AND SSB MODULATION TECHNIQUES Ab5-13098 ONEILL. E. F. PHOTOGRAPHS, DIAGRAMS AN0 DRAWINGS DEPICTING REIDS E. J. PRINCIPLES OF COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES AN0 THEIR TELSTAR SATELLITE TELEMETRY AN0 COMMAND SYSTEMS GROUND ANTENNA STATIONS A64-26 333 Nb4-16156

OSGODD. C. C. RITT, R. K. DYNAMIC AND STRUCTURAL DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR MEASUREMENT OF RADAR REFLECTION PROPERTIES OF ECHO RELAY SATELLITE A64-22792 PROJECT BALLOON - FULL-SCALE MODEL OF ECHO I1 SATELLITE Nb4-24294 OWENS, A. 1. RESULTS AN0 DESIGN IMPROVEMENTS OF SYNCHRONOUS RDDGERS. J. W. COMMUNICATIONS /SYNCOM/ PROJECT SILICON P-N JUNCTION DIODE RADIATION DETECTOR AIAA PAPER 63-264 Ab4-21188 DESIGNED FOR TELSTAR SATELLITE EXPERIMENTS A64-22878

P ROEMER, H. PALLAVICINDs L. ANNUAL, SEMIANNUAL AND 27 DAY VARIATIONS OF SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONSI DISCUSSING TRANSPORTABLE EXOSPHERIC DENSITIES FROM ECHO I DRAG DATA, NOTING GROUND EPUIPMENT TO BE USE0 WITH ACTIVE AN0 HELIUM CONCENTRATION INCREASE A64-25030 PASSIVE SATELLITES A64-28430 ROSEN. H. A. PAROOE. G. K. C. ADVANCED SPIN-STABILIZED SYNCHRONOUS EQUATORIALI CIRCULAR ORBIT, COMSAT COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE PROGRAMS, INCLUDING SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR FULL GLOBAL COVERAGE HS-303 /EARLY BIRD/ SATELLITE Ab4-26166 Ab4-24583 RDSENELUH. V. G. PAUL, B. REGULATION IN ORBIT - ADMINISTRATIVE ASPECTS OF REDUCTION OF NULL CONE SHADOWS OF TOROIDAL ANTENNA COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE ACT AND SPACE LAW BY SPIN-STABILIZING COMMUNICATION SATELLITES Nb4-21142 Ab4-1 7113 ROSENTHAL. A. PEZDIRTZ, G. F. REVIEW OF 1963 AT GOOOARO SPACE FLIGHT CENTER - MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ECHO I1 SATELLITE CHRONOLOGICAL INDEX LAMINATES NASA-TM-X-51626 Nb4-19598 NA SA-TN-D-2 361 N64-26543

PLOTTINW G. S EUROPEAN TELEVISION BROADCASTING SYSTEM USING SANNER. G. E. CATAPHOTIC REFLECTING SATELLITE IN STATIONARY TRANSMITTING AN0 RECEIVING EQUIPMENT FOR SYNCOM EPUATORIAL ORBIT 465-11012 GROUND STATION SYN-52-07-01. VOL. 1 Nb4-33073 POLLACK. L. TRANSPORTABLE SPACE COMMUNICATION TERMINALI SASS, H. E. NOTING WORK WITH RELAY AN0 TELSTAR SATELLITES COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE TECHNOLOGY PROBLEMS Ab4-19900 DISCUSSING SYNCHRONIZATION OF ORBIT, ATTITUDE STABILIZATION* LIFETIME AN0 POWER SUPPLY PRICES H. L. Ab4-26623 MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ECHO I1 SATELLITE LAM INATES SASSLER. M. NA SA- TN-0-2 361 Nb4-26543 PHASE LOCKED OEMOOULATION FOR MULTICHANNEL TELEPHONE TRAFFIC FROM SATELLITES PRIHAR. 2. A65-11338 RANDOM ACCESS STATIONARY SATELLITE RELAY COMMUNICATI ON SYSTEM SAUNDERS, V. 1. PCE-R-1152-0020A Nb4-16163 CLOCK SYNCHRONIZATION BETWEEN UNITEO STATES AND UNITED KINGOOMI USING TELSTAR SATELLITE PRIME, H. A. Ab4-15501 CONTROL AN0 MOTOR DRIVE SYSTEM OF STEERABLE ANTENNA AT SAIELLITE COMMUNICATION EARTH STATION SCHEINER. H. A64-1 8249 MULTIFREQUENCY HIGH POWER CASSEGRAIN ANTENNA FEE0 SYSTEM FOR TRANSPORTABLE SATELLITE GROUND STATIONS GROUND STATION DESIGN AN0 EPUIPMENT FOR Ab4-19903 COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEMS A64-24581 SCHULTZ, K. U. COMMUNICATIONS AN0 RECONNAISSANCE SATELLITES,

1-22 PERSONAL AUTHOR INDEX TRIPP. G. P.

THEIR DETECTION AN0 MONITORING AND THEIR RELATION PRECISELY REDUCE0 OBSERVATIONS OF SATELLITES TO SPACE LAW A64-26336 NASA-CR-53783 N64-19350

SCHWENKE, T. W. STONE, R. F. IBM 7090 AND 7094 PROGRAMS FOR COST ESTIMATES AN0 TRANSPORTABLE TRACKING AN0 COMMUNICATIONS OPERATION OF COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEMS TERMINAL FOR USE WITH PASSIVE SATELLITES NA S A-C R-5 5 888 N64-27262 A64-22516

SHAFFER, H. Id. STRATFORD, A. H. RANGE AND RANGE RATE SYSTEM AND DATA ANALYSIS FOR ECONOMICS AN0 COST ESTIMATES FOR SYNCOM I SATELLITE TELECOMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM NASA-TN-0-2139 N64-21264 A64-24585

SHCHEGOLEV, 0. E. STREET, H. W. L. SYNCHRONOUS OBSERVATIONS BY RUSSIAN PHOTOGRAPHIC ELECTRONIC PARTS AN0 COMPONENT RELIABILITY FOR STATIONS OF ECHO I FOR GEODETIC PURPOSES SYNCOM I SATELLITE A64-26242 NASA-TM-X-55012 N64-27249

SIMULTANEOUS TRACKING OF ECHO I SATELLITE FOR STRICKBERGER, H. P. GEODETIC PURPOSES - CELESTIAL TRIANGULATION FLIGHT TEMPERATURE SIMULATION IN SPACECRAFT VACUUM NASA-TT-F-8954 Nb4-30841 CHAMBER TEST USED FOR RELAY COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE Ab4-23244 SHENNUM. R. H. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF TELSTAR COMMUNICATION SOLAR SIMULATION COMPARED TO THERMAL GRADIENT SATELLITE TO IMPROVE ITS RELIABILITY VACUUM TESTING, BASE0 ON RELAY COMMUNICATIONS A64-15651 SATELLITE DATA Ab4-23245

SHERMAN, H. STRIPLING, M. H. LINCOLN EXPERIMENTAL COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE - SYNCHRONOUS AN0 RANDOM COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE LAUNCH PROGRAM, COMPONENTS, AND FUNCTION SYSTEMS COMPARED IN TERMS OF ESTABLISHMENT IN ESD-TOR-b4-559 Nb5-12095 ORBIT AND EQUIPMENT REPLENISHMENT Ab4-24722 SHIBATA. H. ATMOSPHERIC REFRACTION EFFECT ON RADIO WAVES IN EARTH-SATELLITE COMMUNICATION LINK UNDER VARIOUS T TROPOSPHERIC AND IONOSPHERIC CONDITIONS TEETSEL, W. P. A64-19690 COURIER COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEM FOR GLOBAL COMMUNICATIONS A64-24579 SILVERMhN, G. SYNCOM I1 SINGLE AN0 MULTIPLE CHANNEL THOMAS. L. C. COMMUNICATIONS EXPERIMENT DURING EARLY OPERATION, TELSTAR SATELLITE EXPERIMENTS, DISCUSSING DESCRIBING DATA REDUCTION AN0 ANALYSIS COMMUNICATION SYSTEM, ORBIT AN0 ATTITUDE ASPECTS Ab4-21720 IEEE PAPER 63-952 A64-15839

SMITH, G. A. ATTITUDE DETERMINATION AND PREDICTION FOR SPIN- CONTROL AN0 MOTOR DRIVE SYSTEM OF STEERABLE STABILIZED TELSTAR SATELLITES USING MEAN GRAVITY ANTENNA AT SATELLITE COMMUNICATION EARTH STATION AN0 MAGNETIC TORQUE VALUES A64-24870 A64- 10249 THOMPSON, E. E. SPANGLER, E. R. BIBLIOGRAPHY ON ECHO COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE BOOK ON PROBLEMS IN ESTABLISHING COMMUNICATIONS AD-422049 Nb4-33047 SATELLITE NETWORK A64-25485 THOMPSON. W. C. SPANOS, w. SYNCHRONOUS AN0 RANDOM COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE MULTIFREQUENCY HIGH POWER CASSEGRAIN ANTENNA FEE0 SYSTEMS COMPARED IN TERMS OF ESTABLISHMENT IN SYSTEM FOR TRANSPORTABLE SATELLITE GROUND STATIONS ORBIT AN0 EQUIPMENT REPLENISHMENT A64-19903 A64-24722

SPIERER, M. M. THUE, M. IBM 7090 AND 7094 PROGRAMS FOR COST ESTIMATES AND APPLICATION CATEGORIES OF SATELLITES INCLUDING OPERATION OF COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE SYSTEMS 1970 AN0 1900 FORECAST OF INTERNATIONAL TELEPHONE NASA-CR-55888 N64-21262 COMMUNICATIONS Ab4-26916

SPONSLER, G. C. TILSLEYr 0. F- SYNCHRONOUS AND RANDOM COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE CONTROL AND MOTOR DRIVE SYSTEM OF STEERABLE SYSTEMS COMPARED IN TERMS OF ESTABLISHMENT IN ANTENNA AT SATELLITE COMMUNICATION EARTH STATION ORBIT AN0 EQUIPMENT REPLENISHMENT 664-10249 A64-24722 TOBIAS, W. T. STAFFORD. J. W. 24 HR COMMUNICATIONS TEST OPERATIONS AN0 GROUND TELSTAR SPHERICAL SPIN-STABILIZED SATELLITE, SYSTEMS OF SYNCOM I1 ACTIVE SYNCHRONOUS SATELLITE DESCRIBING ELECTRICAL AN0 MECHANICAL SYSTEMS A64-21717 A64-15838 TONELSON, N. STAFFORD, W. H. EVALUATION OF SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM SUBSATELLITE PATH FOR 24-HOUR ORBITS AFFECTED BY CONSISTING OF RANDOMLY SPACE0 SATELLITES IN CHANGES IN ECCENTRICITY, INCLINATION, AN0 ARGUMENT CIRCULAR ORBIT USING DIGITAL TECHNIQUE COMPUTER OF PERIGEE - ORBITAL PATH OF SYNCOM I1 AIAA PAPER 63-398 ~64-26590 NASA-TM-X-54564 Nb4-15864 TRAVERS. S. STENLUNO, S. J. SYNCHRONOUS LUNAR ORBITING SATELLITE EVALUATED FOR INFLATABLE MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PASSIVE INTERSTATION COMMUNICATION ON MOON COMMUNICATION SATELLITE N64-23730 A64-16346

STERN, P. TRIPP, G. P. CATALOG OF PRECISELY REDUCE0 SATELLITE SYNCOM I1 GROUND STATION VOICE CHANNEL DESIGN, OBSERVATIONS USING CDMPANOOR TO IMPROVE TRANSMISSION AND NASA-CR-55843 N64-16719 RECEPTION A64-21721

1-23 .

TUNNICLIFFEI W. 5. PERSONAL AUTHOR INDEX

TUNNICLIFFE, W. S. ATTITUDE SENSING AN0 CONTROL FOR SPIN STABILIZED CONTROL AN0 MOTOR DRIVE SYSTEM OF STEERABLE SYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATIONS /SYNCOM/ SATELLITES ANTENNA AT SATELLITE COMMUNICATION EARTH STATION Ab4-25301 Ab+-18249 WILMOTTE, R. M. RELAY SATELLITE DESIGN FOR SPACE ENVIRONMENTAL V TFST!NG OF COuu!.!N:C~::ONS SAiEiiiiE EPUiPMtNl V:LER:C, J. Ab4-24577 TRAPPED RAOIATION MEASUREMENTS BY RELAY I SATELL ITE WITTENBERG, A. M. NA SA-CR-57018 Nb4-33123 THERMAL PROPERTIES OF TELSTAR I AND I1 FROM SPAC SIMULATOR DATA COMPARE0 WITH THOSE TELEMETEREO RAOIATION MEASUREMENTS OF GEOMAGNETICALLY TRAPPED FROM FLIGHT Ab4-23227 ELECTRONS BY INSTRUMENTS ON RELAY I SATELLITE IN 1963 HEMISPHERICAL EMISSIVITY OF TELSTAR MATERIALS NASA-TN-0-2516 Nb5-12812 MEASURE0 BY CALORIMETRIC METHOD Ab5-11510 VERNET-LOZET, M. ORBITING PROBLEMS AN0 ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS WOERNER, H. FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS SATELLITES NIGHT EXTINCTION VALUES FROM PHOTOGRAPHIC Ab4-24584 BRIGHTNESS OBSERVATIONS OF ECHO I ARTIFICIAL SATELLITE Ab4-26278 VERNOV, 5. N. LAUNCHING OF ELECTRON SPACE SYSTEMS FOR EARTH WREN, A. W.. JR. RADIATION BELT STUDY MEASUREMENT OF RADAR REFLECTION PROPERTIES OF ECHO JPRS-23810 Nb4-17 554 PROJECT BALLOON - FULL-SCALE MODEL OF ECHO 11 SATELLITE Nb4-24294 VOCE, J. APPLICATION CATEGORIES OF SATELLITES INCLUDING WUERFFEL, H. L. 1970 AN0 1980 FORECAST OF INTERNATIONAL TELEPHONE RELAY COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE OESIGNI RELIABILITY COMMUNICATIONS Ab4-26916 AN0 QUALITY CONTROL PROGRAMS TO MEET MISSION REQUIREMENTS Ab4-2 3648 W WADDELI R. C. Y DECREASED CURRENT IN SOLAR CELLS ON RELAY I AND YAU, S. 5. RELAY II DUE TO DAMAGE BY VAN ALLEN BELT COMMUNICATION NET DESIGNED WITH SATELLITES AS RAD I AT1ON Ab5-11003 RELAY STATIONS AT MINIMUM COST Ab5-11468

DAMAGE TO SOLAR CELL RAOIATION SHIELOS IN RELAY I AN0 RELAY I1 SATELLITES Nb4-29153

WAGNER. C. A- TRIAXIALITY OF EARTH FROM OBSERVATIONS ON DRIFT OF SYNCOM I1 SATELLITE - LONGITUOINAL DEPENDENCE OF EARTH GRAVITATIONAL FIELD NASA-TM-X-55003 Nb4-23935

WALORON, P. LINCOLN EXPERIMENTAL COMMUNICATIONS SATELLITE - LAUNCH PROGRAM. COMPONENTS, AN0 FUNCTION €SO-TOR-64-559 Nb5-12895

WALL, M. EVALUATION OF SATELLITE COMMUNICATION SYSTEM CONSISTING OF RANDOMLY SPACED SATELLITES IN CIRCULAR ORBIT USING DIGITAL TECHNIQUE COMPUTER AIAA PAPER 63-398 Ab+-26590

WEBB, J. E. NASA PROGRAM - PROGRESS AN0 GOALS IN SPACE N64-3 3 37 1

WENOT, A. J. INFLATABLE MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PASSIVE COMMUNICATION SATELLITE Nb4-23730

WENRICK. E. 0. COMMUNICATION SATELLITES FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS - ECONOMIC FEAS I8 ILI TY NASA-CR-58031 Nb4-29553

WERTH, A. DIGITAL RANGE MEASUREMENTS USE0 IN DESIGN OF INSTANTANEOUS COMMUNICATIONS HANOOVER SYSTEM FOR ME0 IUM ALT I TUOE NUL TISATELL ITE SYSTEM Ab4-28247

WHEATLEYt G. H. SILICON P-N JUNCTION DIODE RAOIATION DETECTOR DESIGNED FOR TELSTAR SATELLITE EXPERIMENTS Ab4-22878

WILLIAMS, 0. 0. SYNCHRONOUS ORBITSv TRANSFER ORBITS, ORBIT ERRORS AN0 PERTURBATIONS, AND CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR SYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATIONS /SYNCOM/ SATELLITES Ab4-24578

1-24 NASA-Langley, 1965