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Department of Music Carleton College

CONCERT PROGRAM BOOKLET

2016-2017

Northfield, Minnesota

2016-2017 CONCERT PROGRAMS

CONCERT SERIES AND VISITING ARTISTS pgs. 8-52

Christopher U. Light Lectureship I September 16 Andrea Mazzariello, Mobius Percussion, & Nicola Melville,

Christopher U. Light Lectureship II September 17 Symmetry and Sharing film screening Featured artists Andrea Mazzariello & Mobius Percussion

Guest Artist Concert September 30 Dúo Mistral plays Debussy Featuring pianists Paulina Zamora & Karina Glasinovic

Woodward Concert Series October 16 Larry Archbold Concert and Colloquium

Faculty and Guest Artist Concert October 29 “Music of ” Featuring Spirit of Nature & the Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble

Guest Artist Concert January 20 The Saint Paul Chamber Featuring Jonathan Biss, piano & composer Sally Beamish

Guest Artist Lecture February 1 Musicians from the Bamboo Orchestra

Laudie D. Porter Concert Series February 9 MONTAGE: Great Film and the Piano film screening Featuring Gloria Cheng, piano 2016-2017 CONCERT PROGRAMS

CONCERT SERIES AND VISITING ARTISTS (Cont.)

Guest Artist Concert April 28 Malcolm Bilson, keyboard virtuoso

ARTS @ CARLETON VISITING ARTISTS pgs. 53-57

Third Coast Percussion April 11 Sponsored by Arts @ Carleton and the Department of Art and Art History

FACULTY RECITALS pgs. 58-72

Contemporary Voices from Latin America January 15 Matthew McCright, piano Featuring Guest Artist Francesca Anderegg,

Chinglish: Gao Hong, Chinese April 7

Homages: Nicola Melville, piano April 14

CARLETON MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS pgs. 73-136

African Drum Ensemble November 15 Jay Johnson, director March 7 May 30

Chinese Music Ensemble & Global Music Chamber Ensemble Concert Gao Hong, director February 19 Featuring Shu Yin Ensemble from the Sichuan Conservatory of Music May 19 2016-2017 CONCERT PROGRAMS

CARLETON MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS (Cont.)

Choir Concert November 5 Lawrence Burnett, director May 18

Jazz Ensemble Concert November 6 Laura Caviani, director February 26 May 21

Orchestra Concert November 11 Hector Valdivia, director March 3 May 26

Symphony Band Concert October 28 Ronald Rodman, director February 24 and 25 May 12

STUDENT AND STUDIO RECITALS pgs. 137-218

Piano Studio Recital November 9 Nicola Melville, coordinator March 1 May 24

Student Chamber Recital November 13 Nicola Melville, coordinator May 28

Student Chamber Recital I March 1 Nicola Melville, coordinator

Student Chamber Recital II March 5 Nicola Melville, coordinator

Jazz Chamber Recital March 7 Zacc Harris, Laura Caviani, and Greg Keel, directors May 24 2016-2017 CONCERT PROGRAMS

STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS (Cont.)

Violin/Viola Recital I November 14 Hector Valdivia, director

Violin/Viola Recital II November 16 Hector Valdivia, director

Violin/Viola Recital March 8 Hector Valdivia, director May 29

Voice Showcase Recital Lawrence Burnett, director October 22 February 11 Rick Penning, director May 6

Middle Eastern Music Ensemble May 30 Featuring Issam Rafea, oud

2017 Senior Comprehensive Exercise Presentations April 15 Caroline Glazer Andy Tirro Molly Hildreth Yang Chen Joe Lowry Patrick O’Reilly Kaylee Shiao Josh Ruebeck Jin Lee

Junior/Senior Recitals Yang Chen ’17, violin February 19 Molly Hildreth ’17, May 6 Kaylee Shiao ’17, piano & composition May 7 Vicky Wu ’17, guzheng May 13 Joe Lowry ’17, piano May 14 Hannah Marty ’17 & Claire O’Brien ’17, voice May 25 Koh Zhi You, piano May 29 Carleton is an exceptionally musical college, where excellent musical opportu- nities abound for all students, regardless of major. All Carleton students may choose from a wide variety of classroom courses embracing the study of not only western art music and its history, theory, and practices, but also rock, jazz, global pop, Motown and blues, film music, the philosophy and psycholo- gy of music, and musics of , Africa, the Caribbean, and China.

Over 800 Carleton students per year have also chosen to perform in Choir, Orchestra, Symphony Band, Jazz Ensemble, Chinese Music Ensemble, West African Drum Ensemble, and to study privately in an array of areas, including voice and all instruments typical of western art music ensembles, and also folk , , , sitar, Indian vocal music, African drums and karimba/ mbira, jazz, and Chinese musical instruments.

For the student who wishes to make a career of music, the music major, which leads to a degree, permits emphasis on performance, composition, history, and theory. Students who wish to become supervisors and/or elementary or high school teachers in music may follow a plan leading to a TA year of graduate study at another institution and a Master of Arts in Teaching. Starting in the Fall of 2017, the Music Department is pleased to add the music minor to its degree offerings. Many Carleton students take private lessons and/or participate in ensembles in addition to their three 6-credit courses.

These programs show the wide variety of opportunities for all Carleton stu- dents to hear, study, and perform music. Carleton’s Music and Drama Center includes a concert hall seating 440, a 55-rank Holtkamp organ, two Steinway concert grand , two concert , and an 18th century (replica) forte-piano, as well as teaching, practicing, and rehearsal facilities in the Center and in Music Hall.

Carleton College is working with HGA Architects and McGough Construc- tion to design and build a new music & performance commons addition to the Weitz Center for Creativity. The addition is being created to house the majority of the music program and create a new performance space of high acoustic quality to replace the existing Concert Hall. Music faculty offices, rehearsal spaces, the music resource library, and teaching studios are included in the project. The building will be completed and open in September 2017. CONCERT SERIES AND VISITING ARTISTS

Music at Carleton presents

Symmetry and Sharing

Featuring

Andrea Mazzariello, composer Mobius Percussion Nikki Melville, piano

Friday, September 16, 2016 7:00 p.m., Concert Hall

8 PROGRAM

Fall Down Five Times Get Up Six (2008)

Nikki Melville, piano

Electrobot (2012)

Mobius Percussion

Home Body (world premiere)

David Degge, dulcimer, voice, kick, hi-hat

Losses But Just (world premiere)

Andrea Mazzariello, drums, voice, keyboard, electronics

Symmetry and Sharing (2015)

Mobius Percussion

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving during the performance. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

9 PROGRAM NOTES

One way to think of tonight’s program is as a collection of pieces that engage, in various ways, the physiology of performance. I’m obsessed with the idea of bodies in motion and what they need to do and to know in order to make music, and I ask performers to re-wire these ways of doing and knowing as they prepare and perform my work. This comes out of an important aspect of my own prac- tice: the foregrounding of my own idiosyncratic physical relationship to keyboard and percussion instruments and to my voice, and a sense that tactile and kinetic experience is as important to me as more abstract, structural, syntactical ways of understanding music. And knowing this opens up another helpful, I hope, way of regarding this work: music that is concerned with the circumstances of its own making, with what these creative routines mean in the contours of daily life, its emotional realities, the costs of making together with its joys.

A moment of despair inadvertently titled Fall Down Five Times Get Up Six; I no lon- ger remember my specific grievance, but my younger brother’s characteristically understated response, “fall down five times, get up six,” still rings in my ears. The idea of getting unstuck, of the next effort being the one to break a pattern of fall- ing short, saturates the piece. The hands start out in conflict, jockeying for position on the keyboard, but ultimately end up exploding out into their own territory at the extremes of the instrument’s range. The musical ambition that drove me to write the piece in the first place– how can I get unstuck from repetitive cycles, from static harmony– is given over to completely in the opening but reassessed and re-contextualized by the interior, inner life of the piece, some of the most static and repetitive music I have ever made. Getting up that final time might actually look more like yielding than like blasting through; the initial material returns and reconciles, as though the energy of repetition, of falling down over and over, pro- pels us to that next, or first, step.

Electrobot asks Mobius to play the keyboard as well, except in this case the range is highly restricted and the most basic physical and musical assumption– press a key and a note comes out– is confounded. Each active key on the instruments triggers a short recording I made in my studio, beat fragments or synthesizer blasts or long, held tones, and each recording has its own rhythmic pulse and drive. The per- formers recombine these recordings into cycles that grow and evolve by playing keyboard patterns that dislocate their fingers from their ears. The sound world is more so-called “Intelligent Dance Music” than concert music, inspired by artists like Autechre and Aphex Twin, but in this specific crystallization of it, human bodies intervene and unlock the expressive power of live performance.

10 PROGRAM NOTES

While Electrobot takes computer music and humanizes it, Home Body in a sense turns the performer’s body into a machine. David plays irregular patterns in the dulcimer in his hands while his feet lay down a basic 4/4 groove. His voice en- ters and adds another level of independence, and then the hands pull apart into a more contrapuntal texture as the vocal part continues to intensify. The words reshuffle and recycle over the course of the piece, folding the mundane details of daily life into something more profound, or perhaps discovering profundity in the seemingly mundane.

Losses But Just is a very new piece, the maiden voyage of a performance setup that collides voice, drum set, keyboard, and electronics. Unlike previous work I’ve done as a one-person-band, in which musical athleticism could, at best, achieve the “right”/accurate version of a fixed piece, this work sets up an environment to explore, a world to inhabit. It also tries to hold deep sorrow and profound joy at the same time. “Sorry for your losses,” goes the text, “but just look at that sky,” over and over, like a mantra. The performing body can multi-task, but so can the heart, given enough time and space. This piece tries to offer up that space to the player as well as to anyone listening.

I made Symmetry and Sharing specifically for Mobius Percussion. They requested a “bot,” referring to a series of percussion pieces I’d created that traffic in grooves broken up and distributed among the players as well as constantly shifting un- derlying pulses. This is not that. The members of Mobius have a special interest in using their voices, and their vocal ranges just happen to map onto those in traditional SATB (Soprano/Alto/Tenor/Bass) part writing. Knowing this, I made what might be the world’s first SATB vocal percussion quartet. Through the text, they ask us to let go of our day-to-day preoccupations, our need to make our beds or make sure our watches run. The requests intensify, though, into more emo- tionally fraught territory, until we’re being told to disentangle ourselves from the traumas that drive us. I wanted to make that intervention feel like generosity and not intrusion. The ensemble plays tuned metal pipes and wood slats, deconstructs two drum kits and shares a vibraphone, singing in four independent parts all the while. I am in awe of their ability to do this, and honored by their willingness.

I’m grateful to Carleton College, and my supportive colleagues in the Department of Music, for producing this concert, as well as to Mobius Percussion and Nikki Melville for their willingness to take these pieces on. Thanks to Dave Hagedorn for graciously providing tonight’s vibraphone. And thank you all, sincerely, for being here and for your kind attention to this work.

-- Andrea Mazzariello

11 ORIGINAL TEXTS

Home Body Take. Cling. Make. Fold. Make. Sing. Take. Hold.

Take my sadness Take my clinging ways Take my madness Fold them in a drawer

Make my face up Make my body sing Make my grace up Hold them like a door

Take my grace up Make my face hold

Losses But Just Sorry for your losses but just look at that sky

Symmetry and Sharing Unmake your bed Unwind your watch Stay in awhile

Today is going to be so full of light and full of shadow

Unmake, unwind

Unmask your face Untie your heart Undo what’s been done to

Unmake, unwind, unmask, untie, undo

Mobius Percussion uses Vic Firth Sticks and would like to thank Vic Firth for their generous support and donations.

12 BIOGRAPHY

Andrea Mazzariello, is a composer, performer, writer, and teacher. His work borrows from both popular and art music approaches, and obsesses over techno- logical intervention, instrumental technique, and the power of language. So Per- cussion, NOW Ensemble, Newspeak, and many others have performed his con- cert music. He has played shows at venues like the Knitting Factory, the Princeton Record Exchange, Galapagos, and Cakeshop. The Queens New Music Festival, Make Music New York, and the Wassaic Festival have presented his songs and spo- ken words. Active as an educator, he has taught at Princeton University, Ramapo College of New Jersey, and the So Percussion Summer Institute. He is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor of Music at Carleton College.

Nicola Melville, piano, received the B.M. from the Victoria University of Wel- lington (), and the M.M., D.M.A., and the Performers Certificate from the Eastman School of Music. Melville has commissioned and premiered many works by composers in the and her native New Zealand. She has recorded the complete piano rags of William Albright for the Equilibrium label; her most recent CD, released on Innova Recordings, features thirteen new commissions by award-winning composers from around the US. As well as being an advocate for new music, her ongoing interests include interdisciplinary perfor- mances that combine music with other Arts in live performance.

Mobius Percussion is an ensemble of young musicians that bring a visual and theatrical edge to their performances. By working with a wide range of collab- orators including videographers, dancers, designers, thespians, and like-minded composers, they are breaking down the traditions of performance in favor of an immersive concert experience. The Brooklyn-based quartet (com- prised of David Degge, Mika Godbole, Yumi Tamashiro, and Frank Tyl) performs frequently throughout the tristate area at venues such as (le) Poisson Rouge, Baby’s All Right, Shapeshifter Lounge, and the Princeton Sound Kitchen, and the mem- bers have been guest artists on Vicky Chow’s Contagious Sounds Series, Andrea Clearfield’s Salon Series, The Firehouse New Music Series, and So Percussion’s Brooklyn Bound. Mobius’ past season included the Philadelphia premiere of Steve Reich’s Music for 18 Musicians in conjunction with Russel Hartenberg- er of Nexus and the Temple University Percussion Ensemble. Mobius also led a day-long seminar entitled “Rhythms of the Brain” produced by DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) for scientists and other artists to gain insights related to the neuroscience of musical rhythm. In March, Mobius premiered a new multimedia work entitled There Might Be Others in collaboration with choreog- rapher Rebecca Lazier and composer Dan Trueman in a four day engagement at New York Live Arts. Prior multimedia collaborations have included the produc- tion of four performance videos with videographer Evan Chapman, as well as a week long workshop with the Pig Iron Theatre Company at the Baryshnikov Arts Center. 13 CHRISTOPHER U. LIGHT LECTURESHIP

The Christopher U. Light Lectureship in Music was created in 1985 by Mr. Light, Carleton Class of 1958. Among his many interests, Mr. Light is a freelance writer, composer, , and musician with interest in computers and music. Past artists include:

1986–87 Pomerium Musices - Alexander Blachly, director 1987–88 Sergiu Luca, violinist, and Malcom Bilson, fortepianist 1986–89 Anthony Davis, composer-pianist 1989–90 Joan Morris, mezzo-soprano, and William Bolcom, pianist and composer 1990–91 Cuarteto Latinoamericano (Latin American String Quartet) 1991–92 Phillip Rhodes, composer; Opera: “The Magic Pipe” 1992–93 Kronos Quartet, string quartet 1993–94 The Musicians of Swanne Valley, performers of late Renaissance English and Italian repertoires 1994–95 Sounds of Blackness - Gary Hines, director 1995–96 Karl Kohn, composer-pianist 1996–97 A Celebration: Seventy Years of Carleton Composers 1997–98 Zeitgeist, contemporary ensemble with Eric Stokes, composer 1998–99 All-Stars, contemporary ensemble 1999–00 Phillip Rhodes, composer & the McLain Family Band 2000–01 Bob Brookmeyer, composer-valve trombonist 2001–02 Mary Ellen Childs, composer 2002–03 Deniz Ulben Hughes, composer 2003–04 George Crumb, composer 2004–05 Salvador Brotons, composer 2005–06 Alice Parker, composer 2006–07 none 2007–08 Composer’s Symposium including Auguste Read Thomas, Alexander Freeman, and Steven Paulus 2008–09 Jefferson Friedman,composer , and the Chiara String Quartet 2009–10 Nicolas Collins, composer 2010–11 The Bad Plus 2011–11 Paul D. Miller, aka DJ Spooky: That Subliminal Kid, composer, video artist, sound engineer 2012–13 Josh Ritter, singer-songwriter, and The Royal City Band 2013–14 Chiara String Quartet 2014–15 Polygraph Lounge 2015–16 Dan Trueman, composer, fiddler, and electronic musician 2016–17 Andrea Mazzariello, composer, Nikki Melville, piano, and Mobius Percussion

14 CONCERT SERIES AND VISITING ARTISTS

Music at Carleton presents

Guest Recital Dúo Mistral

featuring pianists Paulina Zamora Karina Glasinovic

Friday, September 30, 2016 8 p.m., Concert Hall

15 PROGRAM

Claude Debussy Etudes, Book One (1862-1918) pour les ¨cinq doigts¨ pour les tierces pour les quartes pour les sixtes pour les octaves pour les huit doigts

Paulina Zamora

-Pause-

Claude Debussy En blanc et noir Avec emportement Lent. Sombre Scherzando

Paulina Zamora and Karina Glasinovic

-Pause-

Claude Debussy Etudes, Book Two pour les degrés chromatiques pour les agréments pour les notes répétées pour les sonorités opposées pour les arpéges composés pour les accords

Paulina Zamora

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

16 BIOGRAPHY

Dúo Mistral’s pianists Paulina Zamora and Karina Glasinovic are piano and professors at the Music Department of the Faculty of Arts of the University of , Santiago.

The vision of the Duo focuses on three main objectives: the development of four-hand piano repertoire and/or two pianos; premiering of Chilean con- temporary new works; and accomplishing, in matters of musical education, a strong and effective dialogue with the audience.

In 2014 the duo began a season of concerts in front of the Forestal Park in downtown Santiago, Chile, where the audience enjoyed the concert in a friendly outdoor environment, with varied themes and musical games. They have continued this highly successful venture in subsequent years.

The Dúo Mistral has a live album recorded in the Sala Isidora Zegers, Fac- ulty of Arts, University of Chile, entitled “returning home.” In 2016, Dúo Mistral continues their innovative programming, and a recording of a new CD in the US combined with a very busy schedule of concerts around Chile and abroad.

17 CONCERT SERIES AND VISITING ARTISTS

Music at Carleton presents

WOODWARD CONCERT SERIES

Lawrence Archbold Colloquium and Concert

Featuring Lawrence Archbold, organist William Peterson, organist Benjamin Allen, baritone Rick Penning, tenor Ronald Rodman, tenor Joshua Ruebeck '17, baritone

Sunday, October 16, 2016 3:00 p.m., Concert Hall

18 COLLOQUIUM

Introductory Remarks Stephen Kelly Dye Family Professor of Music, Emeritus

Reflections at Career's End: Manualiter Organ Music and the Holtkamp Organ

Lawrence Archbold Professor of Music and Enid and Henry Woodward College Organist, Emeritus

William Peterson Harry S. and Madge Rice Thatcher Professor of Music and College Organist at Pomona College

• Intermission •

19 PROGRAM

William Peterson, organ Benjamin Allen, baritone Rick Penning, tenor Ronald Rodman, tenor Joshua Ruebeck '17, baritone

Johann Sebastian Bach | 1685-1750 Dritter Teil der Klavierübung | 1739 Kyrie, Gott Vater in Ewigkeit, BWV 672 Christe, aller Welt Trost, BWV 673 Kyrie, Gott heiliger Geist, BWV 674 Dies sind die heiligen zehen Gebot, BWV 679 Wir glauben all an einen Gott, BWV 681 Vater unser im Himmelreich ... Choir Vater unser im Himmelreich, BWV 683 Christ, unser Herr, zum Jordan kam ... Choir Christ, unser Herr, zum Jordan kam, BWV 685 Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir ... Choir Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir, BWV 687 Duetto III in G Major, BWV 804

• Pause •

20 PROGRAM

Lawrence Archbold, organ Benjamin Allen, baritone Rick Penning, tenor Ronald Rodman, tenor Joshua Ruebeck '17, baritone

Hans Leo Hassler | 1564-1612 Magnificat quarti toni Magnificat anima mea Dominum.Choir Et exsultavit spiritus meus ... [Versus 1.] Organ Quia respexit humilitatem ... Choir Quia fecit mihi magna ... Versus 2. Organ Et misericordia ejus ... Choir Fecit potentiam ... Versus 3. Organ Deposuit potentes de sede ... Choir Esurientes implevit bonis ... Versus 4. Organ Suscepit Israel ... Choir Sicut locutus est ... Versus 5. Organ Gloria Patri, et Filio ... Choir Sicut erat in principio ... Versus 6. Organ

Girolamo Frescobaldi | 1583-1643 Fiori Musicali | published 1635 La Messa della Madonna Recercar con obligo di cantare la quinta parte senza toccarla [Sancta Maria, ora pro nobis] - Organ and Rick Penning, tenor

Pieter | c. 1575-1633 Salve Regina [Salve Regina] ... Organ Vita, dulcedo ... Rick Penning, tenor Ad te clamamus ... Organ Ad te suspiramus ... Tenor Eia ergo ... Organ Et Jesum ... Tenor O clemens ... Organ O dulcis Virgo Maria. Tenor Pro Fine. Organ 21 BIOGRAPHY

Lawrence Archbold is Professor of Music and the Enid and Henry Wood- ward College Organist Emeritus at Carleton College where he taught from 1982 until 2016. A graduate of the University of California, Berkeley [A.B. (1973), M.A. (1975), and Ph.D. (1981)], he has specialized in both the schol- arship and performance of organ music. In the classroom, he has taught a variety of courses on Western art music, from survey courses for majors (on specific style periods) and for non-majors (the history of Western music from chant to the present), to symphonies, operas, music and gender, and music criticism, and a first-year seminar on American literature and music co-taught with a member of the English department.

He has presented papers at national meetings of both the American Musicological Society and the American Guild of Organists. In 1985 his dissertation was published as Style and Structure in the Organ Praeludia of Dietrich Buxtehude. In 1989 he founded, with William Peterson of Pomo- na College, ICSOM: The Institute for Critical Studies of Organ Music that presented several symposia. He has edited, with William Peterson, French Organ Music from the Revolution to Franck and Widor, a volume of essays on nineteenth-century French organ music, which was published in 1995. He has published articles in The American Organist, Nineteenth-Centu- ry Music, and in three collections of essays: Church, Stage, and Studio: Music and Its Contexts in Seventeenth-Century ; The Organist as Scholar: Essays in Honor of Russell Saunders; and The Organ as a Mirror of Its Time: North European Reflections, 1610-2000. Over the last decade, he has specialized in writing feature reviews for The American Organist and The Tracker (the journal of the Organ Historical Society). Topics have included: studies and editions of Bach, Buxtehude, Widor, Vierne, and Mes- siaen, a biography of Mendelssohn, a survey of twentieth-century reperto- ry, organ methods, improvisation treatises, and even a book on the “house organs of the rich and famous.” Writing in another genre, lengthy liner notes for Robert Glasgow’s recording of Franck’s Trois Chorals stretched the bounds of what was possible in the familiar jewel case.

Several essays had a long history as conference presentations before reach- ing publication: work on Charles Tournemire’s recording of César Franck’s Choral III was heard in St. Paul, at the University of Michigan, a national AMS meeting, SUNY Buffalo, and the Cleveland Museum of Art.

22 BIOGRAPHY

“Standard Repertory/Postmodern Critique” grew out of an earlier paper, “Modernism, Postmodernism, and Organism,” and was heard at Stanford, the Cleveland Museum of Art, the University of Indiana, and elsewhere.

As a performer, he has played programs entirely devoted to Frescobaldi, Buxtehude, Bach, Liszt, Saint-Saëns, and Widor, often drawing on unusu- al and little-heard works. Under the banners of L’Orgue Glorieux and Paraphrases Grégoriennes he has presented programs of French organ music based on chant, often in collaboration with chant choirs. He has participated in multi-performer programs such as “Organ Music from Nineteenth-Century and Twentieth-Century ” (for a national meeting of the American Musicological Society), “Tournemire: The Last Decade,” and “American Organ Music Since 1970: A Retrospective” (all including collaboration with William Peterson). He has performed several times at St. Thomas Church, New York, at the Universities of Indiana (a program of all-women composers for a College Music Society Institute on Music, Wom- en, and Gender), California (Berkeley), Nebraska (Lincoln), Trinity (Hart- ford), and at Pomona, and Hamline Colleges. Appearances also include major venues of the Twin Cities: the Cathedral of St. Paul, House of Hope Presbyterian Church, St. Mark’s Cathedral, the Basilica of St. Mary, and Hennepin Avenue United Methodist Church. From 1999 until his retire- ment in 2016, he presented a series of recitals at Carleton entitled “Explor- ing Organ Music” which included some 30 different programs spanning the history of organ music from the fifteenth to the twenty-first centuries and featuring several premiere performances.

William Peterson is the Harry S. and Madge Rice Thatcher Professor of Music and College Organist at Pomona College. He received the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. Earlier he received the B.A. and B.M. degrees from and Conservatory. At Pomona College he teaches organ and courses in music history, includ- ing “A Survey of Western Music,” “History of Western Music,” “Johann Sebastian Bach,” and “Music and National Identity.”

As a performer, he has played concerts in recent years in many parts of the United States. He has performed a number of all-Bach recitals at various locations, including complete performances of Bach’s Dritter Theil der Cla- vierübung. In September of 2006 he played a concert of French music —

23 BIOGRAPHY

“French Organ Music from the Time of World War I” — on the Fisk organ (Fisk, Op. 116) in Finney Chapel at Oberlin College and Conservatory of Music. He played a concert on the recently installed Fisk organ in the Chris- topher Cohan Center in San Luis Obispo, CA in 2008. In March 2010 he presented an all-Bach concert on the Hill Memorial Organ in Bridges Hall, Pomona College, a concert planned in recognition of the 325th anniversary of Bach’s birthday. A concert presented in Bridges Hall in 2015,“French Organ Music, 1870-1920,” included works by Franck, Loret, Gigout, Guil- mant, d’Indy, Lioncourt, Vierne, and Ibert.

As a scholar he has worked extensively on French organ music of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. He is co-editor with Lawrence Archbold of French Organ Music from the Revolution to Franck and Widor (University of Rochester Press, 1995), a volume that includes eleven articles by a group of American and French authors; Peterson is author of “Lemmens, His Ecole d’orgue, and Nineteenth-Century Organ Methods.” His article, “Storm Fantasies for the Nineteenth-Century Organ in France,” appeared in Keyboard Perspectives, volume II (2009). A translation of this article, “Stormfantasieën voor het 19de-eeuwse orgel,” was published, in 2010, in the Belgian periodical, Orgelkunst. In 2012 his article titled “Saint- Saëns’s Improvisations on the Organ (1862)” appeared in Camille Saint- Saëns and His World, edited by Jann Pasler (Princeton University Press). In 2011 he gave a paper, “Documenting Organ Registration Practice in Nine- teenth-Century France: The 1880s and 1890s,” at the Regional Convention of the American Guild of Organists in .

With James Peterson (Valdosta State University), he has given seven papers on Czech music and politics: in November of 2014 they presented a paper titled “Czech Musical Memorials to the World War I Dead, 1918-1924” at the National Meeting of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies in San Antonio, Texas. Research projects have been sup- ported by a Fulbright research grant (1985-86, in ), by the Mellon Foundation (Mellon Summer Research Grant, 2005), and by the Pomona College Research Committee.

In October of 2002 he played the Inaugural Concert on the Hill Memorial Organ built by C.B. Fisk, of Gloucester, MA (Fisk, Op. 117) for Bridges Hall of Music at Pomona College. He was heard on “Pipedreams” (Na-

24 BIOGRAPHY tional Public Radio) in a 2006 broadcast: the program included music of Tournemire, Duruflé, and Widor recorded in concerts in Bridges Hall in 2002 and 2003.

Benjamin Allen, Senior in Voice, received the B.M.Ed. from Wartburg College. He has studied with C. Robert Larson, Donna Pegors, Lawrence Weller, and, in New York, with Bernard Taylor. He has per- formed as a soloist with numerous regional and national organizations including the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, the Minnesota Orchestra, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, the Duluth-Superior Symphony Orchestra, and the Minnesota Opera. He has taught at the University of Minneso- ta-Duluth, the Minnesota Center for Arts Education, Macalester College, and Bethel University and is currently on the voice faculty and coordinator of the voice department at the International Music Camp.

Tenor, Rick Penning, has earned degrees including the Doctor of Musi- cal Arts from the University of Minnesota, the Master of Music from the University of Cincinnati and the Bachelor of Arts from Luther College. He has performed over 35 operatic roles with opera companies including Central City Opera, Chautauqua Opera, Minnesota Opera, Opera Omaha, and Opera Theatre of St. Louis. He has appeared as tenor soloist with the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, Minnesota Orchestra, Minnesota Chorale, Rochester Symphony, Arapahoe Symphony and the Bismarck-Mandan Symphony Orchestra. He maintains busy voice studios at Carleton and Augsburg Colleges.

Ron Rodman is Dye Family Professor of Music at Carleton. When not singing chants, he can be found performing on , or conducting research in , and music and the media. His current project is working on a history of Carleton bands, and he is working on a new edition of the Symphony No. 1 by James Gillette. He is also founder and director of the North Star Cinema Orchestra, a theater orchestra that re-creates Vaudeville shows and accompanies early silent films from the early 1900s.

Josh Ruebeck is a senior physics and music major at Carleton College. His musical interests include performance and composition of , pop, art song, and some jazz. He is currently working on a 'concept EP' for his music comps that takes a critical look at narratives, especially how and why we tell them. 25 WOODWARD CONCERT SERIES

Enid and Henry Woodward, two extraordinary musician-teachers, taught at Carleton College from 1942 to 1973. At their retirement, their many friends established an endowment fund in their honor to help support a concert each year by an outstanding musician or ensemble. The notable artists who have appeared on this series are listed here.

1973-74 Marie-Claire Alain, organist 1974-75 David Bar-Illan, pianist 1975-76 Gustav Leonhardt, harpsichordist 1976-77 Tashi Chamber Ensemble 1977-78 Ivan Moravec, pianist 1978-79 Concertus Musicus 1979-80 Da Capo Chamber Players 1980-81 Jan DeGaetani, mezzo-soprano, and Gilbert Kalish, pianist 1981-82 Sequoia String Quartet 1982-83 The Musicians of Swanne Alley 1983-84 Lucy Shelton, soprano 1984-85 Gustav Leonhardt, harpsichordist 1985-86 LaSalle String Quartet 1986-87 Zeitgeist 1987-88 Orford String Quartet 1988-89 The Waverly Consort 1989-90 The Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson Trio 1990-91 William Sharp, baritone, and Steven Blier, pianist 1991-92 The Mozartean Players 1992-93 Richard Fuller, fortepianist 1993-94 Ralph Stanley and the Clinch Mountain Boys 1994-95 The Chicago Brass Quintet

26 WOODWARD CONCERT SERIES

1995-96 The Chamber Music Society of Minnesota 1996-97 Calliope: A Renaissance Band 1997-98 The Dale Warland Singers 1998-99 Marion Verbruggen, recorder 1999-00 Edith Davis, soprano, Dallas Tidwell, clarinetist, and Anne Mayer, pianist 2000-01 The Veblen Trio 2001-02 Lawrence Archbold, Enid and Henry Woodward College Organist 2002-03 North Star Cinema Orchestra and Quadrille Band 2003-04 VocalEssence 2004-05 Rhythm Fantasies (South Indian Music) 2005-06 In Celebration of Phillip Rhodes – Carleton Orchestra, Carleton Choir 2006-07 Peter Jankovic, guitarist 2007-08 Renegade Ensemble 2008-09 Antero Winds 2009-10 Nicola Melville, pianist, and Guest Artists 2010-11 Trio Montecino 2011-12 Nina Olsen, clarinetist, with Mary Laymon, soprano, and Mary Jo Gothmann, pianist 2015-16 Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh, fiddler 2016-17 Lawrence Archbold, Enid and Henry Woodward College Organist

27 CONCERT SERIES AND VISITING ARTISTS

Music at Carleton presents

Spirit of Nature with the Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble

Sponsored by the College Communication Office, Department of Music, the Elizabeth Nason Distinguished Women Visitors Fund & Asian Studies

Saturday, October 29, 2016 8:00 p.m., Concert Hall

28 PROGRAM

Welcome Music by Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble Combo Group (Korean Drum Ensemble)

雨打芭蕉 (Raindrops Falling on the Plantain Leaves) Guangdong Music Spirit of Nature

流水 (Flowing Water) Classical Music Liu Li,

欢乐的新疆 (Cheerful Xinjiang People) Uygur Minority Folk Song arr. Zhou Deming Li Ping,

春江花月夜 (Moonlight Over the Spring River) Ancient Music Spirit of Nature

将军令 (The General’s Order) Court Music Yang Yi, guzheng

骏马奔腾 (Galloping Horses) Chen Yaoxing Wang Hong,

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

29 PROGRAM

秋江 (The Autumn River) Chen Tao Chen Tao, ; Yang Yi, guzheng

驼铃响叮当 (Ding Dong Bell) Xinjiang Folk Tune arr. Gu Guanren Spirit of Nature

荫中鸟 (Birds Amid Tree Shadows) Folk Tune arr. Liu Guanyue Chen Tao, dizi

瑶族舞曲 (Dance of the Yao People) Liu Tieshan, Mao Yuan Carleton Guzheng Ensemble with Guest Artist Yang Yi

江南好 (Beautiful Jiangnan) Jiangnan Silk and Bamboo Music arr. Tan Mizi, Jin Shiying Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble with Spirit of Nature

花好月圆 (Flowers are Blooming and the Moon is Full) Zhao Jianan Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble with Spirit of Nature

Program is subject to change

30 BIOGRAPHY

Spirit of Nature is a professional Chinese music group that performs the best of Chinese folk, classical, court, silk and bamboo, new, and minority music. Comprised of the world’s top performers of traditional Chinese instruments, Spirit of Nature has performed worldwide.

Chen Tao is an internationally acclaimed Chinese flutist, music educator, com- poser and conductor of Chinese . He is the founder and director of the Melody of Dragon Inc., the co-founder and director of Melody of Dragon & the Youth, the artistic director and conductor of the Chinese Music Ensem- ble of New York, and conductor of New Jersey Buddha’s Light Youth . called Chen Tao a “poet in music” and his playing “a miracle of the oriental flute.” Conductor Herbert Von Karajan prais- es him as an artist who “performs with his soul.” Chen Tao is a graduate and former Associate Professor at the prestigious Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing. He was the winner of the 1989 National Folk Instrument Competition in China and has toured throughout the U.S., Germany, , France, England, Holland, , , Hong Kong, and Macao. He has collab- orated with the BBC Philharmonic and the National Orchestra of Lyon. His playing can be heard on several soundtracks of Hollywood movies including Seven Years in Tibet, Corrupter (with the New York Philharmonic) and on the PBS documentary Under the Red Flag.

Guqin virtuoso, Liu Li, is president of the New York Guqin Association. Since she moved to America in 1994, Liu Li has been invited frequently to perform and lecture throughout the country. Her collaboration with the New Music Consort of the Manhattan School of Music’s Chamber Orchestra received high praise from critics. She has also performed at , New Jersey Performing Arts Center, Japanese Society, La Mama Theater, the Metropolitan Museum of Arts and other New York venues. In February 1996, invited by Taiwan’s National Music Ensemble in Taipei, Liu Li held a concerto performance in the National Hall of Music as well as a lecture on Guqin music, both of which were critically acclaimed. In 2002, she collaborated on the movie music recording of “Hero” composed by Oscar- and Grammy-winner Tan Dun with world famous violin master Itzhak Perlman.

Wang Hong is most actively an internationally acclaimed multi-instrumentalist. He graduated from Nanjing Normal University’s Music Department where he mainly studied the erhu (two string bowed instrument), and composition. As a dynamic performer, he has performed with Meredith Monk for her opera Atlas, with Tan Dun for his “2000 Today” world premiere with the Shanghai

31 BIOGRAPHY

Broadcasting Orchestra in China, and at the “Waldbühne in Berlin 2000” with the Berlin Philharmonic conducted by Kent Nagano. He has also performed with the San Francisco Symphony. In 2010, he played several instruments with Opera Boston for Pulitzer Prize-winner Zhou Long’s world premiere of Madame White Snake. In May 2010, he performed as a soloist with the Neubran- denburg Philharmonic in Germany. He has also performed with jazz musicians Max Roach, David Murray and Anthony Brown’s Asian American Jazz Orches- tra. Wang visited Inner twice and collected the most valued tradition- al songs and music from the grassland. He is self-learning a legendary instru- ment from , the matouqin (; a horse head cello). Wang also performed as a multi-instrumentalist on soundtracks for episodes of Kung Fu Panda and for Nickelodeon.

Yang Yi is a leading virtuoso on zheng, described by the New York Times as “fascinating, surprising and extraordinarily beautiful... extraordinarily fantastic, intensive and passionate.” A winner of the International Chinese Instruments Competition, among other awards, Yang Yi is also a distinguished Zheng edu- cator, lecturer, and has served on the faculty of the prestigious China Conser- vatory of Music, her alma mater, where she still serves as a visiting professor today. Since moving to the United States in 1991, Yang Yi has served as the music director at the Princeton University Chinese Music Ensemble, founder & artistic director of the Princeton International Chinese Music Festival, as well as the founder and chairwoman of Music Teacher National Association’s Annual Chinese instruments competition, which was the first competition of its kind in America. As a soloist, Yang Yi has performed at some of the world’s greatest venues such as Royal Albert Hall (UK) at BBC Prom, Lincoln Center, Radio City, , Freer of Gallery in Washington DC., etc. She has premiered new composition works by some of today’s renowned composers including Lutz Werner Hesse, Chen Yi and Tan Dun, Zhou QinRu, He Zhan- hao, Lee Tzyy-, and many more. Yang Yi is also a respected competition adjudicator, who has judged many talent and guzheng competitions in the U.S., , Hong Kong, Maylasia, as well as reputable China National Guzheng Competitions throughout China. She was the only Chinese instrument judge that appeared on US Chinese national TV station, Sinovision, to judge the final round of the American Talent Competition.

Li Ping played as principal dulcimer player and first soloist of the China Cen- tral Orchestra for Traditional Music and The Asian Orchestra (Japanese, Kore- an, Chinese). She has dazzled audiences with her performances for over thirty years in more than twenty countries worldwide including the United States and

32 BIOGRAPHY major European and Asian cities. She was the winner of many international dulcimer competitions including the Second Prize of the China National Tra- ditional Music Competition in 1989, the Gold Prize in the 13th World Profes- sional Youth Symposium in Pyongyang, North Korea in 1988, and the Japanese Chamber Music Competition Gold Medal at Osaka, . Li has composed, published, performed and recorded master works not only on the dulcimer, but also on the guzheng and percussion. She is the Founder and President of the Boston Art School for Chinese Music and the Society for Chinese Instrumental Music (SCIM). She also leads the Chinese Dulcimer Guzheng Youth Band and received a certificate of merit and money award from Massachusetts Cultural Council in 2012.

Gao Hong, Chinese pipa player and composer, began her career as a profes- sional musician at age 12. She graduated with honors from the Central Conser- vatory of Music in Beijing where she studied with pipa master Lin Shicheng. She has received numerous awards and honors, including First Prize in the Hebei Professional Young Music Performers Competition, a Beijing Art Cup, an Asian Pacific Award, and fellowships from the Minnesota State Arts Board, Meet the Composer and Sorel Organization in New York. In 2005 Gao Hong became the first traditional musician to be awarded the prestigious Bush Artist Fellowship, and in 2012 she became the only musician in any genre to win four McKnight Artist Fellowships for Performing Musicians. As a composer, she has received commissions from the American Composers Forum, Walker Art Center, the Jerome Foundation, Zeitgeist, Ragamala, Minneapolis Guitar Quar- tet, Theater Mu, IFTPA, and Twin Cities Public Television. She has performed throughout Europe, , Argentina, Japan, Hong Kong, China, and the United States, and has participated in events at the Lincoln Center Festival, the San Francisco Jazz Festival, and at international festivals in Paris, Caen, Milan, and Perth. She has performed countless U.S. and world premieres of pipa concerti with organizations such as the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, Heidel- berg Philharmonic, Buenos Aires Philharmonic, Louisville Orchestra, Pasadena Symphony, and the Women’s Philharmonic (San Francisco), among others. In 2016, Gao Hong completed the first pipa method book ever written in En- glish and had it published by Hal Leonard, the world’s largest music publishing company. She is also Guest Professor at the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing and Tianjin Conservatory of Music in China. Gao Hong’s personal website can be found at: www.chinesepipa.com.

33 ENSEMBLE MEMBERS

Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble Gao Hong, Director

笛子 Dizi 古琴 Guqin Yanhan Lyu, Yijun Wang Gege Zhang

古筝 Guzheng Xinying Liu (St. Olaf Student) Shatian Wang, Haoyi Wang, Vicky Wu, Amber Zhang 二胡 Erhu Benjamin Lee (Roches- 大提琴 Cello ter High School Student), Emma Grisanzio Yuedong Merritt (Visiting Instructor in Chinese), Xiao- 吉他 Guitar min Wu ( Zhibo Zhang Associate), Huahua Zhong 打击乐 Percussion 琵琶 Pipa Serafina Chen, Kewei Yue Jin 指挥 Conductor 中阮 Jin Lee Gus Holley, Yue Wu

Guzheng Ensemble Qiyuan Hu, Shatian Wang, Yijun Wang, Haoyi Wang, Vicky Wu & Amber Zhang

Korean Drum Ensemble Shiny Choi Daniel Kim Jin Kim Jin Lee Ji Young Lee Nayon Park Joshua Song

34 SPONSORS AND THANKS

Sponsors The College Communication Office, The Department of Music, The Eliza- beth Nason Distinguished Women Visitors Fund and Asian Studies.

A special thanks to Carleton College, the College Communication Office and Events Director, Kerry Raadt, and Melissa Thomas; The Department of Music Chair, Nikki Melville, Concert Committee, PAC Office and Holly Streekstra; The Eliza- beth Nason Distinguished Women Visitors Fund, Carolyn Fure-Slocum and Committee; Asian Studies Chair, Prof. Arnab Chakladar; Waterbury Music, Reid Kurger; PEPS, and Dann Hurlbert.

UPCOMING

Carleton Choir: Chants From Around the World and Through the Ages Saturday, November 5, 2016 7:00 p.m., Basilica of Saint Mary

Jazz Ensemble Sunday, November 6, 2016 3:00 p.m., Concert Hall

Carleton Orchestra Friday, November 11, 2016 8:00 p.m., Concert Hall

SPCO Concert Thursday, January 19, 2016 2:00 p.m., Concert Hall

Gao Hong Faculty Recital: Chinglish Friday, April 7, 2017 8:00 p.m., Concert Hall

35 CONCERT SERIES AND VISITING ARTISTS

Music at Carleton presents

Jonathan Biss, director and piano Mischa Santora, conductor

36 PROGRAM

THE SAINT PAUL CHAMBER ORCHESTRA Jonathan Biss, director and piano | Mischa Santora, conductor

Le tombeau de Couperin Maurice Ravel | 1875–1937 Prélude Forlane Menuet Rigaudon

Piano Concerto No. 3, City Stanzas Sally Beamish | b. 1956 Burlesque Requiem Rondo Jonathan Biss, piano | Mischa Santora, conductor

World premiere Commissioned by The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra and Orchestre de Chambre de Paris with support from the Royal Scottish National Orchestra, the Swedish Chamber Orchestra and the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra

INTERMISSION (20 min)

Concerto No. 1 in C for Piano and Orchestra, Opus 15 Allegro con brio Ludwig van Beethoven | 1770–1827 Largo Rondo: Allegro Jonathan Biss, director and piano

program subject to change

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

37 PROGRAM NOTES

Le tombeau de Couperin (1919) Maurice Ravel

When World War I broke out in Europe, the 39-year-old Maurice Ravel volunteered as a truck and am- bulance driver for the army. One of the compositions interrupted by Ravel’s army service was Le tombeau de Couperin, a solo piano work in the style of a French Baroque suite. In its initial conception, the work paid homage to François Couperin, the court composer for Louis XIV and a master of solo music. (In French tradition, the word tombeau—literally “tomb”—was used to describe musical collec- tions of a memorial nature.) Ravel did not finish the work until 1917, by which time it had acquired a more personal meaning: he dedicated the six movements to friends killed in the war.

In 1919, the same year that the piano version of Le tombeau de Couperin received its first performance, Ravel transcribed four of the movements for chamber orchestra. The oboe, so prominent as a solo in- strument in the Baroque era, has an outsized role in Ravel’s orchestration, starting with the fluid melody of the Prélude. Ravel dedicated this movement to Lieutenant Jacques Charlot (the godson of his music publisher), who died in battle in 1915.

The second movement, a Forlane, is based on a lively and flirtatious couple’s dance that entered the French court via northern Italy. Ravel sketched this movement before the war and subsequently dedicat- ed it to the Basque painter Gabriel Deluc, who was killed in 1916.

The oboe returns to the fore in the Menuet, a French dance distinguished by its stately, three-beat pulse. Ravel dedicated this section to the memory of Jean Dreyfus, whose stepmother, Fernand Dreyfus, was one of Ravel’s closest confidantes during the war.

The Rigaudon, originally the fourth of six movements, serves as the finale of the orchestral suite. It pays tribute to two family friends of Ravel: Pierre and Pascal Gaudin, brothers killed by the same shell on their first day at the front in 1914. The Rigaudon is the most unabashedly upbeat movement of the four, with fast outer sections surrounding a more reflective melody introduced by the oboe. When faced with criticism that this memorial music was too cheery, Ravel purportedly responded, “The dead are sad enough, in their eternal silence.”

— © 2016 AARON GRAD

Beethoven/5

This week, the SPCO continues its Beethoven/5 project with celebrated pianist Jonathan Biss. Beethoven/5 features the SPCO leading an international collective of orchestras in commissioning five composers to write new piano concertos for Biss, each inspired by one of Beethoven’s five piano concertos. The proj- ect launched in November 2015 when Biss joined the SPCO to play Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 2, along with the new concerto it inspired: The Blind Banister, by . Sally Beamish composed the concerto for the 2016.17 season which has been paired with Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 1 for this week’s program.

“The First Piano Concerto might be an early work, but it has Beethoven’s gigantic personality stamped all over it. It crackles with energy, is dizzyingly inventive, and in its slow movement, has a rapt beauty that looks decades forward to the late period. Few pieces are more purely pleasurable to play. I’ve been an admirer of Sally Beamish’s music for many years, and I’m thrilled to see what this firecracker of a concerto has inspired from her.” — Jonathan Biss, pianist

38 PROGRAM NOTES

Piano Concerto No. 3, City Stanzas (2017) Sally Beamish

My first two piano concertos refer to the natural world – the first, Hill Stanzas, to the Cairngorm Moun- tains, and the second, Cauldron of the Speckled Seas, to a whirlpool off the West coast of Scotland. In this third concerto, I turned to the urban landscape.

The side drum is the soloist in the opening bars, building to the first solo piano entry. Octaves and runs set up a toccata which has the atmosphere of a street dance or circus. There are two main themes, with a central more relaxed section. After this the themes are heard in retrograde, so that the upward scales from the first part reappear heading downwards, and the side drum fades into the distance.

The central movement represents urban decay, and loneliness. It is a memorial for those who die alone in the midst of the city.

The last movement represents construction and destruction. The mood is grotesque and hollow. It follows the structural pattern of Beethoven’s Rondo, and takes some of its themes, but with a queasy irony. In the midst of a virtuosic cadenza, the piano introduces a lost, lyrical voice, which reappears several times but is extinguished at the end of the piece by savage, slashing chords.

All the material in this work derives in some way from the Beethoven concerto, taking a small group of notes or a rhythmic pattern from each corresponding movement as a starting point. All three move- ments are symmetrical in some sense; the first two framed by a mirror image of their opening bars, and the last a typical rondo, beginning and ending with its main theme.

The concerto is inspired by Jonathan’s individual, expressive and virtuosic playing, and the clarity of his sound world.

—© 2016 SALLY BEAMISH

Concerto No. 1 in C for Piano and Orchestra, Opus 15 (1795 – rev. 1800) Ludwig van Beethoven

When the 21-year-old Beethoven left his hometown of Bonn for Vienna, his patron sent him with this blessing: “May you receive Mozart’s spirit from the hands of Haydn.” Like his hero Mozart (whose own life in Vienna had ended just a year earlier), Beethoven initially made his mark as a composer-performer, establishing himself as the ranking keyboard virtuoso in the capital. His early compositions showcased his performing talents, with 21 of his first 27 published works involving piano, culminating with the Piano Concerto No. 1.

Despite its numbering, the Piano Concerto in C was not Beethoven’s first. After an early attempt that failed to reach fruition, his first real concerto was the one in B-flat (now known as No. 2), initiated in 1788 and completed in 1795. The C-major concerto followed later that year, and Beethoven introduced it that December at a concert in Vienna presented by Haydn. It was also likely this same concerto (in its new revised version) appeared on Beethoven’s breakout concert in 1800 at the Burgtheater the same venue where Mozart made history with his piano concertos in the 1780s. After undertaking that revi- sion, Beethoven sent the C-major concerto to his publisher, followed a few months later by its older B-flat sibling, which is how their catalog sequence came to be reversed.

39 PROGRAM NOTES

One sign of Beethoven’s distinctive voice, even in this early work, is the prevalence in the first move- ment of a unifying motive, recognizable by its rhythmic pattern of long-short-short-long. This approach points the way toward some of Beethoven’s most memorable orchestral constructions, like the Fifth Symphony’s pervasive “fate” motive or the unflinching Allegretto from the Seventh Symphony.

The central Largo opens with a slow variant of that same long-short-short-long rhythm in the accompa- niment, establishing continuity across the movements—another Beethoven hallmark. The orchestration excludes the brighter tones of flute, , and timpani, and instead features prominent clari- net lines to play off the sweet, melodious phrases from the piano.

The tempo marking of Allegro scherzando indicates a joking, playful aspect to the fast finale. The rondo structure incorporates colorful antics (including mischievous detours to minor-key harmonies) between returns of the perky main theme.

— © 2016 AARON GRAD

BIOGRAPHIES

THE SAINT PAUL CHAMBER ORCHESTRA Renowned for its artistic excellence, remarkable versatility of musical styles and adventurous pro- gramming, The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra is widely regarded as one of the finest chamber orchestras in the world. Now in its 58th season, the SPCO has recently undergone transformational change with the opening of its new home, the Ordway Concert Hall, the addition of a new genera- tion of players, and significant changes in its artistic vision. The SPCO is primarily an unconducted ensemble that performs a broad range of repertoire from Baroque to new music and works in close collaboration with a diverse series of artistic partners, including British Baroque specialist Jonathan Cohen, American pianist Jeremy Denk, Swedish clarinetist Martin Fröst, Moldovan violinist Patricia Kopatchinskaja, Finnish violinist Pekka Kuusisto and Austrian conductor/violinist Thomas Zehet- mair. Past Artistic Partners include Roberto Abbado, Pierre-Laurent Aimard, Joshua Bell, Douglas Boyd, Nicholas McGegan, Stephen Prutsman, Dawn Upshaw and Christian Zacharias.

The virtuoso musicians of the SPCO present more than 130 concerts and educational programs each year, and are regularly heard on public radio programs that reach more than 2 million listeners each week on over 300 stations. Additionally, the SPCO reaches more than 200,000 listeners annu- ally through its free online Listening Library. The SPCO has released 67 recordings, commissioned 148 new works, and tours nationally and internationally, including performances in premier venues in Europe, Asia and South America.

The SPCO is nationally recognized for its commitment to broad community accessibility, its inno- vative audience outreach efforts, and its educational and family programming. Regular subscription series are performed in a variety of different venues across the Twin Cities metropolitan area each season, a unique commitment to geographic accessibility for a major orchestra. The SPCO offers the most affordable tickets of any major orchestra in the United States, with over 50 percent of tickets available for $12 or less, and has expanded accessibility even further by offering free tickets for children and students starting in the 2016.17 season as a part of the New Generation Initiative. The orchestra also offers an innovative ticket membership model in which members pay $5 per month to attend unlimited concerts. The SPCO’s award-winning CONNECT education program reaches over 5,000 students and

40 BIOGRAPHIES teachers annually in 12 Minneapolis and Saint Paul public schools, and its Target® Free Family Mu- sic program provides engaging and educational experiences for thousands of Twin Cities children and families each year. The SPCO’s Liquid Music Series (named “Best of Classical” by The New York Times) develops innovative new projects with iconoclastic artists in unique presentation for- mats and invites adventurous audiences to discover the new and the fascinating within the flourish- ing landscape of contemporary chamber music.

JONATHAN BISS (piano) Pianist Jonathan Biss shares his talent, passion, and intellectual curiosity with classical music lovers in the concert hall and beyond. Over nearly two decades on the concert stage, he has forged rela- tionships with the New York Philharmonic; the Philadelphia, Cleveland, and Philharmonia orches- tras; the Boston, Chicago, and Swedish Radio symphony orchestras; and the Leipzig Gewandhaus, Budapest Festival, and Royal orchestras, among many others. Biss performs a diverse repertoire ranging from Mozart and Beethoven, through the Romantics, to Janáček and Schoenberg, as well as works by contemporary composer Gyorgy Kurtág and commissions from David Ludwig, Leon Kirchner, Lewis Spratlan, and Bernard Rands. jonathanbiss.com

MISCHA SANTORA (conductor) Santora is one of the most innovative and entrepreneurial conductors of his generation. He recent- ly premiered The Blind Banister by Timo Andres with the SPCO and pianist Jonathan Biss, as well as American Nomad by Steve Heitzeg with the Minnesota Orchestra, both to critical acclaim. This season’s highlights with his newly founded Minneapolis Music Company include performances at the Baroque Room (Saint Paul), the launch of an interdisciplinary education program, and the creation of a forum for arts and business leaders focusing on new ways to engage the entire com- munity in arts programming. In addition, Santora is the artistic director of the successful Spotlight Concert Series at the MacPhail Center for Music, featuring faculty and guest artists in collaborative programs. mischasantora.com

SALLY BEAMISH (composer) Beamish was born in London. Initially a viola player, she moved from London to Scotland in 1990 to develop her career as a composer. Her music embraces many influences, particularly jazz and Scottish traditional music. The concerto form is a continuing inspiration, and she has written for many internationally renowned soloists. She performs regularly as violist, pianist and narrator, and has presented programs on TV and radio. Beamish is also the recipient of an honorary doctorate from the University of Glasgow, a Creative Scotland Award, and a Paul Hamlyn Award, and was recently made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. sallybeamish.com

41 MUSICIANS OF THE SPCO

VIOLIN OBOE Steven Copes Kathryn Greenbank CONCERTMASTER PRINCIPAL John M. and Elizabeth W. Musser Chair Sewell Family Chair Ruggero Allifranchini Barbara Bishop ASSOCIATE CONCERTMASTER John H. and Elizabeth B. Myers Chair Kyu-Young Kim Position vacant PRINCIPAL VIOLIN PRINCIPAL Bruce H. Coppock Chair Philip H. and Katherine Nason Chair Francisco Fullana PRINCIPAL VIOLIN Daria T. Adams Charles Ullery Nina Tso-Ning Fan PRINCIPAL Eunice Kim Carole Mason Smith Maureen Nelson Elsa Nilsson Kayla Moffett* Position vacant PRINCIPAL VIOLA Maiya Papach PRINCIPAL Lynn Erickson+ Alfred and Ingrid Lenz Harrison Chair Hyobi Sim TIMPANI Alice Preves Viola Chair Position vacant PRINCIPAL CELLO Hulings Chair Julie Albers PRINCIPAL Bill and Hella Mears Hueg Chair Joshua Koestenbaum ASSOCIATE PRINCIPAL *Guest musician for the 2016.17 season Ruth and John Huss Chair +Leave of absence for the 2016.17 season Sarah Lewis For a complete listing of orchestra personnel John and Karen Larsen Chair performing on each program, including biographical information and photos, please visit BASS thespco.org/roster. Zachary Cohen PRINCIPAL All solo performances by SPCO musicians are endowed by the Redleaf Family Chair. FLUTE Julia Bogorad-Kogan In addition to those listed above, we extend our PRINCIPAL deepest thanks to the HRK Family for endowing a Alicia McQuerrey position in the orchestra.

42 CONCERT SERIES AND VISITING ARTISTS

Music at Carleton presents

LAUDIE D. PORTER CONCERT SERIES

Montage: Great Film Composers and the Piano

Gloria Cheng, piano

Thursday, February 9, 2017 7:00 p.m., Weitz Cinema

43 LAUDIE D. PORTER CONCERT SERIES

The Laudie D. Porter Memorial Fund was established in 1986 by the family and friends of Laudie Porter, Assistant Professor of Flute at Carleton from 1968 until her death in 1986. Not only did Laudie teach flute to hundreds of Carleton students, she also endeavored to supplement her teaching by bring­ing to the campus outstanding musicians­ and other artists. The fund is used each year to invite a distinguished performing or creative artist for a visit devoted both to performance and discussion.­ The first choice each year should be for women practitioners in the arts.

Past artists have included:

1989-90 Libby Larsen, composer 1990-91 Susan Allen Toth, author 1991-92 Mary Ellen Childs, composer 1992-93 Linda Shapiro, dancer and choreographer 1993-94 Jeanne Arland Peterson and Patty Peterson, jazz pianists and vocalists 1994-95 Jane Hamilton, author 1995-96 Sheila Adams, Appalachian balladeer, banjo player and author 1996-97 Sylvia Rhyne, soprano 1999-00 Sharon Isbin, guitarist 2001-02 Carolyn Pratt, soprano 2008-09 Emily Lodine, mezzo soprano 2009-10 Asteria, vocal duo 2010-11 Harpourri, harp ensemble 2011-12 Joan Griffith, composer, guitar and mandolin 2012-13 Sarah Kirkland, composer Brenda Brenner, violin 2013-14 Lydia Artymiw, piano 2015-16 Nirmala Rajasekar, veena 2016-17 Gloria Cheng, piano

44 PROGRAM

I. Montage: Great Film Composers and the Piano (2016)

Documentary film, 26 minutes Breakwater Studios, Ltd

II. Performance, Selections from the harmonia mundi CD

Composition 430 (2013) | b. 1967

L’Étreinte (The Embrace), from Trois Études (2012) Alexandre Desplat | b. 1961

Surface Tension (2013), excerpt | b. 1957

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

45 PROGRAM

Five Pieces for Piano (2010) iv. Slow ii. Flowing | b. 1945

Conversations (2012-13) iii. Chet and Miles iv. Strays, Duke... and Blind Tom | b. 1932

Family Album: Homage to Alfred, Emil and Lionel Newman (2013) i. The Follies: Young and Beautiful v. Outdoors But Not the Red River Valley | b. 1943

III. Q & A

Moderated by Matthew McCright

46 BIOGRAPHY

Grammy-winning pianist Gloria Cheng has been a recitalist at the Ojai Festival, Chicago Humanities Festival, William Kapell Festival, and Tanglewood Festival of Contemporary Music. She has appeared on leading concert series including Carnegie Hall’s Making Music, Cal Performances, San Francisco Performances, and Stanford Lively Arts.

Cheng’s recitals and recordings cover a wide span of the contempo- rary landscape and often explore significant interconnections between composers. Her 2008 Piano Music of Esa-Pekka Salonen, Steven Stucky, and Witold Lutosławski (Telarc) captured the Grammy for Best Instru- mental Soloist Performance without Orchestra, and her 2013 re- lease, The Edge of Light: Messiaen/Saariaho (harmonia mundi usa), was nominated for Best Classical Instrumental Solo. In 2015 she launched MONTAGE: Great Film Composers and the Piano, a CD featuring solo works composed for her by Bruce Broughton, Don Davis, Alexandre Desplat, Michael Giacchino, Randy Newman, and John Williams. A documentary film chronicling the collaborations and recording pro- cess is now available and slated to air on PBS SoCal in 2017.

According to The Boston Globe, “Cheng is an authority on modern piano music, having premiered works that run the aesthetic gamut from Terry Riley to Pierre Boulez.” It was Pierre Boulez who in 2003 invited her as soloist in Messiaen’s Oiseaux exotiques during the Philharmonic’s historic final concerts in the Dorothy Chan- dler Pavilion. Cheng made her concerto debut in 1998 with the under the direction of Zubin Mehta. Other concerto engagements have included appearances with the Louisville Orchestra, Indianapolis, Shanghai, Pasadena, Long Beach, and Pacific symphonies.

Recent seasons have brought Cheng and pianist/composer Thomas Adès onstage together to premiere Adès new 2-piano Concert Para- phrase on Powder Her Face, and guest appearances on the L.A. Philhar- monic Green Umbrella series in works such as Elliott Carter’s Double Concerto for Piano and Harpsichord conducted by Oliver Knussen,

47 BIOGRAPHY

John Cage’s Concerto for Prepared Piano, and the world premiere of Esa-Pekka Salonen’s Dichotomie, composed for and dedicated to her.

She presents an annual recital on the Piano Spheres series, on both piano and harpsichord, and is a frequent guest on the Jacaranda Mu- sic series. At UCLA Cheng curated a 2015 international symposium entitled BEYOND MUSIC: Composition and Performance in the Age of Augemented Reality, a gathering of composers and media artists in- cluding Kaija Saariaho, Jean-Baptiste Barriere, and Bill Viola, and will present Inside the (G)Earbox: @70, in 2017.

Cheng’s countless premieres, commissions, and dedications come from a distinguished roster of composers who include John Adams, Thomas Adès, Mark Applebaum, Pierre Boulez, Cindy Cox, Ge Gan-ru, Daniel Strong Godfrey, John Harbison, Joan Huang, William Kraft, Veronika Krausas, James Newton Jr., Bernard Rands, Steve Reich, Terry Riley, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Carl Stone, Steven Stucky, Stephen Andrew Taylor, Andrew Waggoner, and Gernot Wolfgang.

Cheng received her B.A. in Economics from Stanford University, and graduate degrees in Music from UCLA, where she studied with Aube Tzerko, and from the University of Southern California as a student of John Perry. She teaches at the UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music where she has initiated new courses that unite performers and composers. She is often invited to speak as an advocate for contem- porary music, and in 2012 served as Regents Lecturer at the Universi- ty of California, Berkeley.

48 Laudie Porter Concert Series

Masterclass with Grammy Award winner Gloria Cheng, piano

Saturday, February 11, 2017 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m., Concert Hall

49 CONCERT SERIES AND VISITING ARTISTS

Music at Carleton presents

Guest Artist

Malcolm Bilson

Early Keyboard Virtuoso

Friday, April 28, 2017 7:00 p.m., Concert Hall

50 PROGRAM

Three Mazurkas Frédéric Chopin | 1810-1849 Bb Major, Vivo risoluto, Op. 17/1 Ab Major, Allegretto, Op. 59/2 C# Minor, Moderato, Op. 50/3

Sonata in A Major, Op. 120 (D. 664) Franz Schubert | 1797-1828 Allegro moderato Andante Allegro

• Intermission •

Waldscenen (Forest Scenes), Op. 82 Robert Schumann | 1810-1856 Eintritt (Entrance to the Forest) Jäger auf der Lauer (The Hunter Lurks) Einsame Blumen (Lonely Flowers) Verrufene Stelle (Accursed Place) Freundliche Landschaft (Friendly Landscape) Herberge (The Inn) Vogel als Prophet (The Prophet Bird) Jägerlied (Hunter’s Song) Abschied (Farewell)

Sonata in E Major, Op. 109 Ludwig van Beethoven | 1770-1827 Vivace ma non troppo Prestissimo Andante molto cantabile et espressivo (with variations)

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

51 BIOGRAPHY

Malcolm Bilson has been in the forefront of the period instrument movement for more than thirty years. A member of the Cornell University Music Department since 1968, where he is the Frederick J. Whiton Professor of Music Emeritus, he began his pioneering activity in the early 1970s as a performer of Haydn, Mozart, Beetho- ven, and Schubert on late 18th- and early 19th-century pianos. He has been a key contributor to the restoration of the to the concert stage and to fresh recordings of the mainstream repertory.

In addition to an extensive career as a soloist and chamber player, Mr. Bilson has toured with the English Baroque Soloists with John Eliot Gardiner, the Academy of Ancient Music with Christopher Hogwood, the Philharmonia Baroque under Nicholas McGegan, Tafelmusik of Toronto, Concerto Köln, and other early and modern instrument orchestras around the world. He was awarded an honor- ary doctorate by Bard College, is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is a recipient of the James Smithson Bicen- tennial Medal at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, for his extraordinary lifetime achievements as “a pioneer in the perfor- mance of period instruments and chamber music in general.” In 2015 he was awarded the Order of the Hungarian Gold Cross by president of , János Áder, for his “significant international artistic and scholarly career, and in recognition of his decades-long contributions to Hungarian musical life.”

Please visit: www.malcolmbilson.com

We invite you to attend the Master Class with Malcolm Bilson: Saturday, April 29, 11am-1pm Urness Recital Hall St. Olaf College’s Christiansen Hall of Music

52 ARTS @ CARLETON VISITING ARTISTS

Arts @ Carleton presents

Sean Connors, Robert Dillon, Peter Martin, & David Skidmore

Tuesday, April 11, 2017 8:00 p.m., Concert Hall

53 PROGRAM

Wild Sound, Mvt. IV (2014) Glenn Kotche | b. 1970

Blindnesses (2012) Isaac Schankler | b. 1979

Nagoya Marimbas (1994) Steve Reich | b. 1936

Music for Pieces of Wood (1973) Steve Reich | b. 1936 arr. David Cossin (for two drum kits)

• INTERMISSION •

BEND (2016) Peter Martin | b. 1980

Drumkit Quartet #51 (2011) Glenn Kotche| b. 1970

Aliens with Extraordinary Abilities (2016) Don’t Eat Your Young Take Anything You Want Torched and Wrecked David Skidmore | b. 1982

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

54 PROGRAM NOTES

Wild Sound

Chicago-based percussionist and composer Glenn Kotche has written pieces for world-renowned ensembles including Kronos Quartet and Yo Yo Ma’s Silk Road Ensemble, and has released six albums of his own compositions. Since 2001, Kotche has also been the drummer and percussionist of the groundbreaking rock band Wilco.

Wild Sound is a massive multi-media project developed by Glenn Kotche and that utilizes custom instruments, many of which are created on stage during the performance. Tonight’s con- cert features the final section of the piece, arranged for more standard pitched percussion instruments.

Wild Sound was commissioned by the University of Notre Dame’s DeBartolo Performing Arts Center and the Chamber Music America Classical Commissioning Program, with generous funding provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Chamber Music America Endowment Fund. Additional support provided by The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra’s Liquid Music Series and the National Forum of Music Wrocław.

Blindnesses

Isaac Schankler is a composer, pianist, accordionist and electronic musician based in Los Angeles. He writes music inspired by improvisation, indeterminacy, repetition, language, narrative, and puzzles, cre- ating work that is ‘experimental’ while still engaging with the foundational elements of music: harmony, melody, time, timbre; music that is ‘beautiful’ while still allowing space for more unsettling experiences: uncertainty, anxiety, humor, horror.

“Being close to someone can mean agreeing not to see parts of them, and in some sense Blindnesses is about the absences that this mutual understanding contains.” -Isaac Schankler

Blindnesses is scored for four percussionists— sharing one vibraphone— and electronic sound processing. The electronic component of the piece at times adds a cavernous artificial resonance to the sound, while at other times, it plays back distorted fragments of music performed by the live musicians earlier in the piece. The four percussionists- whose movements must be meticulously choreographed to perform to- gether on a single instrument- create their own stark sonic contrasts with a variety of mallets and acoustic pitch bending effects.

Nagoya Marimbas and Music for Pieces of Wood

American composer Steve Reich is widely viewed as one of the most influential composers of the last hundred years. While many composers of the mid-20th century were crafting music driven by complex theoretical and numerical systems, Reich was determined to create music that progressed through clearly audible processes. His Music for Pieces of Wood (arranged here for 2 drum kits) is a study in economy of means, both in terms of physical and musical materials. The three sections of the work are each com- prised of a single rhythm, with a new version of the pattern building up in each voice before blending into the texture. Many of the rhythms that emerge along the way suggest alternative meters or rhythmic inflections that may change the listener’s perception of the whole. Nagoya Marimbas utilizes more complex and varied melodic patterns on the marimbas, but is still built on tight canons, with both musicians play- ing the same pattern one just slightly after the other to create an energized and kaleidoscopic whole.

To celebrate Reich’s 80th birthday in 2016, Third Coast Percussion released an album of Reich’s works, Third Coast Percussion | Steve Reich on Cedille Records, which won a Grammy for Best Chamber Music/ Small Ensemble Performance, and a free mobile app exploring Reich’s music. 55 PROGRAM NOTES

BEND

Renowned as a soloist, chamber musician, and educator, Third Coast Percussion’s Peter Martin was Assistant Professor and Director of Percussion Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University in Rich- mond, VA before returning to Chicago in 2013 to pursue TCP full time. Peter has composed music for many of the group’s educational and concert projects in recent years.

His quartet BEND draws inspiration from the player piano compositions of Bruce Goff, a wonder- fully unconventional architect and amateur composer. Many of Goff ’s piano rolls were highly stylized geometric designs perforated into the scrolls, resulting in music that created very clear sonic “shapes.” Whereas these shapes would create the pitch and rhythm in a player piano performance, BEND translates these shapes into volume, tone, and gesture. The composer’s experience with the piano rolls- through a blurry, decades-old video- inspired an unconventional sound palette created with alternative techniques on 2 marimbas.

Drumkit Quartet #51

While touring the world with Wilco, Glenn Kotche began making sketches for a series of pieces each inspired by different cities through which he was traveling. Kotche made 54 of these sketches in total, many of which became a collection of “Drumkit Quartets” written for the New York-based quartet So Percussion. These works were all written for drum kits initially, but later re-scored for everything from marimbas and cowbells to sirens and disposable cameras. In Drumkit Quartet #51 (/Brisbane/Berlin) the 4 musicians surround 2 marimbas, creating a melody of raindrops with overlapping descending figures that unfold at different speeds. The accompanying electronic audio track includes recordings from the cities that inspired this quartet, as well as a haiku that captures the spirit of the music, written by Kotche and read by Yuka Honda (of the band ):

blinking fresh raindrops full ephemeral anchor placidity hush

Aliens with Extraordinary Abilities

The compositions of Third Coast Percussion member David Skidmore are performed regularly in concert halls and universities across the country. In 2011, his multi-movement work Common Patterns in Uncommon Time was commissioned by Frank Lloyd Wright scholar Sidney K. Robinson to commemorate the 100th Anniversary of Taliesin, home of the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture. In 2007 his piece, Unknown Kind, was premiered at Carnegie Hall. He has also received commissions from the Rush Hour Concert Series in Chicago, and a number of leading percussion soloists and pedagogues.

Aliens with Extraordinary Abilities is a cycle of works exploring a common idea, that the same piece of music can move at several different speeds at the same time. An electronic audio track- Skidmore’s most intensive work with electronic composition to date- expands and reinforces the live percussion in many of these works, and video artist Xuan was commissioned to create accompanying video. Many of the individual pieces take their cryptic names from memorable Third Coast Percussion touring experiences or inside jokes.

Sponsored by Arts @ Carleton and the Department of Art and Art History

56 BIOGRAPHY

Third Coast Percussion is a Grammy-winning, artist-run quartet of classically-trained percussionists hailing from the great city of Chicago. For over ten years, the ensemble has forged a unique path in the musical landscape with virtuosic, energetic performances that celebrate the extraordinary depth and breadth of musical possibilities in the world of percussion. The ensemble has been praised for “commandingly elegant” (New York Times) performances, and the “rare power” (Washington Post) of their recordings. The four members of Third Coast are also accomplished teachers, and since 2012, have served as ensemble-in-residence at the University of Notre Dame’s DeBartolo Performing Arts Center.

A direct connection with the audience is at the core of all of Third Coast Percussion’s work. Percussion instru- ments are perhaps the oldest musical instruments, and any object on the planet that produces sound can be a . Perhaps this is why audiences seem to have an innate attraction to percussion instru- ments. A spirit of inclusivity inspires all that Third Coast Percussion does, whether the musicians are speaking from the stage about a new piece of music, inviting the audience to play along in a concert or educational performance, or inviting their fans around the world to create new music using one of their free mobile apps.

The quartet’s curiosity and eclectic taste have led to a series of unlikely collaborations that have produced exciting new art. The ensemble has worked with engineers at the University of Notre Dame, architects at the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, dancers at Hubbard Street Dance Chicago, and musicians from traditions ranging from the mbira music of Zimbabwe’s Shona people, to indie rockers, to some of the world’s leading concert musicians.

A commission for a new work from Augusta Read Thomas in 2012 led to the realization that commission- ing new musical works can be – and should be – as collaborative as any other artistic partnership. Through extensive workshopping and close contact with composers, Third Coast Percussion has commissioned and premiered new works from Donnacha Dennehy, Glenn Kotche, , Gavin Bryars, Christopher Cerrone, Timo Andres, Marcos Balter, Ted Hearne, and today’s leading up-and-coming composers through their Emerg- ing Composers Partnership Program. These works have become part of the ensemble’s core repertoire and seen hundreds of performances across North America and throughout Europe.

Third Coast Percussion maintains a busy touring schedule, with past performances in 32 of the 50 states plus Canada, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, and , and venues ranging from concert halls at the Metro- politan Museum of Art and De Doelen to clubs and alternative performance spaces such as New York’s Le Poisson Rouge and the National Gallery’s West Garden Court.

Third Coast Percussion’s recordings include three full-length albums, three EPs, and a number of appearances on other releases. The quartet has put its stamp on iconic percussion works by and Steve Reich, and Third Coast has also created first recordings of commissioned works by Augusta Read Thomas, David T. Little, and Ted Hearne, in addition to recordings of the ensemble’s own compositions. In 2017 the ensemble won a Grammy for Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance for its recording of Steve Reich’s works for percussion.

Third Coast Percussion has always maintained strong ties to the vibrant artistic community in their hometown of Chicago. The quartet has collaborated with Chicago institutions such as Hubbard Street Dance Chicago and the Adler Planetarium, performed at the grand opening of Maggie Daley Children’s Park, conducted residencies at the University of Chicago, Northwestern University, and the Civic Orchestra of Chicago, created multi-year collaborative projects with Chicago-based composers Augusta Read Thomas, Glenn Kotche, and chamber ensemble Eighth Blackbird, and taught tens of thousands of students through partnerships with Urban Gateways, the People’s Music School, the Chicago Park District, Rush Hour Concerts, and others.

The four members of Third Coast Percussion met while studying music at Northwestern University. Members of Third Coast also hold degrees from the Eastman School of Music, Rutgers University, the New England Conservatory, and the Yale School of Music. Stay up-to-date and go behind-the-scenes by following Third Coast on Twitter (@ThirdCoastPerc), Facebook (@Third Coast Percussion), and Instagram (@Third- CoastPercussion).

*Third Coast Percussion is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization. 57 FACULTY RECITALS

Music at Carleton presents

Faculty/Guest Artist Recital

Contemporary Voices from Latin America

Francesca Anderegg, violin Matthew McCright, piano

Sunday | January 15 | 2017 3 p.m. | Concert Hall

58 PROGRAM

Silvestre Revueltas | 1899-1940 Tres Piezas (1932) Allegro Lentamente Allegro

Reinaldo Moya | b. 1984 Imagined Archipelagos (2012) The Island of the Imaginary Moons The Island at Noon

Heitor Villa-Lobos | 1887-1959 Sonata-Fantasia No. 1 “Désespérance” (1912)

Astor Piazzolla | 1921-1992 Three Tangos (1987) Libertango Oblivion Escualo

Alberto Ginastera | 1916-1983 Pampeana No. 1 (1947)

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

59 BIOGRAPHY

Hailed by the New York Times for her “rich tone” and “virtuosic panache,” violin- ist Francesca Anderegg delivers insightful accounts of contemporary and classical music. Through her inventive programming, active composer collaborations, and precise yet impassioned interpretations, Anderegg has earned renown as a musical explorer of the first order. As a recitalist, Francesca Anderegg explores a personal interest in diverse musi- cal traditions through the creation of concert programs with deep cultural and narrative threads. Upcoming concerts include performances of contemporary Latin American works drawing inspiration equally from folk heritage and the European avant-garde, traditional Russian repertoire, and a “Canciones Populares” program of works inspired by popular music ranging from jazz and blues to folk dances. Anderegg brings her exploration home with a program of recent compositions and commissions from a new generation of U.S. composers, including Clint Needham, Hannah Lash, and . Anderegg’s performances of contemporary music have led to collaborations with some of today’s most prominent composers. At the Lucerne Festival, she has had leading roles in works by Tristan Murail, Bruno Mantovani, Ivan Fedele, and Kaija Saariaho, and performed Pierre Boulez’s Anthèmes II for Solo Violin and Electronics in collaboration with IRCAM. At New York’s (le) Poisson Rouge, she performed John Adams’s Shaker Loops and Road Movies. She also worked with New York Philharmonic composer-in-residence Magnus Lindberg, performing his Clarinet Quintet throughout New York. A recent highlight was a tour of , in which Anderegg performed as soloist with orchestras, taught master classes at Brazilian universities, performed in cham- ber music venues throughout the country, and taught at a social music project in the northeastern city of Recife at the invitation of the U.S. Consulate. Other highlights include recitals at the Arts Club of Washington, DC, all-Elliott Carter concerts at the Miller Theatre, performances with Itzhak Perlman and members of the Perlman Music Program, and more. Anderegg has toured South America as soloist with the St. Olaf Orchestra and, as winner of the Juilliard Concerto Competition, performed the Ligeti Violin Concerto with the Juilliard Orchestra. Recently, her second album of contemporary music “Wild Cities” was released on New Focus Recordings and featured in Strad Magazine. Anderegg holds degrees from Harvard and Juilliard, where her teachers includ- ed Robert Mann, Ronald Copes, and Naoko Tanaka. In 2016, Ms. Anderegg was awarded a McKnight Fellowship for Performing Musicians, given to artists with a “distinctive musical voice.” She is a past recipient of the Leonore Annenberg Fellowship in the Performing Arts. Committed to education and outreach as well as performing, Anderegg is a professor of violin at St. Olaf College, and has taught at Interlochen Center for the Arts. She is represented by Ariel Artists. 60 BIOGRAPHY

American pianist Matthew McCright has performed extensively throughout the United States, Europe, Asia, and the South Pacific as piano soloist and chamber musician. He has thrilled audiences and critics alike with imaginative programming that places the greatest piano repertoire alongside the music of today’s most inno- vative composers. McCright currently resides in Minneapolis, Minnesota, teaches privately in the Twin Cities, and is a member of the piano faculty of Carleton Col- lege. He maintains an active performing schedule as one of the most sought after pianists of his generation in contemporary music. He has premiered numerous new pieces, many written for him, and has collaborated with such composers as , Terry Riley, Augusta Read Thomas, Paul Dresher, Michael Gordon, Mary Ellen Childs, , Mark Anthony Turnage, Alvin Lucier, and Judith Lang Zaimont among many others. An accomplished recording artist, McCright has released five solo recordings: three albums on innova Records Second( Childhood, A Sound, New Century the Vapor, and Blender), a 2011 release of the piano works of Gene Gutchë on Centaur Records and a 2015 release on Albany Records of the piano music of Olivier Messiaen.

McCright’s festival participation includes Bang on a Can at MassMOCA, Print- ing House Festival of New Music (Dublin), Late Music Festival (UK), SEAMUS, Hampden-Sydney Chamber Music Festival, Engelbach-Hart, Kodály Institute, Per- ilous Night, Fringe, , Spark Festival of , Festival of Lakes, Seward Arts, Duquesne University’s Summer Music Institute, Music 2000, CCM Village Opening, and Minnesota Composers Alliance, as well as programs for the American Composers Forum across the country. He has been featured in articles in the NewMusicBox, Tutti, and Voice magazines and in radio broadcasts across the globe. He is currently the Director of Music at Saints Martha and Mary Episcopal Church. He has performed in collaboration with a variety of ensembles including Ensemble 61, Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, dal niente, Wild and Wulliman, La Bonne Chanson, Intersections, Gypsy Hocket, Renegade Ensemble, Zeitgeist, Tai- pei Trio, Balkanicus, New Sound, New Century Piano Duo, Dixie Five, Composer’s Ensemble, Westminster Triptych, WC Jazz Ensemble, and with countless other chamber music groups. Since 2009, he regularly performs internationally with flutist Linda Chatterton. Their 2016 album French Connections was released on the Proper Canary label.

McCright completed his Doctor of Musical Arts Degree in Piano Performance from the University of Minnesota, Master of Music Degree in Piano from the Col- lege-Conservatory of Music at the University of Cincinnati and earned his Bache- lor of Music Degree in Piano Performance, Magna Cum Laude, from Westminster College. His past teachers include Lydia Artymiw, Nancy Zipay DeSalvo, Lisa Moore, and Richard Morris. He is represented by Proper Canary Artist Services. For more information please visit: www.matthewmccright.org

61 FACULTY RECITALS

Music at Carleton presents

Faculty Recital

Gao Hong’s Celebration of 45 Years of Music Making

Guangxi Caprice for Pipa and String Quartet with The Artaria String Quartet Ray Shows, violin Nancy Oliveros, violin Annalee Wolf, viola Rebecca Merblum, cello

Chinglish Music and Concept by Gao Hong Directed and Designed by Roger Bechtel

Friday, April 7, 2017 8:00 p.m., Concert Hall

62 PROGRAM

廣西隨想 (Guangxi Caprice) Gao Hong, pipa Artaria String Quartet

I. 挑擔舞 (Tiaodan Dance) II. 夏蝉 (Summer Cicadas) III. 慶豐收 (Celebrating the Harvest)

Guangxi is a province in southern China that sports a population rich in diversity that embraces forty-eight different ethnic groups. Guangxi Caprice (2017) is in three movements without pause. The first movement, called 挑擔舞 (Tiaodan Dance), depicts Tiaodan people as they carry goods on their shoulders with bamboo sticks. The music describes the people as they work happily in the field. People come one-by-one from far away with the bam- boo sticks on their shoulders, creating “biandan” up and down movements that mimic dancing.

The second movement is called 夏蝉 (Summer Cicadas). In Guangxi, the weather is very hot and the cicadas are very noisy. But in the Dong minority culture, the most famous love song is inspired by the sounds of the cicadas. The music describes a hot summer day, with young men and women looking for lovers during work breaks in the field. They initially sing in an antiphonal style, but when they find their lovers they dance and sing together. In the end, they quietly leave the field as couples.

The third movement is 慶豐收 (Celebrating the Harvest). A bountiful harvest is cause to celebrate in Guangxi, and Gao Hong depicts this celebration with sounds of percussion bands and people yelling with excitement as they dance. Near the end of the movement she uses celebratory words to express the joy and happiness of the people as they celebrate.

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

63 PROGRAM

中式英文 (Chinglish) Music & Concept by Gao Hong, pipa Direction & Design by Roger Bechtel

What happens when you confuse “Mountain Dew” with “mildew”? “Cleve- land” with “cleavage”? When you’re Chinese and speak no English and your new husband is American and speaks no Chinese? Chinglish (2017) is the true story of renowned pipa player Gao Hong and her personal odyssey from her native China, to Japan, and finally to America.

Whether she’s telling us about her refusal to believe that ducks can fly or re- counting an immigration officer’s emotional response to the love letters she exchanged with her husband, her story is both hilariously funny and mov- ingly poignant. Music is also essential to her performance, and she speaks as eloquently through her live playing as she does through her storytelling. Her journey is also captured in an accompanying video backdrop, bringing music, visual images, and spoken word together to recount her extraordi- nary story.

Created with director and designer Roger Bechtel and animator Brian Gor- don, Chinglish presents Gao’s funny and moving story in concert with her original compositions for the pipa, performed before a multimedia back- drop. Gao Hong composed all the music on the prerecorded soundtrack and performs her pipa live, as she uses looping and special effects to relay her stories.

The performance of Chinglish will be followed by a question & answer session with collaborators Gao Hong and Roger Bechtel.

64 BIOGRAPHY

Now celebrating 30 years of professional performing and teaching, the Artaria String Quartet has been hailed as an “exceptional ensemble with impressive confidence in its interpretations” and “Minnesota’s foremost teaching and performing string quartet.” Winners of the McKnight Fellow- ship for Performing Musicians, and named Minnesota Public Radio Art- ists-in-Residence, Artaria has been featured on Twin Cities Public Television as part of the “Minnesota Originals” series.

Artaria’s refined and thoughtful playing has brought them to major venues throughout the United States and Europe, on national television and public radio stations, and at top summer festivals including the Banff Centre in Canada, Festival de L’Epau in France, and the Tanglewood Music Center in Lenox, MA.

Artaria has earned numerous awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, Chamber Music America, and the Minnesota State Arts Board for ex- cellence in performance and educational outreach. Directors of the Artaria Chamber Music School, a premiere weekly string chamber music program in Saint Paul; and Stringwood Chamber Music Festival, featuring the ASQ and renowned guest artists every June in Lanesboro, MN; they are founders of the Saint Paul String Quartet Competition, which showcases the nation’s top high school age string quartets each April.

Roger Bechtel, Professor of Theater, and Chair of Theater and Dance at Carleton College, is both a theater artist and a scholar. He is the artistic di- rector of the Chicago-based multimedia performance company Big Picture Group. BPG’s inaugural production of .duck was named one of the ten best productions of the year by the Chicago Tribune, and its devised perfor- mance True + False won the Critic’s Choice award at the Cincinnati Fringe Festival. As an actor and director, he has worked Off-Broadway in New York City and at a host of regional theaters, including the McCarter Theater at Princeton, the Yale Repertory Theater, the Utah Shakespeare Festival, and the Attic Theater in Detroit, where his Hamlet won a best actor award. He is the author of the book Past Performance: American Theatre and the Histor- ical Imagination, and has contributed chapters to several other books, includ- ing The History of Collective Creation, The Oxford Handbook of American Drama, and The Wooster Group and Its Traditions. He received an MFA in Acting from the Yale School of Drama and a Ph.D. in Performance Theory and Criti- cism from Cornell University.

65 BIOGRAPHY

Gao Hong, master of the Chinese pear-shaped lute, the pipa, began her career as a professional musician at age 12. She graduated with honors from China’s premier music school, the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing, where she studied with the great pipa master Lin Shicheng. In both China and the U.S. Gao has received numerous top awards and honors, including First Prize in the Hebei Professional Young Music Performers Competition and an International Art Cup in Beijing. In 2005 Gao Hong became the first traditional musician to be awarded the prestigious Bush Artist Fellowship, and in 2012 she became the only musician in any genre to win four McKnight Artist Fellowships for Performing Musicians. The Min- nesota State Arts Board has awarded her with an Artist Assistance Fellow- ship, two Artist Initiative Grants, two Folk and Traditional Arts Grants, two Arts Learning Grants and a Cultural Community Partnership grant. She was the winner of a 2012, 2015 and 2016 Global Music Award and a USArtists International grant from the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The Elizabeth & Michel Sorel Charitable Organization, Inc. in New York City awarded her a Sorel Medallion in Recording grant.

Gao has performed throughout Europe, Australia, Argentina, Japan, Hong Kong, China, and the U.S. in solo concerts and with symphony orchestras, jazz musicians, and musicians from other cultures. She has performed at many major festivals worldwide. Her performances have included those at the Lincoln Center Festival; Carnegie Hall; the Teatro Colon (Buenos Ai- res); the San Francisco Jazz Festival; the Smithsonian Institution; the Next Wave Festival; Festival d’Automne a Paris in Paris and Caen, France; the In- ternational Festival of Perth, Australia; and the Festival de Teatro d’Europa in Milan, Italy. Her performances of pipa concerti with symphony orches- tras include several world, U.S., and regional premieres and performances with the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, Buenos Aires Philharmonic, Lou- isville Orchestra, China National Traditional Instruments Orchestra (Bei- jing), Pasadena Symphony, Heidelberg (Germany) Philharmonic, Women’s Philharmonic (San Francisco), Portland (Maine) Symphony, and the Minne- apolis Pops Orchestra among others. In addition, she performed worldwide with the Lincoln Center production of “The Peony Pavilion,” and 2017 she was invited to perform the national anthem at a Minnesota Timberwolves’ NBA home game in Target Center.

66 BIOGRAPHY

As a composer, she has received commissions from the American Compos- ers Forum, Walker Art Center, the Jerome Foundation, Zeitgeist, Ragamala Music and Dance Theater, Theater Mu, IFTPA, Minneapolis Guitar Quar- tet, Danish guitarist Lars Hannibal, a 416 Club Commission through The Cedar and Jerome Foundation (for Gao Hong on the Highway) and from Twin Cities Public Television for the six-part TV series “Made in China.” Meet the Composer Inc. in New York City awarded her two Creative Connec- tions grants and two MetLife Creative Connections grants.

Gao currently teaches Chinese Instruments at Carleton College in North- field, Minnesota, where she also directs the Chinese Music Ensemble and Global Music Ensemble. She is an honorary Guest Professor at both the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing and the Tianjin Conservatory, and is a member of the Board of Directors at McNally Smith College of Music. In 2016, Gao Hong completed the first pipa method book ever written in English and had it published by Hal Leonard - the world’s largest music publishing company. China’s foremost music publication, “People’s Music,” wrote of Gao Hong that “like the famous peony, she has gradually emerged as the best of all beautiful flowers...her performance has extremely strong artistic appeal and belongs under the category of ‘fine wine’...the more you listen, the more beautiful it gets…”

For more information visit www.chinesepipa.com

Gao Hong is a fiscal year 2016 recipient of an Artist Initiative grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board. This activity is made possible by the voters of Minnesota through a grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board, thanks to a legis- lative appropriation by the Minnesota Legislature; and by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

67 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

My heartfelt thanks goes out to Roger Bechtel for his willingness to work with me and his great artistry and vision!

A big thank you to the Artaria String Quartet: Ray Shows, violin; Nancy Oliveros, violin; Annalee Wolf, viola; Rebecca Merblum, cello.

A big thank you for the unconditional support of Carleton College; Depart- ment of Music, Concert Committee, Andrea Mazzariello, Andy Flory, and Yijun Wang; College Communications Office, Joe Hargis, Jaye Lawrence, and Jessica Paxton; Office of the Director of Arts, Steven Richardson; Cin- ema and Media Studies, Paul Bernhardt, and Brendan Friesen; The Human- ities Center, Silvia Lopez, and Brian Gordon (the SRA grantee.)

A big thank you to my lovely family in China, my sweet husband Paul Dice, and my beautiful daughter Alida for their unconditional love and support.

A big thank you to the PAC Office, Holly Streekstra, and staff; Waterbury Music + Sound, Reid Kurger; Presentation Events & Production Support Office, Matthew Lundberg, and Dann Hurlbert; and Jeffrey Bartlett for lighting.

Many thanks to all my colleagues, friends, and students who have supported me throughout my 16 years at Carleton College.

~ Gao Hong

68 FACULTY RECITALS

Music at Carleton presents

Faculty Recital Homages

Nicola Melville, piano

Friday, April 14, 2017 7:00 p.m., Concert Hall

69 PROGRAM

Images, Book I Claude Debussy | 1862-1918 I. Reflets dans l’eau II. Hommage à Rameau III. Mouvement

The Horizon from Owhiro Bay Gareth Farr | b. 1968

• Pause •

Sonatine Maurice Ravel | 1875-1937 I. Modéré II. Mouvement de menuet III. Animé

Three New York Waltzes Lou Harrison | 1917-2003 Reel: Homage to Henry Cowell

• Pause •

Serried with a Tinge of Bop Doug Opel | b. 1967

From Hommage à trois Mark Olivieri | b. 1972 Gestures (Hommage à Takemitsu) Funk for Nikki (Hommage à James Brown)

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

70 BIOGRAPHY

Nicola Melville has been described as “having an original and intelligent mu- sical mind” (Waikato Times), “a marvelous pianist who plays with splashy color but also exquisite tone and nuance” (American Record Guide), and “the sort of advocate any composer would love” (Dominion Post). Her live performances and recordings have been broadcast on Canadian, U.S., New Zealand, South African and Chinese radio, and she has been involved in numerous interdisciplinary projects with dancers, filmmakers and visual artists, including a performance at the Kennedy Center, Washington DC, and Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall. Nicola attended Victoria University School of Music, Wellington, where she studied with Judith Clark, and then earned Masters and Doctoral degrees from the Eastman School of Music, where she was awarded the Lizzie T. Mason prize for Outstanding Graduate Pianist, and the prestigious Performers Certif- icate. Nicola won both the National Concerto Competition and the Auckland Star Concerto Competition while in New Zealand, and was a winner of the SAI International Concerto Competition at the Chautauqua Music Festival, NY.

Nicola has commissioned and premiered many works in the U.S. and in New Zealand. She was awarded grants from such organizations as Meet the Com- poser, Creative New Zealand, the Argosy Fund for Contemporary Music, and the Jerome Composers Commissioning Program for the commissioning, performing and recording of new music. Nicola has recorded for the Innova and Equilibrium labels, and is the pianist for the Twin Cities-based new music group, Zeitgeist. She is Professor of Music at Carleton College, and Co-Direc- tor of the Chautauqua Music Festival Piano Program in New York.

Gareth Farr is a prolific composer and percussionist, whose music has been performed all over the world. In 2006 Gareth was made an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit, for his services to music and entertainment, and in 2010 he was a recipient of the prestigious NZ Arts Laureate Award. Farr’s mu- sic is particularly influenced by his extensive study of percussion, both Western and non-Western. Rhythmic elements of his compositions can be linked to the complex and exciting rhythms of Rarotongan log drum ensembles, Balinese gamelan and other percussion music of the Pacific Rim. In addition to his music for the concert chamber, Farr has written music for dance, theatre, televi- sion and film; he has won four Chapman Tripp theatre awards.

71 BIOGRAPHY

Over fifty years ago Lou Harrison (1917-2003), composer, environmentalist and gay icon, quietly began his own musical revolution. With superb craftsman- ship he combined a reverence for world cultures, a passionate belief in social equity and a love of melody and beauty in all its forms, to create his own world of music. In his over 300 compositions for western, eastern, and custom-made instruments Harrison wrote for symphony orchestra, ballet, small chamber ensembles and soloists. Performers such as Keith Jarrett, Yo-Yo Ma, and The Mark Morris Dance Group also premiered Harrison’s music. Beyond his myriad musical accomplishments, Harrison’s outspoken, lifelong involvement in politi- cal activism garnered him icon status in many communities. He was recognized with countless awards including membership in the American Academy of Arts and Letters, “Humanitarian of the Year” by the American Humanist Associa- tion, the Michael Callen Medal of Achievement from the Annual Gay/Lesbian American Music Awards (GLAMA), and Musical America’s composer of the year 2002. (from The Lou Harrison Documentary Project website)

Exploring amalgamations of contemporary, rock, jazz, pop and electronic music, Doug Opel’s work has been performed by the National Young Arts Foundation, American Modern Ensemble, Nautilus Music-Theater, Vox Novus, Duo Petrof, Keys to the Future, Vision of Sound and the Duquesne Contem- porary Ensemble. He is a recipient of the Aaron Copland Award and winner of Definiens’ Composition Competition. He has received commissions from the Chatterton-McCright Duo, the Bridge Chamber Music Festival, the Chau- tauqua Institution, the Atlantic Chamber Ensemble, MATA, the Fort Wayne Philharmonic and bass-baritone Timothy Jones. He has also written for cellist Jeffrey Zeigler, PUBLIQuartet and the ensemble Intersection.

Mark Olivieri is an Associate Professor of Music at Hobart and William Smith Colleges. Olivieri receives numerous commissions and performances of his work from artists throughout the U.S. and abroad. Olivieri’s compositions are equally inspired and informed as much by Black Sabbath and Thelonius Monk as they are by traditional concert music. His experience as an improvising mu- sician and jazz arranger also informs his work as a composer. Olivieri’s “Spec- tacular Vernaculars” for solo piano were recorded by pianist Nicholas Phillips on New Focus Recordings, and described by the New York Times as “glittering pop-infused etudes.” His recently completed score for the 1920 silent film, The Mark of Zorro, premiered at the Syracuse International Film Festival in the spring of 2016. Olivieri’s newest commission, a triple concerto for flute, viola, and piano is scheduled to premiere in Medellín, in the fall of 2018.

72 CARLETON MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS

圀攀猀琀 䄀昀爀椀挀愀渀 䐀爀甀洀 䔀渀猀攀洀戀氀攀

䨀愀礀 䨀漀栀渀猀漀渀Ⰰ 䐀椀爀攀挀琀漀爀

73 CARLETON MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS

Jay Johnson, Director

74 CARLETON MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS

75 CARLETON MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS

Music at Carleton presents

Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble Concert Music from China, Korea, Cuba, and Argentina

featuring Shu Yin Guzheng Ensemble from the Sichuan Conservatory of Music in China with the Global Music Ensemble and Tang & Song Music Ensemble

Gao Hong, director

Sunday, February 19, 2017 3:00 p.m., Concert Hall

76 PROGRAM

四物놀이 (Samul nori) Traditional Korean Drum Music

Korean Drum Ensemble

洛阳春 (Luoyang Spring) Music from Tang Dynasty

Tang & Song Music Ensemble

彝族舞曲 (Dance of Yi) Wang Huiran

Gus Holley, zhongruan

鸽子 (Pigeons) Sebastián Iradier

自由探戈 (Libertango) Astor Piazzolla

Carleton Global Music Ensemble

婵歌 (Song of Elegance) Wang Jianmin

Jiao Li, guzheng; Yi Yan, piano

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

77 PROGRAM

炎 (Flames) Shuiye Liyan Members of the Shu Yin Guzheng Ensemble: Zhang Yawen, Jiao Qirui, and Jin Tian

蜀调-拷红 (Interrogating the Maid) Wang Hongcheng Members of the Shu Yin Guzheng Ensemble: Zhang Yawen, Sun Yeran, Jiao Qirui, and Jin Tian

渔舟唱晚 (Evening Song from the Fishing Boat) Classical Music lyrics by Fu Mingjian Members of the Shu Yin Guzheng Ensemble: Lang Juanjuan, Xu Feifei, Li Dantong, Yao Yige, and Zhou Qinghui

赶花会 (Go To Festival) Sichuan Folk Tune Carleton Guzheng Ensemble and Shu Yin Guzheng Ensemble

欢沁 (Immersed in Happiness) Lin Hai 赛马 (Horse Racing) Huang Haihuai Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble and Shu Yin Guzheng Ensemble

78 PERSONNEL

Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble

Dizi Yijun Wang

Zhongruan Gus Holley

Guzheng Serafina Chen Shatian Wang Haoyi Wang

Yangqin Amber Zhang

Guqin Gege Zhang

Cello Emma Grisanzio

Piano Moliang Jiang

Ehru Benjamin Lee, student from Rochester High School Yuedong Merritt, visiting Instructor in Chinese Xiaomin Wu, Chinese Language Associate Arthur Zhang Huahua Zhong

79 PERSONNEL

Carleton Global Music Ensemble Jin Lee, violin Graham Hanchet, clarinet Emma Grisanzio, cello Moliang Jiang, piano Alexa Feeney, guitar Shatian Wang, guzheng Benjamin Lee, erhu

Tang & Song Music Ensemble Gus Holley, zhongruan Yue Wu, vocal/zhongruan Gege Zhang, guqin Kitty Miao, xiao Amanda Jin, yunluo

Korean Drum Ensemble Jin Lee Ji Young Lee Daniel Kim Jin Kim Joshua Song Eun Yong Chung

Carleton Guzheng Ensemble Serafina Chen, Shatian Wang, Yijun Wang, Haoyi Wang, Heqing Huang, Amber Zhang, Yifan Zhong

80 BIOGRAPHY

Shu Yin Guzheng Ensemble was founded in 2000 by Jiao Li with the aim of combining traditional music with Sichuan culture and promoting this new form of art. Shuyin Guzheng Ensemble is the first professional Guzheng ensemble in Sichuan, and has been invited to perform in domestic concerts as well as international concerts in Korea, Japan, South Africa, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Taiwan and many other regions.

Jiao Li is a nationally-renowned Guzheng performer who comes from a family of musicians. Jiao is the head of Chengdu Guzheng Society, professor of Guzheng at Sichuan Conservatory of Music, director of the Office of Plucked String Instruments at Sichuan Con- servatory of Music, and visiting professor at the College of Arts of Yunnan University of Nationalities and Guangxi Normal University. Jiao has given many solo performances all over the world. He found- ed Shu Yin Guzheng Ensemble in 2000. Jiao also recorded for sev- eral CDs, and published several scholarly articles and handbooks on musical performance techniques. China National Radio and Sichuan Television have given him special coverage many times.

Gao Hong, a renowned Chinese pipa player and composer, gradu- ated from the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing where she studied with pipa master Lin Shicheng. She has received numerous awards and honors at home and abroad. In 2005, Gao Hong became the first traditional musician to be awarded the prestigious Bush Artist Fellowship, and in 2012 she became the only musician in any genre to win four McKnight Artist Fellowships for Performing Musicians. She has received numerous commissions and has performed countless U.S. and world premieres of pipa concerti with organizations such as the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, Heidelberg Philharmonic, Buenos Ai- res Philharmonic, and many others. She is also Guest Professor at the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing and Tianjin Conservatory of Music in China. www.chinesepipa.com.

81 BIOGRAPHY

• About the Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble • The Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble, under the direction of Gao Hong, was established eleven years ago and has since performed to much acclaim at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, the Mall of America, University of Minnesota, Confucius Institute’s China Day 2010 event at Northrop Auditorium, the ASIANetwork Conference in Chicago, the National Conference for Silk Road Scholars at the University of Minnesota, the Organization of Chinese Americans’ annual Chinese New Year Celebration, Winona State University, the Land O’Lakes Company’s Celebrate Asian Pacific American Heritage Month Concert Series, the Schubert Club’s new concert series Cocktails with Culture, the Flint Hills International Children’s Festival presented by Ordway Center for the Performing Arts, and the Chinese Minghua Language School in St. Paul. Locally they performed the inaugural performance for Northfield Library’s Carnegie Concert Series, and at St. Olaf College, Northfield High School, Northfield Middle School, and Carleton’s International Festivals, art gallery openings, and Chinese New Year celebrations. They even appeared on KSTP news for their performance during the Confucius Institute’s opening ceremony at the University of Minnesota. In 2014, four members of the ensemble won medals at the Huian International Chinese Instrument Competition.

82 Win the CD!

83 CARLETON MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS

Music at Carleton presents

Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble Concert

featuring the Korean Drum Ensemble, Tang Song Music Ensemble, and Global Music Ensemble with Guest Artist Issam Rafea, oud

Gao Hong, director

Friday, May 19, 2017 8:00 p.m., Concert Hall

84 PROGRAM

웃다리가락 (Utdari) Korean Drum Ensemble

Korean Drum Ensemble

渔樵问答(古琴独奏) Classical (Dialogue Between Fisherman and Woodcutter)

Gege Zhang, guqin

New Representations of Tang-Song Music I. 鬲溪梅令 , 宋 姜夔 Song dynasty (Plum Blossoms on the Far Side of the Stream, Jiang Kui) II. 醉公子, 唐 Tang dynasty (The Drunken Gentleman)

Tang Song Music Chamber Ensemble

送我一支玫瑰花 (Send Me a Rose) Wang Fandi | b. 1933

Lydia Ding, Amada Jin, Ruyi Shen, Gao Hong, pipa; Gus Holley, zhongruan

剑器中阮独奏 (Sword Dance) Xu Changjun| b. 1957

Gus Holley, zhongruan

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

85 PROGRAM

梁祝 (Butterfly Lovers) He Zhanhao | b. 1933 Chen Gang | b. 1935

Chen Yang, violin; Vicky Wu, guzheng; Emma Grisanzio, cello; Ian Seong, piano; Gus Holley, zhongruan

John Stephen of Chance Inn Irish Folk Tune Belles of Tipperary

Carleton Global Music Ensemble

Al Jamal Issam Rafea Al Ajaleh

Guest Artist Issam Rafea with Global Music Ensemble

琵琶语 (中国印象版本) (Whisper from Lutes) Lin Hai | b. 1969

Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble

绣荷包 (Embroidering a Pouch) Yunnan Folk Tune

Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble

86 PERSONNEL

Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble

笛子 Dizi Yijun Wang

二胡 Erhu Benjamin Lee (Rochester High School Student) Yuedong Merritt (Visiting Instructor in Chinese) Xiaomin Wu (Chinese Language Associate) Arthur Zhang Huahua Zhong

中阮 Zhongruan Gus Holley

琵琶 Pipa Lydia Ding* Amada Jin Ruyi Shen*

古筝 Guzheng Serafina Chen Haoyi Wang Vicky Wu*

杨琴 Yangqin Amber Zhang

古琴 Guqin Gege Zhang

小提琴 Violin Jin Lee* Chen Yang*

大提琴 Cello Emma Grisanzio*

钢琴 Piano Ian Seong

87 PERSONNEL

Korean Drum Ensemble

Jin Lee* Nayon Park* Ji Young Lee Joshua Song Jin Kim Daniel Kim

唐宋古乐队 Tang Song Music Ensemble

中阮 Zhongruan Gus Holley

歌手 Vocal/云锣 Yunluo Yue Wu

古琴 Guqin Gege Zhang

箫 Xiao Kitty Miao

歌手 Vocal/琵琶 Pipa Amanda Jin

Carleton Global Music Chamber Ensemble Molly Hildreth*, flute Jin Lee*, violin Graham Hanchet, clarinet Emma Grisanzio*, cello Ian Seong, piano Benjamin Lee (Rochester High School Student), erhu Gus Holley, zhongruan Vicky Wu*, guzheng

*Senior 88 BIOGRAPHY

Guest artist Issam Rafea is the Winner of the 2010 “Best Composer Award” in Dubai International Film Festival (Muhr Arab) in the film “Matar Ayloul,” “September Rain.” Rafea is the Chair of the Arabic Music Depart- ment at High Institute of Music in Damascus and the principal conductor of Syrian National Orchestra for Arabic Music. Rafea has studied under Fayez Zahr El-Din, Aref Abdallah, and Askar Ali-Akbar. In 1995, he re- ceived his bachelor’s degrees in Oud and performance, as well as Oriental Conducting from the High Institute of Music in Damascus. He is also on the faculty in the institute teaching Oud. In Syria, Rafea has been an active composer and arranger for TV and Theater since the 90s.

Please visit www.issamrafea.com

Gao Hong, a renowned Chinese pipa player and composer, graduated from the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing where she studied with pipa master Lin Shicheng. She has received numerous awards and honors at home and abroad. In 2005, Gao Hong became the first traditional usicianm to be awarded the prestigious Bush Artist Fellowship, and in 2012 she be- came the only musician in any genre to win four McKnight Artist Fellow- ships for Performing Musicians. She has received numerous commissions and has performed countless U.S. and world premieres of pipa concerti with organizations such as the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, Heidelberg Philharmonic, Buenos Aires Philharmonic, and many others. She is also Guest Professor at the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing and Tianjiang Conservatory in China.

Please visit www.chinesepipa.com

89 BIOGRAPHY

The Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble, under the direction of Gao Hong, was established ten years ago and has since performed to much ac- claim at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, the Mall of America, University of Minnesota, Confucius Institute’s China Day 2010 event at Northrop Au- ditorium, the ASIA Network Conference in Chicago, the National Confer- ence for Silk Road Scholars at the University of Minnesota, the Organiza- tion of Chinese Americans’ annual Chinese New Year Celebration, Winona State University, the Land O’Lakes Company’s Celebrate Asian Pacific American Heritage Month Concert Series, the Schubert Club’s new concert series Cocktails with Culture, the Flint Hills International Children’s Festival presented by Ordway Center for the Performing Arts, and the Chinese Min- ghua Language School in St. Paul. Locally they performed the inaugural per- formance for Northfield Library’s Carnegie Concert Series, and at St. Olaf College, Northfield High School, Northfield Middle School, and Carleton’s International Festivals, art gallery openings, and Chinese New Year celebra- tions. They even appeared on KSTP news for their performance during the Confucius Institute’s opening ceremony at the University of Minnesota. In 2014, four members of the ensemble won medals at the Huian Internation- al Chinese Instrument Competition.

90 CONGRATULATIONS

Good Luck Seniors! 祝你好运

Congratulations on graduating! Wishing you all bright opportunities and success in all that you will pursue. We will miss you! Yang Chen Jin Lee Emma Grisanzio Vicky Wu Gao Hong* Xiaomin Wu+ Ruyi Shen Lydia Ding Tumi Akin-Deko (not pictured) Sijin Chen (not pictured) *Director Lisa Cheung (not pictured) +Chinese Molly Hildreth (not pictured) Language Nayon Park (not pictured) Associate

91 CARLETON MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS

CHANTS From around the world and throughout the ages

Lawrence Burnett, conductor

The Basilica of Saint Mary, Minneapolis, Minnesota Saturday, November 5, 2016, 7:00 p.m.

92 PROGRAM

An informance to explore and gain appreciation of chant history.

“The Circle of Life” featured in The Lion King: the Broadway Musical | 1997 Zulu Chant: Hans Zimmer | b. 1957 and Lebo Morake | b. 1964 Music: Elton John | b. 1947 Lyrics: Tim Rice | b. 1944 Soloist: Bethany Bobo ’20, mezzo-soprano

Zulu chant Here comes a lion, father. Nants ingonyama bakithi, baba. We hail the lion. Sithi hu ingonyama. The royal lion wears his leopard spots. Ingonyama nengw’ namabala.

From the day we arrive on the planet And blinking, step into the sun There’s more to see than can ever be seen More to do than can ever be done There’s far too much to take in here More to find than can ever be found But the sun rolling high through the sapphire sky Keeps great and small on the endless round It’s the Circle of Life And it moves us all Through despair and hope Through faith and love Till we find our place On the path unwinding In the Circle The Circle of Life It’s the Circle of Life And it moves us all Through despair and hope Through faith and love Till we find our place On the path unwinding In the Circle The Circle of Life 93 PROGRAM

“Somagwaza” | Xhosa Traditional Song

The South African compilers of the original collection from which this song was drawn state that the word “Somagwaza” is no longer translatable. However, according to Ysaye M. Barnwell, former member of the vocal group Sweet Honey in the Rock, a non-literal translation is, “He who can carry his own spear no longer needs his mother.” Other words are vocables.

Part 1. Haweh, haweh somagwaza Part 2. somagwaza mna yoweh, yoweh Part 3. Hey mna yoweh, hey mna yoweh somagwaza

“Gaudete” | Late Medieval Christmas Carol

Gaudete, gaudete! Rejoice, rejoice! Christus est natus Christ is born Ex Maria virgine, Of the virgin Mary, Gaudete! Rejoice!

Tempus ad est gratiae, It is now the time of grace Hoc quod optabamus; That we have desired; Carmina laetitiae, Let us sing songs of joy, Devote redamus. Let us give devotion.

Deus homo factus est, God was made man, Natura mirante; And nature marvels; Mundus renovatus est The world was renewed A Christo regnante. By Christ who is King.

Ezecheelis porta The closed gate of Ezechiel Clausa per transitur; Has been passed through; Unde Lux est orta From where the light rises Salus invenitur. Salvation is found.

Ergo nostra cantio, Therefore let our assembly now sing, Psallat iam in lustro; Sing the Psalms to purify us; Benedicat Domino: Let it praise the Lord: Salus Regi nostro. Greetings to our King. 94 PROGRAM

“Ave M a r i a , g r a c i a p l e n a ” from Liber Usualis, 1861 Soloist: Andy Tirro ’17, baritone-tenor

“Ave Maria” Tomás Luis da Victoria | 1548 - 1611

Ave Maria, gratia plena, Hail Mary, full of grace, Dominus tecum. the Lord is with thee. Benedicta tu in mulieribus, Blessed art thou among women, Et benedictus fructus And blessed is the fruit ventris tui, Jesus. Of thy womb, Jesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, Holy Mary, Mother of God, Ora pro nobis peccatoribus, Pray for us sinners, Nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Now and at the hour of our death. Amen. Amen.

“Bogorodeste Devo” from Vsenoshchnoe bdenie (All-Night Vigil), Opus 37, No. 6 | 1915 Sergei Rachmaninoff | 1873 – 1943

Bogoroditse Devo, raduysya Rejoice, O Virgin, Theotokos, Blagodatnaya Mariye Gospod s Toboyu: The Lord is with You: Blagoslovenna Ti v zhenah, Blessed are You among women, i blagosloven Plod chreva Tvoyego, and blessed is the Fruit of Your womb, yako Spasa rodila yesi dush nashih. for You have borne the Savoir of our souls.

95 PROGRAM

“Ubi Caritas” from Quatre motets sur des thèmes grégoriens, Op. 10 | 1960 Maurice Duruflé | 1902 – 1986

Ubi caritas et amor, Deus ibi est. Where charity and love are, God is there. Congregavit nos in unum Christi amor. Love of Christ has gathered us into one. Exsultemus, et in ipso jucundemur. Let us rejoice in Him and be glad. Timeamus, et amemus Deum vivum. Let us fear, and let us love the living God.

Et ex corde diligamus nos sincero. And from a sincere heart let us love one [another].

Ubi caritas et amor, Deus ibi est. Where charity and love are, God is there. Simul ergo cum in unum congregamur: At the same time, therefore, are gathered into one:

Ne nos mente dividamur, caveamus. Lest we be divided in mind, let us beware. Cessent iurgia maligna, cessent lites. Let evil impulses stop, let controversy cease.

Et in medio nostri sit Christus Deus. And in the midst of us be Christ our God. Ubi caritas et amor, Deus ibi est. Where charity and love are, God is there. Simul quoque cum beatis videamus, At the same time we see that with the saints also,

Glorianter vultum tuum, Christe Deus: Thy face in glory, O Christ our God: Gaudium quod est immensum, atque probum, The joy that is immense and good, Unto the Saecula per infinita saeculorum. Amen. World without end. Amen.

96 PROGRAM

“Gitanjali Chants” | 2006 Craig Ella Johnson | b. 1962 Soloists: Elizabeth Sachs ’20 and Christine Johnson ’20 Where charity and love are, God is there. Love of Christ has gathered us into one. Ever in my life have I sought thee with my songs. Let us rejoice in Him and be glad. It was they who led me from door to door, Let us fear, and let us love the living God. and with them have I felt about me, searching and touching my world. And from a sincere heart let us love one [another]. It was my songs that taught me all the lessons I ever learnt; they showed me secret paths, Where charity and love are, God is there. they brought before my sight many a star on the horizons of my heart. At the same time, therefore, are gathered into one: They guided me all the day long to the mysteries of the country of pleasure and pain, and at last to what palace gate have they brought me at the end of my journey? Lest we be divided in mind, let us beware. Let evil impulses stop, let controversy cease. You came down from your throne and stood at my cottage door. I was singing all alone in a corner, and the melody caught your ear. And in the midst of us be Christ our God. Where charity and love are, God is there. You came down and stood at my cottage door. At the same time we see that with the saints also, Masters are many in our hall, and songs are sung there at all hours. Thy face in glory, O Christ our God: But the simple carol of this novice struck at your love. The joy that is immense and good, Unto the One plaintive little strain mingled with the great music of the world, World without end. Amen. and with a flow’r for a prize; You came down and stopped at my cottage door.

97 PROGRAM

Traditional African-American Songs as Chants

“Wade in the Water” Wade in the water. Wade in the water, children. Wade in the water. God’s gonna trouble the water.

“Sometimes I Feel Like A Motherless Child” Sometimes I feel like a motherless child. Sometimes I feel like a motherless child. Sometimes I feel like a motherless child. A long way from home, a long way from home.

“I Wanna Die Easy” I want to die easy. I want to die easy. I want to die easy. I’ll shout salvation when I die.

98 PROGRAM

“Epitaph for Moonlight” | 1968 Raymond Murray Schafer | b. 1933 Soloist: Elizabeth Sachs ’20, soprano

“Epitaph for Moonlight” is a free composition in which the singers impro- vise from given indications of pitch, intensity and duration. The score is written graphically and so does not require knowledge of conventional mu- sical notation. The text is made up of words invented by eleven-year-olds. They were asked to come up with substitutes for English words that would express in sound the concept of “moonlight”.

sloofulp shalowa nu-u-yul

noorwahm maunklinde

sheelesk neshmoor

shiverglowa malooma

shimonoell

“Dona nobis pacem” | Unknown source Text: Last line of the “Agnus Dei” from the Mass Ordinary

Jean La Fontaine ’19, spoken word

Dona nobis pacem. Give us peace.

99 ABOUT CARLETON COLLEGE

Carleton is an exceptionally musical college, where excellent musical opportunities abound for all students, regardless of major. All Car- leton students may choose from a wide variety of classroom courses embracing the study of not only western art music, its history, theory, and practices, but also rock, jazz, global pop, Motown, and blues, film music, the philosophy and psychology of music, and musics of India, Africa, the Caribbean, and China. Over 800 Carleton students per year have also chosen to perform in Choir, Orchestra, Symphony Band, Jazz Ensemble, Chinese Music Ensemble, West African Drum Ensemble, and to study privately in an array of areas, including voice and all instruments typical of western art music ensembles, and also folk guitar, mandolin, banjo, sitar, Indian vocal music, African drums and karimba/mbira, jazz, and Chinese musical instruments.

BIOGRAPHY

Lawrence Burnett, Professor of Music and Choral Director/Ap- plied Voice Coordinator, received the B.M. degree in Vocal Music Education from Texas A&I University, the M.M. degree in Choral Conducting, Vocal Performance, and Vocal Pedagogy from East- ern New University, and the D.M.A. in Choral Conducting from the University of Texas. His professional background includes solo/stage work with numerous orchestras, choruses, and festivals throughout the country. In 1992 he was awarded the Governor’s Award for African-Americans of Distinction in New York State. Dr. Burnett is an active member of the Music Educators National Con- ference, and the American Choral Directors Association for which he serves as National Chair of the Repertoire Standards Committee for Ethnic Music and Multicultural Perspectives.

100 Christine Babajide Max Pope Bethany Bobo Julia Preston Diana Delgado Thomas Redding Olivea Eaton Nathan Rowley Julia Fiocco Elizabeth Sachs Ellie Grabowski Laura Smith Josh Hauser Katie Stoughton Catherine Johnson Andy Tirro Rinya Kamber Bonnie Towne Sarah Min Taylor Yeracaris Zoe Peterson

Choral and Vocal Instructors Benjamin Allen, Senior Lecturer in Voice Thomas Bartsch, Collaborative Pianist in Voice Lawrence Burnett, Professor of Music and Choral Director/ Voice Studios Coordinator Rick Penning, Senior Lecturer in Voice Victoria Vargas, Instructor in Voice

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Teri Larson, Director of Music/Liturgy at the Basilica of Saint Mary Holly Streekstra, Performance Activities Coordinator at Carleton College Dann Hurlbert, Media and Design Specialist at Carleton College 101 CARLETON MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS

Music at Carleton presents

Spirituals, Hymns, & Gospel Music

A Joyful Noise

Lawrence Burnett, director

Vocalists Bethany Bobo, Brittany Deweaver, Danielle Lewis, Marcella Lees, Nathan Gibes, Andy Tirro, and Nathan Rowley

Guest Artists Robert Morris, piano and organ Jim Bierma P’02, Bass Trevor Haining, Percussion

Thursday, May 18, 2017 7:30 p.m., Music & Drama Center

102 PROGRAM

Medley of Hymns by African American Composers

Something Within Lucie Eddie Campbell | 1885–1963

We’ll Understand It Better By and By Charles Albert Tindley | 1851–1933

The Lord Will Make A Way Somehow Thomas Andrew Dorsey | 1899–1993

Robert Morris, piano

Walk Together, Children Traditional African American Spiritual arr. Anthony T. Leach | b. 1951

Ain’t Got Time to Die Words and Music by Francis Hall Johnson | 1888–1970

Nathan Rowley, soloist

Ain’t No Grave Can Hold My Body Down Traditional African American Spiritual arr. Dr. Ysaÿe M. Barnwell | b. 1946

Andy Tirro, soloist

I Got Shoes Traditional African American Spiritual adapted by Lawrence Burnett | b. 1951

Come Sunday Edward “Duke” Ellington | 1899–1974 from Black, Brown, & Beige transcribed by Lawrence Burnett

Bethany Bobo, soloist

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

103 PROGRAM

Lead Me, Guide Me Doris Mae Akers | 1922–1995

Lord, Keep My Day By Day Eddie Williams

We Are Our Heavenly Father’s Children Roberta Evelyn Martin | 1907–1969

Robert Morris, piano

Precious Lord, Take My Hand Thomas A. Dorsey | 1899–1993

Nathan Gibes, soloist

We’ve Come This Far By Faith Albert A. Goodson | 1933–2003

Oh Happy Day Phillip Doddridge | 1702–1751 arr. Edwin Hawkins | b. 1943

Brittany Deweaver, soloist

Give Me A Clean Heart Margaret Pleasant Douroux | b. 1941

Andy Tirro, soloist

I Don’t Feel No Ways Tired Traditional African American Spiritual arr. Rev. James Cleveland | 1931–1991

I’ll Stand Words and Music by Raymond Wise | b. 1962

Awesome Words and Music by Charles C. Jenkins | b. 1975

104 CARLETON MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS

Music at Carleton presents

Jazz Ensemble Concert featuring the Jazz Chamber Group

Laura Caviani, director

Sunday, November 6, 2016 3:00 p.m., Concert Hall

105 PROGRAM

Jazz Ensemble Dat Dere Bobby Timmons | 1935-1974 arr. by Erik Morales Adam Nijhawan, also sax Roland Montgomery, guitar

Cold Duck Time Eddie Harris |1934-1996 arr. by Mark Taylor Alli Domingues, trumpet Jordan Sybesma, trombone Aaron Young, trumpet Adela Mu, alto sax MacKenzie Smith, alto sax Russell Star-Lack, guitar

I Mean You Thelonious Monk | 1917-1982 arr. by Mike Tomaro Seth Bergstedt, trombone Caroline Glazer, piano

Better Get Hit In Your Soul Charles Mingus | 1922-1979 arr. by Carleton Jazz Ensemble Jonathan Foresander, bass trombone Seth Bergstedt, trombone Adam Nijhawan, alto sax

106 PROGRAM

Jazz Chamber Group Nica’s Dream Horace Silver | 1928-2014

Oleo Sonny Rollins | b. 1930

Jazz Ensemble

Soul Bossa Nova Quincy Jones | b. 1933 arr. by Rick Stitzel Jack Atkins, flute Anna Robinson, baritone sax

Theme from the Summer of ‘42 Michel Legrand | b. 1932 arr. by Tommy Newsom Adam Nijhawan, alto sax

Street Music Fred Sturm | 1951-2014 Jack Atkins, tenor sax Seth Bergstedt, trombone Russel Star-Lack, guitar Ben Greene, trumpet

107 JAZZ@CARLETON

Jazz Ensemble Jazz Chamber Group Alto Sax Bass Trombone Seth Bergstedt, trombone Adam Nijhawan Jonathan Foresander Ryan Lee, tenor sax MacKenzie Smith Patrick O’Reilly, guitar Piano Sara Wall, bass Tenor Sax Caroline Glazer Nater Osher, drums Jack Atkins Adela Mu Acoustic Bass Sara Wall Bari Sax Anna Robinson Electric Bass Travis Schilling, instructor Trumpet in electric and acoustic bass Ben Greene Alli Dominguez Drums Aaron Young Noah Robiner Oliver Wolyniec Jorge Banuelos Todd Johnson Trombone Seth Bergstedt Guitar Jordan Sybesma Roland Montgomery Tony Bouza Russell Star-Lack

BIOGRAPHY

Laura Caviani is a veteran of two decades of performing, recording and composing. Her recordings have received such praise as “stun- ningly fresh” from JazzTimes and “in a word, outstanding” from the Minneapolis Star Tribune. Recent commissions include diverse projects ranging from setting music to poetry to composing string quartets and choral works. She holds degrees from both Lawrence University and The University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. As a dedicated educator, she is on faculty at Carleton College, where she directs the jazz ensemble, coaches chamber groups, and teaches jazz piano. Please visit www.lauracaviani.com

108 CARLETON MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS

Music at Carleton presents

Carleton Jazz Ensemble Concert

featuring Jazz Workshop Ensemble

Laura Caviani, director

Sunday, February 26, 2017 3:00 p.m., Concert Hall

109 PROGRAM

Ascending Fred Sturm | 1951 - 2014 Jazz Ensemble, featuring Seth Bergstedt, Alli Domingues, Adela Mu, Todd Johnson and Caroline Glazer

Boplicity Miles Davis | 1926 - 1991 arr. Gil Evans | 1912 - 1988 Nonet, featuring Anna Robinson, Ben Greene, and Caroline Glazer

Move Denzil de Costa Best | 1917 - 1965 arr. John Lewis | 1920 - 2001 Nonet, featuring Ben Greene, Adam Nijhawan, and Jorge Banuelos

I’ll Run To You Kevin Olusola | b. 1988 Avi Kaplan | b. 1989 Jazz Workshop

Good Bait Tadd Dameron | 1917 - 1965 Count Basie | 1904 - 1984 Jazz Ensemble, featuring Adam Nijhawan, Roland Montgomery, Jonathan Forsander, Sara Wall, and Todd Johnson

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

110 PROGRAM

Come On, Come Over Jaco Pastorius | 1951 - 1987 Jazz Combo, featuring Caroline Glazer, Russell Star–Lack, Jared Kannel, and Jorge Banuelos

Down by the Riverside Spiritual arr. Laura Caviani Trombone and Rhythm Section, featuring Seth Bergstedt, Jordan Sybesma, Tony Bouza, Camden Sikes, and Jonathan Forsander

Circle Song Carleton Jazz Workshop Jazz Workshop

My Foolish Heart Victor Young | 1900 - 1956 Ned Washington | 1901 - 1976 arr. Bob Curnow | b. 1941 Jazz Ensemble, featuring Alli Domingues and the Trombone Section

Honk Jeff Jarvis | b. 1952 Jazz Ensemble, featuring Aaron Broege, Jordan Sybesma, Aaron Young, Anna Robinson, Jared Kannel, Jorge Banuelos, Russell Star–Lack, and Roland Montgomery

111 JAZZ@CARLETON

Saxophones Rhythm Section Adam Nijhawan, alto sax Caroline Glazer (piano) Aaron Broege, alto sax Jared Kannel (electric bass) Adela Mu, tenor sax Sara Wall (acoustic bass) Anna Robinson, bari sax Jorge Banuelos (drums) Todd Johnson (drums) Trumpets Roland Montgomery (guitar) Benjamin Greene Russell Star-Lack (guitar) Alli Domingues Aaron Young Jazz Workshop Oliver Wolyniec Henry Alexander Kelly Buck Ben Capp Seth Bergstedt Joey Caradimitropoulo Jordan Sybesma Eve Chesivoir Tony Bouza Anne Guttridge Camden Sikes Chris Lee Jonathan Forsander Emma Olsen-Dufour Max Pope Lucia Ray Anna Stubbs

BIOGRAPHY

Laura Caviani is a veteran of two decades of performing, recording, and composing. Her recordings have received such praise as “stun- ningly fresh” from JazzTimes and “in a word, outstanding” from the Minneapolis Star Tribune. Recent commissions include diverse projects ranging from setting music to poetry, to composing string quartets and choral works. She holds degrees from both Lawrence University and The University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. As a dedicated edu- cator, she is on faculty at Carleton College, where she directs the Jazz Ensemble, coaches chamber groups, and teaches jazz piano. Please visit www.lauracaviani.com

112 CARLETON MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS

Music at Carleton presents

Carleton Jazz Ensemble Spring Concert

Blues, Beatles and Boogaloo

Laura Caviani, director

featuring Matthew McCright, piano & Lucia Sarmiento, tenor saxophone

Sunday, May 21, 2017 3 p.m.| Concert Hall

113 PROGRAM

Suddenly It’s Spring Jimmy Van Heusen | 1913-1990 Johnny Burke | 1908-1964 arr. Lennie Niehaus

Lauren Azuma and Adela Mu

The Blues Story Gene Roland | 1921-1982

Roland Montgomery, Seth Bergstedt, Sara Wall, Mikkel Sawyer, Lucia Sarmiento

Children of Sanchez Chuck Mangione |b. 1940 arr. Victor Lopez

Seth Bergstedt, Lauren Azuma, Adam Nijhawan

Blackbird Paul McCartney | b. 1942 arr. Laura Caviani

Caroline Glazer and Matthew McCright

Lady Madonna | 1940-1980 Paul McCartney | b. 1942 arr. Carol Canning

Vocal Jazz Group

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

114 PROGRAM

Fool on the Hill John Lennon | 1940-1980 Paul McCartney | b. 1942 arr. Mac Huff

Vocal Jazz Group and Jazz Combo

Ekaya Abdullah Ibrahim | b. 1934 arr. Carleton Jazz Ensemble

Soloists to be announced from the stage

Corn Bread Lee Morgan | 1938-1972 arr. Mark Taylor

MacKenzie Smith, Russell Star-Lack, Adam Nijhawan, and Lucia Sarmiento

Boogaloo for Mary Lou Laura Caviani

Jared Kannel, Adam Nijhawan, Caroline Glazer, Anna Robinson, and Russell Star-Lack

Doctor Blues Peter Blair

Vocal Jazz Group, Jazz Ensemble, and selected soloists

115 JAZZ AT CARLETON

JAZZ ENSEMBLE JAZZ COMBO Adam Nijhawan, alto sax Jack Atkins, flute MacKenzie Smith, alto sax Ryan Lee, tenor sax Adelu Mu, tenor sax Mikkel Sawyer, trumpet Anna Robinson, bari sax Lauren Azuma, trumpet Mikkel Sawyer, trumpet Seth Bergstedt, trombone Lauren Azuma, trumpet Caroline Glazer, piano Aaron Young, trumpet Roland Montgomery, guitar Oliver Wolyniec, trumpet Sara Wall, bass Seth Bergstedt, trombone Todd Johnson, drums Jordan Sybesma, trombone Tony Bouza, trombone VOCAL JAZZ GROUP Camden Sikes, trombone Kelly Buck Jonathan Forsander, bass trombone Ben Capp Caroline Glazer, piano Anne Guttridge Sara Wall, acoustic bass Bennett Herson–Roeser Jared Kannel, electric bass Ellie Maltby Jorgé Banuelos, drums Emma Olsen–Dufour Todd Johnson, drums Max Pope Roland Montgomery, guitar Josh Ruebeck Russell Star–Lack, guitar GUEST ARTISTS Matthew McCright, piano Lucia Sarmiento, tenor sax BIOGRAPHY

Laura Caviani, Senior Lecturer in Jazz Piano and Director of the Jazz Ensemble, is a veteran of two decades of performing, recording, and composing. Her record- ings have received such praise as “stunningly fresh” from JazzTimes and “in a word, outstanding” from the Minneapolis Star Tribune. Recent commissions include diverse projects ranging from setting music to poetry, to composing string quartets and choral works. She holds degrees from both Lawrence University and The University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. Please visit www.lauracaviani.com

Matthew McCright, Lecturer in Piano, has performed extensively throughout the United States, Europe, Asia, and the South Pacific as piano soloist and chamber musician. A native of Pennsylvania, McCright now resides in Minneapolis, Minne- sota. An accomplished recording artist, McCright has released five solo recordings: three albums on innova Records (Second Childhood, A Waltz through the Vapor, and Blender), a 2011 release of the piano works of Gene Gutchë on Centaur Records and a 2015 release on Albany Records of the piano music of Olivier Mes- siaen. For more information please visit: www.matthewmccright.org 116 CARLETON MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS

Music at Carleton presents Carleton Orchestra Concert Hector Valdivia, director

Friday, November 11, 2016 8 p.m., Concert Hall

PROGRAM

The Hebrides Overture, op. 26 Felix Mendelssohn | 1809-1847

Jin Lee, conductor

Dances of Galanta Zoltán Kodály | 1882-1967

• INTERMISSION •

Symphony No. 1 in E Minor, op. 39 Jean Sibelius | 1865-1957 Andante - Allegro energico Andante Scherzo: Allegro Finale (quasi una fantasia)

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photogra- phy and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

117 CARLETON ORCHESTRA

Flute Harp Viola Molly Hildreth Sarah N. Burckle Sofia Rooks Sofia E. Serrano Patty Commins Jack Atkins Timpani Cecily N. Choy Stuart F. Yi Sanjay N. Chepuri Oboe Allegra R. Tashjian Evie Rosenberg Percussion Emma R. Duggan Anna M. Conley Matt Thill Saahithi S. Rao Alex Adamcyzk Noah v. Scheer Sylvie E. Stanback Violin 1 Sam Wiseman, concert- Cello Clarinet master Kelsey C. Qu Dawson H. d’Almeida Maddy Menard Matthew Pan Adriana Y. Smith Anton N. Sack Will R. Schwarzer Julie A. Bailard Camille M. Gordon Adam N. Klaits Jin Lee Roger Solie Bassoon Yang T. Chen Adela H. Mu Jessie Baskauf Bass Am Bovornvirakit Kate Hoeting Angel Villa Clara O. Livingston Nathaniel MacAr- Ana D. Knighten thur-Warner Paul J. Keller Ingrid K. Dai Elissa A. Koele Evan Wright Jacob Gunderson Violin 2 Trumpet Jenna Greene Caleb P. Rakestraw-Morn Geoffrey K. Mo Andrew L. Wheeler Soren E. Smallwood Katie Paasche Grace M. Pipes Amanda E. Crawford Trombone Jack E. Hardwick Peter C. Lindquist Alex Schneider Naseem Dilhan-Hasso Eli J. Inkelas Peter A. Sparks Bass Trombone Jenna K. Tom Jonathan D. Forsander Liralyn Smith Yihuan Wu

118 CARLETON MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS

Music at Carleton presents Carleton Orchestra Concert Hector Valdivia, director

Friday, March 3, 2017 8 p.m., Concert Hall

PROGRAM

Helios Overture, Op. 17 Carl Nielsen | 1865-1931

Lieutenant Kijé Suite, Op. 60 Sergei Prokofiev | 1891-1953 Birth of Kijé Romance Kijé’s Wedding Troika Kijé’s Burial • INTERMISSION •

Adagietto from Symphony No. 5 Gustav Mahler | 1860-1911

Symphonic Dances Leonard Bernstein | 1918-1990 from West Side Story Prologue (Allegro moderato) Somewhere (Adagio) Scherzo (Vivace e leggiero) Mambo (Meno Presto) Cha-cha (Andantino con grazia) Meeting Scene (Meno mosso) Cool Fugue (Allegretto) Rumble (Molto allegro) Finale (Adagio)

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photogra- phy and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

119 CARLETON ORCHESTRA

Flute Trumpet Violin 2 Molly Hildreth Caleb P. Rakestraw-Morn Jenna H. Greene Jack Atkins Andrew L. Wheeler Amanda E. Crawford Sofia E. Serrano Katie Paasche Grace M. Pipes Michelle L. Marinello Oboe Trombone William O. Decourt Anna M. Conley Peter C. Lindquist Alex Schneider Il Shan Ng Naseem Dilhan-Hasso Eli J. Inkelas Evie Rosenberg Peter A. Sparks Bass Trombone Jenna K. Tom Clarinet Jonathan D. Forsander Liralyn Smith Dawson H. d’Almeida Steven Wu Julie A. Bailard Tam T. Tieu Joshua D. Crotts Abby Jackson E flat Clarinet Ellen Perkins Harp Viola Sarah N. Burckle Sofia Rooks Bass Clarinet Patty Commins Isabel S. Storey Piano Cari Comnick Yuan Shen Li Sanjay N. Chepuri Alto Sax Cecily N. Choy Anna R. Viner Percussion Allegra R. Tashjian Stuart F. Yi Emma R. Duggan Tenor sax Saahithi S. Rao Adela Mu Violin 1 Sam Wiseman, concert- Cello Bassoon master Kelsey C. Qu Micah Nacht Anton N. Sack Matthew Pan Adela Mu Jin Lee Alice M. Anita Am Bovornvirakit Evan Wright Jonas T. Donnenfield Jessie Baskauf Will R. Schwarzer French Horn Ana D. Knighten Adam N. Klaits Paul J. Keller Soren E. Smallwood Roger Solie Elissa A. Koele Ingrid K. Dai Jacob Gunderson Martha E. Durrett Bass Tamara Scott Angel Villa Geoffrey K. Mo Connie Martin

120 CARLETON MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS

Music at Carleton presents

Carleton Orchestra Concert Hector Valdivia, director

Friday, May 26, 2017 8 p.m. | Concert Hall

PROGRAM

Overture to Candide (1956) Leonard Bernstein | 1918-1990

Quiet City (1941) Aaron Copland | 1900-1990

Evie Rosenberg, english horn Caleb Rakestraw-Morn, trumpet

Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Op. 18 (1900) I. Moderato Sergei Rachmaninoff | 1873-1943

Yuan Shen Li, piano

• Intermission •

Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95 (1893) I. Adagio - Allegro molto Antonín Dvořák | 1841-1904 II. Largo III. Scherzo IV. Allegro con fuoco

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

121 CARLETON ORCHESTRA Flute Tuba Viola Molly Hildreth Joshua D. Crotts Sofia Rooks Jack Atkins Patty Commins Sofia E. Serrano Percussion Cari Comnick Stuart F. Yi Sanjay N. Chepuri Oboe Cecily N. Choy Evie Rosenberg Harp Allegra K. Tashjian Anna M. Conley Sarah Burkle Sara Canilang Il Shan Ng Alex Adamczyk Violin I Cello Sam Wiseman Kelsey C. Qu Clarinet Camille M. Gordon Matthew Pan Dawson H. d’Almeida Anton N. Sack Alice M. Antia Julie A. Bailard Evan K. Wright Jonas T. Donnenfield Jin Lee Will R. Schwarzer Bassoon Yang T. Chen Adam N. Klaits Adela Mu Jessie Baskauf Lalangi Marasinghe Sandra Taylor Ingrid K. Dai Am Bovornvirakit Geoffrey K. Mo Bass Ana D. Knighten Angel Villa Horn Soren E. Smallwood Roger Solie Jacob Gunderson Tamara D. Scott Elissa A. Koele Clara O. Livingston Martha E. Durrett Trumpet Caleb P. Rakestraw-Morn Violin II Andrew L. Wheeler Jenna H. Greene Katie Paasche Amanda E. Crawford Grace M. Pipes Trombone William O. Decourt Peter C. Lindquist Jack E. Hardwick Naseem H. Dillman-Hasso Eli J. Inkelas Peter A. Sparks Bass Trombone Jenna K. Tom Jonathan D. Forsander Liralyn Smith Steven Wu Abby Jackson Tam T. Tieu

122 CARLETON MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS

Music at Carleton presents

Carleton Symphony Band Concert In Celebration of Carleton’s 150th Anniversary Music by Carleton Composers Ron Rodman, director

Friday, October 28, 2016 7:00 p.m., Concert Hall

123 PROGRAM

Officer of the Day Robert Browne Hall | 1858-1907

Cosmic Fantasies for Band Phillip Rhodes | b. 1940 I. The Fanfare of the Chaotic Good II. Darkness Falls on Saturn III. Dance of the Alien Creatures IV. The Cosmos of Chaotic Evil

Carleton John Meyers ’47

• PAUSE •

Symphony No. 1 in C Major, “Pagan” James Gillette | 1886-1963 I. Allegro II. Andantino III. Scherzo: vivace IV. Allegro moderato

March Carletoniana Ron Rodman | b. 1953

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

124 SYMPHONY BAND

Flute Bassoon Gabby Bierlein-De La Rosa Adela Mu Danielle Eisen Madeline Emmons Trumpet Michael Elizabeth Gasior Lauren Azuma Yoojin Kim Adam Bigelow Courtney Kimmell Katie Rose Parsons Danielle Lewis David Roizin Ketzel Levens Oliver Staten Andrew Wheeler Clarinet Eavan Donovan Horn Graham Hanchet Allen L. Smith Shelby Jones Jenny Portis Trombone Oscar Smith Erin Patrick Isabel Storey Bass Clarinet Tianna Avery Edward Malnar Cristian Hernandez Hannah Parrott Alice Hinzmann B.J. Ryan Sarah Steinke Jesse Gates Tuba Alto Saxophone Joshua Crotts Daniel Quintero Anna Viner Percussion Jin Kim Tenor Saxophone Kayle Spikes Ben Matson Adela Mu Piano Katie Rose Parsons

125 BIOGRAPHY

Ron Rodman is Dye Family Professor of Music, and Director of the Car- leton Symphony Band. In addition to research in band music at Carleton, he teaches in the low brass studio and courses in music theory and media studies. He is author of the books and articles on film and television music, and is currently working on a new edition of the Gillette symphonies for band. He is also founder and director of the North Star Cinema Orchestra, a theater orchestra that re-creates Vaudeville shows and accompanies early silent films from the early 1900s.

UPCOMING

Spirit of Nature: Music of China Saturday, November 29, 2016 8:00 pm, Concert Hall

Carleton Choir: Chants from Around the World and Through the Ages Saturday, November 5, 2016 7:00 p.m., Basilica of Saint Mary

Jazz Ensemble Sunday, November 6, 2016 3:00 p.m., Concert Hall

Carleton Orchestra Friday, November 11, 2016 8:00 p.m., Concert Hall

West African Drum Ensemble Tuesday, November 15, 2016 4:00 p.m., Great Hall - Sayles Hill

SPCO Concert Thursday, January 19, 2016 2:00 p.m., Concert Hall

126 CARLETON MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS

Music at Carleton presents

Carleton Symphony Band Music for the Shakespearian Theater

Ron Rodman, director

Friday, February 24, 2017 Saturday, February 25, 2017 7:00 p.m., Weitz Atrium

127 PROGRAM

Pieces to be performed will be selected from the following:

Celebration Overture (1984) Gordon Jacob |1895 - 1984

A Little Shakespeare Suite arr. Gordon Young | 1919 -1998 I. O Mistress Mine II. Come Live with Me, and Be My Love

Twelfth Night Alfred Reed | 1921 - 2005 (Music for Concert Band) I. Prelude Illyri II. Viola and Orsino V. A Double Wedding, and All’s Well

Satiric Dances Norman Dello Joio | 1913 - 2008 (after a Comedy by Aristophanes) I. Allegro Pesante II. Adagio Mesto III. Allegro Spumante

Music to Shakespeare in Love (1984) Stephen Warbeck | b. 1953

A Shakespeare Suite William Walton | 1902 - 1983 I. Fanfare II. Music Plays VI. Trumpets Sound

128 PERSONNEL

Flute Baritone Saxophone Gabby Bierlein-De La Rosa Alex Whitis Danielle Eisen Madeline Emmons Trumpet Michael Elizabeth Gasior Lauren Azuma Yoojin Kim Adam Bigelow Danielle Lewis David Roizin Oliver Staten E-flat Clarinet Andrew Wheeler Oscar Smith Horn B-flat Clarinet Seth Harris Eavan Donovan Allen L. Smith Graham Hanchet Jenny Portis Trombone Oscar Smith Erin Patrick Isabel Storey Euphonium Bass Clarinet Cristian Hernandez Edward Malnar Alice Hinzmann Hannah Parrott B.J. Ryan Sarah Steinke Contrabass Clarinet Jesse Gates Tuba Joshua Crotts Alto Saxophone Daniel Quintero Percussion Anna Viner Jin Kim

Tenor Saxophone Piano Ben Matson Michael Elizabeth Gasior

129 BIOGRAPHY

Ron Rodman is Dye Family Professor of Music, and Director of the Carleton Symphony Band. In addition to research in band music at Carleton, he teaches in the low brass studio and courses in music theory and media studies. He is author of books and articles on film and television music, and is currently working on a new edition of the Gillette symphonies for band. He is also founder and director of the North Star Cinema Orchestra, a theater orchestra that re-creates Vaudeville shows and accompanies early silent films from the early 1900s.

130 CARLETON MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS

Music at Carleton presents

Carleton Symphony Band

A Valedictory Concert

Ron Rodman, director

Friday, May 12, 2017 7:00 p.m., Concert Hall

131 PROGRAM

Königsmarsch Richard Strauss | 1864-1949

Janean Hall, organ

Serenade for Clarinet and Band John Edmondson | 1933-2016

Isabel Storey ’17, clarinet

Gabriel’s Trumpet Ennio Morricone | b. 1928

Lauren Azuma ’17, trumpet

Sonata da Chiesa Kees Schoonenbeek | b. 1947 I. Moderato, poco pesante e espressivo II. Variations on a Theme by Johann Pachelbel III. Moderato

Catherine Rodland, organ

• Intermission •

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

132 PROGRAM

Wedding March Jan Van der Roost | b. 1956

Robert Henstein, organ

“Love Theme” from Cinema Paradiso Ennio Morricone | b. 1928

Gabby Bierlein-De La Rosa ’17, flute

Finale from Symphony No. 9 Antonin Dvořák | 1841-1904 (“From the New World”)

Benediction John Stevens | b. 1951

Erin Patrick ’17, trombone

133 PERSONNEL

Flute Trumpet Gabby Bierlein-De La Rosa Lauren Azuma Danielle Eisen Adam Bigelow Madeline Emmons David Roizin Michael Elizabeth Gasior Oliver Staten Yoojin Kim Andrew Wheeler Danielle Lewis Horn Oboe Allen L. Smith Sylvie Stanback Trombone B-flat Clarinet Erin Patrick Eavan Donovan Graham Hanchet Euphonium Jenny Portis Cristian Hernandez Janet Scannell Alice Hinzmann Isabel Storey B.J. Ryan Sarah Steinke Bass Clarinet Edward Malnar Tuba Hannah Parrott Joshua Crotts

Contrabass Clarinet Percussion Jesse Gates David Miller

Alto Saxophone Piano Alina Maki Michael Elizabeth Gasior Daniel Quintero Anna Viner

Tenor Saxophone Alex Whitis

134 BIOGRAPHY

Ron Rodman is the Dye Family Professor of Music, and Director of the Carleton Symphony Band. In addition to research in band music at Carleton, he teaches in the low brass studio and offers courses in music theory and media studies. He is the author of books and articles on film and television music, and is currently working on a new edition of the Gillette symphonies for band. He is also the founder and director of the North Star Cinema Orchestra, a theater orchestra that re-creates Vaudeville shows and accompanies silent films from the early 1900s.

Catherine Rodland, whose playing has been described as “transcendent” (The American Organist), is an Artist in Residence at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota. She graduated cum laude with departmental distinction in organ performance from St. Olaf in 1987 and received both the MM and DMA from the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, NY where she was a student of Russell Saunders. At Eastman, Catherine received the prestigious Performer’s Certificate and the Ann Anway Award for excellence in organ performance. She is a prizewinner in several competitions including the 1994 and 1998 American Guild of Organists Young Artists Competition, the 1994 Calgary International Organ Competition, and the 1988 International Organ Competi- tion at the University of Michigan for which she received first prize. Catherine has concertized extensively throughout the United States and Canada, and has been featured often on the syndicated radio program “Pipedreams” on Nation- al Public Radio.

At St. Olaf College Catherine teaches a full studio of organ students as well as music theory and ear training classes. She performs regularly at St. Olaf, dedicating the Holtkamp organ in Boe Memorial Chapel in 2007, and performs as a featured soloist with the St. Olaf Orchestra and the St. Olaf Band. These performances were all recorded and released as CDs through St. Olaf Records. Currently Catherine is presenting a series of recitals featuring the complete organ symphonies of Louis Vierne, after having spent a recent sabbatical leave researching organs in Paris. In 2010 she released two CDs: “Dedication” on the newly installed Nichols and Simpson Organ at West Side Presbyterian Church in Ridgewood, NJ and “American Weavings,” recorded in Boe Chapel at St. Olaf College with violist and duo partner Carol Rodland, released by Crystal Records. The Rodland Duo is currently part of the Concert Artists Coopera- tive, and was featured at both the American Guild of Organists national con- vention in Houston, Texas, and the American Viola Congress in Oberlin, Ohio during the spring of 2016.

135 BIOGRAPHY

Janean Hall (Enid and Henry Woodward College Organist, and Sr. Lecturer of Organ and Harpsichord) received a B.S. in education and a B.A. in music from Concordia University, Nebraska in 1977. Her areas of study are organ performance and harpsichord performance with principal teachers Charles Ore and Paul Manz. Janean has 40 years of experience as head organist at various churches (Bethlehem Lutheran, Morristown, Trinity Lutheran, Northfield, and currently Trinity Lutheran, Owatonna). A member of the American Guild of Organists, Janean has performed in recitals from the Twin Cities to , as well as Bach festivals and harpsichord workshops. This is her twenty-third year at Carleton College serving as organist for official convocations, per- forming with a baroque trio, and playing for college chapel services, memorial services, and weddings. She teaches the Minnesota Music Listening Class for Waseca High School, in addition to serving as a judge for the Southern region.

Bob Henstein has been involved in church music for many years. He has served as a church musician for numerous congregations including Lutheran, Methodist, Catholic, Baptist, and Congregational. He received his undergradu- ate degree in organ performance from Concordia College, Moorhead, MN. He went on to study with John Ferguson and Larry Smith at Kent State University at the master’s level. He has also studied organ with other prominent musi- cians, such as Paul Manz, Ruth Berge, Arthur Poister, Roberta Gary and Robert Quade. Currently, Bob is the organist at Northfield United Methodist Church. Bob has conducted hymn festivals in Minnesota, South Dakota, and New York State, and has performed concerts in Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Great Britain. He has composed music for several mediums including organ, choir, strings, brass, handbells, and solo vocal works. He is currently employed at the 3M Company in St. Paul, where he works as a corporate global training and development specialist.

136 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS

Music at Carleton presents

Piano Studios Recital Students from the studios of Loren Fishman, Matthew McCright, and Nicola Melville

Wednesday, November 9, 2016 7:00 p.m., Concert Hall

PROGRAM

Prelude in C-sharp minor, Op. 3, No. 2 Sergei Rachmaninoff Matt Thibodeau

Intermezzo in A major, Op. 118, No. 2 Johannes Brahms Ned Wang

Mephisto Waltz No. 1 Franz Liszt Yuan Shen Li

From Pictures at an Exhibition Modest Mussorgsky Promenade Gnomus Promenade Tuileries David Byun

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

137 PROGRAM

Prelude from “Suite Bergamasque” Claude Debussy Caroline Hall

Epilogo: Serenata del espectro from Goyescas Enrique Granados Caroline Glazer

Sonata No. 8 in C minor, Op. 13, “Pathétique” Ludwig van Beethoven I. Grave – Allegro di molto e con brio Will Schwarzer

“Vanished Days” from Lyric Pieces, Op. 57, No. 1 Edvard Grieg Sacha Greenfield

From Pictures at an Exhibition Modest Mussorgsky Promenade Ballet of Unhatched Chicks in Their Shells Baba Yaga The Great Gate of Kiev Sam Wiseman

Prelude and Fugue in C major, Op. 87, No. 1 Dmitri Shostakovich Joe Lowry

Hungarian Rhapsody No. 6 in D-flat major Franz Liszt Charlie Broadbent

138 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS

Music at Carleton presents

Piano Studios Recital Students from the studios of Nikki Melville, Matt McCright, and Marcia Widman

Wednesday, March 1, 2017 7:00 p.m., Concert Hall

PROGRAM

Partita No. 2 in C minor, BWV 826 J.S. Bach I. Sinfonia Sam Wiseman

Rhapsody in G minor, Op. 79 No. 2 Johannes Brahms Shayna Gleason

Waltz Op. 12 No. 2 Edvard Grieg Marietta Geist

Fantaisie in F minor, Op. 49 Frédéric Chopin Will Schwarzer

Nocturne Samuel Barber Caroline Glazer

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

139 PROGRAM

Metamorphosis #3 Philip Glass Mo Hicks

Sonata in F major, Hob. XVI:23 Josef Haydn I. Allegro moderato David Byun

Intermezzo in A major, Op. 118 No. 2 Johannes Brahms Ann Sheng

Sonata No. 23 in F minor, Op. 57 “Appassionata” Ludwig van Beethoven I. Allegro assai Junyi Min

Etude in G-flat major, Op. 10 No. 5 “Black Key” Frédéric Chopin Ian Seong

Scherzo No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 31 Frédéric Chopin Lucy Wu

Andante and Rondo Capriccioso, Op. 14 Felix Mendelssohn Jessie Baskauf

140 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS

Music at Carleton presents Piano Studio Recital Students from the studios of Nikki Melville, Matt McCright, and Loren Fishman

Wednesday, May 24, 2017 7:00 p.m. | Concert Hall

PROGRAM

Transcendental Étude No. 10 in F minor Franz Liszt Yuan Shen Li

Étude in G-flat major, Op. 25, No. 9 (“Butterfly”) Frédéric Chopin Junyi Min

Sonata No. 17 in D minor, Op. 31, No. 2 Ludwig van Beethoven III. Allegretto Cameron Meikle

Fantasiestücke, Op. 12, No. 4 “Grillen” Robert Schumann Clara Hesler

Hungarian Rhapsody No. 6 in D-flat major Franz Liszt Caroline Hall

Concerto No. 5 in E-flat major, Op. 73 (“Emperor”) I. Allegro Ludwig van Beethoven Jim Zhang As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated. 141 PROGRAM

Nocturnes Claude Debussy Jin Kim

Rhapsody in G minor, Op. 79, No. 2 Johannes Brahms Ned Wang

Six Moments Musicaux, Op. 16, No. 4 in E minor Sergei Rachmaninoff Lucy Wu

Lieder Ohne Worte, Op. 30, No. 6 (“Venetian Boat Song”) Felix Mendelssohn Kallinikos Chalvatzis

Ballade in G minor, Op. 118, No. 3 Johannes Brahms David Byun

Jeux d’eau Maurice Ravel Charlie Broadbent

Sonata No. 10 in G major, Op. 14, No. 2 Ludwig van Beethoven I. Allegro Sacha Greenfield

Piano Concerto in A minor Robert Schumann I. Allegro affettuoso Maddie Freyberg

Fantasie in C major, Op. 17 Robert Schumann III. Langsam getragen. Durchweg leise zu halten. Will Schwarzer

142 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS

Music at Carleton Student Chamber Music Recital

Sunday, November 13, 2016 2:00 p.m., Concert Hall

PROGRAM

One Green Dolphin Street Bronislaw Kaper Strasbourg-St. Denis Roy Hargrove Adam Nijhawan, alto saxophone Aman Panda, guitar Rohan Mukherjee, piano Alex Aeppli, bass Andrew Biehl, drums

Silver Bells Ashokan Farewell Jay Unger Cat in the Corner Traditional Irish Annie Foxen, violin Elizabeth Grubb, violin Angel Villa, bass

Red Clay Mercy, Mercy, Mercy Joe Zawinul Charlie Broadbent, tenor saxophone Henry Pearson, tenor saxophone Max Rohdes, guitar Jared Kannel, bass Kayle Spikes, drums

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

143 PROGRAM

Fairfield, CT Charles Lutvak Charles Lutvak, guitar

Trio Sonata in G major, BWV 1039 J.S. Bach I. Adagio (arr. Manfred Harras) II. Allegro ma non presto Julia Braulick, recorder Ben Drake, flute Will Schwarzer, piano

Sen Ji De Ma Mongolian Folk Song Emma Grisanzio, Chinese cello Graham Hanchet, clarinet Molly Hildreth, flute Jin Lee, violin Yuan Shen Li, piano Vicky Wu, guzheng

Oleo Sonny Rollins Nica’s Dream Horace Silver Patrick O’Reilly, guitar Ryan Lee, tenor saxophone Seth Bergstedt, trombone Sara Wall, bass Nate Osher, drums

FACULTY COACHES

Laura Caviani, Senior Lecturer in Jazz Piano; Director of the Carleton Jazz Ensemble; Coordinator of Jazz Area Zacc Harris, Instructor in Jazz and Blues Guitar Gao Hong, Senior Lecturer in Chinese Musical Instruments; Director of the Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble Martha Jamsa, Senior Lecturer in Flute Greg Keel, Instructor in Saxophone Mark Kreitzer, Lecturer in Guitar and American Folk Instruments

144 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS Music at Carleton Student Chamber Music Recital I

Wednesday, March 1, 2017 4:30 p.m., Concert Hall

PROGRAM

The Trajectory of a Thursday Andy Tirro I. Moderato, “Turn-Over” II. Agitato, “Groove” III. Placido, “Mawkish”

Jack Atkins, flute Janet Scannell, clarinet Yang Chen, violin Chris Shoemaker, cello Connie Martin, double bass Szu-Ling Wu, piano

Pigeons Sebastián Iradier

Libertango Astor Piazzolla

Global Music Ensemble: Jin Lee, violin Graham Hanchet, clarinet Emma Grisanzio, cello Moliang Jiang, piano Alexa Feeney, guitar Shatian Wang, guzheng Benjamin Lee, erhu

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated. 145 PROGRAM

A Jade Tree’s Rear-Court Blossom Tang Dynasty lyrics by Chen Houzhu Luoyang Spring Song Dynasty lyrics by Ouyang Xiu

Tang Song Ensemble: Gus Holley, zhongruan and xiaoruan Gege Zhang, guqin Yuheng (Kitty) Miao, xiao Yue Wu, voice, , zhongruan Amanda Yue Jin, voice, yunluo

FACULTY COACHES

Gao Hong, Senior Lecturer in Chinese Musical Instruments; Director of the Carleton Chinese Music Ensemble

Hector Valdivia, Professor of Music and S. Eugene Bailey Director of the Carleton Orchestra

146 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS Music at Carleton Student Chamber Music Recital II

Sunday, March 5, 2017 2:00 p.m., Concert Hall

PROGRAM

Clarinet Quintet in D Major, Op. 8 No. 1 Carl Philipp Stamitz

Bomi Johnson, flute Evie Rosenberg, oboe Micah Nacht, bassoon Paul Keller, french horn

6x4, Mvt. IV Alec Wilder Horn Quartet No. 1, Mvt. II Wayne Lu La Chasse Nikolai Tschérépnine

Hannah Gellman Seth Harris Jonathan Dahlsten Allen Smith

Home No More To Me: A Wanderer’s Journey Yang Chen I. Home No More To Me II. Fire and Windows Bright III. Come Again No More

Yang Chen, violin Claire Trujillo, cello Molly Hildreth, flute As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated. 147 PROGRAM

String Quartet No. 7 in F Major, Op. 59 No. 1 Ludwig van Beethoven I. Allegro

Jin Lee, violin Max Trostel, violin Michelle Marinello, viola Alice Antia, cello

A Gaelic Offering Catherine McMichael I. Rose Cottage II. The Doubtful Wife III. Lake Solace IV. Describe a Circle

Molly Hildreth, flute Margriet VanDerwerker, flute Kaylin Steinberg, flute Ben Drake, flute

FACULTY COACHES

Gwen Anderson, Senior Lecturer in French Horn

Liz Ericksen, Senior Lecturer in Violin and Viola

Martha Jamsa, Senior Lecturer in Flute

Tom Rosenberg, Senior Lecturer in Cello

148 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS

Music at Carleton presents Student Chamber Music Recital Students from the studios of Gwen Anderson, Liz Ericksen, Loren Fishman, Martha Jamsa, Jay Johnson, Tom Rosenberg, and Hector Valdivia

Sunday, May 28, 2017 2 p.m. | Concert Hall

PROGRAM

Trois Pièces Brèves Jacques Ibert | 1890-1962 I. Allegro II. Andante III. Assez lent, allegro scherzando

Pied Pipers Wind Quintet: Bomi Johnson, flute Evie Rosenberg, oboe Micah Nacht, bassoon Madeline Topf, clarinet Gwen Anderson, french horn

String Quartet No. 10 in E-flat Major, Op. 51 I. Allegro ma non troppo Antonín Dvořák | 1841-1904

Jin Lee, violin Max Trostel, violin Sophie Rooks, viola Alice Antia, cello

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

149 PROGRAM

Palo Traditional arr. Carleton Afro-Cuban Ensemble

Georgia Schmitt: clave, guataca, guagua Caroline Glazer: cachimbo, mula Abby Polk: caja

Flute Trio, Op. 13, No. 1 Friedrich Kuhlau | 1786-1832 II. Andante quasi adagio III. Rondo

Molly Hildreth, flute Jack Atkins, flute Margriet VanDerwerker, flute

Piano Quartet in E-flat, Op. 47 Robert Schumann | 1810-1856 III. Andante cantabile

Jin Lee, violin Cecily Choy, viola Matthew Pan, cello Nayon Park, piano

Piano Quartet No. 3 in C Minor, Op. 60 I. Allegro non troppo Johannes Brahms | 1833-1897

Anton Sack, violin Shunyo Morgan, viola Connor Webber, cello Will Schwarzer, piano

Piano Trio in G Minor, Op. 15 Bedřich Smetana | 1824-1884 III. Presto

Sam Wiseman, violin Kelsey Qu, cello Yuan Shen Li, piano

150 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS

Music at Carleton presents

Jazz Chamber Recital

Jazz chamber groups under the direction of Zacc Harris, Laura Caviani, and Greg Keel

Tuesday, March 7, 2017 6:00 p.m., Concert Hall

151 PROGRAM

Killer Joe Benny Golson | b. 1929

Chameleon | b. 1940

Isn’t It Romantic Richard Rodgers | 1902-1979

The Preacher Horace Silver | 1928-2014

Henry Pearson, saxophone Charlie Broadment, saxophone Max Rohde, guitar Jared Kannel, bass Kayle Spikes, drums

Sandu Clifford Brown | 1930-1956

Tangerine Victor Schertzinger | 1888-1941

Solar Miles Davis | 1926-1991

Mr. Clean Freddie Hubbard | 1938-2008

David Goodell, saxophone Solomon Foster, trumpet Aman Panda, guitar Sam Bacon, bass Noah Robiner, drums

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

152 PROGRAM

Bag’s Groove Milt Jackson | 1923-1999 arr. Patrick O’ Reilly

Armando’s Rhumba | b. 1941

Ryan Lee, tenor saxophone Seth Bergstedt, trombone Patrick O’Reilly, guitar Sara Wall, bass Nate Osher, drums

Ladybird Tadd Dameron| 1917-1965

In a Sentimental Mood Duke Ellington | 1899-1974

Dexterity Charlie Parker | 1920-1955

The South of Everywhere Jonathan Kreisberg | b. 1972

Adam Nijhawan, alto saxophone Aman Panda, guitar Rohan Mukherjee, piano Alex Aeppli, bass Andrew Biehl, drums

153 BIOGRAPHY

Laura Caviani is a veteran of two decades of performing, recording, and composing. Her recordings have received such praise as “stun- ningly fresh” from JazzTimes and “in a word, outstanding” from the Minneapolis Star Tribune. Recent commissions include diverse projects ranging from setting music to poetry, to composing string quartets and choral works. She holds degrees from both Lawrence University and The University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. As a dedicated edu- cator, she is on faculty at Carleton College, where she directs the Jazz Ensemble, coaches chamber groups, and teaches jazz piano. Please visit www.lauracaviani.com

Zacc Harris is a guitarist and composer who has been a central fig- ure in the twin cities jazz scene since moving to Minneapolis in 2005. He co-leads Atlantis Quartet, winners of the 2015 McKnight Fel- lowship for Performing Artists and City Pages’ 2011 Best Jazz Artist, and is involved in numerous other projects. In 2012, he released The Garden on Shifting Paradigm Records, his debut album as leader, with Zacc Harris Group.

Greg Keel studied with Ruben Haugen, Harry Miedema, Brian Griv- na and William Grahn, and has been a participant at many master- class workshops with Dr. Eugene Rousseau since 1975. He attended the University of Wisconsin at Eau Claire, Madison, and holds the Bachelor of Arts degree from Concordia College in St. Paul. Greg is also on the faculty at MacPhail Center for Music, Hamline University, Century College, the Shell Lake Arts Center, and is an artist/clinician for Selmer Saxophones. Greg has performed with the Minnesota Orchestra, Aretha Franklin, Mel Torme, The Temptations, Andy Wil- liams, The O’Jays, Lou Rawls, Frankie Valli, Johnny Mathis, Natalie Cole, The 5th Dimension and Bob Hope. His students have received numerous recognitions from MMEA and DownBeat magazine, with outstanding soloist winners in their annual Student Music Awards.

154 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS

Music at Carleton presents

Jazz Chamber Recital, Jazz Workshop, and Jazz Juries Students from the studios of Laura Caviani, Zacc Harris, and Greg Keel

Wednesday, May 24, 2017 7 p.m. | Music and Drama Gallery

155 PROGRAM

Kayle & The Spikes Greg Keel, director

Stop-Time Blues Jamey Aebersold | b. 1939 Just Friends John Klenner |1899-1955 Pick Up The Pieces Average White Band

Kayle Spikes ’20, drumset Jared Kannel ’20, bass Henry Pearson ’20, saxophone Max Rohde ’17, guitar Charlie Broadbent ’20, saxophone

Chamber Group Laura Caviani, director

Straight No Chaser Thelonious Monk | 1917-1982 Body and Soul Johnny Green | 1908-1989 “Song of Life” Fred Hersch | b. 1955

Caroline Glazer ’17, piano * Russell Star-Lack ’20, guitar Joey Castaneda ’20, electric bass Jorgé Banuelos ’20, drums Emma Olsen-Dufour ’20, vocals

* Juried piece is performed with chamber group

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

156 PROGRAM

The Bacon Strips Zacc Harris, director

A Night In Dizzy Gillespie | 1917-1993 Footprints Wayne Shorter | b. 1933 Detroit Marcus Miller | b. 1959

David Goodell ’18, tenor saxophone Solomon Foster ’18, trumpet Aman Panda ’18, guitar * Sam Bacon ’17, bass Noah Robiner ’19, drums

Chamber Group Laura Caviani, director

Black Narcissus | 1937-2001 Fall Wayne Shorter | b. 1933 Sweet Georgia Brown Ben Bernie | 1891-1943 Maceo Pinkard | 1897-1962

Ryan Lee ’19, tenor sax Mikkel Sawyer ’20, trumpet Seth Bergstedt ’20, trombone Patrick O’Reilly ’17, guitar * Sara Wall ’19, acoustic bass Todd Johnson ’20, drums

* Juried piece is performed with chamber group

157 PROGRAM

Panda Mania Zacc Harris, director

Relaxing At Camarillo Charlie Parker | 1920-1955 My Favorite Things Richard Rodgers | 1902-1979 Softly As a Morning Sunrise Sigmund Romberg | 1887-1951 arr. Zacc Harris

Adam Nijhawan ’19, alto sax Rohan Mukherjee ’19, piano * Alex Aeppli ’18, bass Andrew Biehl ’19, drums Aman Panda ’18, guitar *

Vocal Jazz Group Laura Caviani, director

“And So It Goes” Billy Joel | b. 1949 “Lady Madonna” Paul McCartney | b. 1942 John Lennon | 1940-1980 arr. Carol Canning

Kelly Buck ’20 Ben Capp ’20 Anne Guttridge ’18 Bennett Herson-Roeser ’18 Ellie Maltby ’20 Emma Olsen-Dufour ’20 Max Pope ’20 Josh Ruebeck ’17

* Juried piece is performed with chamber group

158 PROGRAM

Jazz Workshop Laura Caviani, director

Black Orpheus Luiz Bonfá | 1922-2001 “Take The A Train” Billy Strayhorn | 1915-1967

Anne Guttridge ’18, vocals Taylor Yeracaris ’20, piano * Rohan Mukherjee ’19, piano Bobby Volpendesta ’17, guitar Aditya Vaze ’18, electric bass Joey Castaneda ’20, electric bass Jorgé Banuelos ’20, drums

* Juried piece is performed with chamber group

Juried Students Zacc Harris and Laura Caviani, directors

Fly Me To The Moon Frank Sinatra | 1915-1998 Saki Amagai ’18, piano

Recorda-Me Joe Henderson | 1937-2001 Max Mattesich ’18, guitar

Girl From Ipanema Antonio Carlos Jobim | 1927-1994 Ammar Babar ’18, guitar

Donna Lee Charlie Parker | 1920-1955 Bobby Volpendesta ’17, guitar Russell Star-Lack ’20, guitar

159 PROGRAM

Blue Bossa | 1924-1972 Hiroshi Nakajima ’18, guitar

Billie’s Bounce Charlie Parker | 1920-1955 Malekai Mischke ’18, guitar

Resonance Cascades Patrick O’Reilly Patrick O’Reilly ’17, guitar

BIOGRAPHY

Laura Caviani is a veteran of two decades of performing, recording, and composing. Her recordings have received such praise as “stun- ningly fresh” from JazzTimes and “in a word, outstanding” from the Minneapolis Star Tribune. Recent commissions include diverse projects ranging from setting music to poetry, to composing string quartets and choral works. She holds degrees from both Lawrence University and The University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. As a dedicated edu- cator, she is on faculty at Carleton College, where she directs the Jazz Ensemble, coaches chamber groups, and teaches jazz piano. Please visit www.lauracaviani.com

Zacc Harris is a guitarist and composer who has been a central fig- ure in the twin cities jazz scene since moving to Minneapolis in 2005. He co-leads Atlantis Quartet, winners of the 2015 McKnight Fel- lowship for Performing Artists and City Pages’ 2011 Best Jazz Artist, and is involved in numerous other projects. In 2012, he released The Garden on Shifting Paradigm Records, his debut album as leader, with Zacc Harris Group.

160 BIOGRAPHY

Greg Keel studied with Ruben Haugen, Harry Miedema, Brian Griv- na and William Grahn, and has been a participant at many master- class workshops with Dr. Eugene Rousseau since 1975. He attended the University of Wisconsin at Eau Claire, Madison, and holds the Bachelor of Arts degree from Concordia College in St. Paul. Greg is also on the faculty at MacPhail Center for Music, Hamline University, Century College, the Shell Lake Arts Center, and is an artist/clinician for Selmer Saxophones. Greg has performed with the Minnesota Orchestra, Aretha Franklin, Mel Torme, The Temptations, Andy Wil- liams, The O’Jays, Lou Rawls, Frankie Valli, Johnny Mathis, Natalie Cole, The 5th Dimension and Bob Hope. His students have received numerous recognitions from MMEA and DownBeat magazine, with outstanding soloist winners in their annual Student Music Awards.

Upcoming Events

Orchestra Concert Friday, May 26th, 2017 8:00 p.m., Concert Hall

West African Drum Ensemble Concert Tuesday, May 30th, 2017 12:15 p.m., Bald Spot

Issam Rafea and Carleton’s Middle Eastern Music Ensemble Tuesday, May 30th, 2017 7:00 p.m., Concert Hall

161 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS Music at Carleton Violin/Viola Recital I

Hector Valdivia, Liz Ericksen, Susan Crawford, and Mary Horozaniecki, instructors Szu-ling Wu, piano

Monday, November 14, 2016 4:30 p.m., Music Hall 103

PROGRAM

Twinkle Variation A & Theme Suzuki Celeste Gaughan, violin

Allegro from Concerto Vivaldi Shatian Wang, violin

Gigue Veracini Kate Higgens, viola

Allegro Brilliant Ten Have Danae Bowen, violin

Concerto, mvmt. 1 Vivaldi Warren Situ, violin

Romance in F Beethoven Soren Smallwood, violin

Allegro from Sonata 1 Beethoven Geoffrey Mo, violin

Concerto, mvmt. 1 Mendelssohn Ana Knighten, violin 162 Sonata, mvmts. 1 & 2 Marcello Jackie Tyson, viola

Andante from Concerto Stamitz Sara Canilang, viola

Allegro from Concerto Kabalevsky Anny Lei, violin

Allemande from Partita Bach Max Trostel, violin

163 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS Music at Carleton Violin/Viola Recital II

Hector Valdivia, Liz Ericksen, and Mary Horozaniecki, instructors Szu-ling Wu, piano

Wednesday, November 16, 2016 3:00 p.m., Music Hall 103

PROGRAM

Concerto in D, mvmt. 1 Mozart Jack Hardwick, violin

Allegretto Schumann La Preccieuse Kreisler Clara Livingston, violin

Allegro from Concerto in C major Haydn Eli Inkelas, violin

Andante from Concerto Mendelssohn Yang Chen, violin

Allegro Brillante Ten Have Ingrid Dai, violin

Arpeggione Sonata Schubert Patty Commins, viola

Allegro from Sonata 1 Brahms Anton Sack, violin

Poeme Chausson Sam Wiseman, violin 164 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS Music at Carleton Violin/Viola Recital

Hector Valdivia, Liz Ericksen, Susan Crawford, and Mary Horozaniecki, instructors Szu-ling Wu, piano

Wednesday, March 8, 2017 3:00 p.m., Concert Hall

PROGRAM

Go Tell Aunt Rhody Jean-Jacques Rousseau | 1712 - 1778 Celeste Gaughan, violin

Concerto No. 2, mvmt 3 Fritz Seitz | 1848 - 1918 Megan Zhao, violin

Suite #1, Gigue Johann Sebastian Bach | 1685 - 1750 Kate Higgens, viola

Minuet in G Ludwig van Beethoven | 1770 - 1827 Will Thompson, violin

Sonata Henry Eccles | 1670 - 1742 Danae Bowen, violin

Romance in F Major Ludwig van Beethoven | 1770 - 1827 Maximillian Trostel, violin

Elegy for Viola and Piano Alexander Glazunov | 1865 - 1936 Sara Canilang, viola

Concerto, mvmt 1 Dmitry Kabalevsky | 1904 - 1987 Anny Lei, violin

165 PROGRAM

4 Duos Béla Bartók | 1881-1945 Yang Chen and Woo Jin Lee,

Concerto, mvmt 1 Felix Mendelssohn | 1809 - 1847 Ana Knighten, violin

Concerto, mvmt 1 Dmitry Kabalevsky | 1904 - 1987 Ingrid Dai, violin

Sonata in D, mvmts 1-2 George Frideric Handel |1685 - 1759 Soren Smallwood, violin

Concerto in a, mvmt 1 Johann Sebastian Bach |1685 - 1750 Geoffrey Mo, violin

Concerto, mvmt 1 William Walton | 1902 - 1983 Patty Commins, viola

Sonata No 2, mvmt 1 Sergei Prokofiev | 1891 - 1953 Jin Lee, violin

Sonata No 1, mvmt 1 Johannes Brahms | 1833 - 1897 Anton Sack, violin

Concerto, mvmt 1 Pyotr Llyich Tchaikovsky | 1840 - 1893 Lana Sunamara, violin

Concerto, mvmt 1 Ludiwg van Beethoven | 1770 - 1827 Sam Wiseman, violin

166 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS

Music at Carleton presents

Violin & Viola Studio Recital Students from the studios of Hector Valdivia, Elizabeth Ericksen, Mary Horozaniecki, and Susan Crawford

accomp. Szu-ling Wu, piano

Monday, May 29, 2017 3:00 p.m. | Concert Hall

167 PROGRAM

Allegro Shinichi Suzuki | 1898-1998

Kallinikos Chalvatzis, violin

Concerto No. 5 in D Major, Op. 22 Fritz Seitz | 1848-1918 I. Allegro moderato

Megan Zhao, violin

Two selections from Five Old French Dances L’Agreable Marin Marais | 1656-1728 Le Basque Kate Higgins, viola

Melodie from Orfeo ed Euridice Christoph Willibald Gluck | 1714- 1787

Danae Bowen, violin

Märchenbilder, Op. 113 Robert Schumann | 1810-1856 I. Nicht schnell (D Minor)

Sara Canilang, viola

Scène de Ballet (partial), Op. 100 Charles Ausguste de Bériot | 1802-1870

Tamara Scott, violin

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

168 PROGRAM

Excerpt from The Butterfly Lovers Violin Concerto Chen Gang | b. 1935 He Zhanhao | b. 1933 Yang Chen, violin

Chaconne in G Minor Tomaso Vitali | 1663-1745 Melodie from Orpheo ed Euridice Christoph Willibald Gluck | 1714-1787

Clara Livingston, violin

Concerto No. 1 in E Major, Op. 8, “Spring” from The Four Seasons I. Allegro Antonio Vivaldi | 1663-1745

Alleana Austin, violin

Violin Concerto No. 1 in G Minor, Op. 26 Max Bruch | 1838-1920 I. Vorspiel: Allegro moderato

Jack Hardwick, violin

Violin Sonata No. 5, Op. 24 (“Spring Sonata”) I. Allegro Ludwig Van Beethoven | 1770-1827

William Decourt

Violin Concerto in E Minor, Op. 64 Felix Mendelssohn | 1809-1847 I. Allegro molto appassionato (E Minor)

Ana Knighten, violin

Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 35 Pyotr Tchaikovsky| 1840-1893 II. Canzonetta: Andante (G Minor) Soren Smallwood, violin

169 PROGRAM

The Lark Ascending Ralph Vaughan Williams | 1872-1958

Ingrid Dai, violin

Violin Concerto in A Minor Johann Sebastian Bach | 1685-1750 II. Andante

Geoffrey Mo, violin

Violin Sonata No. 2 in D Major Sergey Prokofiev | 1891-1953 VI. Allegro con brio

Jin Lee, violin

Symphonie espagnole in D Minor, Op. 21 Édouard Lalo | 1823-1892 I. Allegro non troppo

Evan Wright, violin

Viola Concerto William Walton | 1902-1983 II. Vivo, con moto preciso

Patty Commins, viola

Violin Concerto in D Minor, Op. 47 Jean Sibelius | 1865-1957 I. Allegro moderato

Anton Sack, violin

Violin Sonata No. 3, Op. 108 Johannes Brahms | 1833-1897 I. Allegro

Sam Wiseman, violin

170 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS

Music at Carleton presents

Disney Classics Voice Showcase Recital Lawrence Burnett, Director Thomas Bartsch, Collaborative Pianist

Saturday, October 22, 2016 7:30 p.m., Music & Drama Center

171 PROGRAM

“I Won’t Say (I’m In Love)” from Hercules (1997) music by Alan Menkin | b. 1949 lyrics by David Zippel | b. 1954

Hannah Marty, soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“A Dream Is A Wish Your Heart Makes” from Cinderella (1948) music and lyrics by Mack David | b. 1912-1993 Al Hoffman | 1902-1960 and Jerry Livingston | 1909-1987

Diana Delgado, mezzo soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“So This Is Love” from Cinderella (1950) music and lyrics by Mack David | b. 1912-1993 Al Hoffman | 1902-1960 and Jerry Livingston | 1909-1987

Lizzy Ehren, soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

172 PROGRAM

“Feed the Birds” from Mary Poppins (1964) music and lyrics by Richard M. Sherman | b. 1928 and Robert B. Sherman | 1925-2012

Eve Chesivoir, soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“The Bare Necessities” from The Jungle Book (1967) music and lyrics by Hamilton H. (Terry) Gilkyson III | 1916-1999

Nathan Gibes, baritone Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“Part of Your World” from The Little Mermaid (1988) music by Alan Menken|b. 1949 lyrics by Howard Ashman | 1950-1991

Lindsay Brandt, soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“Beauty and the Beast” from Beauty and the Beast (1991) music by Alan Menken | b. 1949 lyrics by Howard Ashman | 1950-1991

Katrin Ree, mezzo soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

173

PROGRAM

“Proud of Your Boy” from Aladdin (1993) music by Alan Menken | b. 1949 lyrics by Howard Ashman | 1950-1991 Colin Lau, baritone Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“You’ve Got a Friend in Me” from Toy Story (1995) music and lyrics by Randy Newman | b. 1943

Josh Ruebeck, baritone and piano

“God Help the Outcasts” from The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996) music by Alan Menken | b. 1949 lyrics by Stephen Schwartz | b. 1948

Estelle Bayer, mezzo soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“Hellfire” from The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996) music by Alan Menken | b. 1949 lyrics by Stephen Schwartz | b. 1948

Alyk Kenlan, baritone Thomas Bartsch, pianist

174 PROGRAM

“Someday” from The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996) music by Alan Menken | b. 1949 lyrics by Stephen Schwartz | b. 1948

Laudie Porter, soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“Go the Distance” from Hercules (1997) music by Alan Menken | b. 1949 lyrics by David Zippel | b. 1954

Andy Tirro, baritone Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“Circle of Life” from The Lion King (1994) music by Elton John | b. 1947 lyrics by Tim Rice | b. 1944

Bethany Bobo, mezzo soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“Reflection” from Mulan (1998) music by Matthew Wilder | b. 1953 lyrics by David Zippel | b. 1954 Bard Swallow, mezzo soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

175 PROGRAM

“When She Loved Me” from Toy Story 2 (1999) music and lyrics by Randy Newman | b. 1943

Lisa Downie, soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“Beyond My Wildest Dreams” from The Little Mermaid: A Broadway Musical (2006) music by Alan Menken | b. 1949 lyrics by Glenn Slater | b. 1968

Lauren Goboff, soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“Almost There” from The Princess And The Frog (2009) music and lyrics by Randy Newman | b. 1943

Claire O’Brien, mezzo soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“When Will My Life Begin?” from Tangled (2010) music by Alan Menken | b. 1949 lyrics by Glenn Slater | b. 1968

Elizabeth Sachs, soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

176 CHORAL AND VOCAL MUSIC AT CARLETON

Under the direction of:

Benjamin Allen | Senior Lecturer in Voice Diana Delgado 2018 Lindsay Brandt 2017 Alyk Kenlan 2018 Laudie Porter 2018 Lisa Downie

Lawrence Burnett Professor of Music and Choral Director / Applied Voice Coordinator Nathan Gibes 2018 Anderson (Andy) Tirro 2017 Bethany Bobo 2020

Rick Penning |Senior Lecturer in Voice Eve Chesivoir 2020 Colin Lau 2018 Josh Ruebeck 2017 Elizabeth Sachs 2020

Victoria Vargas | Instructor in Voice Lizzy Ehren 2018 Katrin Lee 2019 Estelle Bayer 2019 Hannah Marty 2017 Bard Swallow 2018 Lauren Goboff 2018 Claire O’Brien 2017

177 BIOGRAPHY

Benjamin Allen, Senior Lecturer in Voice, received the B.M.Ed. from Wart- burg College. He has studied with C. Robert Larson, Donna Pegors, Lawrence Weller, and, in New York, with Bernard Taylor. He has performed as a soloist with numerous regional and national organizations including the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, the Minnesota Orchestra, the Detroit Symphony Orches- tra, the Duluth-Superior Symphony Orchestra, and the Minnesota Opera. He has taught at the University of Minnesota-Duluth, Bethel University, Macalester College and the Minnesota Center for Arts Education. Ben is currently on the voice faculty and coordinator of the voice department at The International Music Camp. His interest in understanding the “cultural voice” to better serve the needs of international students who don’t have experience with Western Vocal concepts, led him to become involved with the East African community in Minneapolis where he sang in the Minnesota Swahili Choir. In several trips to Africa, Ben collected and transcribed original African choral music and sev- eral of his transcriptions of the works of Tanzanian composer, Israel Kagaruki have been published by Hal Leonard Publishing. Ben is a past Board Chair for a non-profit agency, Compassionate Solutions for African Development (COSAD) which undertakes economic development using the African choir as the target community within which to develop sustainable enterprise projects.

Thomas Bartsch, Collaborative Pianist, pursues an active career as a free-lance pianist and coach/accompanist. Appearances include Schubert Club, Thursday Musical, Minnesota Fringe Festival, and many competition/audition venues. In addition, Tom is the Organist and Choir Director at Temple of Aaron Synagogue in St. Paul, and the Organist at St. Michael’s Lutheran Church in Roseville.

Lawrence Burnett, Professor of Music and Choral Director / Applied Voice Coordinator, received the B.M. degree in Vocal Music Education from Texas A & I University, the M.M. degree in Choral Conducting, Vocal Performance, and Vocal Pedagogy from Eastern University, and the D.M.A. in Choral Conducting from the University of Texas. His professional background includes solo/stage work with numerous orchestras, choruses, and festivals throughout the country. In 1992 he was awarded the Governor’s Award for African-Americans of Distinction in New York State. Dr. Burnett is an active member of the Music Educators National Conference, and the American Cho- ral Directors Association for which he serves as National Chair of the Reper- toire Standards Committee for Ethnic Music and Multicultural Perspectives.

178 BIOGRAPHY

Rick Penning, Senior Lecturer in Voice, received the B.A. in Music from Luther College, the M.M. from the Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music, and the D.M.A. from the University of Minnesota. He has a wide range of performing experience including operatic roles and concert appearances with leading American regional opera companies and orchestras. He can be heard on recordings with the Plymouth Music Series Ensemble Singers (now Vocal Essence) and the Cathedral Choir of St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral (Minneap- olis). He has appeared on “A Prairie Home Companion” as well as Minnesota Public Radio, Dakota Public Television, and CBS’ television program “CBS Sunday Morning.” His voice students have won awards and have gone on to perform with professional opera companies and orchestras across the country and overseas. Besides a busy home voice studio, he is also on the faculty of Augsburg College.

Victoria Vargas, Instructor in Voice, holds a Master of Music degree in vocal performance from the Manhattan School of Music and a Bachelor of Music degree in vocal performance from the State University of New York at Fredo- nia. She has performed with some of the finest opera companies in the United States including the Opera Theater of Saint Louis, Chautauqua Opera, Sarasota Opera, the Ash Lawn-Highland Opera Festival, and was a resident artist with Minnesota Opera. Mrs. Vargas is also on the faculty at MacPhail Center for Music in Minneapolis.

179 180 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS

Music at Carleton presents

The Legacy of African American Composers in Classical music Voice Showcase Recital

Rick Penning, director Thomas Bartsch, collaborative pianist

Saturday, February 11, 2017 7:30 p.m., Music & Drama Center

181 PROGRAM

“He’s Got The Whole World In His Hands” (1963) African American Spiritual arr. Margaret Bonds | 1913 - 1972

Bethany Bobo ’20, mezzo-soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“Were You There?” (1924) African American Spiritual arr. H. T. Burleigh | 1866 - 1949

Daamir Robinson-Johnson ’20, baritone Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child” (1918) African American Spiritual arr. H. T. Burleigh | 1866 - 1949

Lindsay Brandt ’17, soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“The Awakening” (1913) music by John Rosamond Johnson | 1873 - 1954 poem by James Weldon Johnson | 1871 - 1938

Ben Capp ’20, baritone Thomas Bartsch, pianist

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

182 PROGRAM

“I Told My Love to the Roses” (1916) music by John Rosamond Johnson | 1873 - 1954 poem by J. A. Middleton

Catherine Johnson ’20, soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“Sophisticated Lady” (1932) music by Edward Kennedy (Duke) Ellington | 1889 - 1974 lyrics by Mitchell Parish | 1900-1993

Lisa Downie ’17, soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“Come Sunday” from Black, Brown and Beige (1943) music and lyrics by Edward Kennedy (Duke) Ellington | 1889 - 1974

Claire O’Brien ’17, mezzo-soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“Night” (1946) music by Florence B. Price | 1887 - 1953 poem by Louise C. Wallace

Estelle Bayer ’19, mezzo-soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

183 PROGRAM

“Ride On, King Jesus” from Easter Cantata (1946) African American Spiritual arr. Francis Hall Johnson | 1888 - 1970

Bard Swallow ’18, mezzo-soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“At the Feet of Jesus” (1947) melody by Ethel (Toy) Harper arr. Francis Hall Johnson | 1888 - 1970 text by Langston Hughes | 1902 - 1967

Colleen Scallen ’20, soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“Lit’l Boy” from The Life of Christ (1954) music by Roland Hayes | 1887 - 1977

Andy Tirro ’17, baritone-tenor Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“A Song Without Words” (1974) African American Spiritual arr. Charles Brown | 1922 - 1999

Lydia Hanson ’18, mezzo-soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

184 PROGRAM

“A Child’s Grace” (1977) music by Coleridge-Taylor Perkinson | 1932 - 2004 poem by Robert Herrick | 1591 - 1674

Lauren Goboff ’19, soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“Somebody’s Knockin’ at Yo’ Door” (2000) African American Spiritual arr. Moses Hogan | 1957 - 2003

Eve Chesivoir ’20, soprano Thomas Bartsch, pianist

“Little Fly” (2011) music by Esparanza Spalding | b. 1984 text by William Blake | 1757 - 1827

Josh Ruebeck ’17, baritone and electric bass Thomas Bartsch, pianist

185 CHORAL AND VOCAL MUSIC AT CARLETON

Under the direction of:

Ben Allen | Senior Lecturer in Voice

Lindsay Brandt 2017 Ben Capp 2020 Diana Delgado 2018 Catherine Johnson 2020 Laudie Porter 2018

Lawrence Burnett | Professor of Music and Choral Director

Bethany Bobo 2020 Daamir Robinson-Johnson 2020 Andy Tirro 2017

Rick Penning |Senior Lecturer in Voice/Applied Voice Coordinator

Eve Chesivoir 2020 Josh Ruebeck 2017 Colleen Scallen 2020

Victoria Vargas | Instructor in Voice

Estelle Bayer 2019 Lauren Goboff 2019 Lydia Hanson 2018 Claire O’Brien 2017 Bard Swallow 2018

186 BIOGRAPHY

Thomas Bartsch, Collaborative Pianist, pursues an active career as a free-lance pianist and coach/accompanist. Appearances include Schubert Club, Thursday Musical, Minnesota Fringe Festival, and many competition/audition venues. In addition, Bartsch is the Organist and Choir Director at Temple of Aaron Syna- gogue in St. Paul, and the Organist at St. Michael’s Lutheran Church in Roseville.

Lawrence Burnett, Professor of Music and Choral Director/Applied Voice Coordinator, received the B.M. degree in Vocal Music Education from Texas A&I University, the M.M. degree in Choral Conducting, Vocal Performance, and Vocal Pedagogy from Eastern New Mexico University, and the D.M.A. in Choral Conducting from the University of Texas. His professional background includes solo/stage work with numerous orchestras, choruses, and festivals throughout the country. In 1992 he was awarded the Governor’s Award for African-Amer- icans of Distinction in New York State. Dr. Burnett is an active member of the Music Educators National Conference, and the American Choral Directors Association for which he serves as National Chair of the Repertoire Standards Committee for Ethnic Music and Multicultural Perspectives.

Rick Penning, Senior Lecturer in Voice, received the B.A. in Music from Luther College, the M.M. from the Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music, and the D.M.A. from the University of Minnesota. He has a wide range of performing experience including operatic roles and concert appearances with leading Amer- ican regional opera companies and orchestras. He can be heard on recordings with the Plymouth Music Series Ensemble Singers (now Vocal Essence) and the Cathedral Choir of St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral (Minneapolis). He has appeared on “A Prairie Home Companion” as well as Minnesota Public Radio, Dakota Public Television, and CBS’ television program “CBS Sunday Morning.” His voice students have won awards and have gone on to perform with profes- sional opera companies and orchestras across the country and overseas. Besides a busy home voice studio, he is also on the faculty of Augsburg College.

Victoria Vargas, Instructor in Voice, holds a Master of Music degree in vocal performance from the Manhattan School of Music and a Bachelor of Music degree in vocal performance from the State University of New York at Fredonia. She has performed with some of the finest opera companies in the United States including the Opera Theater of Saint Louis, Chautauqua Opera, Sarasota Opera, the Ash Lawn-Highland Opera Festival, and was a resident artist with Minnesota Opera. Vargas is also on the faculty at MacPhail Center for Music in Minneapo- lis.

187 188 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS

Music at Carleton presents

Voice Showcase Recital Viva Italia!!!

Rick Penning, director Thomas Bartsch, collaborative pianist

Saturday, May 6, 2017 7:30 p.m., Music & Drama Center

189 PROGRAM

“Gia il sole dal Gange” from L’Honesta Negli Amori music by Alessandro Scarlatti | 1660-1725 words by Felice Parnasso | c. 1661

Rachel Harris ’18, soprano Emily Schwartz ’20, reader

Amarilli music by Giulio Caccini | 1551-1618 words by G. B. Guarini | 1538-1612

Katrin Ree ’19, mezzo soprano Rachel Harris ’19, reader

Nina (c. 1749) music by Anonymous words by Anonymous

J. D. Slaugh ’17, baritone Lindsay Brandt ’17, reader

Come raggio di sol music attributed to Antonio Caldara | c. 1670-1736 words by Anonymous

Colin Lau ’18, baritone Julia Braulick ’20, reader

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

190 PROGRAM

“Che Faro Senza Euridice” from Orfeo ed Euridice music by Christoph Willibald Gluck | 1714-1787 words by Ranieri Calzabigi | 1714-1795

Estelle Bayer ’18, mezzo soprano Zhi You Koh ’18, reader

Pietá, Signore music by Francis Joseph Fetis | 1784-1871 words by Anonymous

Zhi You Koh ’18, baritone Estelle Bayer ’18, reader

Se tu m’ami (1869) music attributed to Alessandro Parisotti | 1660-1725 words by Paolo Rolli | 1687-1765

Bethany Bobo ’20, mezzo soprano Professor Lawrence Burnett, reader

“Per La Gloria D’Adorarvi” from Griselda music by Giovanni Bononcini | 1670-1747 words by Paolo Rolli | 1687-1765

Nathan Gibes ’18, baritone Professor Lawrence Burnett, reader

Come raggio di sol music attributed to Antonio Caldara | 1670-1736 words by Anonymous

Skyelar Ginsberg ’20, soprano Ian Seong ’19, reader 191 PROGRAM

Il fervido desiderio music by Vincenzo Bellini | 1801-1835 words by Anonymous

Lydia Hanson ’18, soprano Peter Mackenzie ’19, reader

Vaga Luna music by Vincenzo Bellini | 1801-1835 words by Anonymous

Peter Mackenzie ’19, baritone Lydia Hanson ’18, reader

Il Risentimento music by Gioacchino Rossini | 1792-1868 words by Pietro Metastasio | 1698-1782

Eva Chesivoir ’20, mezzo soprano

L’Abbandonata (1869) music by Saverio Mercadante | 1795-1870 words by F. M. Piave | 1810-1876

Josh Rueback ’17, baritone Kelly Buck ’20, reader

“Oh dischiuso e il furmamento” from Nabucco (1841) music by Giuseppe Verdi | 1813-1901 words by Temistocle Solera | 1815-1878

Victoria Vargas ’19, mezzo soprano

192 BIOGRAPHY

Benjamin Allen, Senior Lecturer in Voice, received the B.M.Ed. from Wartburg College. He has studied with C. Robert Larson, Donna Pegors, Lawrence Weller, and, in New York, with Bernard Taylor. He has per- formed as a soloist with numerous regional and national organizations including the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, the Minnesota Orchestra, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, the Duluth-Superior Symphony Orchestra, and the Minnesota Opera. He has taught at the University of Minneso- ta-Duluth, the Minnesota Center for Arts Education, Macalester College, Bethel University and is currently on the voice faculty and coordinator of the voice department at the International Music Camp.

Lawrence Burnett, Professor of Music and Choral Director/Applied Voice Coordinator, received the B.M. degree in Vocal Music Education from Texas A&I University, the M.M. degree in Choral Conducting, Vocal Performance, and Vocal Pedagogy from Eastern New Mexico University, and the D.M.A. in Choral Conducting from the University of Texas. His professional background includes solo/stage work with numerous orches- tras, choruses, and festivals throughout the country. In 1992 he was awarded the Governor’s Award for African-Americans of Distinction in New York State. Dr. Burnett is an active member of the Music Educators National Conference, and the American Choral Directors Association for which he serves as National Chair of the Repertoire Standards Committee for Ethnic Music and Multicultural Perspectives.

Rick Penning, Senior Lecturer in Voice, received the B.A. in Music from Luther College, the M.M. from the Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Mu- sic, and the D.M.A. from the University of Minnesota. He has a wide range of performing experience including operatic roles and concert appearances with leading American regional opera companies and orchestras. He can be heard on recordings with the Plymouth Music Series Ensemble Sing- ers (now Vocal Essence) and the Cathedral Choir of St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral (Minneapolis). He has appeared on “A Prairie Home Compan- ion” as well as Minnesota Public Radio, Dakota Public Television, and CBS’ television program “CBS Sunday Morning.” His voice students have won awards and have gone on to perform with professional opera companies and orchestras across the country and overseas. Besides a busy home voice studio, he is also on the faculty of Augsburg College.

193 BIOGRAPHY

Victoria Vargas, Instructor in Voice, holds a Master of Music degree in vocal performance from the Manhattan School of Music and a Bachelor of Music degree in vocal performance from the State University of New York at Fredonia. She has performed with some of the finest opera companies in the United States including the Opera Theater of Saint Louis, Chautau- qua Opera, Sarasota Opera, the Ash Lawn-Highland Opera Festival, and was a resident artist with Minnesota Opera. Vargas is also on the faculty at MacPhail Center for Music in Minneapolis.

Thomas Bartsch, Collaborative Pianist, pursues an active career as a free-lance pianist and coach/accompanist. Appearances include Schubert Club, Thursday Musical, Minnesota Fringe Festival, and many competition/ audition venues. In addition, Bartsch is the Organist and Choir Director at Temple of Aaron Synagogue in St. Paul, and the Organist at St. Michael’s Lutheran Church in Roseville.

194 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS

Music at Carleton presents

Issam Rafea with the Middle Eastern Music Ensemble featuring Matt Rahaim, Yaron Klein, and Steven Hobert

Tuesday, May 30, 2017 7:00 p.m. | Concert Hall

195 PROGRAM

ʿAla dalʿuna Traditional Shiddu al-himma Marcel Khalife Tik tik yam Sliman Rahbani Brothers Oud Workshop: Ana Knighten, Russell Star-Lack, and William Decourt

al-Hilwa di Sayyid Darwish Jayyib li salam Filmun Wahbi Raqsat al-ghajariyya Ghanim Haddad Middle Eastern Music Ensemble: Lydia Field, Gaston Lopez, Joe Lowry, Alex Schneider, Max Smith, Nick Lorenz, and Ana Knighten

Improvisations Issam Rafea, oud

Parfum de Gitane (ʿIṭr al-ghajar) Anouar Brahem Issam Rafea, oud & Yaron Klein, violin

ʿItr al-ghajar Maqam/Raga (Taqasim) Anouar Brahem Issam Rafea, oud & Matt Rahaim, Hidustani vocals

Oudyano Oudyano Issam Rafea, oud & Steve Hobert, piano

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

196 BIOGRAPHY

Issam Rafea is one of Syria’s most esteemed oud players. His unique and innovative style won him the first prize in the oud category at the 2000 Cairo Improvisation Competition as well as the 2010 “Best Composer Award” in Dubai International Film Festival. He served as the chair of the Arab Music Department at the High Institute of Mu- sic in Damascus, and the principal conductor of the Syrian National Orchestra for Arab Music. Rafea toured as a soloist and with his ensembles Twais and Hewar in France, , Germany, UK, Holland, Italy, Algeria, Morocco, Iraq, , , , Kuwait, Japan, and the United States. Issam is teaching at Carleton as a Dayton-Hud- son Distinguished Visiting Artist.

Matt Rahaim is a Hindustani vocalist, trained in the Gwalior tra- dition under L.K. Pandit and Vikas Kashalkar. He is also Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology at the University of Minnesota.

Yaron Klein is a violinist and oud player, who studied with Bassam Saba and Taiseer Elias. He performs with the Minneapolis-based Arab music ensemble Amwaj. He is an Associate Professor of Arabic and the Chair of the Department of Middle Eastern Languages at Carleton, and teaches oud in Carleton’s Music Department.

Steven Hobert describes himself as a soul who plays, sings and dances while exploring life’s mysteries. His genre-blending piano, ac- cordion and vocal music has been described as “delightful, innovative and viscerally inspiring” that “dazzles audiences with sincerity and playfulness to open up hearts and fire imaginations.”

Oudyano is Issam Rafea, oud player, and Steven Hobert, eclectic keyboardist and improviser. Rafea, a native of Syria, and Hobert, of Minneapolis, MN, join hearts to create music that sensitively peers inward, boldly prays outward; crawling with curiosity, then leaping into clouds. Arabic classical tradition meets American jazz & roots to delight audiences through the world peace enacted by their embrace.

197 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS

Music at Carleton presents 2017 Senior Comprehensive Exercise Presentations

Saturday, April 15, 2017 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., Concert Hall Each presentation will be followed by a 5-minute Q&A

MORNING PRESENTATIONS

Caroline Glazer “Pretty Peggy” and the “Bonnie Lass”: 250 Years of Folk and Commercial Transmission of a British-American Folk Song

Andy Flory, advisor

Molly Hildreth Tradition and Innovation in Liz Carroll’s Irish Tune Compositions

Megan Sarno, advisor

Joe Lowry Jeremiah Ingalls’ “The Christian Harmony”: Ecumenicial Vision and Elitist Failure

Andy Flory, advisor

Kaylee Shiao The Soundtrack for a Revolution: Examining Music in the Events of the Civil Rights Movement, 1963-1965

Melinda Russell, advisor

Jin Lee A Performance of Mendelssohn’s The Hebrides (overture) Op. 26

Hector Valdivia, advisor

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography and refrain from leaving during the presentations. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

198 AFTERNOON PERFORMANCES

Andy Tirro The Trajectory of a Thursday: Moderato “Turnover” Agitato “Groove” Placido “Mawkish”

Jack Atkins, flute; Janet Scannell, clarinet; Yang Chen, violin; Chris Shoemaker, cello Connie Martin, double bass; Szu-Ling Wu, piano

Andrea Mazzariello, advisor

Yang Chen Home No More to Me: A Wanderer’s Journey I. Home No More To Me II. Fire and Windows Bright III. Come Again No More

Yang Chen, violin; Molly Hildreth, flute; Clarie Trujillo, cello

Andrea Mazzariello, advisor

Patrick O’Reilly The Next Step: Performing Improvisational Strategies from the Works of Kurt Rosenwinkel

Patrick O’Reilly, guitar; Joe Lowry, piano; Sara Wall, bass; Nate Osher, drums

Zacc Harris, advisor

Josh Ruebeck True Story

Andrea Mazzariello, advisor

FACULTY

Lawrence Burnett, Professor of Music and Choral Director Andy Flory, Assistant Professor of Music Zacc Harris, Instructor in Jazz and Blues Guitar Justin London, Professor of Music and Cognitive Science Andrea Mazzariello, Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Nikki Melville, Associate Professor of Music, Chair of Music Ronald Rodman, Dye Family Professor of Music and Director of the Carleton Symphony Band Melinda Russell, Director of American Music, Professor of Music Megan Sarno, Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Hector Valdivia, Professor of Music and S. Eugene Bailey Director of the Carleton Orchestra 199 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS

Music at Carleton presents

Senior Violin Recital

Yang Chen ’17, violin

Sunday, February 19, 2017 6:00 p.m., Concert Hall

200 PROGRAM

Horse Racing (1964) Huanghai Huai | 1935-1967

Violin Concerto in E Minor, Op. 21 Felix Mendelssohn | 1809-1847 I. Allegro Molto Appassionato II. Andante III. Allegro Molto Vivace

- Intermission -

Sonata, Op. 24 “Spring” (1801) Ludwig van Beethoven | 1770-1827 I. Allegro

5 Melodies, Op. 35b (1920) Sergei Prokofiev | 1891-1953 I. Andante

Home No More To Me: A Wanderer’s Journey Yang Chen | b. 1995 I. Home No More To Me II. Fire and Windows Bright III. Come Again No More Molly Hildreth ’17, flute Claire Trujillo ’17, cello

O Magnum Mysterium (1994) Morten Lauridsen | b. 1943

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

201 PROGRAM NOTES

On Home No More To Me: A Wanderer’s Journey

I was looking around for a poem or a narrative to base my composi- tion on when a fellow music major showed me the poem, “Home No More To Me” by Robert Louis Stevenson. After reading the poem I immediately became attached to it and decided to base my compo- sition on it. As a Taiwanese immigrant, I really relate to the idea of the Wanderer who becomes completely estranged to what use to be home. Taiwan is no longer home to me, now that I’ve spent more years in the United States, and after going to Carleton and seeing my friends leave Texas in their own paths, Texas is no longer a home for me either. Therefore, I really wanted to write a piece that could por- tray this idea for which I felt so strongly.

Throughout the process of writing this piece, I was able to explore new compositional techniques from movement to movement. Each step helped me to grow in my experience, from trying out double stops to experimenting with whole tone. Not only is this piece a rep- resentation of my growth, it is also my response to my own struggle on the meaning of “home.” I projected my own nostalgic feelings for home onto the piece as well as sadness at losing home unto the Wan- derer. The main glue that held the entire project together, besides the poem, would be the use of the opening theme and the way it comes back in the other movements. This leitmotif comes back each time slightly different, and closes the piece just as it opened up the piece. Although it is has roots in the first movement, it is changed slightly as time progresses. As the ending implies, this theme is neither com- pletely in major nor in minor, neither completely happy or sad. The Wanderer in the poem must accept that home is “home no more” and must adapt, just like this opening theme, in search of the next place. In the same way, I must accept that home is “home no more” and continue on with what is next, as I myself changed with time.

202 PROGRAM NOTES

“Home No More To Me” - original poem by Robert Louis Stevenson

Movement I. Home No More to Me

Home no more home to me, whither must I wander? Hunger my driver, I go where I must. Cold blows the winter wind over hill and heather; Thick drives the rain, and my roof is in the dust. Loved of wise men was the shade of my roof-tree. The true word of welcome was spoken in the door -- Dear days of old, with the faces in the firelight, Kind folks of old, you come again no more.

Movement II. Fires and Windows Bright

Home was home then, my dear, full of kindly faces, Home was home then, my dear, happy for the child. Fire and the windows bright glittered on the moorland; Song, tuneful song, built a palace in the wild. Now, when day dawns on the brow of the moorland, Lone stands the house, and the chimney-stone is cold. Lone let it stand, now the friends are all departed, The kind hearts, the true hearts, that loved the place of old.

Movement III. Come Again No More

Spring shall come, come again, calling up the moorfowl, Spring shall bring the sun and rain, bring the bees and flowers; Red shall the heather bloom over hill and valley, Soft flow the stream through the even-flowing hours; Fair the day shine as it shone on my childhood -- Fair shine the day on the house with open door; Birds come and cry there and twitter in the chimney -- But I go for ever and come again no more.

203 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS Music at Carleton presents Senior Recital Molly Hildreth ’17, flute accomp. Szu-Ling Wu, piano

Saturday, May 6, 2017 4:00 p.m., Concert Hall

PROGRAM

Sonata in E Minor, BWV 1034 Johann Sebastian Bach | 1685-1750 I. Adagio ma non tanto II. Allegro III. Andante IV. Allegro

Six Duets, No. 1 | 1756-1791 I. Allegro maestoso  Sofia Serrano, flute

• Intermission •

Sonata in D, Op. 94 Sergei Prokofiev | 1891-1953 I. Moderato II. Allegretto scherzando III. Andante IV. Allegro con brio

Traditional Irish Tunes Give Me Your Hand/The Mouse in the Mug (Waltz/Jig) That’s Right Too!/Father Newman’s (Reels) accomp. Caroline Glazer, piano

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

204 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS Music at Carleton presents Senior Recital Kaylee Shiao ’17, piano & composition

Sunday, May 7th, 2017 2:00 p.m., Concert Hall

PROGRAM

re: love Kaylee Shiao

Masques Claude Debussy | 1862-1918

SIMYC (#1) Kaylee Shiao WBU (#2)

Berceuse, Op. 57 Frederic Chopin | 1810-1849

miss/communication Kaylee Shiao

“For Emma” Justin Vernon | b. 1981 arr. Clara Hesler ’18 feat. the Knightingales love lesson Kaylee Shiao arr. Clara Hesler ’18 feat. the Knightingales

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

205 PROGRAM NOTES

This suite of electronic compositions includes text pieces inspired by the emotions that result from sounds around us. Much of this work is record- ed through an iPhone, capturing the sounds I hear in corners of my life interwoven with text that I have written, performed by some of my dearest friends. Together, these pieces present my perspective on varying sound worlds connected by human experience. re: love, composed in 2016, is a collage of everyday sounds of love. The following pair, SIMYC (#1) and WBU (#2), was created in 2016. While SIMYC (sorry i missed your call) explores the relationship between two people, WBU (what about you) takes the form of an internal dialogue. miss/communication (2017) makes use of contrasting textual and sonic moods to convey an emotion for which there is no English word.

These pieces include recordings of: The Carleton Knightingales, Joseph D. Lowry, Clara J. Hesler, Joshua B. Ruebeck, Emily B. Cudhea-Pierce, and myself.

Acknowledgments

Nicola Melville and Andrea Mazzariello for constant care and guidance, the Music Department for a wonderful and true home, and all who have helped along the way. [f\

206 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS

Music at Carleton presents

Yifan (Vicky) Wu’s Guzheng Senior Recital with Jin Lee, violin featuring Huimin Wu, erhu

This recital is dedicated to family, friends, and kind strangers who appreciate cultures and embrace diversity.

We are so glad you are here!

Saturday, May 13th, 2017 2:00 p.m., Concert Hall

207 PROGRAM

鸿雁 (Swan Goose) Mongolian Folk Song Hongguang Zhang Jin Lee, violin Matthew Pan, piano Yifan Wu, guzheng

井冈山上太阳红 (The Sun Shines on the Jinggang Mountains) Manqin Zhao Yifan Wu, guzheng

爷爷 (Dear Grandpa) Improvisation Yifan Wu, guzheng

Arches Kevin Puts Jin Lee, violin

打虎上山 (Climbing Up the Tiger Mountain) Manqin Zhao Yifan Wu, guzheng

Honest Music Nico Muhly Jin Lee, violin

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

208 PROGRAM

江南春色(Spring in South China) Changyao & Xilin Ma Huimin Wu, erhu Sam Wiseman, piano

*To All the Mothers in the World Improvisation Mama Gao, pipa Yifan Wu, guzheng

Berceuse from 8 pieces, Op.39 Reinhold Glière Jin Lee, violin Matthew Pan, cello

战台风 (Fighting Against the Typhoon) Changyuan Wang Yifan Wu, guzheng

*祝所有的妈妈母亲节快乐!

♥ Happy Mothers’ Day to all the mothers in the world!

209 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Hi there,

This is Yifan (or Vicky). Thank you so much for coming to my recit- al. I cannot tell you how much it means to me. This is a very personal experience, and I am glad you are here with me.

I have been playing Guzheng since I was six years old. We have been through a lot together. Guzheng to me is not just an instrument. She is the best listener and the most genuine storyteller.

Unfortunately, my family is not able to be here. But this recital is for my family. Thank you for giving me the world and always making my dreams come true. I love you so much.

I would like to thank Mama Gao and Papa Paul for making my Carleton experience truly amazing. I feel so fortunate to have your continuous and unconditional support. Thank you to the Chinese and Global Music Ensemble, my professors, mentors, friends, and everyone who helped me along my journey at Carleton and beyond. I am very grateful.

Cheers to music and all those who hold on to their passions and dreams, Yifan (Vicky) Wu 05/13/2017

210 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS

Music at Carleton presents

Senior Recital Joe Lowry, piano

Sunday, May 14th, 2017 1:30 p.m., Concert Hall

211 PROGRAM

24 Preludes and Fugues, Op. 87 Dmitri Shostakovich | 1906-1975

No. 1 in C major Dmitri Shostakovich

Sonata No. 27 in E minor Op. 90 Ludwig van Beethoven | 1770-1827 I. Mit Lebhaftigkeit und durchaus mit Empfindung und Ausdruck II. Nicht zu geschwind und sehr singbar vorgetragen

• Pause •

Improvisations Joe Lowry | b. 1995

• Pause •

Suite, Op. 14, Sz. 62, BB. 70 Bela Bartok | 1881-1945 I. Allegretto II. Scherzo III. Allegro Molto IV. Sostenuto

Romanian Folk Dances Sz. 56, BB 68 Bela Bartok I. Joc cu bâtă (Stick Game) II. Brâul (Peasant Costume) III. Pe loc (Standing Still) IV. Buciumeana (Song of the Mountain Horn) V. Poarga Românească (A Garden Gate in ) VI. Marunțel (Little One)

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography, and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

212 PROGRAM NOTES

Dmitri Shostakovich composed his set of preludes and fugues in 1950-51 after hearing J.S. Bach’s The Well-Tempered Clavier performed by Russian pianist Tatiana Nikolayeva at the International Bach Festival in Leipzig. Like each book of The Well-Tempered Clavier, Shostakovich’s cycle includes a prelude and fugue in each of the 24 keys, and all of them show to varying degrees Bach’s inspiration. The C major prelude presents a distillation of the arpeggios of Bach’s first prelude, with a slow and highly regular rhythm, yet the piece has a harmonic language and wacky humor that is very distinc- tively Shostakovich. The fugue is slow and majestic—its meditative tone is very Bach-like, yet Shostakovich departs from his predecessor in using all the possibilities afforded to him by a modern piano. Beethoven’s Op. 90 sonata was written in the summer of 1814 and dedicated to Prince Moritz von Lichnowsky, a friend of the composer and the dedicatee of the Eroica Variations. Unlike most sonatas, this piece contains only two movements and is significant- ly shorter than most Beethoven sonatas. The piece begins with a stormy, restless, and searching movement written in typical sonata allegro form. Eschewing a slow movement, this sonata skips directly from the tumultuous first movement to a graceful major-key rondo, with a gentle melody that presages the lyricism of Schubert. As a compliment to my studies of classical music and other styles, I have been improvising for as long as I can remember. Impro- vising was an integral part of the European art music tradition until the 19th century, and in many other musical traditions—including jazz, Indian classical music, and many forms of traditional European folksong, to name just a few examples—improvisation is central. I hope to present to you today a sample of my inner thoughts and in- ner creativity. Everything you hear today will be new both to me and to you, and it will probably be somewhat reflective of both my varied listening and the variety of musical opportunities I have been lucky to pursue at Carleton. Bartok’s Suite, Op. 14 was written in February, 1916, pub- lished in 1918, and debuted by the composer in 1919. Unlike the Romanian Folk Dances or many other of Bartok compositions, this

213 PROGRAM NOTES suite does not make use of folk melodies. According to Bartok, quot- ed during a 1994 radio interview with David Levita, “When this work was composed I had in mind the refining of piano technique, the changing of piano technique, into a more transparent style. A style more of bone and muscle opposing the heavy chordal style of the late, latter romantic period.” Compared to the early Romanticism of Beethoven or the elegant pianism of the Shostakovich Prelude and Fugue, the Suite is jarring, perhaps even ugly in places. Yet the work does not lack emotional contrast, from the earth-shattering climax of the third movement to the plaintive dying-away of the Sostenuto. Throughout the work, Bartok makes use of a variety of techniques, drawing both from then-contemporary compositional trends and from his folk song research; such as a twelve-tone row in the second movement, and Lydian and whole tone scales in the first movement. The Romanian Folk Dances, by contrast, are based directly on field recordings made by Bartok himself within Transylvania (a region now part of Romania; then part of Bartok’s native Austro-Hungarian Empire). The original melodies were played by local musicians either on or shepherd’s flute, and Bartok composed his work in 1915. This suite of pieces present a range of musical ideas, corresponding to the variety of styles within Transylvania. While more melodic than the Suite, Op. 14, this piece nevertheless preserves the unexpected harmonies and melodic angularity characteristic of Bartok’s music. I want to extend a special thank you to Nikki Melville for her help in coaching me for this recital, to Holly Streekstra and the per- formance activities office, and to all my friends and family who have supported my musical endeavors during my time at Carleton.

214 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS

Music at Carleton presents Senior Recital

Claire O’Brien, voice Hannah Marty, voice Thomas Bartsch, accompanist

Thursday, May 25th, 2017 6:30 p.m., Chapel

PROGRAM

•Please wait to applaud until after each set•

Early Music “Kyrie” Sean Maxwell Hannah Marty and Claire O’Brien

“Ave Maria” Johann Sebastian Bach

“Panis Angelicus” César Franck Hannah Marty

Italian Music “Sento Nel Core” Alessandro Scarlatti

“Chi Vuol La Zingarella” Giovanni Paisiello Claire O’Brien

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography and refrain from leaving the Chapel while the performers are playing. Your coopera- tion is greatly appreciated.

215 PROGRAM

German “Stil Wie Die Nacht” Carl Bohm Hannah Marty

“Von Ewiger Liebe” Johannes Brahms Claire O’Brien

French “Plaisir D’amour” Johann-Paul Martini Claire O’Brien

“Romance” Claude Debussy Hannah Marty

Contemporary “Can’t Help Lovin Dat Man” Jerome Kern & Oscar Hamerstein II

“Come Sunday” Duke Ellington Claire O’Brien

“I Won’t Say I’m in Love” Alan Menken “Make Someone Happy” Jule Styne Hannah Marty

“For Good” Stephen Schwartz Hannah Marty and Claire O’Brien

We’d like to thank our friends and family for their love and support, the Carleton College Music Department for making this all possible, our incredible accompanist Thomas Bartsch, and our instructor Victoria Vargas for her guidance.

216 STUDENT & STUDIO RECITALS

Music at Carleton presents Junior Recital

Koh Zhi You, bass-baritone Thomas Bartsch, accompanist

Monday, May 29th, 2017 1:00 p.m. | Concert Hall

PROGRAM

“Thus Saith the Lord” from Messiah, Part I: The Coming Judgement (Scene II) George Frideric Händel | 1685-1759 librettist Charles Jennens | 1700-1773

Amarilli, mia bella Giulio Caccini | 1545-1618 edited by John Glenn Paton | b. 1934

“Per la più vaga e bella” (Aria of the Shepard) from La liberazione di Ruggiero Francesca Caccini | 1587-1637 librettist Fernando Saracinelli | 1587-1640

Pietà Signore Anonymous

• Intermission •

Épitaphe (Epitaph) Francis Poulenc | 1899-1963 poem by François de Mahlerbe | 1555-1628

As a courtesy, please turn off all cell phones, do not use flash photography and refrain from leaving the Concert Hall while the performers are playing. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

217 PROGRAM

Le Bestiare, ou cortège d’Orphée (The Book of Beasts or Procession of Orpheus) Francis Poulenc | 1899-1963 poem by Guillaume Apollinaire | 1880-1918

Toréador (Toreador) Spanish-Italian Song Francis Poulenc | 1899-1963 poem by Jean Cocteau | 1889-1963

Acknowledgments I would like to thank Ms. Victoria Vargas, who has been a won- derful voice instructor and guide for the last six terms.

Many thanks too to Ms. Holly Streekstra, for the administrative work of organizing this recital.

And lastly, I would like to thank the Music Department for pro- viding voice lessons and supporting this recital. i

218 excerpts from the Metaphysics of Notation used with permission © MarkApplebaum