<<

Belmont University Belmont Digital Repository

Composition/Recording Projects School of

Fall 11-20-2020

Exploring the Fusion of The Recording Collective

Tyler Williams [email protected]

Follow this and additional works at: https://repository.belmont.edu/music_comp

Part of the Composition Commons, and the Commons

Recommended Citation Williams, Tyler, "Exploring the Gospel Fusion Arrangements of The Recording Collective" (2020). Composition/Recording Projects. 2. https://repository.belmont.edu/music_comp/2

This Thesis is brought to you for free and open access by the School of Music at Belmont Digital Repository. It has been accepted for inclusion in Composition/Recording Projects by an authorized administrator of Belmont Digital Repository. For more information, please contact [email protected]

EXPLORING THE GOSPEL FUSION ARRANGEMENTS OF THE RECORDING COLLECTIVE

By TYLER WILLIAMS

A PRODUCTION PAPER

Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Music in Commercial Music, Media Composition and Arranging in the School of Music of the College of Music and Performing Arts Belmont University

NASHVILLE,

November 2020

Acknowledgements

This project would not have been possible without the contributions of numerous individuals. I first want to thank Dr. Tony Moreira for being such an encouraging presence during my time here at Belmont. The fruits of his musical instruction can be seen and heard in the arrangements included in this production. Thank you also to Keith

Mason and Dr. Peter Lamothe, whose seminar classes directly impacted the trajectory and execution of this project.

I am deeply grateful to the musicians whose incredible talents brought pure magic to the recording process. These arrangements would merely be notes on a page without the performances of Danny Marquez, Winner Olmann, Danny Diaz, Hunter Spivey,

Krystal Gutierrez, Justin Barahona, Dwight Hernandez, and Mykeyly Hernandez. Thank you to my good friend, Eric Uplinger, for going above and beyond, working miracles and lending your professional ear to the production and mixing of these recordings.

I want thank Dr. Chuck Lewis for encouraging me to begin graduate studies and for first introducing me to the joys of ministry. Christian Ramos, thank you for allowing my musical and ministerial gifts to grow and flourish during our time in ministry together, and for introducing me to the magic of secondary dominant progressions nearly a decade ago! Thank you to my mother, Leslie Howington, for your unending love and encouragement. And most importantly, I would like to thank God, the giver of all gifts, who is worthy of every word that is ascribed to Him in the of the found within this project.

iii

Contents

Tables ...... v

Examples ...... vi

Presentation of Material

Introduction ...... 1

Chapter 1: Historical Background ...... 6

Chapter 2: Gospel Instrumentalists and Their Techniques ...... 21

Chapter 3: Gospel Vocalists and Their Techniques ...... 35

Chapter 4: Analysis of Three Songs by The Recording Collective ...... 42

Chapter 5: Analysis of Three Original Gospel Fusion Arrangements ...... 73

Chapter 6: The Production Process ...... 100

Conclusion ...... 118

Appendix A: Chapter Four Scores ...... 121

Appendix B: Chapter Five Scores ...... 178

Appendix C: Additional Gospel Fusion Arrangements ...... 226

References ...... 256

iv

Tables

1. “ Be Magnified” Programming List ...... 101

2. “King of Kings” Programming List ...... 102

3. “Lion and the Lamb” Programming List ...... 102

4. “Who I Am” Programming List ...... 102

5. “Yes I Will” Programming List ...... 102

6. Drum Set Microphone List ...... 104

v

Examples

2.1 Tritone substitution for V7 to I ...... 30

2.2 Tritone substitution for V7/IV to IV ...... 30

2.3 Backcycling found in “Love Theory” by ...... 31

2.4 Major ...... 32

2.5 Minor pentatonic scale ...... 32

2.6 scale ...... 32

2.7 “” gospel waltz version ...... 32

2.8 Walking bass line ...... 33

4.1 verse ...... 46

4.2 The Recording Collective verse ...... 47

4.3 Secondary dominant chords ...... 47

4.4 Bass pedal point ...... 48

4.5 Example of background vocal harmonies ...... 48

4.6 Soloist’s atop background vocalists’ melody ...... 49

4.7 Sixteenth-note figure ...... 50

4.8 Phil Wickham intro ...... 50

4.9 The Recording Collective intro ...... 51

4.10 Staccato eighth-note pairs begin each measure ...... 52

vi

4.11 Quarter-note chords in the chorus ...... 52

4.12 Drums-only chorus with light rhodes ...... 54

4.13 Bridge 3 with three-part harmony and inversions ...... 55

4.14 Bethel’s pushed plagal cadence ...... 57

4.15 The Recording Collective chorus with added chords ...... 58

4.16 The Recording Collective’s “praise break” section ...... 59

4.17 Melismas follow blues and pentatonic scales ...... 60

4.18 intro ...... 61

4.19 The Recording Collective intro ...... 61

4.20 intro ...... 64

4.21 The Recording Collective intro ...... 64

4.22 V7/V in the bridge ...... 65

4.23 Chris Tomlin verse ...... 65

4.24 The Recording Collective verse ...... 66

4.25 Examples of melismas ...... 67

4.26 Countermelody sung by background vocalists ...... 67

4.27 Bass guitar riff ...... 68

4.28 Drums-only chorus with rhythmic accents ...... 69

4.29 Chorus with greatest amount of growth ...... 70

5.1 Bethel Music verse ...... 75

5.2 Gospel fusion verse ...... 76

5.3 Bridge reharmonization ...... 77

vii

5.4 End of the bridge in Bethel Music version ...... 78

5.5 End of the bridge in gospel fusion version ...... 79

5.6 Bethel Music intro ...... 79

5.7 Gospel fusion intro ...... 79

5.8 Gospel fusion jam section ...... 80

5.9 Gospel fusion new verse progression ...... 84

5.10 Verse 3 reharmonization ...... 84

5.11 Multiple deceptive cadences in the gospel fusion version ...... 85

5.12 Worship intro hook ...... 86

5.13 Gospel fusion intro hook ...... 86

5.14 Gospel fusion fourth verse ...... 88

5.15 Gospel fusion eight-bar build ...... 90

5.16 Gospel fusion first verse ...... 92

5.17 Reharmonization of the instrumental hook ...... 93

5.18 Reharmonization that points toward Gm7 ...... 93

5.19 Busy chord changes in the final chorus ...... 94

5.20 Praise break section ...... 96

5.21 Bridge tags section ...... 99

viii

Introduction

The Recording Collective is a series of gospel-influenced arrangements produced and published by MultiTracks.com. These arrangements are marketed as resources for worship leaders and members of multicultural congregations worldwide. The goal of The

Recording Collective “is to bring musicians and singers together spanning across multiple genres and languages to create highly creative and fresh congregational arrangements that will breathe new life into timeless songs for the global Church” (The

Recording Collective 2019).

This diverse collection of artists and producers has created three EPs and numerous singles of urban-gospel and R&B-influenced arrangements of popular contemporary songs, all written to foster cross-cultural connections in congregational worship settings. This project aims to explore the different musical techniques used in the gospel fusion style of The Recording Collective and to create and record new arrangements of current contemporary worship songs that employ those techniques.

In his book I Hear Music in the Air: Gospel-Style Technique, Thomas W.

Jefferson emphasizes the ways in which black gospel musicians put their own stamp on sacred music by “altering its rhythmic, harmonic, and melodic components,” creating a new style of delivery he calls “the gospel sound” (Jefferson 2013, 5). Since 2016, The

Recording Collective has been putting their stamp on popular, contemporary Christian

1 2

worship songs by crafting new gospel arrangements that can be used in many churches and cultural contexts. The Recording Collective is one of a handful of emerging artists in what can best be described as the “gospel fusion” genre, which blurs the line and bridges the gap between predominantly white contemporary and black .

The first chapter of this document gives an overview of the historical development of gospel music in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, providing an important framework and background to the contemporary gospel music we hear today. Some key highlights include gospel pioneers like Thomas A. Dorsey, the influence of R&B and , and the inclusion of and greater dependence on drums and rhythm sections in the genre. Finally, this chapter researches the rise of contemporary artists such as Kirk Franklin, Hezekiah Walker, and , and their influence on the contemporary gospel style found in the music of The Recording Collective. The mainstream appeal of The Recording Collective is a key factor to their success; the source material for their gospel arrangements consists of songs found outside the genre of gospel music. As such, this paper’s historical overview highlights many of the gospel artists who experienced mainstream success with non-black audiences. Some of these artists include , Andraé Crouch, and “Professor” Alex Bradford (Shearon et. al. 2012).

Chapter Two focuses on the various stylistic elements used by gospel instrumentalists. This includes a list of instruments frequently used in the genre, as well as the techniques employed on these instruments. Thomas W. Jefferson’s aforementioned

3 book proves to be a valuable tool in unpacking some of the harmonic and rhythmic motifs commonly found in gospel music (Jefferson 2013).

Chapter Three highlights the stylistic elements employed by gospel vocalists, including melodic treatment, improvisation, call and response, three-part harmony, and the use of blue notes (Shearon et. al. 2012). An exploration into the prominence of gospel is included.

Chapter Four consists of comprehensive analyses and transcriptions of three songs arranged by The Recording Collective. This analysis identifies the commonly used structural and artistic characteristics found in The Recording Collective’s arrangements.

In order to explore an eclectic mix of arranging techniques, three songs from The

Recording Collective’s 2017 Gospel Vol. 2: Every Praise are examined. Each has been previously recorded by other artists and is now presented in a fresh gospel setting on this album. The first song is the 6/8 ballad “Good Good Father”

(featuring Onaje Jefferson). This song has been recorded by many non-gospel Christian artists, most notably Chris Tomlin. The second song, “King of My Heart” (featuring

Crisabel Clack) is a gospel ballad in 4/4 that adds new instrumentation and an extended praise break to a song originally recorded by Bethel Music. The final song is the up- tempo arrangement of Phil Wickham’s “This Is Amazing Grace” (featuring Onaje

Jefferson), which turns a standard pop-rock arrangement into a gospel shuffle featuring swung sixteenth notes and complex syncopations.

Thorough analysis of these three songs demonstrates The Recording Collective’s ability to arrange in various tempos, styles, and complex rhythm patterns. These new arrangements are also compared to their original contemporary Christian counterparts,

4 noting the musical modifications made in the Recording Collective arrangements. Lead sheet transcriptions are provided in the appendices. These charts give an accurate notational window into the treasure trove of gospel techniques and arranging prowess from which a clear “Recording Collective sound” can be identified.

Chapter Five aims to analyze original gospel arrangements created for this project. I have written five original arrangements of contemporary worship songs in the gospel style of The Recording Collective. The song list includes “Lion and the Lamb” by

Bethel Music and Leeland Mooring; “” by ; “Worthy of

Your Name” by Passion; “Yes I Will” by Vertical Church; and “King of Kings” by

Hillsong Worship. Each song comes from a different non-gospel artist and provides opportunities to create fresh gospel arrangements in various tempos, styles, and meters.

The influences of the Recording Collective listed in Chapter Four, as well as gospel music research found in Chapters Two and Three, has been employed in creating these new arrangements. As with the Recording Collective transcriptions, lead sheets and rhythm charts have been created for these arrangements. In order to provide in-depth analysis, this chapter focuses on only three of these arrangements: “Lion and the Lamb,”

“King of Kings,” and “Yes I Will.” Comparisons have been made to the recordings by the original artists, demonstrating the similarities and differences between the original source material and the newly created gospel arrangements.

Chapter Six documents the recording and production process, including all personnel, equipment, software, and studios used. A key component of the urban gospel style is one of improvisation and a certain flexibility and freedom given to the instrumentalists and vocalists. As such, this chapter notes the magical moments in the

5 studio in which a player or singer deviates from my charts and add their own stylistic interpretation to the process.

The final chapter concludes and summarizes the paper. One of the most important implications for this project is its usefulness in corporate worship settings. This project will benefit other musicians by introducing them to complex musical techniques and providing them with well-crafted sheet music and recordings. The conclusion emphasizes the value of creating notated and recorded arrangements in this style and exploring the ways in which it can give churches of all backgrounds the ability to connect to a wider audience through the use of urban gospel techniques in congregational worship.

Chapter One – Historical Background

The music of The Recording Collective belongs to a newly emerging subgenre of gospel music that I call “gospel fusion,” in which worship songs primarily written by white are arranged and performed with contemporary gospel music techniques. The term fusion is used because in this style, key musical elements of many non-gospel artists are fused together with the stylistic techniques of gospel artists. The result is a genre that retains many of the musical components that it has absorbed, while simultaneously remaining squarely within the gospel . A clear understanding of the history and development of gospel music is essential before analyzing the music of

The Recording Collective, and certainly before arranging music in this style.

While gospel music has multiple manifestations in white and black communities, this paper’s use of the term “gospel music” follows the usage among African

Americans and refers to . Don Cusic notes that unlike other forms of gospel music, black gospel has “a distinctive, identifiable sound making much use of -derived rhythms and blues ” (Cusic 2011, 53). Gospel music combines

“religious lyrics, the biblically based storytelling of the , the close harmonies of jubilee, the rough-edged testifying voices of African-American preachers, and the beat and improvisational musical and lyrical characteristics of the blues” (Darden 2014, 90).

James Kinchen considers gospel music to be both a genre and a style (Kinchen

1986, 11). It is a genre because “it is an established and identifiable class of music in

6

7

which people create” and a style because “it can be—and often is—imposed on virtually any type of musical material, in much the same way that a jazz musician can take a show tune, a ballad, a spiritual, etc. and treat it so that it emerges sounding very much like an original jazz composition” (Kinchen 1986, 11).

Kinchen also lists five major reasons for the popularity of gospel music over the years. First, there is a cultural connection to the black community. He states that gospel music “is not only a cultural identifier, but also a cultural unifier. It is a powerful vehicle for bringing together people who share a common history, common experiences, and reactions to those experiences” (Kinchin 1986, 12). Secondly, there is a social impact as gospel music brings communities together. The third reason is the aesthetic impact as gospel music gives artists a powerful medium of expression. The fourth reason is the religious connection. The word gospel means “good news” and for many, “the music and the message are inextricably intertwined. It has profound personal meaning and is something they feel to be worth sharing” (Kinchin 1986, 12). Lastly, Kinchen considers gospel’s recreational impact, saying, “it is invigorating and cathartic. Gospel music is fun!” (Kinchin 1986, 12).

Early Roots

Gospel music emerged as its own distinct genre in the 1930s, drawing from

“spirituals, jubilee singing, the blues, and hymnody from various traditions.” (Shearon et al. 2012). Early on, the differences between black and white gospel music was “more in its performance practice than in its content” (Wilhoit 2005b, 293). Additionally, the roots of gospel music in the black community go back much farther than white evangelists

(Wilson-Dickson 1992, 201). Even contemporary gospel music shares traits with the

8

African music that slaves brought to the Americas; these include musical elements like call-and-response, rhythmic dominance, blue notes, frequent improvisation, and the use of music as a teaching tool (Shearon et al. 2012).

Though gospel music traces its roots back to the early black American experience, it is notably different than the black spirituals that came before it. Teresa Reed considers gospel music and spirituals as two different approaches to early hymnody available to black Americans. She says, “while the slaves welded, reworked, and simplified a good many of these into what we now call spirituals, postslavery black Pentecostals enlivened many of the same hymns with upbeat tempos, vocal embellishment, and instrumental complexity” (Reed 2012, 17).

At the turn of the twentieth century, the “sanctified church” movement began to grow as an extension of modern Pentecostal revivals. The praise and worship style of the sanctified church was not constrained by traditional concepts of worship and made use of secular musical elements such as , blues, and jazz (Wilhoit 2005b, 293).

Andrew Wilson-Dickson credits Charles Tindley (c. 1851-1933) as the “essential stepping-stone to the establishment of gospel music” (Wilson-Dickson 1992, 203).

Tindley, a Methodist preacher and , was the first black American to publish an original song collection. In 1902, he pastored the Bainbridge Street Methodist Church, where he once served as sexton. In addition to preaching and growing the church membership, Tindley wrote gospel music that was “focused on concerns specific to black

Christians” (McNeil 2005a, 400). These songs made use of the pentatonic scale and allowed for improvisation. In 1927, he formed the Tindley Gospel Singers, one of the first church singing groups to be accompanied by a piano.

9

1920s - 1930s

While Charles Tindley’s original songs laid the textual foundation for gospel music, it was the blues-based music of Thomas Dorsey (1899-1993) that established its harmonic and rhythmic trajectory. Andrew Wilson-Dickson compares the two, saying,

“Where Tindley’s songs have an immediacy and directness which spring from straightforward melodies and the simple and slow harmonic rhythms that accompany them, Dorsey’s songs are linked closely to the harmonic tensions and complexities of the expressive language of the blues” (Wilson-Dickson 1992, 203). Dorsey, known as the

“Father of Gospel Music,” was a former bluesman who incorporated musical components and performance practices from his secular music career into both white and black sacred hymns and songs (Robinson-Martin 2009, 595). At that time, applying jazz and blues elements to sacred music was a revolutionary idea (Reich 2010, 9) and Dorsey’s music was initially met with resistance by the more established Protestant churches in , but was welcomed by Pentecostal congregations. Eventually, Dorsey’s music made its way into the youth of Pilgrim Baptist Church, where it gained even more popularity. It wasn’t long before adult choirs were singing his gospel music (Shearon et al. 2012). Speaking of his music, Dorsey said, “I wanted to get the feeling and the moans and the blues into the songs. It had that beat, that rhythm. And people were wild about it”

(Reich 2010, 9). Two of Dorsey’s songs were performed at the 1930 National Baptist

Convention meeting in Chicago, and the reaction from those in attendance “charted the direction for black gospel” (Cusic 2011, 52).

In addition to writing gospel songs, Thomas Dorsey was a “promoter for gospel music and its most visible champion within the African American community” (Shearon

10 et al. 2012). In 1932, he established the Dorsey House of Music, a publishing company for his gospel songs, and “the first business whose sole concern was the commercial cause of black gospel” (Wilson-Dickson 1992, 204). Before the 1930s, gospel music’s commercial interests were limited primarily to preachers recording their sermons while being backed up by a team of vocalists (Houchens 2013, 25). In 1939, Dorsey began touring with vocalist Mahalia Jackson (1911-1972), and together they kicked off the

Golden Age of gospel music (Shearon et al. 2012).

1940s - 1950s

Known as “The Queen of Gospel,” Mahalia Jackson was one of the most acclaimed gospel artists of the mid-twentieth century. She recorded numerous with Columbia Records and was the recipient of four Grammy awards. Jackson was popular among both white and black audiences. According to Thomas Dorsey, Mahalia

“was extremely personable with her audiences and she possessed a way of eliciting physical responses from them” (Jabir 2009, 651). Her recording career coincided with the rise of gospel records in the 1940s. By the 1950s, gospel music was being performed across the country in cities like Chicago, , New York, and (Houchens

2013, 25). Jackson’s recordings helped create “a conscious sense of self-identity” for black gospel, further distinguishing itself from the traditional forms of gospel music

(Wilhoit 2005b, 293). Jackson sang spirituals, older hymns, and many of Thomas

Dorsey’s newly written gospel songs. She was often accompanied by piano or organ, though as her recording career progressed, so did the grandeur of her with the addition of orchestral instruments and chorus (Shearon et al. 2012).

11

“Professor” Alex Bradford (1927-1978) was another artist who helped push gospel music into the mainstream (Shearon et al. 2012). Bradford, who earlier in his career toured with Mahalia Jackson, was known for his multi-octave voice and prodigious composition and arranging ability. His vocal group, “The Specials,” introduced many new instruments and sounds to the genre, along with an “outlandish sense of choreography and costuming,” perhaps giving a glimpse of the soul music genre to come. Bradford recorded with many gospel labels, and each record featured grander instrumentation and more complex arrangements (Darden 2005, 49).

1960s / 1970s / 1980s

Alex Bradford’s music was part of a larger trend that saw the expansion of instruments in gospel music. By the 1960s, , electric guitars, and percussion were being used regularly by gospel artists. By the 1970s, strings and brass were being added (Jefferson 2013, 56). Building upon the foundation laid by Thomas

Dorsey, the harmonic language of gospel would also be expanded during this time. The era of contemporary gospel music arrived as artists like Edwin Hawkins (1943-2018) began using altered chords with more frequency, coupled with a smoother, rhythm-and- blues-inflected style (Butler 2005, 140) (Jefferson 2013, 59). In the mid-1970s the Edwin

Hawkins Singers’ “Oh Happy Day” became a mainstream hit (Headlam 2011, 182).

This ongoing expansion of harmony, rhythm, and instrumentation also coincided with the rise of soul music, a secular genre that combined elements of gospel and . Many artists, including , , and , were able to shift from gospel to soul, due in part to the similarities of the two genres

(Shearon et al. 2012).

12

The 1970s also saw the birth of the early praise and worship movement.

According to Deborah Smith Pollard, “The label ‘praise and worship’ is used within the

Christian Church in reference to a particular musical repertoire and mode of performance that emerged during the last decades of the twentieth century” (Pollard 2008, 18). This style of worship music was supported by newly-formed record labels such as Maranatha!

Music, Integrity, Vineyard Music, Hillsong, and Hosanna! (Pollard 2008, 27). Praise and worship music was emerging in both black and white congregations, as a way to counteract the lack of engagement among young people (Pollard 2008, 24). In black churches, this led to the rise of contemporary gospel, which shed some of the “sanctified church” elements like call-and-response and choral refrains, instead taking cues from by incorporating “more elaborate uses of harmony and refined vocal styles” (Boyer and Eskew 2001, 180).

Despite these stylistic changes, traditional gospel artists were still able to wield influence among listeners and performers of gospel music. One of the most influential traditional artists of the 1970s was (1931-1991). In addition to his many gospel records, Cleveland fostered new talent and influenced an entire generation of gospel artists as founder and president of the Gospel Music Workshop of America. Don

Cusic describes the Workshop’s positive contributions to the genre, saying, “With the slogan ‘Where Everybody is Somebody’ and the underlying that everyone is someone important in the eyes of God, Cleveland’s convention not only helped singers and musicians with their music, it also lifted their hearts, minds, and spirits” (Cusic 2011,

58).

13

Gospel music continued its split into traditional and contemporary camps in the

1980s. Though James Cleveland’s “raw, gutsy, blues-based soul sound” had fallen out of favor with younger gospel audiences, he was able to inspire the rising generation of contemporary artists (Cusic 2011, 59). One such artist was Andrae Crouch (1942-2015), who, in addition to Cleveland, was inspired by artists from many different genres including blues, jazz, and pop (Gersztyn 2005a, 92). Crouch wrote one of his most famous songs, “The Blood Will Never Lose Its Power” when he was only fourteen years old (Gersztyn 2005a, 92). Because of his association with the “ Movement” of the

1960s and 1970s in his native Southern California, Crouch was one the cutting edge of the contemporary Christian music scene. His music, described as “gospel sung over rock beats,” resonated with both white and black audiences (Shearon et al. 2012). Like James

Cleveland before him, Andrae Crouch would influence the next generation of gospel artists. Pastor (b. 1958) credits Crouch’s music with “having opened the door for today’s praise and worship explosion” (Pollard 2008, 25).

Marvin Winans is part of Family, considered to be Detroit’s “first family of gospel music” (Simmons-Hodo 2005, 428). The son of gospel artists David and

Dolores (Mom and Pop) Winans, Marvin, along with his brothers, Carvin, Ronald, and

Michael, formed a vocal group called “The Winans.” The group’s career took off in the mid-1980s, when they were discovered by none other than Andrae Crouch. According to

Simmona Simmons-Hodo, Mom and Pop Winans “fine-tuned their children to deliver unabashedly evangelistic music in a modern style that attracted not only young people but fans who might not have responded to gospel’s more traditional forms” (Simmons-

Hodo 2005, 427). No strangers to the musical legacy of their hometown Detroit, The

14

Winans pushed gospel music forward with harder beats and rhythms (Shearon et al.

2012). Their younger siblings, BeBe and CeCe, mixed stylistic elements of with gospel lyrics and, working with some of the world’s best music producers, raised the bar for contemporary gospel artists (Shearon et al. 2012).

With an increasing level of polished production and the influence of R&B and other secular sources, the gospel began to shift its focus from congregational singing to solo and ensemble performance (Wilhoit 2005, 293-94).

However, some churches, like the West Angeles , found ways to blend these two mediums. In the late 1980s, they began recording a series called “Saints in Praise,” which opened the door for , often called the “architect of urban praise and worship” (Pollard 2008, 26).

1990s

Fred Hammond (b. 1960) got his start singing and playing bass with The Winans in the 1980s. His solo career began in 1991, in which he released albums that had an “in- concert feel” (Bush 2020). Inspired by the songwriting of Marvin Winans, Hammond

“developed a sensitivity to vocal line and harmonies that has made him one of the most successful writers and producers in the gospel industry” (Cox 2005, 172). His music has an urban style, incorporating elements of R&B, hip-hop, grooves, and gospel vamps. Hammond was inducted into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame in 2001 and continues to record new music and collaborate with other current gospel artists (Cox

2005, 173).

Another influential gospel artist of the 1990s is Hezekiah Walker (b. 1962).

Known as the “Pastor to Hip-Hop,” Walker led the way in bringing urban hip-hop sounds

15 into gospel music and the (Price 2005, 414). Signed to Benson Records in

1991, Walker’s Love Fellowship Crusade Choir was one of the first choirs to mix traditional gospel with R&B and hip-hop, innovating the “urban” sound that would define gospel music in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries (Price 2005, 414).

The late 1990s saw the rise of one of gospel music’s best-selling and best-known artists: Kirk Franklin (b. 1970). Like many other contemporary gospel artists, Franklin’s music was influenced by Andrae Crouch and James Cleveland (Gersztyn 2005b, 132).

Like James Cleveland before him, Kirk Franklin performed with a variety of singing groups, writing music to showcase the talent of a full ensemble. Franklin “pushed gospel music further than it had ever gone, incorporating rap, funk, hip hop, world music, and even rock into the genre, while still featuring overtly religious lyrics and gospel’s famed choral style” (Shearon et al. 2012). In 1994, Kirk Franklin and The Family released the single “Why We Sing,” which received significant from both Christian and R&B radio stations. The album Kirk Franklin and the Family became the first gospel music album to go platinum (Gersztyn 2005b, 132).

In 1997, Franklin took over the leadership of God’s Property, “a fifty-voice inner- city choir and five-piece band composed of at-risk young people of various ages, ranging from sixteen to twenty-six” (Gersztyn 2005b, 132). That same year, they released God’s

Property from Kirk Franklin’s Nu Nation, which is best known for the hit single

“Stomp.” The for “Stomp” was the first gospel video to air on MTV. The song was a smash hit for both white and black radio audiences and the album went triple platinum in the and won a Grammy Award, two Billboard Music Awards, and two Dove Awards (Gersztyn 2005b, 132).

16

2000s and Beyond

Heading into the twenty-first century, world music elements began to influence gospel music to a greater degree. Caribbean rhythms and accents appear in Kirk

Franklin’s “Speak to Me, Lord Jesus” and the sounds of Jamaican can be found on

Donnie McClurkin’s 2000 album Live in London and More (Butler 2005, 141).

Continuing in this stylistic exploration was Israel Houghton (b. 1972), who burst onto the scene as one of the most popular and musically eclectic gospel artists of the

2000s. Known for “compositional creativity and musical versatility,” Israel Houghton and his vocal group, New Breed, are “one of the most respected musical groups in the contemporary urban gospel world today” (Curry 2015, 15). In 2001, Israel & New Breed captivated audiences in both white and black congregations with the release of New

Season. This album helped capture the “live worship service” sound and was taken from a live recording at Cornerstone Church in Toledo, Ohio. One of the best-known songs from this album is “You Are Good,” which has been programmed heavily in both white and black churches. The music of Israel & New Breed is described as “vibrant” and

“genre-hopping,” embracing “gospel, urban, funk, salsa, and Afro-pop” (Larkin 2006).

Deborah Smith Pollard describes Israel’s music as “sonic fusion,” crediting it with broadening the musical tastes of its listeners. She says that Israel’s music “has become welcoming to fans of various ethnic and racial backgrounds and thus has expanded the range of musical forms and artists many are willing to accept and enjoy” (Pollard 2008,

32). Due to its eclectic blend of musical influences, Pollard considers Israel’s genre to be

“un-classifiable” (Pollard 2008, 32).

17

Another current unclassifiable and genre-bending gospel artist is Tye Tribbett (b.

1976). Tired of trying to fit his music into a category, Tribbett coined a new term:

“kingdom music” (Sound Field 2019, at 9:59-10:09). He champions the use of diverse musical styles as a means of effective evangelism, saying, “We embrace all forms of music so we can reach all forms of people with one message” (Sound Field 2019, at

10:32-10:37). Tribbett’s first solo album was released in 2010. His 2013 live album,

Greater Than, won two Grammy Awards, including Best Gospel Album (Monger 2020).

Gospel music continues to evolve and adapt to the musical tastes of its broadening and diversifying twenty-first century audience. Contemporary gospel, aimed at young audiences both inside and outside the church, continues to blend styles and blur genre lines, even influencing other commercial music genres (Maultsby 2010, 185-6). Even as performance practices and stylistic influences shift, gospel music’s “greatest distinctive element,” its sacred lyric, remains unchanged (Shearon et al. 2012).

Trading Zones

With the expansion of media throughout the twentieth century, many long- standing cultural barriers between white and black audiences were weakened, and gospel music (along with other genres) began to be consumed by a diversifying audience. During and after World War II, radio created what Susan J. Douglas calls

“trading zones” between black and white cultures (Darden 2014, 108-9). These trading zones were further developed as monolithic radio networks declined and were replaced by “numerous independent radio stations that provided the music that many of their listeners had rarely been able to hear in the past—gospel, rhythm and blues, country and western” (Darden 2014, 108-9).

18

Mahalia Jackson was one of the first gospel artists to flourish in these new trading zones. By 1950, Jackson was performing in Carnegie Hall. In 1953, she toured Europe, singing to audiences who were already familiar with her music because of radio, television, and records imported from the United States (Butler 2005, 139). She gained even greater exposure among white listeners in 1954 with the debut of her Sunday night

CBS radio show and a record deal with Columbia. Instead of Mahalia’s usual piano or organ accompaniment, her Columbia recordings featured strings, chorus, and orchestra.

Don Cusic discusses the stylistic ramifications to gospel music during its rise as a commercial music powerhouse, saying, “The economic panacea of selling black music to white buyers has long been a part of the music industry and now permeates black gospel, letting black gospel have a larger audience, but watering it down from a raw sound to one more palatable for commercial tastes (Cusic 2011, 59-60).

Network television, followed years later by its more wide-ranging cable counterpart, allowed artists to connect with audiences from outside their own racial and ethnic groups. Networks like BET and TBN featured many black artists in the broadcast of praise and worship music (Pollard 2008, 26).

Another black artist with a successful career among white audiences is Larnelle

Harris (b. 1947). Harris used this success to promote racial integration within the gospel music community. According to Mark Allan Powell, he “spoke out in interviews concerning what he called ‘a legacy of intentional segregation’ in the field, and he sought to remedy this situation by performing in settings where had rarely been featured” (Powell 2005, 177). By the 1980s, the , an organization representing both white and black gospel music, began to diversify its Dove

19

Award nominees, recognizing along with other black singers like Ron

Kenoly and Alvin Slaughter. Today, the Dove Awards include categories for Traditional and Contemporary Gospel, along with Rap/Hip-Hop/Dance (Headlam 2011, 182-3).

Gospel Fusion and The Recording Collective

As digital technology enables greater cultural exchanges across different cultural communities, gospel music continues to both absorb and influence other genres of music.

This brings us to the aforementioned subgenre of gospel fusion, a twenty-first century artform that builds upon the legacy of adapting sacred music from white church contexts into musical formats popular in black congregations. This legacy can be traced back to

1801, when Richard Allen, who founded the African Methodist Episcopal Church, published the first hymnal for black congregants. Many of the hymns he chose were written by white hymnodists like the Wesley brothers and (Reed 2012, 17).

At the beginning of the twentieth century, black churches were singing the same Fanny

Crosby and songs as their white counterparts (Wilhoit 2005b, 293). In 1921, the National Baptist Convention published Gospel Pearls, a songbook that included traditional Isaac Watts hymns alongside popular gospel songs (Wilson-Dickson 1992,

203).

Israel Houghton’s 2010 cover of the well-known Chris Tomlin song “Our God” was one of the first mainstream gospel fusion recordings. In the late 2010s,

Multitracks.com formed The Recording Collective and released three EPs: Gospel Vol. 1:

Born is the King (2016), Gospel Vol. 2: Every Praise (2017), and Gospel Vol. 3: Yes and

Amen (2019). These productions showcased new gospel arrangements of worship songs by artists already popular in primarily white congregations, such as Chris Tomlin, Cory

20

Asbury, Planetshakers, and . In 2017, Hillsong Worship joined the gospel fusion movement with “ - Gospel Version,” a fresh arrangement that makes extensive use of reharmonization and tight, three-part vocal harmony. Charlotte, North Carolina-based created a spin-off musical group called Elevation Collective in 2018 and released the album Evidence. This album contains a collection of Elevation Worship songs rearranged and recorded by prominent gospel recording artists including Israel Houghton, , and Tye

Tribbett.

Chapter Two – Gospel Instrumentalists and Their Techniques

A study of gospel music would not be complete without a closer look at the role of musical instruments and the techniques employed by gospel instrumentalists. The

“gospel sound” is influenced heavily by frequently used instruments and timbres along with distinctive jazz and blues-based harmonic structures. As the genre has grown and evolved over the years, there has been a rise in complexity and virtuosity amongst gospel instrumentalists. According to gospel drummer Devon Curry, “Contemporary urban gospel is the result of over one hundred years of musical innovation and maturation.

Through this time, the musicality and technical ability of the musicians has increased exponentially” (Curry 2015, 5). Instrumentalists, especially guitarists and drummers, were not always at the forefront of black sacred music. The black holiness churches were among the first to use musical instruments in their services, some of which were considered to be “of the devil” by other congregations (Cusic 2011, 51). While gospel music can be notated, it is primarily an aural art form. Consequently, each performer is given a great deal of expressive freedom when making music, even within ensemble settings (Kinchin 1986, 11). Instruments play a powerful role in establishing and reinforcing rhythmic structures in gospel music. These rhythms help to reinforce gospel’s sacred lyrics at a fundamentally psychological level. According to Gerard van der Leeuw,

“words develop a concentrated power that is feared when they are metrically organized—

21 22 strengthened by stricter control through repetition, rhyme, alliteration, parallelism, and refrain” (Leeuw 1963, 117).

Performer and researcher Trineice Robinson-Martin divides gospel music into four broad styles, each based on unique instrumental techniques: traditional, southern, inspirational, and contemporary. Traditional gospel consists of “basic through-composed melodies, simple arrangements (no modulations of key or change in tempi) and modest accompaniment (piano and/or organ)” along with a sparing use of improvisation based on diatonic or pentatonic scales (Robinson-Martin 2009, 597).

Southern or “preaching style” gospel adds elements of blues and rural black to the mix, with elements such as “key changes and spaces in the music for narration.” This style also makes use of a full rather than just piano and organ. It also features a greater use of improvisation, adding blues scales to the already established diatonic and pentatonic scales (Robinson-Martin 2009, 597).

The inspirational gospel style includes music from contemporary Christian music and “white” gospel genres. This style makes use of “through-composed melodies, moderate to complex forms, and arrangements that include key modulations, tempo changes, ritards, tags, and orchestrated interludes.” Inspirational gospel adds mixolydian scales to the already-used diatonic, pentatonic, and blues scales (Robinson-Martin 2009,

598).

The fourth and final style is contemporary gospel, the most stylistically diverse category blending “musical and performance practices of blues, jazz, R&B, soul, hip-hop, rap, and rock with the core elements of gospel music performance” (Robinson-Martin

2009, 598). Contemporary gospel pushes the technical boundaries of its players, making

23 great use of “elaborate introductions, musical transitional passages or bridges, horn runs, licks, riffs, and countermelodies” along with interludes which feature instrumental solos

(Robinson-Martin 2009, 598). This style also has the most eclectic collection of instrumental timbres, including “full rhythm section with horns, drum machines, [analog and digital] , and vocal effects” (Robinson-Martin 2009, 598). In addition to the diatonic, pentatonic, blues, and mixolydian scales, instrumentalists in this style also use half-diminished and whole-tone scales, along with a greater use of nonharmonic tones (Robinson-Martin 2009, 598).

As the contemporary gospel style makes use of so many different genres and techniques, its instrumentalists must demonstrate a certain versatility and flexibility in their performing. According to Arthur “LA” Buckner, “pioneers like Andrae Crouch and

Kirk Franklin have been mixing gospel with everything from funk, to rock, to hip hop.

It’s this cross pollination of genres that makes gospel music so adaptable to the times, and why gospel musicians are so versatile: we play it all” (Sound Field 2019, at 9:09-9:31).

While instrumentalists play a powerful role in shaping the sound of gospel music, they must work in tandem with the vocalists who deliver the sacred lyrics of the genre.

The primary function of a gospel instrumentalist is that of an accompanist. As in most other forms of sacred music, instruments in the black church play a supportive role, regarding the human voice as “the primary instrument” (United States Conference of

Catholic Bishops 2007, 86). M. Roger Holland II takes this responsibility a step further, saying, “the playing of these instruments should inspire the singing” (Holland 2014, 26).

24

Piano

Music scholar Dave Headlam considers the piano to be “the primary instrumental signifier of the gospel song” (Headlam 2011, 182). In gospel music, the piano has remained “the instrument of choice for congregational, ensemble, or solo playing” throughout much of the twentieth century (Wilhoit 2005c, 301).

Pianist and music educator M. Roger Holland, II describes the pianist’s role as both supporting accompanist and conversation partner. One of the major functions of the piano is comping, or accompanying, in which a keyboardist “will play an accompaniment that is independent of the melody, using harmony (chords), rhythm, and perhaps counter- melodies to support the main vocal or melodic line” (Holland 2014, 27). The second function is doubling, in which the keyboardist “‘doubles’ the melodic line with exact rhythms in the accompaniment” (Holland 2014, 27). In the absence of a full rhythm section, the pianist, unconstrained by the need to blend with other players, has the ability to change the harmonic structures of a song through the use of chord substitutions; this is another way in which the pianist can be a “conversation partner” while maintaining its accompaniment status.

Around the turn of the twentieth century, the piano was already rising in popularity in church settings, specifically revival meetings and Sunday school programs.

The piano provided more rhythmic energy in worship services than its keyboard predecessor, the organ. According to Wilhoit, “by 1900, it had already become evident that the piano—with its more percussive quality and lilting possibilities—proved a much better instrument than the organ for accompanying gospel music” (Wilhoit 2005c, 300).

25

The gospel piano style, along with its blues and boogie-woogie cousins, traces its roots back to the barrelhouse style of playing (York 2011, 130). Developed in the

“whorehouses, gambling dens, bars and lumber camps of the American South,” barrelhouse playing was innovative in its use of embellishments including grace notes, short glissandi, and tremolos (York 2011, 130). Most chords would be major or minor and would include “sevenths, major sixths, and the occasional passing diminished chord”

(York 2011, 131). Wilhoit describes barrelhouse as “a pianistic approach to blues-based music” (Wilhoit 2005c, 300). One of the first well-known gospel pianists to play in the barrelhouse style was “Blind” Arizona Dranes (c. 1905-1963). Dranes played in

Pentecostal and Holiness churches in her native , where she “defined the essential elements of the gospel piano style” (York 2011, 132). Some of her notable techniques include left hand bass figures, middle register supporting and harmonizing the melody, and fills and countermelodies in the upper register. Dranes’ harmonic language was taken

“straight from the Protestant hymnals,” consisting of diatonic and occasional diminished passing chords. She played both straight and swung rhythms and made much use of syncopation (York 2011, 132).

In addition to ragtime and blues influences, gospel piano playing was heavily influenced by rhythm and blues from the 1940s onward. Notable gospel pianists of this era include (1907-1969), (1924-1973), James Cleveland, and

Mildred Falls. The gospel vamp, “a repeated phrase or series of chords over which the singer can improvise” was a technique Falls used while accompanying Mahalia Jackson

(Young 1997, 110).

26

Known for her light touch, rich tone, and extensive harmonic knowledge, Roberta

Martin was another transformative figure in this era. Though she brought elements of into her performances, Martin “developed a series of chord substitutions and harmonic cadences that are still part of the gospel sound today” (York 2011, 138).

She was an innovative pianist who relished playing in compound meters and slow tempos. Many of her powerful performances would conclude with “dramatic ‘cascading chords’” (Shearon et al. 2012).

James Cleveland was known for developing another gospel staple: “a rolling bass contrasted with accented upper notes over a thick middle register” (Wilhoit 2005c, 301).

Cleveland brought a heightened sense of rhythmic energy to the keyboard, an essential tool to keep his large gospel choirs unified and on beat. His style is described as

“sensational,” and featured “strong, clanking chords, the heavy pedal alternating with the limp, lyric right hand.” (York 2011, 138).

Hammond Organ

Traditional gospel artists relied heavily on church for their accompaniment. Estelle Allen, another accompanist for Mahalia Jackson, provided a steady foundation on the organ for songs like “Keep Me Every Day” and “God Shall

Wipe All Tears Away.” Allen kept her accompaniment simple, following standard chord progressions and avoiding embellishments. In 1939, the combination of piano and

Hammond organ was introduced to gospel music by and music publisher

Kenneth Morris (1917-1989). The two instruments were able to work in tandem; the percussive piano could play rhythmic figures while the organ undergirded the sound with sustained chords. The Hammond organ added a vocal quality to the lineup of instruments

27 and its vibrato could match that of a gospel choir (York 2011, 139). The teamwork of piano and organ became “the foundation of the gospel sound” until the arrival of synthesizers in the 1970s, along with new and refined production techniques (York 2011,

139).

Guitar

In the 1920s, gospel music, taking cues from blues and popular music, adopted the guitar into its instrumental roster. Prior to that, the banjo, an instrument with African origins, was used (Houchens 2013, 26). The guitar came to gospel music through

American folk and popular music (Carlin 2005, 166). By the mid-1920s, gospel records would often feature blues guitarists, sometimes performing under a different name to avoid backlash from conservative churchgoers. While their identities may have been hidden, these guitarists still played with the “typical finger-style blues accompaniment” on these recordings (Carlin 2005, 166). In the 1930s, electrically amplified lap steel guitars emerged. Around this time, electric guitars could be found in House of God churches, due to their ability to cut through the large choirs and heavy congregational singing with their amplified sound (Carlin 2005, 166-67).

One of the most popular gospel guitarists in the twentieth century was Sister

Rosetta Tharpe (1915-1973). While most gospel recordings in the 1930s and 1940s used the guitar in subdued, supportive roles, Tharpe took advantage of electric elements like distortion and incorporated rhythm and blues elements into her gospel sound (Backer

2011, 124). In the 1950s, guitarist Howard Carroll (1924-2017) provided “pop-jazz- styled” accompaniment for renowned gospel group (Carlin

28

2005, 167). The Hummingbirds’ use of a guitarist in live performances would go on to influence future generations of gospel guitarists (Shearon et al. 2012).

Drums & Percussion

Musician and scholar Thomas W. Jefferson argues that “the gospel beat is probably the first thing that most people respond to when experiencing gospel music at a church service or when listening to the radio or recordings” (Jefferson 2013, 14). The drum set has increasingly become the dominant instrument for providing this beat, on top of which all other instruments and vocalists interact. The use of drums in black traces its roots back to Africa, where drums were “the musical component most widely associated with spirit possession” (Reed 2012, 10). In the same way that early gospel guitarists were also blues musicians, early gospel drummers were well-known jazz players. Sam Woodyard (1925-1988), who accompanied Mahalia Jackson, was also a drummer for the Duke Ellington Orchestra. Panama Francis (1918-2001) played for both

Cab Calloway and (Curry 2015, 5).

Because of their volume relative to other instruments and their ability to establish defined rhythmic patterns (or “grooves”) for an ensemble, drummers in church music settings are held to ever higher standards, in terms of both technical ability and sensitivity to the sacred encounters of parishioners. In the words of Teresa Reed, “it was impossible to have a truly effective service without the presence of a competent drummer, someone both mechanically skilled and acutely sensitive to the fluctuation temperature and tempos of the worship experience” (Reed 2012, 11-12).

In addition to the drum set, auxiliary percussion has played an important part in establishing the gospel sound. The has been adopted by instrumentalists as

29 well as vocalists as a way of keeping time (McNeil 2005c, 394). With the rise of digital recording technology, as well as the infusion of polished popular music production techniques, pre-recorded and automated percussion loops have made their way into gospel recordings. These loops often include shakers, , triangles, world percussion, and sound effects.

Techniques of Gospel Instrumentalists

Gospel musicians regularly employ a variety of advanced musical techniques in the creation of gospel music. The genre is known for its “distinctive rhythms” and “bold progressions” (Kinchin 1986, 11). The expansion of gospel’s harmonic language began in the blues-influenced Golden Age but took off in the latter half of the twentieth century.

Curry states, “Since the 1960s, as gospel musicians began to create new songs for records and religious use, exploration of new harmonic territory took on heightened importance with the addition of devices such as altered chords, augmented 6th chords, and modulations.” (Curry 2015, 4).

Harmony

Guitarist Jesse Gress highlights the ways in which harmony can be modified, saying, “screwing with the harmonic climate behind any melody can have a drastic effect on how it is perceived. This can be achieved by embellishing existing chords in a progression with extensions and / or alterations, by replacing them with completely different chord substitutions, or by employing a combination of both devices” (Gress

2014, 84). Chord extensions, such as sevenths, ninths, elevenths, and thirteenths, can add layers of depth and complexity to a chord without changing its root. Another distinctive harmonic element is the diminished seventh chord, one of the most

30 frequently used chords in gospel music (Jefferson 2013, 41). Also prominent is the use of secondary dominant chords, which “increase the sense of direction and movement in a harmonic progression caused by the pull of the tritone to resolve” (Jefferson 2013, 36).

Due to gospel music’s blues influences, simple tonic chords are often played as dominant seventh chords, which provides additional layers of color and harmonic density (Jefferson 2013, 19).

Gospel musicians often use reharmonization, or chord substitutions, to add layers of complexity to well-known hymns and songs. To reharmonize is “to rewrite the chords to a piece of music for the purpose of creating a richer, sophisticated backdrop or to bring out the melody and solo” (Hal Leonard 2008). Reharmonization is a helpful way to breathe life into otherwise repetitive chord progressions often found in congregational music. One of the most commonly used chord substitutions is the tritone substitution, which “replaces a dominant or dominant-seventh chord with a seventh or ninth chord on the lowered supertonic” (Randel 2003, 847). Jefferson points out that tritone substitutions in gospel music are more often used as a way of resolving to the IV chord, rather than as a flat-II substitution (Jefferson 2013, 57). In this usage, tritone substitutions replace the secondary dominant (V/IV) as a way of setting up the subdominant chord (IV).

7 tritoneExample substitution 2.1 Tritonefor V7 to I substitution for V to I G 7 C Db7 C ˙ ˙ b˙ n˙ & ˙ ˙ b˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙

7 tritoneExample substitution 2.2 Tritonefor V7/IV to substitution IV for V /IV to IV C 7 F Gb7 F ˙ ˙ b˙ n˙ & b˙ ˙ bb˙ ˙ ˙

31

Another frequently used chord is the ii7(b5), a half-diminished chord often used in ii-V-I progressions (Jefferson 2013, 46). Modal interchange, or borrowed chords, is another harmonic technique used by gospel musicians. Jefferson states, “In gospel music, chords are frequently borrowed from the parallel minor key into the major key for expressive purposes, with the occurrence of the iv chord (including iv with an added 6th and the iv7) from the natural and harmonic minor mode being the most common”

(Jefferson 2013, 45).

Harmonic rhythm, or the rate at which chord changes occur, can be expanded or contracted when creating gospel arrangements. Backcycling is a technique that speeds up the harmonic rhythm of a song by “cycling back” to a subdominant chord via the circle of fifths (Jefferson 2013, 36).

example of backcycling (excerptExample from "Love2.3 Backcycling Theory" by Kirk found Franklin) in “Love Theory” by Kirk Franklin Gbmaj7 C m 7(b5) F 7 Bbm 11 Eb13 Abm 9 Db13 Gbmaj7 b b & b b b | Û Û Û Û Û Û |

Backcycling can appear within turnarounds, which are “chord progressions inserted at the end of a section or end of a song that serve to take the music back to a previous point—usually the beginning” (Jefferson 2013, 48).

Scales

Gospel instrumentalists, specifically keyboardists and guitarists, often incorporate various scales in their improvisatory playing. Jefferson cites the as the most widely used for right-hand licks and fills, followed by the pentatonic scale (Jefferson

2013, 32). Due to its lack of half steps, the pentatonic scale “sounds good with a variety of chord types and can be used for improvisation” (Jefferson 2013, 32).

Examples

32

Examplemajor pentatonic 2.4 Major scale pentatonic scale

& œ œ œ œ œ œ

Exampleminor pentatonic 2.5 Minor scale pentatonic scale

& œ bœ œ œ bœ œ

Exampleblues scale 2.6 Blues scale

& œ bœ œ œ bœ œ #œ

Rhythm

There are many rhythmic techniques that appear frequently in gospel music. The gospel meter is one of the most commonly used styles of playing in which 9/8 and 12/8 are used in place"Amazing of 3/4 andGrace" 4/4, respectively (Jefferson 2013, 16). Gospel meter is often used in black churches3 when singing hymns. It is not uncommon to find hymns & b 4 œ ˙ œ œ ˙ œ ˙ œ ˙ traditionally sung in 3/4,A such- mazas “Amazing- ing Grace”grace, sunghow insweet a liltingthe 9/8sound, setting in black congregations. Additionally,3 the gospel waltz provides “extra rhythmic energy and drive & b 4 ˙ œ œ ˙ œ ˙ œ ˙ œ ˙ œ ˙ œ ˙ at slower tempos” by subdividing primary beats into triplets (Jefferson 2013, 16). ? 3 œ œ ˙ œ ˙ œ ˙ b 4 ˙ œ ˙ œ ˙ œ œ ˙ œ ˙

Example"Amazing Grace" 2.7 “Amazing - gospel waltz Grace”version gospel waltz version 3 3

& b œ ˙ œ œ œ ˙ œ Aœ œ - maz - ing grace, how

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 j j & b œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ 3 œ œ œ œ œ n œ œ 3 ? b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ

3

& b ˙ œ sweet theœ œ sound,˙

3 3 3 3 3

& b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 # œ ? b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ "Amazing Grace"

3 & b 4 ˙ œ œ ˙ œ ˙ Aœ - maz - ing grace, how sweet theœ sound,˙

3 & b 4 ˙ œ œ ˙ œ ˙ œ ˙ œ ˙ œ ˙ œ ˙

? 3 œ ˙ œ ˙ œ ˙ œ ˙ b 4 œ ˙ œ œ œ ˙

"Amazing Grace" - gospel waltz version 3 3

& b œ ˙ œ œ œ ˙ œ Aœ œ - maz - ing grace, how

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 j j & b œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ 3 œ œ œ œ œ n œ œ 3 33 ? œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ Example 2.7 (continued)

3

& b ˙ œ sweet theœ œ sound,˙

3 3 3 3 3

& b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 # œ ? b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

Gospel stride is a left-hand keyboard technique that brings energy to upbeat, jubilee-style songs. Walking bass is another method to provide a foundational rhythmic drive.

walkingExample bass line 2.8 Walking bass line C 7 F 7 C 7 F 7 ? . . . œ bœ œ œ œ bœ nœ . œ bœ œ bœ œ œ #œ œ œ

Drawing from gospel’s jazz and blues roots, gospel musicians regularly play swing rhythms, often at the eighth-note and sometimes the sixteenth-note level of subdivision (Jefferson 2013, 21). Sometimes gospel songs opt for a less driving and more free-flowing level of rhythmic energy. This method is known as freestyle, a type of playing that is “highly improvisatory, emotionally driven, and Spirit-led” (Jefferson

2013, 27). While tempos and subdivisions may be relaxed, freestyle playing depends on a competent accompanist “who is sensitive and adaptable to the whims and ad libs of the performer” (Jefferson 2013, 27).

Using this large palette of musical colors, gospel musicians can breathe life into the simplest of praise choruses. As Jefferson states, “Energy and excitement must be

34 sustained for the duration of a song in order to keep the listener actively engaged”

(Jefferson 2013, 51). All of these harmonic, rhythmic, and improvisatory techniques are valuable tools that gospel musicians use in order to put their own personal stylistic stamp on a particular song. While being mindful of the primary goal of supporting ensemble and congregational singing, gospel instrumentalists use these methods to reinforce emotional connections between the listener and the text being sung.

Chapter Three – Gospel Vocalists and Their Techniques

Music scholar Dave Headlam says that “if the guitar is the quintessential blues instrument, the voice is the gospel instrument” (Headlam 2011, 171). Gospel music, with its religious lyrics, relies heavily on vocalists for musical and textual delivery. Gospel vocalists use a wide variety of techniques in their vocal production, including improvisation, melismas, blue notes, grace notes, and even less-musical elements like growls, shouts, and groans. Multiple vocalists will often harmonize with one other, in both polyphonic and homophonic settings. Additionally, in more freeform moments of worship, participants in gospel vocal ensembles may sometimes paraphrase a melody in an individualistic yet collective manner, creating a heterophonic vocal texture. Headlam emphasizes the timbral and expressive uniqueness of black voices, stating, “the vocal style and body rhythms of gospel are difficult to emulate: whereas there have been many white blues guitarists, there are few white gospel singers of similar stature” (Headlam

2011, 171).

Choirs and Ensembles

The gospel choir is one of the most notable and widely used sounds in the genre of gospel music. Choirs have been fixtures in black congregations since the early twentieth century. In the 1900s and 1910s, many northern black churches in the United

States began seeking trained musical directors to establish choirs, and a sense of cultural refinement represented therein, in their churches. While the Sanctified church embraced

35 36 expressive and charismatic forms of worship, many Baptist choirs performed “the more refined, “sophisticated” music from the European classical tradition” by like

Handel, Bach, and Mendelssohn (Wilhoit 2005a, 144). As more and more black churchgoers migrated from the South to northern cities like Chicago, they brought with them different musical tastes and preferences for worship styles. Thomas Dorsey’s blues- inspired choral music was controversial in traditional churches and highly appealing in other more charismatic contexts. (Wilhoit 2005a, 145).

The National Baptist Convention played a large role in the establishment of large vocal ensembles in churches. By 1916, composer and educator Lucie Campbell was supervising the music for the annual convention, directing one thousand-member mass choirs, and writing songs for sacred musicals and pageants (Darden, 2004, 163). Another

Baptist leader, pastor and choir director Glenn Settle (1894-1967) formed Wings Over

Jordan with members from Gethsemane Baptist Church in Cleveland. This group “earned a reputation as a refined choir capable of singing in a variety of styles ranging from

Negro spirituals to classic hymns” (Wilhoit 2005a, 145). The forty-voice choir gained a wide audience through their CBS radio program in the 1930s and 1940s.

In the 1960s, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee organized performances of “freedom choirs” on black college campuses to raise awareness of the ongoing struggle of the Civil Rights Movement. Some of most influential freedom choirs include the Selma Freedom Choir and the Gospel Freedom Choir of the Alabama

Christian Movement (Wilhoit 2005a, 146). Around this time, the choir at Newark’s

Abyssinian Baptist Church, under the direction of “Professor” Alex Bradford, recorded the album Shakin’ the Rafters (Darden, 2004, 267). While Bradford had great influence

37 on black religious choral music, his protégé James Cleveland, would take the concept of a gospel choir to new heights of record industry success (Wilhoit 2005a, 146). Cleveland would go on to found the Southern California Community Choir, winning his first

Grammy with that ensemble in 1975. Another influential figure in the development of gospel choirs and ensembles was pianist and arranger . In the late

1960s, Smallwood established “the first campus-organized college gospel choir in the

United States” at Howard University. In the 1990s, Smallwood and his choir, Vision, recorded one of the most popular gospel choir songs, “Total Praise” (Wilhoit 2005a,

147).

Many contemporary male gospel artists, balancing recording careers with full- time ministry positions, often include their church choirs in their musical endeavors.

These choirs are often the headlining acts at their church conferences and seminars. Some notable pastor-recording artists include Hezekiah Walker and “the of Gospel

Music,” John P. Kee (Shearon et al. 2012). In the latter half of the twentieth century, smaller gospel ensembles, led by contemporary gospel artists such as Kurt Carr and

Donnie McClurkin, began surpassing larger mass choirs in popularity (Wilhoit 2005a,

147). Though ensembles like the Kurt Carr Singers or Israel Houghton’s New Breed emerged, gospel choirs still remain a mainstay in the gospel music recording industry, and a constant, faithful presence in Sunday services across many black congregations.

Soloists

As in other types of music, soloists in gospel music have much more expressive freedom than ensemble singers. Don Cusic emphasizes this expressiveness as a distinctive in black gospel music, saying, “the highly individualistic style of the singers

38 distinguishes black gospel from white” (Cusic 2011, 54). Oftentimes in gospel music, a soloist will take the form of a praise and worship leader, carrying the responsibility to lead church members and praise teams in congregational singing. According to Deborah

Smith Pollard, worship leaders, by example and exhortation, “move congregants from passive observation to active participation in the worship experience so that they might usher in and experience the presence of God” (Pollard 2008, 17). Trineice Robinson-

Martin, emphasizing the spiritual duties associated with lead vocalists in the church, states, “the gospel soloist is a spiritual leader, a musical evangelist, and a vessel in which the word of God is spread through his or her ministry of music” (Robinson-Martin 2009,

596). In church contexts, singing with freedom and passion is often equated with being

“filled” by the Holy Spirit. This results in “performances characterized by high intensity, conspicuous physical responses, and a sense of improvisation— especially by soloists interpolating runs or groans” (Wilhoit 2005b, 293). Effective gospel soloists not only possess strong musicality and vocal virtuosity, they are committed at an emotional level to their sacred lyrics, and the Divine that these lyrics reference. Musician and songwriter

Barb Jungr points out how gospel singing is more than just the notes, saying,

“contemporary singers must display the same understanding of inner emotional commitment to the singing of the material, not the collection of ornamentations which define the singing style.” (Jungr 2011, 115).

Techniques of Gospel Vocalists

Many of the stylistic and technical elements of gospel singing stem from early gospel’s blues roots. Jungr emphasizes the connection between blues and gospel vocal production, noting the similar style found in gospel’s secular offshoot, soul music. She

39 says, “the connection between the vocal deliveries, styles and general performance aesthetic of blues and gospel is clear, without this singers from Thomas Dorsey, Johnnie

Taylor, Rosetta Tharpe, , to Aretha Franklin to name the more prominent could not have moved so effortlessly between the sacred and the secular” (Jungr 2011,

112). In gospel music, melodies are frequently embellished by soloists, and to an extent, ensembles. These embellishments include glissandi, harmonic and rhythmic improvisation, and grace note inflections (Jungr 2011, 114). Gospel vocalists often use growls, shouts, blue notes, and pitch bends as vehicles for soulful expression (Wilson-

Dickson 1992, 202).

Another frequently used technique is the , in which one syllable of a lyric is sustained across many notes. Melismas may take on different forms and lengths, often determined by the tempo of a song. Gospel singers use the pentatonic scale extensively in shaping their melismas (Jefferson 2013, 83). If a choir or ensemble is present, a soloist will have an even greater freedom to incorporate improvised melismas while the other vocalists continue singing the original song lyric and melody. Musicologist Ray Allen equates gospel melismas with the “moans of the spiritual,” and as such, sees their usage as a “distinctly African-American” musical element (Allen 1987, 9).

Allen also emphasizes the “ecstatic emotionalism of southern preaching” as a defining characteristic of gospel music. The preaching style of singing can be considered a sort of sanctified sprechstimme, in which musical integrity and accurate pitches take a backseat role to exhortation and spiritual declaration. Of the preaching style, Jungr says,

“indeed, the line between preaching in recognizable rhythms and pitch inflections and singing is often very thin” (Jungr 2011, 104). Another notable vocal quality in gospel

40 music is the use of chest voice, rather than falsetto singing. Writing about chest voice,

James Kinchen says, “such a use of the voice allows great power, a kind of unaffected

‘naturalness,’ and even a ‘gutsy’ sound” (Kinchen 1986, 13).

Musicologist H.C. Boyer lists the ways in which the format of a particular song informs the style of vocal participation. In slow tempo songs, a soloist may linger on a particular word or syllable for multiple measures through melismatic singing. Moderate tempo songs call for a more percussive style of singing, usually sung in a call-and- response fashion. Fast tempo songs, or “shouts,” make use of repetitive vamps in which the soloist improvises while a choir or ensemble repeats a short musical phrase over and over (Boyer 2001, 181). These refrain-based songs with their “brief and repetitious” melodies allow for easy participation for congregations and ensembles; their foundational rhythmic energy provides a strong, rhythmic pulse (Jungr 2011, 104).

In gospel music, the melody and harmonies of the vocalists are informed by the underlying instrumental accompaniment. However, there are moments of harmonic disconnect, in which dissonances are formed between the voices and instruments.

Jefferson says, “the chord progressions in the instrumental part do not necessarily have to agree with what is being sung by the choir; this creates a very dense texture and at times might produce dissonances that may sound erroneous to the listener unaccustomed to this practice” (Jefferson 2013, 67).

Professor and choral clinician Raymond Wise lists three major components of gospel singing: sound, style, and spirit. The sound is determined by the various techniques, “moans, groans, specific scales and flatted notes, many varieties of melodic and textual improvisation” that form the timbre of voice (Wise 2002, 283). The style is

41

“the manner in which core elements are executed in a performance” such as “melismas / runs, melodic alterations of the melody, or humming / moaning of an improvised melodic phrase (Wise 2002, 284). Wise considers spirit to be the “most important aspect,” forming the core of the gospel presentation. Vocal spirit is “the level of emotion and energy released by gospel performers in their pursuit of evoking the presence of God”

(Wise 2002, 284).

The lyrics and melodies of gospel music can be presented in a variety of ways, from soloists belting virtuosic, blues-influenced melismas in the heights of their range, to choirs boldly declaring sacred texts in a wall of harmonized sound. Whether it be loud or soft, low or high, the emotional connection to these sacred lyrics is what fuels and informs these powerful vocal performances.

Chapter Four – Analysis of Three Songs by The Recording Collective

James Kinchen points out the two ways in which a piece of music can be considered “gospel.” He argues, “a piece can be gospel by of composition (that is, through the intent of the creator), or by virtue of the interpretation (through the intent of the performer)” (Kinchen 1986, 11). The Gospel Fusion music of The Recording

Collective falls into the latter category, in which gospel singers and instrumentalists reinterpret and rearrange music originally composed by white, non-gospel artists and songwriters. Paul Allen of PAJAM, a Detroit-based music production company specializing in gospel, R&B, and soul music, elaborates on ways in which gospel musicians can reinterpret music, saying,

We make it our own by changing a little bit here, making it a little bit more soulful there, so it's praise and worship with a little Black Church soul….You add a little extra drums here when they [in the White Church] just have strings and piano. We add some drums, and we add some bass and some guitar, and we add some climaxes, some key changes (Pollard 2008, 31).

In addition to basic instrumental and timbral changes, The Recording Collective incorporates gospel rhythms, harmonies, and song structures into their music. This chapter studies three songs originally recorded by non-gospel artists along with The

Recording Collective’s corresponding gospel arrangements in order to identify consistent methods of employing Gospel Fusion techniques. Lead sheet transcriptions of all recordings analyzed in this chapter can be found in Appendix A, beginning on page 121.

42 43

SHMRG

A framework of analysis must first be established, through which all major musical elements will be identified. This project uses Jan La Rue’s SHMRG method, which breaks up musical analysis into five key components: sound, harmony, melody, rhythm, and growth (La Rue 1970, 10). The Sound component includes elements like timbre, dynamics, texture, and audio mixing techniques like equalization, reverb, and spatial arrangement (La Rue 1970, 23). Harmony, at its most basic level, analyzes the structure of individual chords. This component is expanded by looking at the progressions formed by these chords, and ultimately, the tonality expressed by these progressions (La Rue 1970, 40-41). Chord extensions and cadences also fall into this category. The Melody component “refers to the profile formed by any collection of pitches” (La Rue 1970, 69). Both vocal and instrumental melodies fall into this category.

La Rue stresses the importance of melody at a fundamental level, saying, “the average person probably responds more knowledgeably to melody than to any other musical element, partly because it reaches us early in the form of cradlesong and continues in adult singing of bathtub or barroom ditties” (La Rue 1970, 69). La Rue divides the

Rhythm component into two layers: surface rhythm and continuum. Surface rhythm, the more basic layer, “includes all relationships of durations, assumed to be approximately as represented by the symbols of notation” (La Rue 1970, 91). Slightly more complex, the continuum layer “goes beyond meter to represent the whole hierarchy of expectation and implication in rhythm, the consciousness of a continuing pulse from which we infer a multidimensional structure of motion that carries through sustained notes or intervals of silence” (La Rue 1970, 91). In other words, surface rhythms can be viewed as short

44 rhythmic figures or patterns, whereas continuum can be interpreted as lengthy, extended grooves formed from surface rhythms. Tempo is another element that falls within the category of rhythm. The final element of SHMRG is Growth, which ties the other elements together as “the combining, controlling element, absorbing all contributions into the simultaneous processes of Movement and Shape” (La Rue 1970, 11). , or song roadmap, falls into this category, along with elements like modulations, changes in tempo and dynamics, and overall song length. La Rue argues that the term “form” is too static, and prefers using the word “growth,” which better reflects “both the feeling of expansive continuation so characteristic of music and also a parallel sense of achieving something permanent” (La Rue 1970, 115).

“This is Amazing Grace”

Originally featured on Phil Wickham’s 2013 album, Ascension, the song “This is

Amazing Grace” is a driving, up-tempo worship anthem that is popular in many predominantly white congregations. The Recording Collective maintains the high-energy nature of this song while adding many rhythmic and harmonic twists in their Gospel

Fusion arrangement featured on the 2017 album Gospel Vol. 2: Every Praise.

Sound

The sound of the Wickham recording is loud in volume and full in texture. The instrumentation consists of drum set, bass guitar, acoustic guitar, two layers of electric guitars, synthesizers playing sustained pads as well as prominent lead lines, background vocals, and a tenor worship leader part, sung by Wickham. The parts are featured prominently in this song, covering the main hook in the intro and turnaround

45 sections. The drums and guitars are treated with a generous amount of reverb, a technique commonly found in much of modern rock-style worship music. Delay effects are used on the lead vocal, which adds to the high production value of this recording. The layers of synth pads and electric guitars create a sound is largely legato and sustained, rather than staccato or sparse.

Similar to the Wickham version, the sound of The Recording Collective version is also loud in volume and full in texture. The Recording Collective adds additional layers of instrumentation, consisting of drum set, percussion loop, bass guitar, four layers of electric guitars, piano, Rhodes, Hammond organ, synthesized bells, strings, and brass

(often stacked together), prominent three-part background vocals, and a tenor worship leader part, sung by Onaje Jefferson, a soloist, worship leader, and songwriter for the award-winning Brooklyn Tabernacle Choir and a former member of Israel Houghton’s vocal ensemble, New Breed (Jefferson 2020). Reverb is used less in this version compared to the original, resulting in a more staccato, dry, and punchy sound rather than a legato and sustained sound. Delay is used on the lead vocal at the bridge, which hearkens back to the original version.

Harmony

The Phil Wickham recording is in the key of B-flat major, using only diatonic chords throughout. The harmonic rhythm, or rate of chord changes, is relatively low: one chord is held for two measures before changing to another chord. The chord progressions in each section of the song are relatively similar and use mainly the I, IV, V, and vi chords. The intro, verses, choruses, turnarounds, and bridge all begin with the tonic chord, which further adds to the harmonic consistency. The chord extensions in this song

46 are relatively simple, with minor sevenths and major sevenths being used sparingly. The verses and bridge end in a plagal cadence (IV-I), while the choruses end in a perfect authentic cadence (V-I).

While The Recording Collective arrangement is in the same key as the original recording, B-flat major, it features a far more bold and exploratory harmonic language. In this arrangement, the verses have been completely reharmonized with a syncopated pattern of descending chords. The melody, remaining largely intact in this arrangement, interacts with these new harmonies in a fresh way. For example, in the Wickham recording the D in the melody is the third scale degree relative to the B-flat major chord.

In The Recording Collective version, the D functions as fifth scale degree of the G minor THIS IS AMAZING GRACE Music and Lyrics by chord in m. 6, and the ninth scale degreePHIL WICKHAM of the VERSIONC minor chord in m.Jeremy 7. ThisRiddle, changeJosh Farro, in & Phil Wickham harmonic context presents the melody in a fresh new way, an effect that is especially Bbunis. Bb Ebmaj7 stirring when the listener, expecting the chord progressionœ from the original song, is in b 4 . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . & b 4 | . ‰ J ‰ œ ‰ J ‰ œ œ œ . for a pleasant and exciting harmonic surprise.J J b 4 & b 4 ∑ . ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ .

PhilExample Wickham version 4.1 Phil Wickham verse Verse B E maj7 6 b b b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b & b ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 1. Who breaks the pow - er œ . of sin and dark - ness?œ . Whose love is might - y œ

G m F 9 b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b & b ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . and so much strong - er? œ The King of Glo œ- ry,œ the King a - bove allœ œ kings.œ

E maj7 B E maj7 12 b b b b & b ’’’’ ’’’’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’’

b & b Œ Ó ∑ ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Whoshakesthewhole earthœ . with ho-ly thun-derœ . andleavesusbreath-lessœ . in aweand won-der?œ THIS IS AMAZING GRACE Music and Lyrics by RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION , Josh Farro, & Phil Wickham Arr. The Recording Collective

Bb œ~~~ y y y y ~~~ œ œ bb 4 J ~~~ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ & 4 J ~ J J f b 4 & b 4 ∑ ∑ ∑

E /G /G A 7(#5) D7(#5 9) 4 b # b b œ œ^ œ^ b œ œ œ ‰ œ bœ œ ‰ œ œ œ & J œ J 47 b & b ∑ ∑

RecordingExample Collective 4.2 versionThe Recording Collective verse Verse G m9 E maj7 D m7 C m7 B maj7 A m7 G m7 E maj7 D m7 6 b b b b & b Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û R R R b & b ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ . œ Who breaks the pow - erœ of sin and dark - ness?œ Whose love is might - œy

C m7 A maj7 G m7 F m9 B 13 /D E maj7 A7(#5#9) D7(#5 9) 9 b b b b b ^ ^ & b Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ Û Û R R b & b ‰ j œ ‰ j œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ ≈ and so much strongœ- er? The King of Glo -œ ry,œ the King a - bove allœ œ kings.œ

The harmonic rhythm moves at a much faster rate than the original, with roughly three chords per measure in the verses. Chord extensions, such as major sevenths, minor sevenths, and minor ninths, are used generously. Secondary dominants also factor heavily into the harmonic structure THISof this ISrecording, AMAZING tonicizing GRACE important chords (such as Music and Lyrics by Rhythm RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION Jeremy Riddle, Josh Farro, downbeats and beginnings of new phrases) throughout. One of theseArr. The secondary Recording& Phil CollectiveWickham dominant chains can be found in m. 5, in which A7(#5) and D7(#5b9) point the listener to the goal Bb œ~~~~ of Gm9 in m. 6. y y y y ~~~~~ œ œ bb 4 J ~~œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ & 4 J J J Example 4.3 Secondary dominantf chords Secondary dominant chords Verse E /G /G A 7(#5) D7(#5b9) G m9 E maj7 D m7 4 b # b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ^ œ^ & b œ ‰ œ bœ œ ‰ œ œ Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û J J R

AnotherC m7 B notablemaj7A mG7 m7 harmonicE majD7 mC7 m7 A shiftmajG7 m Foccurs7 m9 B 13 in/ED themaAj7 7Dbridge,(#75(#59)bG9)m9 Einm awhichjD7 mC7 m7 B themajA7 bassmG7 m7 EremainsmajD7 m7 in 7 b b b b b b b b b ^ ^ a pedal& pointb ÛfunctionÛŒ‰ .Û ÛÛ ÛonÛŒ ‰B.Û-flatÛÛ Û (followingÛŒ‰ .Û ÛÛ ÛÛŒ ‰the.Û ÛchordÛ Û Û Œ progressionÛ Û ÛÛŒ‰ .Û ÛÛ ofÛÛ theŒ‰ .Û originalÛÛ ÛÛŒ‰ . Û ÛÛ R R R R R R R recording) while the keyboard synths add A-flat maj7 and B-flat maj7 chords on top,

C m7 A maj7 G m7 F m9 B 13 /DE maj7 G m11 C 7E maj7/F 15 b b b b b & b Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û R R R

N.C. B unis. B maj7 Funis. F m9 E unis. E maj9 Cunis. C m11 19 b b b b b ^ œ œ & b Û Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û J J J J

Gunis. G m11 Gunis. G m11 A unis. A maj7 Funis. E maj7/F 24 b b b b & b Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û J J J J THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 8 of 15

E maj7/F B E m7(b5)/B E m6/B 65 b b b b b b & b | | | Û Û

3 48 b & b ∑ Ó Œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ giving added interest to this portion of the song. OfOh, note, the A-flatwhoa. maj7/B-flat in m. 68 j b œ (which &containsb ‰ œthe œB-flat, Eœ-. flat,œ andœ Aœ -flatw normally found in the key∑ of E-flat major) œ œ œ œ . all that You've done forœ œ me.œ w functions as a dominant chord, foreshadowing the E-flat major chord in m. 70.

BassExample pedal point 4.4 Bass pedal point Bridge B A maj7/B B maj7 E E add2 68 b b b b b b b & b ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’

b & b THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (RECORDING COLLECTIVEŒ VERSION‰ j Œ) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 8 of 16 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Wor - thy is the Lamb who wasœ slain, yeah, wor - thy is the King whoœ con - 79 b & b Œ Œ Ó œ œ œ œ œ œ œ The backgroundquered the grave.œ vocalsœ are featuredWorœ - thyœ moreœis theprominentlyLamb whoœ wasœ inslain, this arrangement, adding triadic harmonies to the vocal lines. These vocal harmony parts almost always function

B F m9 A maj7/B G m7/B 7182 b b b b homorhythmically and tend to avoid leading tones. b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ Û ’Œ ’ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ wor - thy is the King who con - quered the grave. J b Example&Exampleb of background 4.5 Example vocal harmoniesŒ of background vocal harmonies Ó œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ - quered the grave.œ œ Worœ - thyœ is the Lamb whoœ œ was slain, œ 84 b œ œ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Ó œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Wor - thy is the Lamb who was slain, wor- thy is the King who con - quered the grave.

Melody

The melodyparts invert up!of the Wickham version follows the notes of the B-flat major scale. 88 j j b The rangeb ofœ the leadœ vocalœ partœ isœ not œvery largeœ œ(B-flatœ3 to G4).‰ œWickham’sœ ‰ leadœ vocal & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Wor - thy is the Lamb who was slain, wor - thy,œ wor - part is fairly structured, not deviating too greatly from the song’s melody. The melody is syllabic throughout, however afdrumster the only last chorus chorus, with light Wickham rhodes Chorus adds energy to close out the

90 song by singing longj melismas. Countermelodiesj are played by the prominent synth lead b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . & b œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ Œ Ó œ œ œ œ œ hook during thethy, chorus,wor - thy, and a guitarThis partis a -thatmaz -interactsing grace, with the synth lead in the intro.

93 j j b œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . & b ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ this is un - fail - ing love. œ ˙ That You would take my place, 49

In contrast, the melody of The Recording Collective arrangement features a more virtuosic lead vocal part, sung by Onaje Jefferson. The range is almost two octaves wide, sung in a high tessitura (F3 to D5). Unlike Wickham’s structured style of singing,

Jefferson begins modifying the melody early on in verse one. When the background vocalists enter at the first chorus, they take over the primary responsibility of singing the melody, thus freeing Jefferson up to improvise and enabling moments of call and response. While the background vocal parts follow the original song’s melody in a fairly

structured way,THIS Jefferson’s IS AMAZING GRACE vocal (RECORDING line incorporates COLLECTIVE VERSION many) -long Lead/Rhythm melismas, - Page 3 mostof 14 of which follow the notes of the B-flat pentatonic scale.

soloistExample singing melismas 4.6 Soloist while background’s melismas vocalists atopsing the background melody vocalists’ melody

Cunis. C m11 Gunis. G m11 23 b & b Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û J J Pitches taken from Bb pentatonic scale bb Œ Œ ‰ j & œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ place, œ œ œ

bb ‰ j Œ & œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ˙ . That You would take my place,

Gunis. G m11 A unis. A maj7 25 b b b & b Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û J J

b j & b ‰ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ that You would bear my cross. œ

b j & b ‰ œ . Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ . that You would bear my cross.

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 2 of 14 50 C m7 A maj7 G m7 F m9 B 13 /DE maj7 G m11 C 7 E maj7/F 15 b b b b b &Thisb ÛarrangementÛ Œ ‰ . Û introducesÛ Û Û Û Œ some‰ . newÛ Û ÛinstrumentalÛ Û Œ ‰ . melodiesÛ Û Û andÛ Û Ûmotifs,Û Û Û Û Ûlike the R R R sixteenth noteb jfigure heading into the chorus at m. 19 and later at mm. 51 and 91. This & b ≈ œ . œ ‰ j œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ hook also followsin awe theand woncontour- der? of ThetheKing B-offlatGlo pentatonic- ry, the King scale.a - bove all kings.

Example 4.7 Sixteenth-note figure 16th note synth figure Chorus N.C. B unis. B maj7 19 b b b ^ œ œ & b Û Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û J

bb ‰ j ‰ & œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ˙ . j This is a - maz - ing grace, yeah,œ

bb ‰ j Œ & œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ˙ . This is a - maz - ing grace,

The opening synth hook of the Wickham version is retained; however, it is slightly modified at the end to fit into the newly added secondary dominant chords.

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE Music and Lyrics by PHIL WICKHAM VERSION Jeremy Riddle, Josh Farro, & Phil Wickham Example 4.8 Phil Wickham intro Phil Wickham version Intro Bbunis. Bb b œ œ œ b 4 . œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ & 4 | J J f E maj7 4 b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . & b ‰ J ‰ œ œ œ . J

Phil Wickham version Verse B E maj7 G m F 6 b b b & b ’ ’ ’’ ’ ’ ’’ ’ ’ ’’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b & b ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j œ œ œ œ œœ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ .œ œœ 1. Whobreaksthepower ofsinanddarkness?Whoseloveismighty andsomuchstronger? TheKingofGlo-ry, theKingaboveall kings.

E maj7 B E maj7 12 b b b

b & b ’’’’ ’’’’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’’

b & b Œ Ó ∑ ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Whoshakesthewhole earthœ . with ho-ly thun-derœ . andleavesusbreath-lessœ . in aweand won-der?œ

G m F E maj7 18 b b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ | . Œ

b j & b ‰ j ‰ j Œ Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ The King of Gloœ- ry,œ the King a - bove allœ œ kings.œ œ This is a - maz - ing grace, THIS IS AMAZING GRACE 51 Music and Lyrics by RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION Jeremy Riddle, Josh Farro, & Phil Wickham Example 4.9 The Recording Collective intro Arr. The Recording Collective Recording Collective version Intro Bb œ~~~ y y y y ~~~ œ œ bb 4 J ~~~ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ & 4 J ~ J J f E /G /G A 7(#5) D7(#5b9) 4 b # b œ œ^ œ^ b œ œ œ ‰ œ bœ œ ‰ œ œ œ & J œ J

Verse G m9 E maDj7 mC7 m7 B majA7 mG7 m7 E maDj7 mC7 m7 A majG7 mF7 m9 B 13 E/D maj7 A7(#5#D9)7(#5b9) 6 b b b b b b b Rhythm ^ ^ & b ÛÛ Œ ‰ .Û ÛÛ ÛÛ Œ ‰ .Û ÛÛ ÛÛ Œ ‰ .Û ÛÛ ÛÛ Œ ‰ .Û ÛÛ ÛÛ Œ ‰ .Û ÛÛ ÛÛ Œ Û Û The original songR is a modernR pop rockR anthem Rin 4/4 time,R recorded by Wickham b & b ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j œ ‰ j at a steady 98œ bpmœ œ (œbeats.œ œperœ œ minuteœ .œ )œ. Thereœ .œœ .œ is noœ œ swingœ . œ atœ œeitherœ œ œ œthe. eighthœ œ œ-œ ≈or sixteenth- Whobreaksthepow-erœ ofsinanddarkness?œ Whoseloveis mightœy andsomuchstrongœ er? TheKingofGloœ- ry,œ theKinga-boveallœ œkings.œ note level. There are no tempo changes in the entire song. The rhythmic pulse of the song G m9 E maj7 D m7 C m7 B maj7 A m7 G m7 E maj7 D m7 12 b b b comes fromb the driving “four on the floor” kick drum patterns as well as the snare hits on & b Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û R R R beats two and four. Notably, Wickham’s drummer adds a layer of complexity in verse b j & b ‰ j ≈ œ . ‰ j two with a moreœ syncopatedœ œ œ . œkick and snareœ patternœ œ . œ, whichœ œ œ helps œavoidœ . aœ senseœ . œ of Who shakes the whole earthœ with ho - ly thun - der? œ œ And leaves us breath - lessœ

C m7 A maj7 G m7 F m9 B 13 /DE maj7 G m11 C 7 E maj7/F rhythmic15 monotony. Overall,b there is a greatb senseb of rhythmic consistencyb that binds the b & b Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û various song sections together.R R R b j &Theb Recording≈ œ . Collective arrangement features‰ j far more rhythmic syncopationsœ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ ˙ œ œ in awe and won - der? The King ofœ Gloœ - ry, the King a - bove allœ œ kings. than the original version. The most notable change, however, is the use of swung sixteenth notes throughout. The swing rhythms sound most prominent in the tambourine percussion loop and are reinforced by the other instruments and vocalists. The tempo is

105 bpm, noticeably faster than the 98 bpm of the Wickham version. This change in tempo increases the energy level of the song from the very first measure. This version builds a new rhythmic scheme from a pair of staccato eighth notes. This eighth-note pairing is used at the beginning of each measure of the verse and chorus.

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE Music and Lyrics by Rhythm RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION Jeremy Riddle, Josh Farro, Arr. The Recording& Phil CollectiveWickham

Recording Collective version Intro Bb Eb /G/AG7#D(#57)(#5b9) œ~~~ b y yyy ~~~ œ œ œ œ œ^ œ^ b 4 J œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ bœ œ ‰ œ œ œ & 4 J J J J œ J f Verse

G m9 E maj7 D m7 C m7 B maj7 A m7 G m7 E maj7 D m7 6 b b b b & b Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û R R R

C m7 A maj7 G m7 F m9 B 13 /D E maj7 A7(#5#9D) 7(#5b9) 9 b b b b ^ ^ & b Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ Û Û R R

16th note synth figure

G m9 E majD7 mC7 m7 B majA7 mG7 m7 E majD7 mC7 m7 A majG7 mF7m9 B 13 /ED maj7G m11CE7 maj7/F N.C. 12 b b b b b b b 52 b ...... ^ œœ & b ÛÛŒ‰ Û ÛÛ ÛÛŒ‰ Û ÛÛ ÛÛŒ‰ Û ÛÛ ÛÛŒ‰ Û ÛÛ ÛÛŒ‰ Û ÛÛ ÛÛŒ‰ Û ÛÛ ÛÛÛÛÛÛÛÛ ÛŒœœœ œœœ Example R4.10 StaccatoR eightR -note Rpairs beginR each Rmeasure staccato eighth -note pairs begin each measure Chorus

B unis. B maj7 Funis. F m9 E unis. E maj9 20 b b b b b ...... & b Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û J J J

Cunis. C m11 Gunis. G m11 Gunis. G m11 23 THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 4 of 15 b ...... & b Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û J . J J

Gunis. G m11 A unis. A maj7 Funis. E maj7/F B unis. B maj7 25 b b b b b b . . &Thereb Û Ûare’ a fewÛ non≈Û ‰-syncopatedÛ Û Û ’ Û quarter≈ Û ‰ Û ÛnoteÛ ’ chordsÛ≈ Û that‰ Û highlightÛ Û ’ theÛ ≈endsÛ‰ Û of J J J J phrases in the verses and choruses. These moments give a sense of rhythmic unity and b j & b ‰ œ . ∑ ‰ . r œ œ œ œ œ œ œ .œœ .œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ help punctuatethat theYou would lyricbears myat thesecross. points. œ Youœ laidœ it downfor me

b j j & b ‰ œ . Œ ‰ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ œ . œ . œ œœ œ œ that You would bear my cross. You laid down Your life œ ˙ Example 4.11 Quarter-note chords in the chorus quarter note chords in the chorus

B unis. F m9 B 7 E unis. E maj9 Cunis. A7(#9b13) D7(#5b9) 29 b b b b b - - - - & b Û Û ’ Û Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û Û J b & b œ œ œ œ Ó œ ‰ j Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ that I would be set free, (ee) œ œ b j & b ‰ œ j j ‰ j œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ that I would be set free. ˙ Oh,œ

In contrast to the bright syncopations of the verses and choruses, The Recording

Collective’s bridge opts for a simpler four-on-the-floor pattern from the kick drum. The synths still play syncopations in this part, but at the eighth-note level rather than the sixteenth-note level.

53

Growth

In terms of growth, the original version of the song primarily relies on changes in texture to add or subtract energy, rather than elements like tempo changes or modulations. The dynamic range is relatively loud, however, the volume and energy level reset themselves at the bridge, allowing for a second buildup of sound in the bridge and final chorus. There are short builds at the ends of song sections, and moments in which the absence of heavy synths gives the listener a sonic reprieve. The song length is 4’40” and the roadmap is Intro, Verse, Chorus, Turnaround, Verse, Chorus, Bridge, Bridge,

Chorus, Outro.

The Recording Collective’s arrangement is longer than the Wickham version:

5’03” compared to the original 4’40”. This is due to an additional bridge and repeated chorus near the end of the song. The roadmap of The Recording Collective version is

Intro, Verse, Chorus, Turnaround, Verse, Chorus, Bridge, Bridge, Bridge, Chorus,

Chorus, Outro.

The dynamic range is of The Recording Collective arrangement is on the loud end of the spectrum. As in the Wickham version, the volume and energy levels reset themselves at the bridge. This gives the sound and energy a second opportunity to build into the final chorus and outro. Another similarity to the Wickham version is the use of eighth-note builds at the ends of the verses and the bridge. At m. 92, the band drops out, leaving only the drum set and light interjections from the Rhodes. This helps highlight the powerful three-part harmony of the vocalists, giving the listener a new way of hearing the song before the rest of the band re-enters six measures later.

54

ExampleTHIS IS4.12 AMAZING Drums GRACE- onl(RECORDINGy chorus COLLECTIVE with lightVERSION rhodes) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 12 of 16

drums only chorus with light rhodes Chorus

N.C. B 7/F B 7 91 j j j b b ‰ y ≈ y . y . y ‰ y b ^ œ œ . . & b Û Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ j Û Û J ‰ Œ Ó bœ œ nœ . œ. # œ. bb Ó Œ ≈ œ œ œ . œ ‰ œ Œ ‰ œ Œ & œ œ œ œ y œ œ Come on and put yo' hands to-geth-er!. Hey!J Come on! j j bb ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ Œ Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ This is a - maz - ing grace, this is un - fail - ing love.

E maj9 B /A /D 94 b b bb Û. Œ Ó ‰ j Û. Û. ∑ & œ œ bœ œ. nœ. b œ. b . œ . & b Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . Œ Ó Œ ‰ œ Ooh,J come on! Oh!J j b œ œ œ œ . & b œ œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ˙ . Œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ˙ . œ ˙ That You would take my place,

A maj7 E maj7/F 97 b b b & b ∑ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û

b j œ . œ . & b ∑ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Ó Whoa! j j b œ . . . b ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ bœ ˙ . Œ ‰ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ that You would bear my cross. You laid down Your life

The Recording Collective uses the soloist and background vocalists to strategically add growth to the song. The first verse is only sung by the soloist, with the background vocalists not singing until the first chorus. The growth in vocal parts is most apparent in the bridge, which is divided into three sections. Bridge 1 is sung by the soloist only. Bridge 2 is sung by the background vocalists in unison, while the soloist improvises

55 around them. Finally, Bridge 3 features the background vocalists in three-part harmony; four measures into this section, they invert their parts to a higher tessitura, adding even more energy.

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 11 of 16

BridgeExample 3 with three-part 4.13 Bridge harmony and 3 with inversions three-part harmony and inversions

B F m9 A maj7/B B maj7 E E add2 84 b b b b b b b & b ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ Û ’ ’ ’ ’ Û ’ ’ J J 3 3 b & b ‰ œ œ . œ œ ∑ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Wor - thy œis the Lamb who was slain, He is wor - thy,

b & b œ œ œ œ Œ Ó œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Worœ - thyœ œis the Lamb whoœ wasœ slain, worœ - thyœ œis the Kingœ whoœ con -

G m7 87 b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b j & b Œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ ∑ Ó ‰ œ œ œ ooh, there's no-one like You. Hey, parts invert up! j j b œ œ œ œ œ & b œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ - quered the grave.œ œ Wor - thy is the Lamb who was slain, wor - thy,œ wor -

drums only chorus with light rhodes Chorus Inverted harmony parts are also used in the final chorus of the song, adding an E add2 N.C. 90 b j j j ‰ y ≈ y y y ‰ y extra levelb of energy to the arrangement^ simplyœ by placing the singers. in a. higher & b Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J ‰ Œ Ó tessitura. The Recording Collective version ends with a definitive B-flat major “stinger” bb ‰ j œ ‰ . œ œ œ Ó Œ ≈ œ œ œ . œ ‰ œ & œ œ R œ œ œ œ y J chord, while thehey, Wickhamwor versi- thy! on ends on a sustainedCome on Band-flatput majoryo' hands chordto-geth -thater!. fadesHey! out. j j bb œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ Œ Ó & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ thy,œ wor - thy, This is a - maz - ing grace,

56

“King of My Heart”

Featured on Starlight (Live), a 2017 live recording from Bethel Church in

Redding, California, “King of My Heart” is a powerful worship ballad full of uncomplicated, repetitive phrases. The Recording Collective retains these simple song sections while adding new material in their version, which is also found on Gospel Vol.

2: Every Praise.

Sound

The Bethel Music version is taken from a live worship service recording, in which the church congregation can be heard singing and worshipping in a large, reverberant space. The instrumentation consists of drum set, percussion, bass guitar, two layers of electric guitar, electric piano, layers of synth pads and computer-programmed effects, and alto and tenor worship leader parts, led by and Jeremy Riddle, respectively. The sound is best described as hypnotic and spacious, due to the heavy use of unique synth patches, washed-out vocal effects, and liberal amounts of reverb and delay, especially on the electric guitars and drum set. The guitars and synth pads glue the song together, filling in any and all empty sonic space. Because of the live nature of this recording, the sound is less polished than a studio recording.

In contrast, The Recording Collective version of “King of My Heart” has a less reverberant sound and the tighter, more produced sound of a studio recording. Their instrumentation consists of drum set, percussion loop, bass guitar, four layers of electric guitars, Rhodes, Hammond organ, string and lead synth patches, prominent background vocals, and a soprano worship leader part sung by Cristabel Clack, a former American

Idol contestant and co-pastor of All Nations Worship Assembly in Memphis, Tennessee

57

(Clack 2020). The Recording Collective uses a rhythm and blues approach in this arrangement, incorporating tight and restrained cross-stick drum grooves, electric guitars with minimal effects, and Rhodes and Hammond organ carrying the bulk of the sound throughout. The absence of large congregational singing and cavernous reverb creates a more intimate feeling for the listener.

Harmony

The Bethel Music version of “King of My Heart” is in the key of A major and uses simple chords like I, IV, V, and vi. There aren’t many chord extensions, save for a few minor sevenths on the vi chords. A droning pad on the tonic (A) binds the various KING OF MY HEART (BETHEL MUSIC VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 2 of 8 song sections together. The harmonic rhythm is rather spacious, with only one or two chords per measure. Each song section ends with a plagal cadence played in a signature pushed rhythm that anticipates beat three.

Bethel'sExample pushed plagal4.14 cadence Bethel’s pushed plagal cadence Chorus 12 F#m7 E sus D A F#m E sus # # & # | | Û . Û | ’ ’ ’ ’ J

# # & # œ œ œ j j j ‰ ‰ . r Œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ - som for my life. Oh, He œis myœ œsong.œ You areœ œ good,œ You'reœ good.œ

The Recording Collective retains this distinctive pushed plagal cadence throughout their arrangement. Their version is in B-flat major, a half-step higher than the

Bethel recording. Their chord progressions mirror those of the original, with a few added passing chords thrown in, creating a more active harmonic progression. Sometimes these passing chords help to emphasize the lyrics: every time the soloist sings “You are” in the

58 chorus, the instrumentalists match that rhythm by playing a passing chord (F/A and

Dm7). These passing chords create a busier harmonic rhythm when compared to the original (two or three chords per measure as opposed to one or two).

KING OF MY HEART (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 2 of 14

Example 4.15 The Recording Collective chorus with added chords Recording Collective chorus with added chords Chorus 7 12 Eb Bb Bb F/A Gm Bb/F Eb Bb Bb F/A b & b Û . Û Û Û Û . ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û Û Û Û . J P J b & b j Œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . is my song. 'Causeœ You are good, good. Oh. You are

7 7 7 15 Gm Bb/F Eb Bb Bb/D Dm Gm Bb/F b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û Û Û Û . ’ ’ ’ ’ J

b & b Œ j ‰ j Œ Œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ good, good. Oh, You are good, good.

Verse 7 18The RecordingEb Bb Bb FCollective/AGm Bb/F Eb usesBb more complexBb chordE bextensionsmaj7 Bb Bb/A likeGm majorBb/F and b & b Û . Û Û Û Û . ’’’’ Û . Û Û ’ ’ ’’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ minor sevenths and altered dominant chords.œ In additionX stick on 3 to the I, IV, V, and vi chords, J J œœœ P this arrangementb features secondary dominants like V/vi and V/IV along with chords in b Œ Œ ‰ ‰ œ Ó Œ & œœœœœ œ . œ . œœ j œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œ. œ œ . œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ Kingœof myœœheartbethewind insidemysails, œ Oh,Heœ first and secondOh. inversion.Youaregood, Thisgood. resultsOh. in2. Let athe thicker andœ more elaborate harmonic b & b ∑ ∑ Ó Œ‰ j‰ œ œ œœ œ œ ‰œ œ œœ œœ j‰ approach to the song. One of the +teammost vocals distinguishableœ œ œ œœœ œ harmonicœ changesœœ is foundœœ œ in.œ the (men 8vb) 2. Letthe King of my heartbethewind insidemysails, thean - chorinthewaves.Oh,He “praise break” in m. 77, in which D-flat is thrown into the fray, giving the song a definitive blues and “old-school gospel” quality. These blue notes, found in both the vocal and instrumental parts, turn simple tonic chords into B-flat7(#9) chords. The interaction of the D-flat against the D natural found in the first inversion B-flat7 chord on

59 beat three of m. 77 is an example of melodic/harmonic disconnect, in which a melodic pitch doesn’t belong to the underlying chord (in this case, D-flat against B-flat7). This entire “churchy” section is set up in m. 76 when the sopranos and worship leader sing a

D-flat and the band builds on a F7(#5#9) chord. KING OF MY HEART (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 10 of 14

Example 4.16 The Recording Collective’s “praise break” section

The Recording Collective's "Praise Break" section Praise Break 76 Eb Bb F7(#5#9) Bb7(#9) Bb7/D b > > & b Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ ƒ bœ bb Ó œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ Œ ‰ œ & J Oh. No, j b j b œ . bœ ˙ ‰ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ & œ . œ ˙ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ Oh. You're nev - er gon - na let me down,

7 7( 5) 7( 9) 7 78 Eb Am b D b Gm Bb/D Gm b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b j œ œ . œ & b œ ‰ Œ Ó ‰ œ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ no. No, You won't be - cause You're good.

b bœ œ œ œ nœ œ œ & b ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ Œ œ Œ bœ œ œ œ You're nev - er gon - na let me down, good,

Melody

The melody of the Bethel Music version follows the notes of the A major scale.

The range is A3 to C#5 for the alto worship leader and A2 to E4 for the tenor. The soloists establish the melodies in a structured fashion but begin to deviate with

60 improvisation and exhortation of the congregation in between vocal phrases. The opening KING OF MY HEART (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead Sheet - Page 4 of 6 piano hook in the intro suggests the upcoming melody of the verse.

Bridge 7( 9) B B 7/D E B /DF b Gm B /F E B 61The Recordingb Collectiveb bvocalb melody follows the contoursb b ofb the original, with b œ . œ . bœ œ œ . & b œ Œ Œ œ œ œ œ Ó Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ .Œ Œ œ Ó Œ ‰ œ œ œ only a few two-note slurs, anticipations, and 3slight variations added. Like the Bethel3 nev-er, No, No, no, no, no, Hey, No, no, no, Music version, the melody in this recording follows the major scale of the tonic key (B- B B 7/D E B /F D7( 9) Gm B /F 65 b b b b b b flat). Most melismasœ followœ the B-flat pentatonic scale. When the blues-inspired “praise bb œ Œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ & 3 œ 3 3 œ œ break” occurs,nev -Christabeer. lNev Clack-er gon sings- na let, a B-flat bluesAnd andYou nevD--flater will. pentatonic scale,Hey, both of

Chorus which incorporateEB B F“blue/AGm7 notes.”B /F E B B F/GA m7B /F EB BDm/D7Gm7 B /F E B B F/GAmB7 /F 68 bb b b b b b b bb b b 3 b b b b œ bb Ó≈œ œœœœ ‰œœœœœœ‰œ œœ≈ œœœœœœ‰œœ .Œœœœ‰ .œ œœœ Ó≈œ œ œ œœ ‰œœœœœ.‰‰œœœœœ œœœœœœœ. œ .ŒœŒ œ

& 3 œ œ 3 R œ 3 3 œœ œ

'CauseYouare so good,yesYouare. Oh. JYouare faithful,You'retrue, andYouareso,so, so good,so good,Oh. Youaregood,good. Example 4.17 Melismas follow blues and pentatonic scales melismas follow blues and pentatonic scales Praise Break

F7(#5#9) B 7(#9) B 7/D E 7 Am7( 5) D7( 9) 76 b b b b b b bœ œ œ œ bœ œœ j & b ’ ’ œ œ œ ‰ ’ ’ ‰ œ œ ‰ ’ ’ ’ Oh. No,J no.

Gm B /D Gm7 Cm7 Funis. 79 b b œ œ . œ bœ œ œ & b ‰ œ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ ’ ’ ‰ œ œ No, You won't be - cause You're good. Hey.J

B 7(#9) B 7/D E 7 Am7( 5) D7( 9) 81 b b b b b bb œ ‰ Œ ‰ . œ bœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ Œ ‰ œ œ & bœ œ œ J You'reR nev - er gon - na let me down, bœ hey,

Notably, this “praise break” section introduces brand new melodic material not found in the original recording. This arrangement also showcases Christabel Clack’s wide vocal range with a lead melody stretching over two octaves (F3 to G5). As in other arrangements by The Recording Collective, once the background vocalists begin singing the melody, the soloist is freed up to sing new, improvisatory material.

61

There are a few new instrumental riffs introduced in this recording, such as the sixteenth-note pickups before the verse in m. 4. Of note, the opening instrumental hook in their version is now played by the Hammond organ, and its melody is taken from the chorus rather than the verse.

KING OF MY HEART Music and Lyrics by Lead/Rhythm BETHEL MUSIC VERSION John Mark McMillan & Sarah McMillan Example 4.18 Bethel Music intro Trans. Tyler B. Williams Bethel version Intro A5 A D A F#m7 E sus D A # # 4 U & # 4 | . ‰ œ j œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ . œ ˙ p KING OF MY HEART Music and Lyrics by Lead/Rhythm RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION John Mark McMillan & Sarah McMillan Arr. The Recording Collective Example 4.19 The Recording Collective intro Trans. Tyler B. Williams Verse Recording Collective version 6 A D A Intro

# # B F/A Gm7 B /F E B Gm7 B /F E B & # | b b b b | b b| b bb 4 œ œ . ˙ œ œ œ œ Û . Û Û & 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ . ’ ’ ’ ’ . œ J œ œ œ P œ Verse 8 F m7 E sus D A A 5 B # B /D E maj7 B # # b b b b & bb# | | Û . RhythmÛ | | & ’ ’ ’ ’ J ’ ’ ’ ’ p keys/swells The Bethel Music recording is in 4/4 time and recorded at 68 bpm with no tempo

11 D A changes.7 SomeGm reoccurringD m/F rhythmicE elementsB include the four Brepeated sixteenthB /D notes # # b b b b b# & b ’| ’ ’ ’ Û . Û Û | ’ ’ ’ ’ on beats 1 and 3 of the chorus and the aforementioned anticipationsœ of beat three found in J œ œ œ both the verses and choruses. These sixteenth note figures and anticipations are retained

10 Ebmaj7 Bb F/A Gm D m/F in The Recordingb Collective version of the song. & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ The tempo of The Recording Collective version is 67 bpm, only slightly slower than the original version. Another rhythmic difference can be found in the bridge, in

Recording Collective chorus with added chords which the band plays whole notes withChorus little to no rhythmic subdivision. This is a very 7 12 Eb Bb Bb F/A Gm Bb/F Eb Bb Bb F/A b & b Û . Û Û Û Û . ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û Û Û Û . J P J

62 sparse treatment of the bridge when compared to the Bethel Music version, which features eighth-note clapping from the congregation, giving their bridge a driving energy.

Growth

The Bethel Music version relies on rhythmic subdivision and changes in instrumental texture to propel the song forward and add energy growth. Similar to “This is Amazing Grace,” the energy levels are reset at the bridge (although the congregational clapping prevents a complete drop in sonic and rhythmic energy). The Bethel Music recording is 4’59” in length and the song roadmap is Intro, Verse, Chorus, Verse, Verse,

Chorus, Bridge, Bridge, Chorus, Bridge, Chorus.

The Recording Collective version also relies on rhythmic subdivision and increasingly active instrumental parts to fuel the energy of the song. Similar to the original version, the growth of the song is reset at the bridge, in which the only sound comes from the solo worship leader and simple whole notes played by the keyboard.

After the energy level reaches its climax in the “Praise Break” section of the song, another reset occurs, with a verse and chorus reprise led by the soloist and sparse and simple accompaniment. The Recording Collective arrangement is longer, clocking in at

6’44”. This is due in part to the addition of the “Praise Break” section and the verse / chorus reprise at the end. The roadmap is Intro, Verse, Chorus, Verse, Chorus, Chorus,

Bridge, Bridge, Bridge, Chorus, Praise Break, Verse, Chorus.

“Good Good Father”

Contemporary Christian recording artist Chris Tomlin released his recording of

“Good Good Father” (a song originally written by Housefires, an Atlanta-based worship

63 band) in 2015. This chart-topping recording reached platinum status with the Recording

Industry Association of America and has made its way into many contemporary worship services. Onaje Jefferson returns to sing the Gospel Fusion version found on The

Recording Collective’s 2017 album, Gospel Vol. 2: Every Praise.

Sound

The Chris Tomlin version opens with a lone acoustic guitar strumming a folky 6/8 pattern. Tomlin sings the first verse accompanied only by the guitar and light shaker. The rest of the instruments and background vocals enter at the first chorus, transforming the song with a fuller texture and more produced sound. The instrumentation of the Tomlin version includes drum set, percussion, bass guitar, two layers of acoustic guitars, three layers of electric guitars, piano, simple and restrained Hammond organ, synth pads, synth strings, Tomlin’s tenor lead vocal, and layers of male background vocals. Most of the song has a large, reverberant sound, with generous amounts of audio effects applied to the guitars and drums.

In contrast, The Recording Collective version is a little less reverberant, trading in the folky sound of the original for that of a more traditional gospel ballad. This is due largely in part to the prominence of the piano and Hammond organ as the primary instruments, rather than the acoustic guitar. The instrumentation of The Recording

Collective version consists of drum set, percussion loop, bass guitar, acoustic guitar, three layers of electric guitars, piano, Hammond organ, synth bells, synth strings, a tenor worship leader part (sung by Jefferson), and The Recording Collective’s signature three- part background vocalists. This version has more dynamic range than the Tomlin version, incorporating new and more aggressive musical material.

64

Harmony

The Chris Tomlin version of “Good Good Father” is in the key of A major, using simple chords with few chord extensions and no substitutions. The harmonic rhythm is very drawn out, with only one chord per measure in the choruses and bridge. The verses use an even simpler harmonic structure, alternating between A major and Asus. Each song section end on a dominant chord, propelling the song forward into each subsequent section.

From the opening measures of the intro, it is quite clear that The Recording

Collective version is going to place this song in a new harmonic context. While the Chris

Tomlin intro sets up the tonic drone of verse 1, The Recording Collective intro begins with a bVII chord, foreshadowing a progression that appears in the final bridge. GOOD GOOD FATHER Music and Lyrics Rhythm CHRIS TOMLIN VERSION by Anthony Brown & Pat Barrett

ExampleChris Tomlin 4.20 version Chris Tomlin intro Intro A Asus A Asus A # # 6 & # 8 Û Û ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . P GOOD GOOD FATHER Verse Music and Lyrics Rhythm RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION by Anthony Brown & Pat Barrett 5 Asus A Asus A Example 4.21 The Recording Collective intro Arr. The Recording Collective # # & # ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . Recording Collective version Intro 13 Cb Gb2/Bb Ebm7(b5)/A Db/Ab

Pre-Chorus b b 6 j 9 b b œ . . œ & b 8 œ œ Asuœs œ A œ Aœsusœ œA. œ D œ . # ## . P...... & ’E 2/G ’ G’dim7 ’B 7( 9) ’ G ma’j7/A E (#’5#9) G’maj7/A ’ ’ 3 b b b b b b b b b + gentle clean held elec. gtr. chords b b . . . . ˘ & b b b . Û Û Û Û Û ‰ ‰ œ J A 7 14 Bm E Esus E C# f # # Verse# ...... Pre-Chorus. & ’ ’ ’7 ’ ’ ’7 | 7( 5) 5 DG/Fmaj7 A B m DG/Fmaj7 A B m G maj7Gm b /C b b b b b b b b b b b & b b b Û . Û ‰ ‰ ∑ Û . Û ‰ ‰ ∑ Û . Û ‰ ‰ ∑ Û . Û ‰ ‰ ∑ œ . œ œ œ Chorus J J J J 7 18 DP A Bm E D # ## ...... & ’D /F ’ ’F7(#5 9)’ B 7( 9) ’ B m7’/E E 7 ’ A sus’ ’A ’ 14 b light band in b b b b b b b b P bb b . . & b b œ . œ œ œ œ . œ . | | A 23 E Esus E C# # # Chorus# ...... & G’maj7 ’ D /F’ ’ E m7 ’ A’ D /F ’ G maj7 ’ 18 b b b b b b b b & b b b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

D /F E m7 A sus A 23 b b b b b b & b b b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . | . | . GOOD GOOD FATHER (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 6 of 13 65 Bridge 7 7 55 Gbmaj7 Bbm Ebm Db/F b b &Thisb b arrangementb ’ . ’ . is in D-’flat. major,’ . four’ semitones. ’ . higher ’than. the’ Tomlin. f version. The Recording Collective uses chords in root, first, and second inversion, as well bb b ∑ œ œ . ‰ . œ . œ & b b œ œ œ œ . œ œ J œœœ œ œ œ œœœ as many complex chord extensionsPer-fect andin all Yourbothways, fullyœ .- and halfper-diminished- fect œ inœchords.allœ Your ways,

Secondaryb dominants abound in this arrangement, like the V7/V at the end of the bridge. b bb œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ & b œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ . Per-fect in all of Your ways, You are per-fect in all of Your ways, You are

V/VExample in the bridge 4.22 V7/V in the bridge

7 9 59 Gbmaj7 Bbm Eb Ab b b & b b b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

b b . . œ & b b b ‰ ‰ ≈ r œ œ œ œ œ œ . ‰ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . inœ all Your ways to us.

b b bb œ œ œ œ œ ‰ & b œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ˙ . œ . œ œ . per - fect in all of Your ways to us. You are GOOD GOOD FATHER Music and Lyrics CHRIS TOMLIN VERSION by Anthony Brown & Pat Barrett

Bridge 7 7 63TheChris frequencyG mTomlinaj7 version of chordB changesm is much higherE m in this arrangementD /F than in b Intro b b b b b A Asus A Asus A Tomlin’s.& b Inb bcontrast’ . to’ .the tonic’ drone. found’ . in the’ .verses’ .of the original,’ . The’ . Recording # # 6 & ƒ# 8 Û Û ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . Collective opts for a far more active I6-IV-V-vi progression. 3 b b bb Œ . P ‰ . œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œœ œœœ œ ‰ ‰ Œ . ‰‰ œ . œ œ & b # œœœ J œ œ œ # 6 You do all thingsper-fect. You can do all thingsjper- & # 8 ‰ ∑ ∑ ∑ Œ . ‰ ‰ œ Oh, b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Chris&Exampleb Tomlinb b œ version œ4.23œ œ œChrisœ œ œ Tomlinœ . verse‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . ‰ Verse œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ . per-fect in all of Your ways, You are per-fect in all of Your ways, You are 5 A Asus A Asus A # # & # ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

# # & # œ . œ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ . œ . œ . œ œ œ I’ve heard a thous - and sto - ries of what they think You’re like. But I’ve

9 Asus A Asus A # # & # ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

# # r # ≈ œ . œ . œ œ ≈ r œ . œ . œ œ & œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ heard the ten - der whis - per of love in the dead of night. And You tell

Pre-Chorus 13 A 7 D C Bm # # ## ...... & ’+ gentle clean’ held elec. gtr.’ chords ’ ’ ’

# # j & # œ . œ ‰ ‰ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ me that You’re pleased and that I’m nev - er a - lone. GOOD GOOD FATHER Music and Lyrics RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION by Anthony Brown & Pat Barrett Arr. The Recording Collective

Recording Collective version Intro 13 7 7( 9) Cb Gb2/Bb Ebm7(b5)/A Db/Ab Eb2/G GbdimBb b GbmaEj7b/(A#5b#G9b)maj7/Ab ˘ b b 6 j . . . . & b b b 8 œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ . œ œ . . Û Û Û Û Û ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ J P f 66 b b 6 & b b b 8 ‰ ‰ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑

RecordingExample Collective 4.24 version The Recording Collective verse Verse 7 5 Db/F Gbmaj7 Ab Bbm b b & b b b Û . Û ‰ ‰ ∑ Û . Û ‰ ‰ ∑ J J P b b bb j ‰ . j ‰ ‰ j ‰ ‰ j ‰ . & b œ . œ r œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ r I’ve heard œa thous - and sto - ries of what they think You’re like. Butœ

7 9 Db/F Gbmaj7 Ab Bbm b b & b b b Û . Û ‰ ‰ ∑ Û . Û ‰ ‰ ∑ J J

b b bb j ‰ . j ‰ ‰ j ‰ . œ . & b œ . œ r œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ r œ . œ œ œ œ I’ve heard theœ ten - der whis - pers of love in theœ dead of night. And You tell

Pre-Chorus 7( 5) 7( 9) 7 13Like theGbm aoriginalj7 Gversion,m b /C eachDb/F song sectionF7 (in#5b 9The) Bb Recordingb Bbm7/Eb CollectiveEb bb b œ . œ œ œ & b b œ . œ œ œ œ . œ . arrangement ends in a half cadence, with the exception of verse 2, which replaces the V

b chord withb bab ii-V-I progression‰ . that tonicizes G-flat major (mm. 38j -‰39).. & b œ . œ . œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ r œ œ œ œ me, tellœ meœ that You’re pleased and that I, I'mœ nev - er a - lone. Melody

Chris Tomlin’s lead vocal melody follows the notes of the A major scale and falls within a one octave range (E3 to E4). The melody is very structured, with little improvisation and no melismas. There is a notable absence of instrumental hooks in the song, particularly in the intro, in which a lone acoustic guitar strums chords.

Onaje Jefferson’s virtuosic vocal performance returns in The Recording

Collective version; his signature high tenor range soars from Ab3 to F5. As is custom with The Recording Collective, the entrance of the structured background vocal parts gives the soloist room to improvise. Jefferson’s nimble melismas follow the pentatonic scale throughout most of the song, although leading tones also make rare appearances.

67 GOOD GOOD FATHER (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead Sheet - Page 3 of 5

ExamplesExample of melismas 4.25 Examples of melismas 57 bb b ‰ . œ . œ ‰ ‰ ≈ r œ ‰ & b b J œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ . per - fect œ inœ allœ Your ways, œ . inœ all Your ways

Bridge 61 b b bb Œ . ‰ œ .œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ . ‰ . œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ Œ . & b œ œ œ œ J to us. You do all things per - fect. GOOD GOOD FATHER (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 4 of 14

66 3 The background vocalists have a greater melodic responsibility in The Recording bb b ‰ ‰ œ . œ ‰ ‰ . ‰ & b b œ œ œ œ 7 31 D /F œ œG maœj7 œ . œ .œœ œ œ œ . A œ œ œ œB m b œ œ Collective version,b Youfunctioningcanb do all things independentlyper - fect. of the lead Oh,vocalist (comparedb to us, tobœ œus.withœ b b & b b b Û . Û ∑ Û . Û ‰ ‰ Tomlin’s homophonic backgroundJ vocalChorus parts singing with him in tandem).J In mm. 34- 70 bb b 38, The Recordingbb bbb Œ‰. ‰ Collective background vocalistsœ sing a legato‰ countermelody‰ ≈ ‰ ‰ & bb œ œ œ œœœ . œ œ . œ œ . ≈ œ œœ œœ. œ œ r œ œ . œ œ . You’re aI good,knowgood we’reFa - allther,œ searchit’sœ who- ingYou are,for an - swersœ it’sœ whoon You- lyœare, underneath Jefferson’s verse. b b bb ‰ ‰ ∑ ∑ 73& b œ . I knowœ œ b b & b b b ‰ ‰ ≈ r œ œ ‰ ‰ ≈ r Example 4.26 Countermelodyœ œ œ . œ œ sungœ œ by. œ œbackground‰ ≈ œ vocalistsœ œ . œ œ œ it’sœ who You are. And I’m loved by You,œ it’sœ who I am, it’sœ who I am, BGVs countermelody Pre-Chorus

7( 5) 34 Db Chorus Gb Gm b /C 77 b b œ & b b b Œ . Û . œ . œ œ bb b ‰ ‰ ≈ r ‰ Œ . Œ . j ‰ ‰ Œ . & b b œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ it’sœ who I œ am. œ Oh, oh, œ whoœ You are, bb b ‰ & b b œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ You can pro - vide. ’Cause You know just 82

bb b œ œ bb bbbb ŒŒ. . ‰ ‰ œ ‰‰ ‰ œ œ œ œœ . œ‰. ≈ œ œ ‰ œ . œœ ‰ ‰ . œœ . & bb œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J I am loved, 'Causecom-pleteYou- lyknowloved, e- ter - nal-ly loved,what weyes,

7( 9) 7 9 36 Db/F F7(#5b9) Bb b Bbm7/Eb Eb Abm Db/F bb b . . & b b œ . œ œ œ œ . œ . ’ ’

b b bb ‰ . œ ‰ œ . j ‰ ‰ Œ . & b œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ what we need be - fore œ we say a word.

b b j & b b b œ . ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ . need be - fore we say a word. You're a good,œ goodœ .

68

The gospel instrumentalists shine in The Recording Collective arrangement, with a piano-led intro, unison melodic hooks in mm. 98 and 102, and a lilting synth bells countermelody on top of the chorus at m. 71. The bass guitar plays an impressive and highly syncopated riff in mm. 29 and 30.

GOOD GOOD FATHER (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Rhythm - Page 2 of 4

BassExample guitar riff 4.27 Bass guitar riff 7 A B m D /F G maj7 29 b b b b œ ≈ œ œ ? b b Û . Û ≈ ≈ œ œ ≈ œ Û . Û ‰ ‰ b b b œ œ œ œ J œ œ J

BGVs countermelodyRhythm Pre-Chorus 7 7( 5) 7( 9) 32 Ab Bbm Db Gb Gm b /C Db/F F7(#5b9) Bb b The tempo of the Chris Tomlin recording is 48 bpm, giving the song room to ? b b ∑ Û . Û ‰ ‰ Œ . Û . œ . œ œ œ b b b & œ . œ œ œ breathe and ample space for Jthe syncopated vocal melody. While the melody is

Chorus Chorus 7 9 7 7 syncopated, theB minstrumental7E/E A m D /FG ma jparts7 D / FareE not.m TheA D downbeat/FG maj7 D / Fof Eeachm measureA D /FG m aisj7 naturallyD /F the 37 b bb b b b b b b b b b b b b b b strongest; bthisb b is emphasized. . further. . . in. the. Tomlin. . . recording. . . . because. . .the. do.wnbeats. . . are & b b œ . œ . ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ most often where chord changesF occur.

7 7 7 E m A D /F G maj7 B m E m 49The tempob of The Recordingb b Collectiveb versionb is 49 bpm, onlyb slightly faster bb b ...... Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û than the& originalb b ’ version.’ Both’ versions’ ’of “Good’ Good Father” are flowing 6/8 ballads

Examples of melismas with no swung notes to be found. TheBridge melody of The Recording Collective version 7 7 A D /F G maj7 B m E m 54 b b b b b follows theb sameb rhythms and syncopation patterns found in the Tomlin version. & b b b Û Û Û Û Û Û ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . The Recording Collective setsf the verses in a completely new rhythmic context, featuring a measureD /F of chords followedG maj7 by a measureB m7 of rest.E 9 The percussionA loop 58 b b b b b b b provides& theb b rhythmicb ’ . glue’ . that holds’ . this’ section. together,’ . ’ moving. ’things. forward’ . and providing light subdivision in the absence of the keyboards and guitars.

GOOD GOOD FATHER (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 10 of 14

69 7 9 90 Db/F Gbmaj9 Bbm Eb Ab b b &Theb b instrumentalb ’ . rhythms’ . get ’more. and’ .more ’complex. ’ as. the song’ . progress’ . es, with some of the busiest rhythms found in and around the drums-only chorus at m. 95. b . b bb œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ ‰ Œ . ∑ & b J œ œ œ œ . Syncopated figuresand andI am accentedloved by You,duples are playedoh, byoh, the entire band in this section. b . . r . b bb œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ . Œ ≈ œ œ œ œ . œ ≈ r œ œ œ œ & b œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ And I’m loved by You, it’s who I am, it’s who I am, it’s who I am. Example 4.28 Drums-only chorus with rhythmic accents

Drums-only chorus Chorus with rhythmic accents 94 Ab/C Db Db/F Gb b b > > > > & b b b ’ . ≈ Û Û Û Û ‰ ‰ Œ . ∑ J ƒ b b œ . œ œ & b b b œ . œ . Œ . œ ‰ ‰ . œ œ œ ‰ You are good. Yes, You are. It'sœ who You are,

b b œ œ œ œ œ œ . r œ œ œ . & b b b œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . - œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . You're a good, good Fa - ther, it’s who You are, it’s who You are,

97 F Db C Ab Eb2/G Ebm7(b5)/Gb b b >œ . >œ . > > & b b b ∑ œ . œ . ’ . ’ .

b b . œ . œ & b b b ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ myJ Fa - ther, I'm loved, say, I'm j b r . b bb ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ ≈ r ∫œ œ œ . & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . nœ œ b œ œ œ it’s who You are. I’m loved by You, it’s who I am,

Growth

The Tomlin version is fairly mellow, even when the song builds. This is due in part to the subdued lead vocal melody which never goes above E4. The song grows into each section (from verse to chorus and from chorus to bridge) by means of one-bar crescendos and eighth-note builds. Tomlin’s recording is 4’53” in length and the song roadmap is Intro, Verse 1, Pre-Chorus, Verse 2, Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Bridge, Bridge,

Verse 3, Extended Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Chorus, Outro.

70

The method of resetting energy levels at the bridge (found in both “This Is

Amazing Grace” and “King of My Heart”) is not used in either arrangement of “Good

Good Father.” Tomlin builds into the bridge, keeping volume and instrumental texture at full capacity, then reduces the intensity heading into Verse 3. The Recording Collective also maintains growth in the bridge but, choosing to omit Verse 3 altogether, they decrescendo into a soft chorus at m. 71. It is there that The Recording Collective begins another long period of growth through a total of four choruses. Growth is sustained throughout this section by means of changing vocal and instrumental textures. At m. 71,

Jefferson sings with only simple keyboard and percussion loop accompaniment. Eight measures later (m. 79), the background vocalists sing in unison. The band builds during this chorus and the singers return to three-part harmony in m. 82. The background vocalists invert their parts to a higher tessitura in the pickup to m. 87. The fourth and final chorus in this section starts with vocals and drums only, followed by a new harmonization for both the band and singers in which the bass descends and a series of secondary dominants culminate on the V chord in m. 102. This chorus, with its bold harmonic choices, inverted background vocalist parts, and Onaje Jefferson’s high F, is where the song’s growth reaches its climax.

GOOD GOOD FATHER (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 11 of 14

ChorusExample with greatest 4.29 amount Chorus of growth with greatest amount of growth 97 F Db C Ab Eb2/G Ebm7(b5)/Gb b b >œ . >œ . > > & b b b ∑ œ . œ . ’ . ’ .

b b . œ . œ & b b b ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ myJ Fa - ther, I'm loved, say, I'm j b r . b bb ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ ≈ r ∫œ œ œ . & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . nœ œ b œ œ œ it’s who You are. I’m loved by You, it’s who I am,

100 D /F E /D A /C E 7/B A D E F G b b b b b b b b b b b b . . . . ˘ & b b b ’ ’ ’ ’ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û œ œ J œ œ

b b œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ . & b b b œ Œ . Œ . œ œ 4 loved by You, oh, good, good,

b œ œ œ . œ . œ b bb œ ‰ œ œ œ . œ ‰ œ . œ ‰ ‰ & b œ nœ œ œ nœ œ œ . who I am, I am! You are GOOD GOOD FATHER (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 11 of 14 71

ChorusExample with greatest 4.29 amount (continued) of growth

97 F Db C Ab Eb2/G Ebm7(b5)/Gb b b >œ . >œ . > > & b b b ∑ œ . œ . ’ . ’ .

b b . œ . œ & b b b ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ myJ Fa - ther, I'm loved, say, I'm j b r . b bb ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ ≈ r ∫œ œ œ . & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . nœ œ b œ œ œ it’s who You are. I’m loved by You, it’s who I am,

100 Db/F Eb/Db Ab/C Eb7/Bb Ab Db Eb F Gb b b . . . . ˘ & b b b ’ ’ ’ ’ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û œ œ J œ œ

b b œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ . & b b b œ Œ . Œ . œ œ 4 loved by You, oh, good, good,

b œ œ œ . œ . œ b bb œ ‰ œ œ œ . œ ‰ œ . œ ‰ ‰ & b œ nœ œ œ nœ œ œ . who I am, I am! You are

This chain of repeated choruses, along with a reprise of the bridge extends the song length to 5’21”. The song roadmap for The Recording Collective version is Intro,

Verse 1, Pre-Chorus, Verse 2, Pre-Chorus, Chorus, Bridge, Bridge, Chorus, Chorus,

Chorus, Chorus, Bridge, Chorus, Chorus.

Recurring Techniques of The Recording Collective

This analysis highlights some consistencies in the arranging and recording techniques of The Recording Collective. Each of their songs begins with a solo vocalist while the entrance of background vocalists is reserved for later verses and choruses. Once the background vocalists begin singing, the soloist either sings the melody with them, or improvises around them, or a combination of both. The Recording Collective uses a great

72 deal of transformative reharmonization in their arrangements. However, some of their arrangements (“King of My Heart,” for instance) stick with the chord progressions of the original song. While the melodies of the original songs are largely preserved in these new arrangements, they interact with the added gospel reharmonizations in fresh ways. The song lyrics are also unchanged, although some song sections are omitted, and new lyrical material sometimes added. The Recording Collective arrangements are typically longer than their original counterparts, largely due to the repetition of certain song sections. This repetition (and corresponding song length) is justified and enabled by the strategic use of sound, harmony, melody, and rhythm, all of which sustain steady growth over long periods of time.

Chapter Five – Analysis of Three Original Gospel Fusion Arrangements

Having studied the development of gospel music in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, the various musical techniques employed by gospel instrumentalists, vocalists, and arrangers, and having analyzed the musical style of The Recording Collective, three new gospel fusion arrangements written and recorded specifically for this project will now be analyzed.

Using LaRue’s SHMRG method, this chapter analyzes the elements of Sound,

Harmony, Melody, Rhythm, and Growth found in three worship songs from non-gospel contexts. The newly created gospel fusion arrangements of these songs are also analyzed, demonstrating the similarities and differences in arranging style. Lead sheet transcriptions of all recordings analyzed in this chapter can be found in Appendix B, beginning on page 178.

“Lion and the Lamb”

Fronted by worship leader Leeland Mooring, “Lion and the Lamb” is a high- energy, moderato tempo worship song from Bethel Music’s 2016 album Have It All

(Live). This project’s arrangement of “Lion and the Lamb” presents the song in a fresh, new gospel fusion style, inspired by similar Recording Collective arrangements.

73 74

Sound

Because the Bethel Music recording is taken from a live worship service, one can hear congregational elements and moments of exhortation from Mooring. The sound of this recording is loud and active, due to the presence of busy synth programming throughout. The instrumentation of the Bethel Music version consists of drum set, percussion loops, bass guitar, acoustic guitar, two layers of electric guitars, synth piano playing pre-programmed arpeggiated sixteenth notes, multiple layers of synth pads, and

Mooring’s high tenor vocal part. Notably, there are no background vocals in this recording. The electric guitars play a prominent role in this song, trading off playing solos in the intro that return in subsequent sections. As in other Bethel Music productions, there are a generous amount of reverb and effects used in this recording.

When arranging this project’s gospel fusion version of “Lion and the Lamb,” I drew inspiration from The Recording Collective’s swing version of “This Is Amazing

Grace,” with active chord changes and prominent background vocal parts atop a constant sixteenth-note swing rhythm. The instrumentation is as dense as the Bethel Music version, albeit with different, more gospel-based sounds. This includes drum set, percussion loop, bass guitar, two layers of electric guitars, an FM synthesis keys patch found in synths like the Yamaha DX7, Hammond organ, synth leads and pads, Wurlitzer, synth bass, sound effects, three-part background vocals, and a tenor lead vocal part sung by worship leader Justin Barahona. Sustained pad sounds are used only in the bridge, giving this arrangement lots of breathing room in between the choppy, syncopated chord changes played by the band. Delay is used sparingly, notably on the Wurlitzer lick in

75 mm. 59-60. Other effects include reverb on the guitars and vocals, and pad sweeping effects, created with preprogrammed control changes in Logic.

Harmony

The Bethel Music version is in the key of B major and uses only diatonic chords with few extensions (limited to an occasional minor 7th or sus2). Almost all chords are in root position, save for the I6 found in the bridge progression. The harmonic rhythm moves at a slow rate, with roughly one chord per measure. Each song section ends in an authentic cadence, with the exception of the second chorus which moves from the V chord to the ii of the bridge progression.

The gospel fusion version is in G major, four semitones lower than the original version. While this change of tonal center places the soloist in a lower tessitura than

Leeland Mooring, the melody’s placement in the soprano counteracts this lower range and gives the background vocal parts a sense of excitement and brightness. The Dm9 LION AND THE LAMB chord at the end of the first measure tells the listener to expect the unexpectedMusic and Lyrics, as by BETHEL MUSIC VERSION Brenton Brown, , & Leeland Mooring borrowed chords are used all throughout this arrangement.

The chord progressionB maj7 in the verse traces theE maj7 /contourB of the original song’s verse # ## # 4 y y y y progression,& incorporating# 4 ’ ’ a ’more’ complex’ ’ ’ series’ of’ borrowed’ ’ ’ chords’ ’ and’ secondaryy y dominantsIntro as it arrives at the I, IV, and vi chords. 1. 5 B C#m E # ## # . œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . . & # . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . Figure 5.1 Bethel Music verse Verse 2. 9 B ( I ) C#m ( ii ) # ## # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . . & # œ œ œ . ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# ## & # # Ó Œ ‰ . r . Œ j œ œ . œ œ ‰ œ œ œ . œ œ œ 1. He'sœ comœ . - ing on the clouds, kingsœ . and king - doms will bow (2.) o - pen up the gates, make way be - fore the King of

12 E G#m # ## & # # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# ## & # # Ó Ó Œ ‰ . r œ œ . œ œ œ . down.˙ Andœ evœ . - 'ry chain will break, asœ kings. The God who comes to save is

15 F# E F# # ## & # # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# ## & # # ‰ . r œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ broœ . - ken hearts de - clare His praise.œ Forœ who can stop theœ Lord Al - might - œy? here to set the cap - tives free. For who can stop the Lord Al - might - y? LION AND THE LAMB Music and Lyrics by BETHEL MUSIC VERSION Brenton Brown, Brian Johnson, & Leeland Mooring

B maj7 E maj7/B # ## 4 y y y y & # # 4 ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ y y

Intro 1. 5 B C#m E # ## # . œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . . & # . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ .

Verse 2. 9 B C#m # ## # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . . & # œ œ œ . ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ 76 # ## & # # Ó Œ ‰ . r . Œ j œ œ . œ œ ‰ œ œ œ . œ œ œ 1. He'sœ comœ . - ing on the clouds, kingsœ . and king - doms will bow Figure 5.1 (continued) (2.) o - pen up the gates, make way be - fore the King of

12 E ( IV ) G#m ( vi ) # ## & # # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# ## & # # Ó Ó Œ ‰ . r œ œ . œ œ œ . down.˙ Andœ evœ . - 'ry chain will break, asœ kings. The God who comes to save is

( V ) ( IV ) ( V ) 15 F# E F# # ## & # # ’ ’ LION’ ’ AND’ THE’ LAMB’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ Music and Lyrics by GOSPEL FUSION VERSION Brenton Brown, Brian Johnson, & Leeland Mooring # ## Arr. Tyler B. Williams & # # ‰ . r œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ broœ . - ken hearts de - clare His praise.œ Forœ who can stop theœ Lord Al - might - œy? here to set the cap - tives free. For who can stop the Lord Al - might - y? N.C. D m9 N.C. C m9 A m7G Fmaj9E mD7m9 A m7G/B C G/FD13 # 4 >œ w >œ & 4 œ .œ œœ œ œ w œ .œ œœ œ œ .œ œœ œ œ w œ .œ œœ œ œ .> œ . œ .> œ . Figure 5.2 Gospel fusion verse

Verse G G G/D F/G 8 ( I ) ( V7/IV ) # ˙ > > > > ˘ . - & Û Û ‰ Û Û ‰ Û Œ Û . Û Û Û Ó Û Û

SOLO # r V Ó Œ ‰ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ Œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ He's com - ing on the clouds, kings and king - doms will bow

( IV ) ( iii ) ( ii ) ( V7sus ) ( vii/º7/vi ) ( vi ) Cmaj7 Cmaj7 B m7 A m7 A m7/D A m7(b5)/D E m9 E m9 E m7/B E m9 11 # # ˘ . - ˘ & Û Œ Û . Û Û Û Ó Û Û Û Œ Û . Û Û Û

# j Œ Œ ‰ Œ Œ ‰ . r œ œ ‰ j V œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ down. Yeah. And ev - 'ry chain will break, as

( v ) ( IV ) ( iii ) ( ii ) ( V7sus ) D m9 Cmaj7 Cmaj7 B m7 A m7 A m7/D 14 # . - & Ó Û Û Û Œ Û . Û Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’

# œ œ œ ‰ . r œ . œ œ œ œ œ V œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ bro - ken hearts de - clare His praise. For who can stop the Lord Al - might - y?

77

Similarly, the bridge of this version starts on the iim7 like its original counterpart, but ventures off into new harmonic territory, alternating between Am7 to D9, which suggests A Dorian. The inclusion of planing neo-Soul chords also creates additional harmonic freshness within the bridge.

LION AND THE LAMB (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 5 of 9 Figure 5.3 Bridge reharmonization (analyzed in A Dorian mode) Bridge ( i ) ( IV7 ) ( i ) ( IV ) ( bII ) 61 A m7 D 9 A m7 D maj9 Bbmaj7 # & | | | | | SOLO # V Ó œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . Ó œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . Who can stop the Lord Al - migh - ty? Who can stop the Lord Al - migh - ty?

( i ) ( IV7 ) ( i ) ( VI ) ( IV ) ( bII ) 65 A m7 D 9 A m7 F maj7 D maj9 Bbmaj7 # & | | | | | |

# V Ó œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . Ó œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . Who can stop the Lord Al - migh - ty? Who can stop the Lord Al - migh - ty?

BridgeOverall, the harmonic rhythm is much faster than the original, with significantly A m7 69 more chords# used throughout the song. Chord extensions are also much more common in & ’ ’ ’ ’ this arrangement, with the inclusion of sevenths, ninths, thirteenths, and altered chords. # V ∑ Melody

LeelandA m/G Mooring carries theF #vocalm7(b5) melody in the BethelF m aMusicj7 A version,m(add4)/EE7(#5 #singing9) in 70 # his high& tenor’ range’ of’ G#3 to’ G#4. All’ melody’ ’ notes ’fall within’ the’ B major’ scale,’ and

Mooring’s# delivery is very structured, given that there are no other vocalists singing with V Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ ∑ ∑ him. His melody includesCome aon, few yeah.short (one beat long) melismas. The original version of

78 the song also relies heavily on instrumental melodies played by the electric guitars. These melodies are found in the intro and return in the turnaround and outro of the song.

The range of Justin Barahona’s lead vocal in the gospel fusion version is E3 to

G5, only slightly lower than Leeland Mooring’s solo. Barahona’s vocal lines follow the

G major and G pentatonicLION AND THEscales, LAMB avoiding(BETHEL MUSIC leading VERSION tones) - Lead/Rhythm throughou - Page 3t ofmost 4 of the song.

2. There are quickE neighbor-tone turns to the flat-seventh scale degreeF found in mm. 42 and 34 # # ## # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . . 90. With& the exceptions# œ œ of theœ first verseœ andœ the first bridge,œ the background. ’ ’ ’ vocalists’ shoulder the# ## weight of melodic delivery (one could argue that they move from the & # # ∑ Ó Œ ‰ . r . œ œ œ œ 2.œ So bow be - fore Him. background to the foreground). When the background vocalists sing, the soloist

B 37 C m E F improvises around# them, in keepingD# with the techniques of The Recording# Collective’s # ## & # # | | | | soloists. The melodies of the Bethel Version are largely kept intact; however, they are # # # # ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ presented& in a# much more syncopated fashion in this gospel fusion arrangement. The

Bridge melody is modified all throughout theB bridge, culminating in a new melody in the form of 41 C m E F # D# # # ## a descending& # #harmonized. | melisma. | | | . # ## # . . & # . Ó . Ó . . œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ Figure 5.4 EndWho ofcan thestop bridgethe Lord inAl -Bethelmigh - ty? Music Whoversioncan stop the Lord Al - migh - ty?

Bridge B C m E F 45 # D# # # ## & # # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ | # ## # & # Ó . Ó . œ w œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . Who can stop the Lord Al - migh - ty? Who can stop the Lord? Chorus 49 N.C. B # ## # . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . . & # . œ œ œ . ’ ’ ’ ’ Drums and elec. only # # # ## . ∑ . Œ ‰ j & œ œ . œ œ œ œ Our God is the Li -

LION AND THE LAMB (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 7 of 10

A m/G F m7(b5) F maj7 Am(add4)/EE7(#5#9) 70 # # & ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# V Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ ∑ ∑ Come on, yeah. # Œ œ . & œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . Lord Al - migh - ty? Who can stop the Lord Al - migh - ty?

A m7 steady groove D 9 73 sn. 2+4 # & ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# œ œ œ œ œ V Ó œ œ œ œ Œ Ó Who can stop the Lord? # & Œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ Who can stop the Lord Al - migh -œ ty?œ 79

Figure 5.5 End of the bridge in gospel fusion version

Band Jam!

A m7 /B /C /C D 9 G 13 G 13 A m D 7 C7(#5#9) B7(#5#9) 75 # # œ ≈ œ œ # ˘ ˘ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & ’ ’ ’ ’ Û Û Û Û Û Û œ œ ≈ œ œ ‰ ‰ . Û ≈ Û . Û R J ƒ # œ . œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ j & œ Œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ~~~˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Ó œ œ œ œ œ ~~~ œ œ œ œ œ Who can stop the Lord Al - migh - ty?

The Bethel Music intro hook has been completely replaced in this version. This LION AND THE LAMB Music and Lyrics by BETHEL MUSIC VERSION Brenton Brown, Brian Johnson, new intro hook performs the same functions as its original song counterpart,& Leeland reappearing Mooring in the turnaround after the first chorus and at the end of the song.

B maj7 E maj7/B

# ## 4 y y y y & # # 4 ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ y y Figure 5.6 Bethel Music intro

Intro 1. 5 B C#m E # ## # . œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . . & # . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . LION AND THE LAMB Music and Lyrics by Rhythm GOSPEL FUSION VERSION Brenton Brown, Brian Johnson, & Leeland Mooring Verse 2. Arr. Tyler B. Williams 9 Figure 5.7 Gospel fusion introB C#m Intro# # # # N.C. œ œ œ œ œ œ œD mœ9. . N.C. C m9 & # œ œ œ . ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ # 4 œ . œ . >œ w & # #4# œ œ œ œ œ w œ œ œ œ & # # Ó Œ œ . ‰ .> r . Œ j œ . œ œ . œ œ ‰ œ œ œ . œ œ œ 1. He'sœ comœ . - ing on the clouds, kingsœ . and king - doms will bow A m7 G Fmaj9 E m7 D m9 (2.) o - penA mup7 Gthe/B gates,C makeG/D wayF 13 be - fore the King of 5 12 # œ . E œ . G#m >œ ˙ >> >> & # # œ œ œ œ œ w œ œ œ œ Û Û ‰ Û Û ‰ # ## œ . > œ . & ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ # ## &In addition# # to theÓ opening hook,Ó anotherŒ ‰new. rinstrumental melody was created for œ œ . œ œ œ . down.˙ Andœ evœ . - 'ry chain will break, asœ the “band jam”kings. portion of this arrangement. This melodyThe God emphasizeswho comes to thissave song’s useis of Verse G G G/D F/G 9 15 F# E F# swung sixteenth## ## notes and is harmonized in a variety˘ of ways before. transitioning- into the & # Û# ’ Œ ’ Û’. ’Û Û’ ’Û ’Ó ’ Û’ ’ Û’ ’ final chorus. # C#maj7 Cmaj7 B m7 A m7 A m7/D A m7(b5)/D E m9 E m9 E m7/B E m9 11 # # . # & # ‰ r . œ . œ œ . œ œ˘ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ˘ # bro - ken hearts. de - clare His praise.œ . For who- can stop the Lord Al . - might - y? & Û hereŒ to Ûset Û theÛ capÛ - tivesÓ free. Û For whoÛ can stopÛ the ŒLord AlÛ - mightÛ Û- y?Û

Chorus 14 D m9 Cmaj7 Cmaj7 B m7 A m7 A m7/D G

# . - & Ó Û Û Û Œ Û . Û Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

G 7 Cmaj7 F 9 E m9 18 # & ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ LION AND THE LAMB (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Rhythm - Page 3 of 4 Bridge D 9 A m7 D 9 A m7 58 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ & | œ œ œ œ œ | œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Bridge steady groove 62 D 9 A m7 D mBajm9aj7A m7 D 9 AFm7maDj7mBajm9aj7A m7 A m/GF m7(b5) FAmma(ja7ddE47)/(E#5A#msn.9)7 2+4D 9 A m7/B/C/CD 9 GG1313 b b # # # 80 # ˘˘ & | | || | | || || ’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’ ’’’’’’’’’’’’ÛÛÛÛÛÛ Figure 5.8 Gospel fusion band jam section ƒ Band Jam! A m D 7 C7(#5#9) B7(#5#9) 77 œ ≈ œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ ≈ œ œ ‰ ‰ . Û ≈ Û . Û R J

A m D 7 E m9 F 9 79 œ ≈ œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ ≈ œ œ ‰ ‰ . Û ≈ Û . Û R J

A m7 A m7 G m9 F m7(b5b9) F m7 E 7(#5) E 7 D 7 81 b # b œ ≈ œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > > & œ œ ≈ œ œ ‰ ‰ . Û ≈ Û . Û R J Chorus A m7 E /F B maj7 E 13(#11) D 13 E 13 E m9 F 9 G 83 b b b b (drums only) œ ≈ œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > > > & œ œ ≈ œ œ ‰ ‰ . Û ≈ Û . Û Û Œ Ó R J ∆

Cmaj7 B m7 A m7 A m7/D 86 Rhythm # 3 &The Bethel Music version of’ the song’ is ’in 4/4’ time, played’ ’ at a moderate’ ’ 90 bpm.

Most of the song is undergirded by a pulsating sixteenth-note synth arpeggiator, which gives the song an element of forward motion, and makes 90 bpm feel slightly faster than it actually is. The drummer uses different grooves: rhythmic kick drum and a steady snare on beats two and four in the choruses, a half-time groove in the bridge, and syncopated kick and snare figures in the verses. The vocal melody is also very syncopated in the choruses. The other instruments don’t have any syncopated figures, with the exception of the aforementioned guitar melodies.

The gospel fusion version of “Lion and the Lamb” is significantly faster, at a peppy 105 bpm, which creates more rhythmic energy and forward motion from the very first measure. In addition to the aforementioned swung sixteenth notes, this version uses a series of syncopated chords played both staccato and tenuto. These figures unify the verse

81 into a cohesive musical idea, while also creating pockets of rests throughout the verse.

The staccato and tenuto trope is repeated at the ends of phrases in the choruses.

Growth

The Bethel Music version of “Lion and the Lamb” has a large dynamic range, with its loud sections (the majority of the song) contrasted by the quiet synth programming preceding the intro and the often-used energy level reset at the bridge.

There are no tempo changes or modulations in this arrangement. Drum fills are the primary driver of growth from section to section. Each bridge repetition increases energy: the bridge begins with no drums, then adds a half time drum groove, followed by a four- on-the-floor drum groove. Other instruments stagger their entrances in the bridge as a way of adding energy and motion. The song length of the Bethel Music version is 4’45” and the song roadmap is Fade In, Intro, Verse, Chorus, Turnaround, Verse, Chorus,

Interlude, Bridge, Bridge, Guitar Solo, Chorus, Outro.

The dynamic range of the gospel fusion arrangement isn’t very wide, as most of the song is loud. Like the original version, energy levels are reset in the interlude before the bridge. The introduction of the background vocalists in the first chorus, and their delivery of the second verse adds additional layers of sonic energy and helps propel the song forward. A growth sequence is found in the bridge, which is first sung by the soloist, then by the background vocalists in unison, followed by three-part harmony, which is then inverted. There are no tempo changes or modulations in this arrangement.

Due to its faster tempo, the gospel fusion version is only 4’03”, shorter than the original version. The roadmap is Intro, Verse, Chorus, Turnaround, Verse, Chorus, Interlude,

Bridge, Bridge, Band Jam, Chorus, Outro.

82

“King of Kings”

Released in 2019, “King of Kings” is a popular worship ballad led by Hillsong

Worship’s Brooke Ligertwood. This project’s gospel fusion arrangement of “King of

Kings” maintains the tempo and pacing of the original while introducing new rhythmic structures, harmonic changes, as well as the inclusion of portions of “Total Praise,” a choral anthem by gospel legend Richard Smallwood.

Sound

Hillsong Worship’s recording of “King of Kings” features an extensive track list, consisting of drum set, percussion loop, synth effects, bass guitar, synth bass, acoustic guitar, four layers of electric guitars, piano, organ, four layers of synthesizers, strings, harp, brass, three-part background vocals, choir, and the lead alto vocal. The overall sound evokes the feeling of a live, congregational recording, largely due to the prominent background vocals and choir tracks. The generous usage of reverb also contributes to this

“large room” sound. Many instruments play long, sustained tones, creating a warm bed of sound and a legato texture, and the warm, upright piano and synth pads form the core of the instrumental accompaniment.

This project’s gospel fusion arrangement features fewer instrumental tracks than the Hillsong version. The instrumentation includes drum set, percussion loop, bass guitar, two layers of electric guitars, piano, electric piano, a subtle droning synth pad, Hammond organ, three-part background vocals, and an alto lead vocal part sung by worship leader

Mykeyly Hernandez. The new arrangement maintains the soft, ballad-like quality of the original, while also building into a powerful and loud climax at the end. While the

Hillsong version uses vocals in three-part harmony, the background vocalists in this

83 gospel fusion recording take on a more performative, choral role, moving to the foreground in the tag of “Total Praise.” Audio effects and synthesizers are used selectively and sparingly in this recording, giving it a more natural, organic, and intimate sound.

Harmony

The original version of the song is in the key of D major and uses strictly diatonic chords with intermittent minor sevenths, sus4, and sus2 chord extensions. The harmonic rhythm is slow, with only two chords per measure in the verses, and one to two chords per measure in the choruses. The signature piano intro and turnarounds sit atop a tonic drone, giving the song even more harmonic breathing room. Hillsong Worship uses a notable reharmonization to highlight the resurrection-themed lyrics of the third verse: replacing the previously established verse progression (I6-IV-V-I) with a new harmonic progression beginning on the vi chord. Each song section ends by eliding with the opening piano hook in an authentic cadence.

The gospel fusion version is in D-flat major, a half step lower than the original.

Like many of The Recording Collective’s arrangements, this rendition of “King of

Kings” features many secondary dominants, tritone substitutions, and extensions and alterations of chords. Hillsong Worship’s authentic cadences at the ends of song sections are preserved in this version, eliding into each instrumental turnaround section. One of this arrangement’s most significant harmonic changes can be found in the second measure, in which the opening piano hook is reharmonized: the expected tonic chord is replaced with a iv6/4. This minor iv chord can be found all over this arrangement, and it foreshadows the harmonic language found in the tag of “Total Praise” at the end.

KING OF KINGS (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 2 of 12

18 Gbmaj7 Ab Ab/Gb Db/F Gb2 Bbm7 Gb2 84 b b 2 & b b b | Û Û | | | | 4 The first verse and chorus of the gospel fusion version is fairly similar to the original song. The second verse, however, is reimagined with much more harmonic and 22 Ab Db Gbm/Db Db Gbm/DbDb/BEbm7(Eb5b)d/Aim/Gb b rhythmic bmovementbb 2 underneath4 ‰ j the already very syncopated‰ j melody. & b 4 | 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∫œ œ œ ∫œBGVs

b b bb 2 ∑ 4 ∑ ∑ ∑ Ó Œ ≈ & b 4 4 œ œ œ Figure 5.9 Gospel fusion new verse progression 2. To re-veal Verse ( I6 ) ( IV ) ( V6 ) ( I )

2747 Db/F Gbmaj7 Ab/C Db b b > > & b b b Û Û . Û Ó Û Û . Û Ó

b b bb ‰ ≈ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ the king - dom com - ing and to rec - on - cile the lost, to re - deem ( ii )

49 29 Db/F Gbmaj7 Ab/C Db Db Ebm7 b b > > > > & b b b Û Û . Û Ó Û Û . Û ‰ . Û ≈ Û . R J

b b & b b b œ œ œ ‰ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ the whole cre - a - tion, you did not de - spise the cross For ev -

Like the original version, the third verse begins on the vi chord, highlighting the powerful resurrection-themed text. Things begin to change during the eighth note build in

6 m. 73, with the introduction of a new, walk-up harmonization: vi – bVII – V – I. KING OF KINGS (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 5 of 11

Figure 5.10 Verse 3 reharmonization

Build 6 73 Bbm9 Cb9 Absus/C Db b b > > > > & b b b Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û F b j b bb ‰ œ ‰ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ rose from their tombs, and the an - gels stood in awe, for the souls 6 75 Bbm9 Cb9 Absus/C Db Db/Ab Ebm/Gb Db/F

b b > > > > > & b b b Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û ≈ Û Û Û

b b j & b b b œ œ œ ‰ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ of all who'd come to the Fa - ther are re - stored. 4. And the church

Church Verse! 77 Db/F Gbmaj7 b b > & b b b Œ Û . Û Ó

b b bb œ œ œ j ‰ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ of Christ was born, then the Spir - KING OF KINGS (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 5 of 11

Build 6 73 Bbm9 Cb9 Absus/C Db b b > > > > & b b b Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û F 85 b j b bb ‰ œ ‰ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Figure 5.10rose (continued)from their tombs, and the an - gels stood in awe, for the souls 6 75 Bbm9 Cb9 Absus/C Db Db/Ab Ebm/Gb Db/F b b > > > > > & b b b Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û ≈ Û Û Û

b b j & b b b œ œ œ ‰ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ of all who'd come to the Fa - ther are re - stored. 4. And the church

Another notable harmonic change in this new arrangement can be found in the final chorus, in which the last phrase is sung a total of three times, circling back each

Church time byVerse! way of deceptive cadences. The second deceptive cadence builds into the final 77 Db/F Gbmaj7 tag, in whichb b all instruments dropout except> the electric piano. & b b b Œ Û . Û Ó

b b bb KING OF KINGSœ (œGOSPELœ FUSION VERSION)j - Lead/Rhythm‰ - Page 10 of 14 &Figureb œ5.11œ Multiple deceptive cadencesœ œ in the gospel fusionœ versionœ œ of Christ was born, then the Spir - 9373 Db/F Gb2 Ab A dim7 Bbm7 Db13 Gbmaj9 Db/F b b & b b b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

bb b ‰ j ‰ & b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Praise for - ev - er to the King of kings. Praise for - ev - er to the

b b j & b b b œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Praise for - ev - erœ toœ the King ofœ kings.œ Praise for - ev - erœ toœ the

Dropout! 9676 C m7(b5) F7(#5b9) Bbm11 F 2/A Abm7(13) Gbmaj7 Ebm7(b5)/Ab b b 2 4 & b b b ’ ’ Û Û Û Û Û Û | 4 | 4 subito p b b bb œ Œ Ó œ . 2 ‰ j 4 & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 4 œ œ 4 King, Praise for - ev - er to the King of

b b j 2 4 & b b b œ ‰ ∫œ œ . ‰ ∑ 4 ∑ 4 œ œ œ . King of kings.

D G m/D G m6 D /F 79 b b b b b bb b 4 ‰ ‰ & b b 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∫œ œ œ œ œ

b b bb 4 Œ Ó Œ ≈ œ œ & b 4 œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ kings. Oh, Oh, we

b b 4 & b b b 4 Œ Œ ˙ œ ˙ œ ∫w ˙ œ King˙ ofœ kings,w Maj˙ - esœ - 86

Melody

The vocal melody of “King of Kings” follows the notes of the D major scale. The melodic range is a little over an octave (C#4 to D5). Brooke Ligertwood’s delivery is fairly structured (as is that of the background vocalists), however she does add a few one- beat, thirty-second note melismas throughout the song. The highest point of the vocal melody occurs in the choruses, when the lead vocal leaps up to the leading tone and resolves up to the first scale degree on the word “majesty.” The piano intro is a signature reoccurring melody that ties each song section together and bookends the song in both the intro and outro.

The gospel fusion arrangement preserves the song’s traditional instrumental hook in the intros and turnarounds, but it should be noted that melody is slightly modified

(using a flat sixth instead of the fifth scale degree) in order to fall within the new harmonic paradigm created by the underlying G-flat minor chord. This opening instrumental hook also returns in the form of a countermelody during the “Amen” section at the conclusion of the piece. KING OF KINGS Music and Lyrics by Rhythm HILLSONG WORSHIP VERSION Brooke Ligertwood, Jason Ingram, & Scott Ligertwood Trans. Tyler B. Williams Figure 5.12 Hillsong Worship intro hook Intro D # # 4 ‰ ‰ & 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ P œ œ œ œ œ KING OF KINGS Music and Lyrics by RhythmVerse GOSPEL FUSION VERSION ChorusBrooke Ligertwood, Jason Ingram, & Scott Ligertwood 5 FigureD/F G5.13# A D GospelD/FG# A DfusionD/FG# AintroD D/FG hook# A D D G 2 B mArr.7 A TylersusA B.D WilliamsG 2 Intro# # D G m/D 2 4 ‰D j G m/D & || |b| || || || |b| b|| 4 | 4 b œœœ œœ | | b| b|| | | œœœœ ˙ bb b 4 ‰ ‰ P & b b 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∫œ œ œ œ œ œ ∫œ P Verse Chorus 21 B mG72 A D D/GF# AD D/GF# AD D/GF# AD D/GF# A D D G 2 B m7 AsuAs D # # 2 4 ‰ j 2 4 ‰ j Verse& ||4 |4 œœœœœ œœœ ’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’4 ’’4 œœœœœ œœœ ’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’’ 5 D /F G œœ œA D D /F G A œœ D œ D /F G b b Fb b b b b b f b b b b & b b b | | | | | | | | | | 40 G 2 B m7 G 2 A D # # 2 4 ‰ j 10& ’ A ’ D’ ’D /F ’G ’ ’ A ’ 4 ’D ’ 4 G m/D œ œ œ b b b b b b œ œ b œ bœ b b bb 2 4 ‰ j & b | | | | 4 | 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Verse œ œ ∫œ 44 Bm G A D Bm G A D Chorus 15 # D G 2 B m7 G maj7 A A /G D /F & # œ b b | | b | | b | b | b b |b | b œ œ b bb œ Û Û & b | |p | | |

49 Bm G A D Bm G A D 20 G 2 B m7 G 2 A D G m/D # b b b b b b b & b# bÛ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û 2Û Û ÛÛ Û ÛÛ4Û Û ÛÛ Û ÛÛ Û ÛÛ Û ÛÛ Û ÛÛ Û Û ÛÛ Û ÛÛ Û ÛÛ & b b b | | | 4 | 4 ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∫œ F œ œ

25 Db Gbm/Db Db/B Ebm7(b5)/A Ebdim/Gb bb b ‰ j & b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∫œ 87

Mykeyly Hernandez, the soloist for this arrangement, incorporates the notes of the

D-flat major scale in her solo vocal delivery, however due to reharmonization in m. 86, she modifies to follow a D-flat Mixolydian b6 scale, outlining the chord tones of G-flat minor.

The solo vocal range in the gospel fusion version is C4 to Eb5, increasing the range of the song by one half-step in both directions. The inclusion of the choral elements further increases the range to include the soprano’s Gb5 in m. 106. As with other gospel fusion arrangements, the worship leader’s melodic delivery is structured until the background vocalists enter at the second verse, at which point the soloist begins to improvise. Hernandez takes a hybrid approach, choosing to sing both small fragments of the melody and completely new ad lib material.

Rhythm

The Hillsong Worship version of “King of Kings” features highly syncopated melodic rhythms on top of very simple instrumental rhythms. The song is recorded at a slow 68 bpm. The only change in tempo is a slight ritardando found in the penultimate measure. “King of Kings” is in 4/4 time but uses 2/4 bars at the ends of song sections in order to place the final lyric on a strong downbeat. Hillsong Worship uses the multiple layers of synth programming to create sixteenth-note pulses that give this ballad a feeling of forward motion.

The gospel fusion arrangement retains the 2/4 measures at the ends of phrases as well as the original song’s tempo of 68 bpm. A ritardando in m. 106 pulls the tempo back to 63 bpm for the “Total Praise” section. The melody is just as syncopated in this version as in the original, while the instrumental rhythms play more complex figures. In addition

88 to the new rhythmic structures found in the second verse, the instrumental rhythms become even more complex in the fourth verse, in which the downbeats of mm. 77, 79, and 81 are also anticipated. The ascending series of sixteenth notes in m. 80 provides an exciting instrumental interjection in this verse, while still following the established pattern of anticipations.

Figure 5.14 GospelKING OF KINGS fusion (GOSPEL fourth FUSION verse VERSION ) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 6 of 14

76 56 Absus/C Db Db/Ab Ebm/Gb Db/F Db/F Gbmaj7 b b > > > > & b b b Û Û Û Û Û Û ≈ Û Û Û Œ Û . Û Ó

b b j œ œ œ j & b b b œ . œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Ah, 4. Andœ theœ church ofœ Christ was born,œ œ then the Spir -

78 A /C D D /A E m/G D /F G maj7 58 b b b b b b b b b b > > > & b b b Û Û . Û Œ ≈ Û Û Û Œ Û . Û Ó

b b & b b b œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ - œit œlit œ the flame. Nowœ thisœ gos - pelœ œtruthœ of old shall not kneel,

80 A /C D D E m7 E dim7 D /F D /A E m/G D /F F m7(b5) G maj7 60 b b b b b b b b b b b b b œ > & b b b Û Û . Û ≈ œ œ Œ Û . Û Ó œ œ nœ œ > j b b œ œ & b b b œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œshallœ œnot œ œfaint.œ Byœ His blood andœ œin œ His Name in His free-

Growth 62 Ab/C Db Db/B Gb2/Bb Theb bdynamic range of “King of Kings” is very wide, ranging from the intimate2 & b b b Û Û . Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û 4 piano introduction to a full band and arsenal of synth programming in the loudest chorus. j b j b bb œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ≈ ‰ 2 While there& isb noœ bridgeœ œ œ inœ thisœ song,œ energyœ œ levelsœ œ œareœ stillœ œ resetœ œ halfwayœ œ throughœ œ in4 the - dom I am free, for the love of Je - sus Christ who has res - third verse, in which most instruments drop out, leaving only the soloist accompanied by

89 piano playing strict half notes in a treble range. This rhythmic change, along with the aforementioned use of reharmonization, captures the attention of the listener. The song paces itself by not introducing all instruments right away; the drum set doesn’t enter until the second verse (1’20” into the song). Hillsong Worship also uses restraint in their vocal arranging; the background vocalists sing in unison in the first chorus, and then open up to three-part harmony in the second chorus. After building energy levels in verses three and four, and the final chorus, the song ends with a soft tag, evoking the restraint of verse 1 with the use of piano and lead vocal only. The Hillsong Worship recording is 4’26” long, and the song roadmap is Intro, Verse, Chorus, Turnaround, Verse, Chorus, Turnaround,

Verse, Verse, Chorus, Tag, Outro.

The gospel fusion arrangement of “King of Kings” has the widest dynamic range of this entire recording project. The softest moments are found in the opening piano solo, an instrumental-only presentation of the verse and chorus of “Total Praise.” The loudest moments are found when “Total Praise” returns at the end in a bombastic, choral tag.

Similar to the Hillsong Worship version, the third verse sees a reduction in volume, and in instrumentation to the piano and soloist only.

A newly composed eight-bar build serves as a connection between “King of

Kings” and “Total Praise.” In this section, the piano and electric guitar play the instrumental hook while the background vocalists sing an ever-inverting series of sustained triads. The growth in this passage reaches its climax in m. 106 with the background vocalists arriving at their highest notes, before transitioning into “Total

Praise.”

KING OF KINGS (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 8 of 10 Chorus Dropout!

64 b b 2 4 œœ . œ œ œ œ œ j j 2 4 & b b b 4 4 ≈ œœœœ∫. œœœbœ∫œœœ‰. œœœ . œœœŒ œœœ . œ∫œœ.œŒ œœœ . œ œŒ œœœœœ œ‰ Œ œœœœœ ∫œ‰œœ‰.∑ 4 ∑ 4 œœœœœœœ œœœœœœœœœ . œœœœœ œœœœœ. œœœ œœœœœ. œœœ.œ œœœœœ. œœ œœœœœœ œœœ œœœœœœ œœœ . - urrectedme. FortheloveofChristhas resurrectedme!PraisetheFather,œœpraisetheSon,praisetheSpirœœit,threeinone.GodofGloœry,œ Majesty.œPraiseforeverœtoœtheKingofkings.œœPraiseforeverœtoœtheKingofkings. 90 b b 2 .œ 4 w 2 4 V b b b 4 Œ ‰ R 4 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ 4 ∑ 4 me. Figure 5.15 Gospel fusion eight-bar build

Build 9979 Db Gbm/Db Gbm6 Db/F b b 4 & b b b 4 Œ Œ ˙ œ ˙ œ ∫w ˙ œ King˙ ofœ kings,w Maj˙ - esœ -

10282 Gbm6 Cb9 Ebm7(b5)/A Db/Ab Gbm/Db b b bb Œ ˙ œ ∫w & b w ˙ œ w ∫ty,w Fath - er, Son, rit. 10585 Db/Ab Db/Cb A dim7 Db/Ab Gbm6 Db/F Ebm7(b5) b j œ- œ œ- ˙- b bb ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ∫œ œ œ ∫˙ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Ho - ly Spir - it Three in One!

The inclusion of this eight-measure build and the addition of “Total Praise” at the beginning and end of the arrangement increases the length of the song to 7’49”, Total Praise 63 q = significantly87 longer than Hillsong Worship’s 4’26”. Additionally, many of the two- b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & b b b Œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ Ó Œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ∫œ Ó J œ J œ measure turnaroundsYou are foundthe insource the originalof my strength, version haveYou beenare extendedthe strength toof fourmy life, measures to give the soloist room to improvise and worship freely. The roadmap of this arrangement is Piano Solo, Intro, Verse, Chorus, Turnaround, Verse, Chorus,

Turnaround, Verse, Verse, Chorus, Tag, Tag, Build, “Total Praise.”

“Who You Say I Am”

In addition to “King of Kings,” this project looks to Hillsong Worship for another tune to arrange: “Who You Say I Am,” from the 2018 EP (Studio

Sessions). This Dove Award-winning worship song also features the vocal talents of

Brooke Ligertwood. This project’s gospel fusion arrangement retains elements like the

6/8 time signature and memorable instrumental hook, while adding elements of swing, reharmonization, and call and response singing.

91

Sound

Similar to “King of Kings,” Hillsong Worship uses a large collection of vocal and instrumental tracks in this highly produced recording. Their track list includes drum set, digitally sampled percussion loops, sweeping synth effects, bass guitar, synth bass, acoustic guitar, two layers of electric guitars, digitally affected piano, three layers of synth pads and pulses, synth strings, three-part background vocals, choir, and

Ligertwood’s alto lead vocal. Audio effects like reverb and delay are used in great amount on many of the instrumental tracks, specifically on the piano, guitars, and synthesizers. The dynamic range isn’t very wide, as the song is relatively loud from beginning to end. The lead vocal is the most prominent track in the array of sound, supported by the background vocalists singing homophonically with the lead singer.

Similar to “King of Kings,” the presence of gang vocals and large, reverberant sound give

“Who You Say I Am” the feeling of being in a live worship service setting.

The sound of the gospel fusion arrangement of “Who You Say I Am” is less reverberant than the Hillsong Worship version, using more natural sounding, gospel- based instrumental timbres like Hammond organ and electric piano instead of layers of synth leads and pads. Some sections of this new arrangement, like the first verse and chorus, feature moments of rests built into the instrumental groove, creating textural space and a choppier, less legato sound. The instrumentation of the gospel fusion version consists of drum set, percussion loop, bass guitar, two layers of electric guitars, electric piano, Rhodes, Hammond organ, synth bells, three-part background vocals, and a tenor worship leader part.

92

Harmony

The Hillsong Worship version lies squarely in the key of G-flat major, using only diatonic chords (I, IV, V, vi). Almost all chords are played in root position, with the exception of the V6 found in the bridge. The only chord extensions in the song are the minor sevenths atop the vi chords. The harmonic rhythm is relaxed, with one to two chords per measure in the verses and bridge, and only one chord for every two measures in the chorus. This creates a harmonic spaciousness that gets out of the way of the lead vocalist’s melodic delivery. Each song section ends in a plagal cadence (IV-I).

This project’s gospel fusion arrangement places the song in B-flat major. A modulation in m. 96 raises it to B major for the remainder of the piece. As with the other arrangements in this project, the harmonic palette is greatly expanded, incorporating many chord extensions, borrowed, augmented, and altered chords, and playful use of WHO YOU SAY I AM Music and Lyrics by reharmonization. The chord progressionGOSPEL in FUSION the first VERSION verse beginsBen by Fielding following & Reuben theMorgan I-vi-V-I Arr. Tyler B. Williams contour of the Hillsong Worship version, with an added V13(b9) in m. 9. By m. 12, the

B B 7 G m/B B aug B B 7 G m/B B augE m6/F harmonic language begins tob divergeb with theb introductionb b of bFm9, and ba ii-biii-bIV-V bb 6 y . y y œ œ œ œ & 8 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ walkup in mm. 14-15.

b 6 V b 8 Œ . ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ Figure 5.16 Gospel fusion first verse Verse 5 Bb G m7 F/A Bb Ebm/F F 13(b9) Bb b & b ’ . Û ‰ ‰ ∑ ’ . ’ . ’ . Û Û ’ . Û ‰ ‰ SOLO J J J œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ bb ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . Œ . ‰ œ V J J 1. Who am I that the high - est King would wel - come me. I was lost, but He

10 G m7 F m7 Ebmaj7 C m9 D m7 Ebmaj9 Eb/F b & b ∑ ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . Û Û Û Û ‰ ‰ J

b œ . œ . œ œ . bœ œ œ . œ . œ V b œ œ œ ‰ œ . œ . œ œ . ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ brought me in. Oh, His love for me. Oh, His love for me. Who YOU SAY I AM Music and Lyrics by GOSPEL FUSION VERSION Ben Fielding & Reuben Morgan Arr. Tyler B. Williams

Bb Bb7 G m/Bb Bbaug Bb Bb7 G m/Bb BbaugEbm6/F bb 6 y . y y œ œ œ œ & 8 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

b 6 V b 8 Œ . ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑

Verse 5 Bb G m7 F/A Bb Ebm/F F 13(b9) Bb b & b ’ . Û ‰ ‰ ∑ ’ . ’ . ’ . Û Û ’ . Û ‰ ‰ SOLO J J J œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ 93 bb ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . Œ . ‰ œ V J J 1. Who am I that the high - est King would wel - come me. I was lost, but He Figure 5.16 (continued)

10 G m7 F m7 Ebmaj7 C m9 D m7 Ebmaj9 Eb/F b & b ∑ ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . Û Û Û Û ‰ ‰ J

b œ . œ . œ œ . bœ œ œ . œ . œ V b œ œ œ ‰ œ . œ . œ œ . ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ brought me in. Oh, His loveWHOfor YOUme. SAYOh, His I AMlove for me. Who the Music and Lyrics by Rhythm GOSPEL FUSION VERSION Ben Fielding & Reuben Morgan Arr. Tyler B. Williams

While the original version places the instrumental hook atop a lone tonic chord, Bb Bb7 G m/Bb Bbaug Bb Bb7 the gospel fusion arrangement finds all sorts of new harmonic progressions that function bb 6 y . y y œ œ œ & 8 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ cooperatively with the hook. For thoseVerse familiar with the original version, the resulting 4 G m/Bb Bbaug Ebm6/F Bb G m7 F/A reimagination and reharmonization of this signature hook creates moments of excitement b . . . & b œ œ œ ’ Û ‰ ‰ ∑ ’ ’ œ œ œ J and surprise. Chorus 8 BEb bm/FF 13(bB9b) G m7F m7Ebmaj7 C mD9 m7Ebmaj9Eb/F Bb F G m7 F EbC m7Ebmaj7/F b & b ’Û. Û ’Û. ‰‰ ∑ ’ ’. . ’’. . ’ ’. . ÛÛÛÛ‰‰ ’’. . ’’. . ’’. . ’’. . ’’. . ’Û. Û J J J J Figure 5.17 Reharmonization of the instrumental hook Turn 21 Bb Bb7 G m/Bb Bbaug Bb Db7(b9) C 7 B 7 bb œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

Verse WHO YOU SAY I AM (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Rhythm - Page 2 of 4 25SometimesBb these new hook progressions point the listenerG m7 towardF new/A harmonic Chorusb 35 b BÛ Û Û Œ . Û F Û Û Œ . D 7(#5) . E maj7 . D m7 destinations,& bas is the case in mm. 50-53, in which the final two’ chordsb (Eb9’ and b & b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . D7#5(#9)28 functionBb as bVI and V7 (respectively)Bb of theBb Gm7C7(# 5found#9) C#7(# 5in#9) Dm.7(#5 #54.9) b bœ œ nœ œ > 40 b Cœmb7 Eœ /FEœ maj7B/Fœ n B# 7œ/D œ E œ7 E m7(b5E) /F B Û Û Û Œ . E m7(b5)ÛF Û D 7(#5Û) E maj7 FÛ/G C m‰7 E /F‰E maj7/F & b œb œb n bœ œ bœ œ bœ b b b b #œ bœ J bb . Û Û œ œ . . . ‰ Û ...... Û Û & ’ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ 31FigureG m7 J5.18F m 7ReharmonizationEbmaj7 thatC pointsm9 towardBb Gm7Abma j7 AbmaJj7 A 7(b9) b . . . . Bridge & b B’ A’13 ’G 7 ’G 7 B /ÛF Û GÛ7 Û Û E 9Û DÛ 7(#5Û#9) Û ‰G m7 Û Û 49 b b b b b bb œ œ œ œ . & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ | œ œ œ œ

Bridge 54 F/A Bb Bb/D Eb G m7 F/A Bb Bb/D Eb G m7 F/A A m7(b5D) 7(b9) b & b | . Û . Û . | . | . | . Û . Û . | . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

64 G m7 F m9 Ebmaj9 D7(#5#9) G7(#5#9) C m9 D m7 Ebmaj7 /E /F D 7/F# b > & b ’ . ‰ Û ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . Û Û Û Û .

Bridge 69 G m7 D7(#5#9)/F# Bb/F D7(#5#9) G m7 Bb/F C 7/E b & b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ‰ Û ’ . ’ .

69 74 Ebm6 Bb/D Ebm6 Bb/F Abmaj7 Eb b & b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

"I Am Who You Say" 79 Bb/F G m7 C m9 Ebm6 Bb/F b & b Û Û Û ’ . Û Û Û ’ . Û Û Û ’ . Û Û Û ’ . Û Û Û ’ . 94

The harmonic rhythm increases throughout the arrangement, with chord changes becoming quite frequent in the final chorus, which includes a rapid series of planning thirteenth chords (m. 103) and an ascending eighth note progression from B to F# (m.

105-106). This chorus also features another harmonic surprise in m.114, in which the V chord is replaced with a V7/vi.

WHO YOU SAY I AM (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 10 of 11

Figure 5.19 Busy chord changes in the final chorus Chorus

102 F dim7 F#13 G 13 G#13 A 13 A#13 B /D# /D /C# B C#m7 D dim7 B/D# E 7 F dim7 # # # ## Û Û Û Û Û Û . œ & ’ œ #œ nœ œ œ #œ œ œ nœ œ n œ # # # ## Œ . ‰ œ œ . œ . œ . ‰ œ & œ œ œ . œ . œ . œ œ Who the Son sets free, oh,œ is

105 F#7 F#7 /F /E D#7(#5) E maj7 F#/G# # # # ## . . œ œ #œ œ . . . & ’ ’ œ #œ n œ œ . ’ ’

# # . # ## œ . œ . œ . ‰ œ œ œ . œ . & œ . œ . œ . œ œ œ . œ . free in - deed. I'm a child of

108 C#m7 E/F# E maj7/F# B A 7 G#7 G 7(#5) F#7sus B # ## # . . . & # ’ Û Û œ œ œ œ œ œ ’ ’ J œ œ œ œ œ œ # # œ . # ## œ ‰ œ œ . œ ˙ . Œ . ‰ œ œ . œ . & œ œ œ . œ ˙ . œ œ œ . œ . God, yes I am. In my Fa - ther's

112 D#7 G#m7 F#m7 # ## & # # ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

# # œ . # ## œ . ‰ œ œ . œ . œ . ‰ œ œ œ . nœ . & œ . œ œ ‹œ . œ . ‹œ . œ œ œ œ . house there'sœ a place for me. I'm a child of

Cadences are also modified in this new arrangement, with Hillsong’s plagal resolutions at the ends of song sections being replaced with V-to-I motion throughout

95 much of the piece. A few exceptions can be found, such as the tritone substitution in m.

25, in which B7 serves as a substitute for F7. Another cadential replacement is found in the bVII-to-I progression (Abmaj7 to Bb) at the end of the second verse.

Melody

In the Hillsong Worship version, all of the vocal and instrumental melodies follow the notes of the G-flat major scale. The range of the lead vocal melody uses

Ligertwood’s rich alto voice, extending from Gb3 to Cb5. Her vocal delivery is very structured, with little deviation or improvisation. Even Ligertwood’s melismas at the ends of each chorus are consistent. The song has an immediately identifiable instrumental hook that first appears after the first chorus. This hook, played by a stack of keys, guitars, and synths, makes frequent appearances in the song, serving as an instrumental connector of each song section.

Instead of an alto soloist, the gospel fusion version features worship leader

Dwight Hernandez’s powerhouse tenor voice. His performance uses a wide and virtuosic vocal range (Db3 to B4), not unlike the Onaje Jefferson performances with The

Recording Collective. Once the background vocalists begin carrying the melody in the second verse, Hernandez begins soaring up and down the staff with all sorts of improvised melismas and exhortations, all of which follow the Bb major scale, although the seventh scale degree is hardly ever used.

Blue notes in the form of quick, neighbor tone inflections can be found in mm. 12 and 28 of the soloist’s melody. These notes foreshadow the newly composed “Praise

Break” section that begins in m. 88. Inspired by Cristabel Clack’s dynamic blues riffs found in The Recording Collective’s arrangement of “King of My Heart,” this new praise

96 break section features a static, repeated phrase (“Yes, I am!”) sung by the background vocalists while Hernandez testifies in a completely improvised fashion. In this section, his melodies follow the D-flat—and after the modulation, D—pentatonic scales. It should be noted that at the time of recording, none of Hernandez’s melody was notated, and that each of these runs, and the text being sung, was completely improvised, yet delivered in a flawless and stylistically appropriate way.

WHO YOU SAY I AM (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 6 of 9

Figure 5.20 Praise break section Praise Break

87 Bb13 Bb7/D Eb7 E dim7 Bb/F G7(#5#9) b & b Û ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ Û Û ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ Û Û ‰ ‰ Û . J J J J J b œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ b Œ . bœ œ bœ œ œ œ . œ . bœ ‰ ‰ V œ œ bœ Oh, yes I am, Oh, b & b œ œ œ Œ . œ œ œ Œ . œ œ œ Œ . Yes I am! Yes I am! Yes I am!

90 C 7(b9) E 13 F 9 Bb13 Bb7/D Eb7 E dim7 j b . bœ œ & b Û bb œ œ Û ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ Û Û ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ Û œ J J J J bœ bœ b œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œbœ œ œ . œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ V b ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ ‰ I'm a child of God, I am cho - sen by You, Lord, b & b œ œ œ Œ . œ œ œ Œ . œ œ œ Œ . Yes I am! Yes I am! Yes I am!

93 Bb/F Ab9 G 7(#9) F dim7 F#7sus B 7 B 7/D# b # ## & b Û ‰ ‰ Û . Û . Û Û # # Û ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ Û J J J J œ œ œ œ nœ . œ #œ nœ # # œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ bb ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ . nœ nœ # # ‰ ‰ J V R # 3 Yeah, some - bod-y sing it with me, say! You thought of me,

b # ## & b œ œ œ Œ . œ œ œ Œ . # # Nœ œ œ Œ . Yes I am! Yes I am! Yes I am!

97

Rhythm

Similar to “King of Kings,” the Hillsong Worship version of “Who You Say I

Am” uses driving sixteenth-note pulses (introduced in verse 2) to propel the song forward. This underlying forward motion makes the song feel faster than it actually is

(only 86 bpm). The vocal melody sings syncopated rhythms in the verses and straightens out in the choruses and bridge. The instrumental parts are not syncopated at all, save for a few dotted eighth-note patters in the kick drum. This simple, yet powerful accompaniment allows the vocal delivery to shine.

The tempo of the gospel fusion version is slightly faster, at 86 bpm. The most noticeable rhythmic change is the use of swung sixteenth notes throughout, which gives the song a lilting shuffle feel. There are no tempo changes, save for a slight ritardando in the penultimate measure. Whereas the Hillsong Worship version uses pulsating synthesizers to generate forward motion, this arrangement relies on the swung percussion loop to be an ever-present subdividing element.

The instrumentalists have a variety of intricate and specific rhythms to play in this new version. This includes an accented break in m. 31, syncopated hits like the Em7(b5) on the fifth beat of m. 45, and a hemiola in m. 102 as the band transitions out of the

“Praise Break” section and into the final chorus.

Growth

The Hillsong Worship version of “Who You Say I Am” relies on changes in instrumental texture to create and sustain growth. The understated intro of the song begins with acoustic guitar strums and sustained piano chords. This accompaniment continues throughout the first verse, until synth pads are introduced in the first chorus.

98

The signature melodic hook is introduced after the first chorus, along with the pulsing sixteenth note figures that continue throughout the song. Drum fills are used to propel the transition from verse 2 to the chorus, and from the bridge to the chorus. The Hillsong

Worship version is not very long, at only 3’19” in length. The song roadmap is Intro,

Verse, Half-Chorus, Verse, Chorus, Bridge, Bridge, Chorus, Tag.

The gospel fusion arrangement is over a minute longer, clocking in at 4’34”. This is due to the sixteen-measure “Praise Break” section, an addition bridge, and the use of extended turnarounds which, as with this project’s arrangement of “King of Kings,” allows the soloist more time to insert improvised moments of worship. The dynamic range isn’t very wide, with softer sections limited to the end of the song and the first bridge. Although the Hillsong Worship version begins the bridge at the same loud dynamic level as the chorus, this version opts instead to bring energy levels down by using only the soloist and keys and limited the amount of rhythmic subdivision (mm. 54-

61). As with the other arrangements studied, the bridge in this version is used as a means of building up energy by introducing new elements with each repetition: solo only (m.

54), followed by background vocalists in unison (m. 62), followed by background vocalists in three-part harmony (m.70). A series of bridge tags is also introduced in this arrangement, in which the background vocalists repeat the phrase “I am who You say I am” four times atop a new harmonic scheme before heading into the explosive “Praise

Break” section.

99

WHO YOU SAY I AM (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 8 of 11 Figure 5.21 Bridge tags section Bridge Tags

79 Bb/F G m7 C m9 Ebm6 b & b Û Û Û ’ . Û Û Û ’ . Û Û Û ’ . Û Û Û ’ .

b œ œ œ œ œ œ b Œ . ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœœœœ œ œ Œ . ‰ ‰ J ‰ V J You said, I am, 3 yeah, You said,

b j j b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ . œ am who You say I am. I am who You say I am. I

83 Bb/F G m7 C m D m7 Ebm6 Ab13A 13 b & b Û Û Û ’ . Û Û Û ’ . Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û J œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bb Œ . ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∑ ‰ V 3 'cause I am, come on say it, Yes I am!

b j b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . Œ . & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ . am who You say I am. I am who You say I am.

One of the biggest contributors to growth in the gospel fusion version is the half- step modulation in m. 96. This proves to be an effective method of sustaining growth and helps prevent the piece from becoming stale. The roadmap of the gospel fusion version is

Intro, Verse, Half-Chorus, Turnaround, Verse, Chorus, Turnaround, Bridge, Bridge,

Bridge, Bridge Tags, Praise Break, Chorus, Turnaround, Chorus Tag.

Chapter Six – The Production Process

Arranging

The first step in the production process was selecting well-known worship songs in order to create gospel fusion arrangements in the style of The Recording Collective. In addition to the three chosen songs analyzed in Chapter Five, this recording project also includes the song “Christ Be Magnified” by CCM recording artist Cody Carnes and “Yes

I Will” by Chicago-based Vertical Worship.

Once selected, I began playing through these songs, becoming intimately familiar with the original lyrics and chord progressions in order to explore the musical elements that could be modified and rearranged. Ideas for reharmonization, changes in rhythms and grooves, changes in instrumental textures, and newly added melodies and lyrics were all sketched out at the piano. In this exploratory process, I found ways to incorporate popular gospel staples into some of my arrangements. For instance, Shekinah Glory

Ministry’s lengthy 2007 worship ballad “Yes” paired well with Vertical Worship’s “Yes I

Will” from both a textual and musical perspective. Similarly, gospel legend Richard

Smallwood’s choral anthem “Total Praise” proved to be a perfect candidate for a powerful “gospel coda” to my arrangement of “King of Kings.”

With simple sketches of the songs written out, rough draft recordings were then created and recorded in Logic Pro X, a Mac-based digital audio workstation. Piano, bass, and drum machine tracks were created by using an M-Audio Keystation 88 II keyboard

100 101 connected via USB to Logic’s built-in virtual instruments (software-based synthesizers).

These “scratch recordings” were helpful in getting a sense of the pacing of these new gospel fusion arrangements.

Pre-Production and Programming

With the arrangements and demo recordings created, my attention turned to pre- production. The appropriate tempo for each song was determined, along with tempo changes and ritardandi in songs like “King of Kings” and “Who You Say I Am.” It was essential to lock these tempi in place before recording began, in order to sync up the various vocal and instrumental tracks (recorded separately) under one master tempo.

Each Logic session was set to a bit depth of 24 and a sample rate of 48kHz; this would be the bit depth and sample rate used in all subsequent recording and mixing sessions.

The initial “scratch recording” keyboard parts were replaced by more refined keyboard parts. Additional virtual instrument textures were programmed, including synth basses, woodwinds, pads, percussion loops, synth lead patches, and guitars. A complete list of all MIDI-programmed instrumental tracks and their corresponding virtual instrument plug-ins (peripheral software programs) is shown below.

Table 1. “Christ Be Magnified” Programming List Instrument DAW Plug-in Sample Keys 1 Logic Sampler Grand Piano Keys 2 Logic Vintage Electric Piano Chorused Electric Piano Keys 3 Logic Vintage Electric Piano Funk Piano Guitar Logic Legacy Guitar 12 String Acoustic Hook Synth Logic ES2 Synthesizer 2 Analog Moog Lead Bass Guitar Logic Sampler Fingerstyle Electric Bass Flute Logic Sampler Flute Solo+

102

Table 2. “King of Kings” Programming List Instrument DAW Plug-in Sample Keys 1 Pro Tools Kontakt 6 Westwood Alt Piano Keys 2 Logic Vintage Electric Piano Suitcase Bright Pad Drone Logic ES2 Synthesizer 2 Dark Pad 01 Loop Logic Legacy Drum Kits R&B Kit Shaker Logic Sampler Studio Percussion

Table 3. “Lion and the Lamb” Programming List Instrument DAW Plug-in Sample Keys 1 Pro Tools Xpand Pretty FM + Chorus Keys 2 Pro Tools Hybrid Direct Wurlitzer B3 Organ Pro Tools DB33 Fast 008856038 Synth 1 Pro Tools Hybrid Power Stabs Synth 2 Pro Tools Hybrid Sineish Lead Orchestra Hit Pro Tools Xpand Orchestra Hit 1 Loop Pro Tools Boom Say It Simple Synth Bass 1 Pro Tools Hybrid Phatsonic Bass Synth Bass 2 Pro Tools Hybrid Fat MKS80 Bass

Table 4. “Who You Say I Am” Programming List Instrument DAW Plug-in Sample Keys 1 Logic E-Piano Classic Suitcase Mk I Keys 2 Logic E-Piano Wide Suitcase Keys 3 Logic ES2 Synthesizer 2 80s FM Piano Loop Logic Sampler Studio Percussion B3 Organ Logic Vintage B3 Organ Rich Gospel Organ Hook Synth Pro Tools Omnisphere D50 – Classic Staccato Heaven

Table 5. “Yes I Will” Programming List Instrument DAW Plug-in Sample Keys 1 Logic E-Piano Classic Suitcase Mk I Keys 2 Pro Tools Omnisphere CS-80 Sine Bells Keys 3 Pro Tools Omnisphere JP Vibrasine Bells Pulsing Synth Pro Tools Omnisphere Sweet Sixteenths Hook Synth 1 Pro Tools Omnisphere Purewave Bells Hook Synth 2 Pro Tools Omnisphere D50 – Classic Staccato Heaven Synth Bass 1 Pro Tools Omnisphere BASS – Billie Bad Bass Synth Bass 2 Pro Tools Omnisphere BASS – Taylor Blank Bass

103

Lead sheets and rhythm charts were created in Finale (a music notation software).

These charts included chord symbols, rhythmic figures, and notated versions of the three- part background vocalist harmonies, all of which would be crucial for the various vocalists and instrumentalists who would be recording this material. In addition to sheet music, the different personnel involved were also given mp3 recordings to listen to as they learned their parts. A demonstration, or “mock-up,” bass guitar part was played into

Logic via my MIDI keyboard in order to give the bass player an idea of his entrances and rhythmic figures. Additionally, rough demos of the soprano, alto, and tenor background vocal parts were recorded by me to assist the singers in learning their parts.

Drums

Because of its central role in gospel music, the drum set was the first instrument that needed to be recorded once pre-production was complete. The performances of all other instrumentalists and singers would certainly be informed by the dynamic intensity, rhythmic patterns, and at times, swing rhythms played by the drummer, so it was critical to record this first.

Drums were recorded on July 6, 2020 at Family Church in West Palm Beach,

Florida. Danny Marquez, a professional musician and a featured drummer with Family

Church Worship, recorded three of the songs for this project. Danny has years of experience playing gospel music, and we played many songs by The Recording

Collective together when I was on staff at Family Church. Weeks before the recording session, practice tracks of these songs were sent to Danny, complete with demo vocals, to give him time to internalize these new arrangements and prepare to record. The drum set at Family Church was outfitted with the following microphones:

104

Table 6. Drum Set Microphone List Kick Drum Shure Beta 52 Snare Drum Top Shure SM57 Snare Drum Bottom Rode M8 Hi-Hat Neumann KM184 Rack-mounted Tom 1 Sennheiser E604 Rack-mounted Tom 2 Sennheiser E604 Floor Tom Sennheiser MD421 Overhead Left AKG C414B Overhead Right AKG C414B

Matt Vaughan, a technical associate on staff at Family Church, served as the recording engineer for this session. In addition to setting up the microphones, he was able to monitor the microphone levels and the audio capturing process, freeing me up to focus on directing Danny in the more musical elements of the session. Both Danny and I used

Allen and Heath ME-1 units for personal in-ear monitoring. Using Logic, click tracks and scratch audio tracks were played from my computer, connected into the Allen and Heath system via a stereo 1/8” headphone cable.

The first song we recorded was “Lion and the Lamb.” Due to the high-energy nature of this arrangement, the drums play almost the entire duration of the song, leaving few places to start and stop recording. We recorded three takes from start to finish. At first, it took a second for Danny to lock in the swing rhythms in the verses, especially in the hi-hat, but this was quickly resolved. The second take ended up being the best take.

The second song we recorded was “Who You Say I Am.” This song also features swing rhythms but was not as challenging for Danny as the first song. Because the drums rest for eight measures at the bridge, this song was recorded in two sections, allowing

Danny to focus on half of the song instead of the entire arrangement. Two takes of measures 1 through 54 were recorded back to back. Then, after practicing the remaining

105 measures, two takes of the back half of the song (measures 61 through 128) were recorded back to back.

The third and final song we recorded was “King of Kings.” This song also features a segment with no drums, allowing us to divide the recording process into two parts. In this arrangement, the drums do not enter until the second verse, which also saved some time. We practiced then recorded two takes of measures 24 through 48. Then, after practicing the back half of the song, we recorded two takes of measures 53 through 111.

Danny’s performances were nearly flawless and needed only minimal coaching in places featuring unique and highly specific rhythmic figures. His fluency with the gospel music vernacular helped bring these gospel fusion arrangements to life.

The microphones were connected to an Allen and Heath Avantis audio console.

The console was connected to an iMac computer via a Dante ethernet system, a low- latency method of transferring multiple channels of digital audio. Using Reaper, another digital audio workstation, the tracks were captured and stored on this iMac in WAV

(Waveform Audio) file format. After the session had concluded, these WAV files were transferred onto an external hard drive to be edited in Nashville at a later date.

While these three songs were being recorded with a live drummer, my friend Eric

Uplinger, a Nashville-based producer and mix engineer, was creating sample-based drum tracks for the two remaining songs: “Yes I Will” and “Christ Be Magnified.” These two songs featured a more synth-driven sound, and Eric’s programming skills and impressive sample library provided a unique drum beat for these arrangements.

To give Eric a conceptual reference for “Yes I Will,” I created a simple, four-bar drumbeat using the Classic Electro Kit setting within Logic’s Ultrabeat drum machine

106 virtual instrument plug-in. I sent him this sample drum idea in a Logic session that included markers, indicating locations for fills, rests, and breaks. From there, Eric recreated and expanded my initial drum idea, using a variety of both sampler-based synthesizers and audio files. Some of the sampler-based sounds came from Logic’s

Roland Tr 909and Ultrabeat drum machines, and Omnisphere. Many of the audio tracks came from the Cinematic Pop Deluxe and Future Drums sample libraries produced by a company called That Sound. Eric’s layered and nuanced drum programming elevated the sound of this song, providing unique timbres and points of interest throughout the recording.

The drums for “Christ Be Magnified” were programmed using the Roland Tr 808 vintage drum machine in Logic’s Drum Machine Designer. All drum elements (kick, snare, cymbals, toms, percussion) were created by inputting MIDI notes into Logic’s piano roll region. Using these 808 drum machine timbres helped to reinforce the 1990s

R&B sound of this particular arrangement.

Eric Uplinger also helped in the drum editing process for the songs recorded in

Florida. After I selected and assembled the best takes (a process known as comping) and trimmed measures of rests in order to avoid unnecessary noise, updated drum WAVs were sent to Eric. Using the Beat Detective feature in Pro Tools, Eric worked in eight- measure segments, resolving any noticeable timing issues in the drums.

Bass Guitar

With the drum tracks recorded, programmed, and edited, other instrumentalists could now be recorded. Winner Olmann, a talented multi-instrumentalist, music producer, and worship pastor at Family Church recorded bass guitar for three of the

107 songs: “Lion and the Lamb,” “Who You Say I Am,” and “King of Kings.” Winner brought his virtuosic yet tasteful gospel chops to this project; his skills have been honed and polished from years spent playing in Haitian American and African American church settings. Rhythm charts were emailed to Winner, along with a folder containing WAV audio stems of click track, accompaniment track (including the newly recorded drums), and a rough demo of a bass part I recorded in Logic via MIDI keyboard. I encouraged

Winner to follow the charts and use the “scratch bass” recordings as a guide, but gave express permission and encouraged him to improvise and take liberties with his parts.

Winner played a five-string Fender Jazz Bass, routed through an Apollo Twin audio interface. For a DAW, he used Logic on his MacBook Pro. After recording bass parts for the three songs, Winner edited his tracks using the iZotope RX-7 timing and pitch correction plug-in, correcting any noticeable performance issues. Upon receiving the edited bass tracks, I was delighted by some of the improvisatory surprises that Winner recorded, especially given the fact that he was only equipped with chord charts and minimal direction. Some of these surprise moments include simple inversion changes, like playing the D-flat major chord in first inversion in m. 106 of “King of Kings.” There were also more virtuosic moments, like an impressive fill in m. 28 of “Who You Say I

Am” and a playful lick in the penultimate measure of “Lion and the Lamb.”

I recorded the bass parts using virtual instruments for the remaining two songs. In

“Christ Be Magnified,” I used the Fingerstyle Electric Bass sample within Logic’s built- in Sampler instrument plug-in. I doubled the bass guitar track with the Funk Piano sample found in Logic’s Vintage Electric Piano patch. This helped create a slightly detuned, 1990s R&B sound to the bass in this song. Because “Yes I Will” features a more

108 synth-driven sound, I used two layers of synth basses from the “ILIO – The Fame

Modern Pop” sample library. “Billie Bad Bass,” with its muted tone and quick release, functioned as the primary synth bass sound throughout the song while “Taylor Blank

Bass,” a crunchier and more sustained sample, was added in the final chorus as a way of boosting intensity.

Electric Guitar

The electric guitar parts were recorded remotely by Danny Diaz, a Nashville- based musician and educator. Similar to the bass guitar sessions, rhythm charts and WAV audio stems of click tracks and instrumental tracks were sent to Danny. Lead guitar lines were notated to avoid any confusion in the recording process. Electric guitar parts were recorded for “Lion and the Lamb,” “Who You Say I Am,” and “King of Kings” over the span of three weeks in late August and early September 2020. Danny used a Fender

American Standard Telecaster solid body electric guitar. The guitar was connected to a

Focusrite Saffire Pro 40 audio interface via a 1/4” cable. Danny recorded all tracks in Pro

Tools 2020, and used Amplitube 4, a digital amp simulator plugin, along with Pulse, a digital impulse response loader, in lieu of miking a physical amp. In keeping with the style of The Recording Collective, the electric guitar parts did not use heavy amounts of reverb, delay, or other effects found in modern worship music. I encouraged Danny to keep things fairly dry and to aim for a bluesy tone. The only effects used on these guitar tracks were overdrive, via Amplitube 4, and D-Verb, the built-in Pro Tools reverb plugin.

Danny recorded multiple layers of electric guitars in each song. These included lead guitar hooks, like the notable turnaround hook featured in “Who You Say I Am,” a simple pass of sustained chords, and a more rhythmically active pass of energetic

109 picking. Danny sent back WAV files of his guitar parts, which were then loaded into

Logic and edited. The guitar editing process included using Logic’s built-in Flex Time feature, allowing me to manipulate his audio in order to help things line up more tightly with the drums and other tracks. Logic’s Flex Pitch feature was used to help the guitar intonation in a few places.

Hammond Organ

Hunter Spivey, a Nashville-based musician and Belmont University alum, recorded B3 organ parts for “Who You Say I Am” and “King of Kings.” As with the other instrumentalists, Hunter was equipped with demo recordings and rhythm charts, and given liberty to interpret and improvise his parts as he saw fit. The organ tracks were created using Logic’s Vintage B3 Organ virtual instrument plug-in. Hunter played a

Novation Launchkey 49 keyboard which features programmable faders and switches that were used to control the organ drawbar and rotary cabinet settings. Hunter used stylistically appropriate organ techniques like glissandi, improvisatory fills and licks, and strategic use of the volume pedal and the signature rotary spin. These organ tracks were vital in creating the classic gospel music sound for these two songs.

Vocals

The vocal parts were one of the most essential components of this project. In addition to bringing the notated three-part harmonies to life, it was paramount that the vocalists for this gospel fusion project be familiar with gospel styles, inflections, and vocal delivery. Even more important was to have soloists who could improvise and sing on top of and around the background vocal parts.

110

I returned to West Palm Beach in the first week of September for a series of vocal recording sessions with some of the featured singers from Family Church Worship.

Angel Arce, a music producer and technical associate at Family Church, assisted in setting up a small, isolated space in which to record. A Neumann TLM 103 condenser microphone was run through a Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 audio interface. This interface was then connected to my MacBook Pro via a USB cable. All vocal parts were recorded into

Logic. A Kaotica Eyeball, a portable foam isolation apparatus, was placed over the microphone to ensure a dry, isolated sound. Phantom power was supplied to the

Neumann via the audio interface. Headphone extension cables were run from the Scartell

2i2 to both the singer and me, and in-ear monitors were used to avoid having any click or track picked up in the microphone.

Each vocal part was recorded individually to ensure clean, dry audio tracks without bleed from other vocalists. For background vocalists, two takes of each section were recorded in order to create a blended, chorus sound. For soloists, three takes of each section were recorded, giving me a safe number of options from which to choose in the editing process. The technique of “flying,” or copying one section of a track and pasting it elsewhere in a song, was used to save time and avoid vocal fatigue. This technique was helpful in songs with repetitive choruses like “Lion and the Lamb” and “Christ Be

Magnified.” In addition to engineering the session, monitoring input levels, and ensuring audio capture, I also conducted entrances and cutoffs for the vocalists. Each song was broken up into small, manageable segments, allowing me to teach and rehearse a section of music with the singer before recording. The vocalist and I would go back and record over any mistakes in a process known as “punching in.” Logic’s built-in system of

111 recording multiple takes of audio automatically creates cross-fades, allowing for a seamless blend between existing and “punched in” audio tracks.

The first vocal session was with Krystal Gutierrez, a classically trained soprano and worship leader fluent in both gospel and pop styles. Krystal recorded the soprano background vocal parts for all five songs in the project. Because of her sight-reading abilities and overall preparedness, Krystal did not need much coaching and was able to record long sections of music with little to no errors. One notable moment of inspiration occurred during Krystal’s recording session, in which she sang one of my notated vocal lines incorrectly. As it turns out, the line Krystal sang went a whole step higher and felt even more energetic than what I had initially written. Because she was the first vocalist to record, I decided to keep her “wrong note” and made sure that the subsequent vocalists matched her phrase.

The next vocal session featured Mykeyly Hernandez, a worship leader and soloist with Family Church Worship who recorded all of this project’s alto background vocal parts as well as the solo for “King of Kings.” Mykeyly brought a soothing and mellow sound as well as moments of improvisation and stylistically appropriate melismas to this project. She is a former member of LU Praise, Liberty University’s multi-ethnic gospel choir. Because Krystal’s soprano parts had already been recorded earlier in the week,

Mykeyly was able to sing along with Krystal in her in-ear mix. This was helpful in creating as unified a sound as possible, considering the background vocalists were not being recorded simultaneously. Due to the tricky nature of some of the alto parts, and a greater dependence on singing by ear rather than by sight reading, Mykeyly’s background vocal takes required more punch-ins and corrections. Once the alto parts for all five songs

112 had been tracked, we turned our attention to the solo for “King of Kings.” This solo was much easier to record as Mykeyly was already quite familiar with the Hillsong Worship version of this song and was given free rein to improvise without having to worry about things like harmonies and cutoffs.

Mykeyly’s husband, Dwight Hernandez, recorded all of the tenor parts as well as the high energy solo for “Who You Say I Am.” Dwight is another powerhouse vocalist with Family Church Worship as well as a former member of LU Praise. As he was the third vocalist to record, Dwight’s in-ear monitor mix included both Krystal and

Mykeyly’s vocal parts which, giving him a full “praise team” sound over which to record.

The same method of teaching, practicing, then recording small sections at a time was also used in recording these tenor parts. Once all of Dwight’s background vocal parts were recorded, we focused on the solo part for “Who You Say I Am.” The notated and more structured parts of the solo were recorded first; these included the first verse and chorus, the solo-only bridge, and the tag at the end of the song. Once these sections were recorded, I then asked Dwight to record multiple takes of Spirit-led, gospel-infused improvisation throughout the remaining sections of the song. This included the Praise

Break section of the song, where Dwight’s fast melismas, shouts, and call and response figures interacted with the background vocalists’ repetitions of the phrase “Yes, I am!”

All of the background vocal sessions required the singers to accurately follow the notated vocal parts on the page, with one exception: the eight bar “Praise” interlude before the bridge of “Yes I Will.” In this section, each of the vocalists was asked to improvise and worship freely while the instrumental track continued the song’s repetitive

113 chord progression underneath. The result was a wave of “pandiatonic praise,” as each vocalist’s improvisations followed the C major scale while overlapping one another.

The fourth and final vocal recording session was with Justin Barahona, another worship leader and featured artist with Family Church Worship. Justin’s strong tenor voice, gospel inflections, and musical instincts were most helpful in capturing both the structed and improvisatory solo moments for “Lion and the Lamb,” “Yes I Will,” and

“Christ Be Magnified.” As with Dwight’s solo, we recorded the simple, solo-only passages first, before recording the more improvisatory elements. In keeping with the techniques of The Recording Collective’s soloists, I encouraged Justin to sing around the background vocalists, essentially inserting his ad lib moments in between the already- recorded background vocal parts. At times, I would sing some suggested runs or phrases whenever Justin was at a loss for improvisatory ideas. We recorded three takes of every solo part in each song, giving me a great selection of performance options in the comping and editing process.

With all vocal tracks recorded, I returned to Nashville and began the process of comping, or compiling, the best takes; elements like pitch, rhythmic accuracy, and clarity of vocal delivery were factors used in evaluating the best take of any given section.

Sections of silence were deleted to remove unnecessary noise and cross fades were added to smooth over entrances and transitions between takes. All of the vocals were tuned using Logic’s built-in Flex Pitch tool. Because the soloists’ tracks were to be more present in the mix, I was careful to not go overboard in the tuning process, allowing these audio tracks to remain as natural sounding as possible. The background vocal tracks

114 received a more generous amount of finessing and manipulation of pitch and at times, vibrato amounts.

Mixing

Once all audio tracks had been recorded and edited, they were then sent off to

Eric Uplinger for mixing. He used Pro Tools 2020, along with an Apollo Twin MkII audio interface connected to two PMC twotwo.6 studio speakers.

Eric began by setting initial volume levels, spatial placement (panning), and balancing all the tracks in each song before adding any plug-ins. From there, he moved on to the drums, using both additive and subtractive equalization (EQ) techniques with plug-ins like Fabfilter’s Pro-Q3 and Waves Scheps 73. Eric also imported drum samples from That Sound’s Nir & Jeff collection to reinforce the kick, snare, and toms. A stereo auxiliary channel (aux) was created for drum effects, which included ValhallaRoom for reverb and Soundtoys’ Decapitator, an analog saturation modeler that added light, tasteful distortion to give the drums body, grit, and character. After the drums had been dialed in,

Eric blended in the percussion loop tracks, ensuring that the two instruments complemented each other.

Bass guitar came next, for which Eric used two stages of compression plug-ins: a

Universal Audio (UAD) LA-2A for gentle and constant compression throughout, as well as the UAD 1176, set to a more aggressive setting to catch audio peaks. The bass guitar was also sent to an aux effects channel equipped with Softube’s Tube-Tech CL-1B compression (used in parallel with the compressors on the bass track) and Avid’s

SansAmp PSA-1 amp simulator. From there, Eric dialed in all of the electric piano, organ, and synth programming tracks with minimal audio effect processing, using

115

Fabfilter’s Pro-Q3 for subtractive EQ and sending each keys/programming track to a stereo aux effect channel equipped with ValhallaVintageVerb’s Bright Hall reverb algorithm. Electric guitar tracks were cleaned up next, using EQ to avoid piercing frequencies and hums, and a boost around 200Hz to give the guitars greater body and thickness. The guitar tracks Danny Diaz sent were already had a light amount of reverb included, so no further effects processing was needed.

The lead vocal tracks received a lot of attention, as they are the most prominent and exposed tracks in each of these mixes. Eric began by using subtractive EQ tailored to each unique singer’s voice. Eksound’s soothe2 plug-in was used as a de-esser, providing frequency-dependent compression in the high-mid area of the spectrum to reduce sibilance. UAD’s LA-2A and 1176 compressors, along with the Waves R-Vox compressor were used to catch peaks and provide gentle and constant compression. Two hardware emulators were used to saturate the lead vocal tracks: Kazrog’s True Iron transformer emulator provided subtle, full bodied saturation and Slate Digital’s Virtual

Console Collection (VCC) emulated an SSL 4000E analog console. The lead vocal channel was also sent to an aux effects channel, equipped with UAD’s 1176 Rev A for parallel compression, ValhallaRoom, ValhallaShimmer and UAD’s EMT 140 for reverb,

Soundtoys’ EchoBoy and EchoBoy Jr. for slap delay and eighth-note tape delay, respectively, and Avid’s Pitch II and Soundtoys’ Microshift plug-ins for stereo intonation effects that beefed up the vocal sound.

Eric focused next on the background vocalist tracks, using Fabfilter’s Pro-Q3 plug-in to remove low and mid-range frequencies and UAD’s 1176 compressor to level the dynamic range on each individual track. All of the background vocal tracks were sent

116 to a stereo aux effects track equipped with ValhallaRoom for reverb. The background vocal tracks were also bussed to an aux track equipped with audio effects to be applied to the entire blended group of singers. This included the Pro-Q3 equalizer to remove frequency buildup that occurs when all vocals are blended together, Kush Audio’s

Clariphonic Parallel Equalizer to add clarity in higher frequencies without adding harshness, a series of de-essers, plug-ins that attenuate or reduce sibilance, targeting different frequencies (Waves R-DeEsser, UAD Precision, and soothe2), and UAD’s

Shadow Hills Compressor, used as a transformer emulator to give body to the background vocalists.

One final stereo auxiliary “Mix Bus” track was created, through which all audio and aux effects tracks were routed. This final round of audio effects plug-ins included an analog console emulator (Slate Digital VCC), a transformer emulator (Kazrog’s True

Iron), and a tube emulator (Plugin Alliance’s Black Box Analog Design HG-2) to provide saturation. Both the API 2500 and SSL 4000G compressors were used lightly on this final bus, along with Soundtheory’s Gullfoss dynamic equalizer, which analyzed the frequency spectrum in real-time and added clarity to the overall mix. Kush Audio’s

Clariphonic Parallel Equalizer and the Waves Scheps 73 were used as mid-side EQ, adding top end to the left and right sides of the mix to enhance width. Finally, this effects channel included a soothe2 Master De-esser, used very gently, and Fabfilter’s Pro-L2

Mastering Limiter, set to the “punchy” setting.

In terms of stereo placement, Eric arranged the drums from the drummer’s perspective, panning the hi-hat to the left, and the three toms from left to right. To balance out the leftward placement of the hi-hat, shakers and percussion loops were

117 panned to the right. Bass guitar, synth bass, and lead vocal tracks remained center, while electric guitar tracks were partially panned to provide separation. All of the keys and programming tracks were stereo to begin with and did not warrant further panning. As the background vocalist tracks were double-tracked (two takes of each vocal part), they were panned left and right, creating a wide, stereo sound.

Eric then applied automation, or pre-programmable adjustments, to the volume levels of individual tracks as needed, then sent me WAV files of rough mixes for each song. I then sent him a list of mix revisions: minor tweaks mainly related to volume and balance. After reviewing these notes, Eric made the necessary adjustments and sent a revised mix of each song.

Finalization

With the recordings finalized, all lead sheet and rhythm charts were updated to reflect the solo parts as they were sung on the record, including transcriptions of all improvised material.

Conclusion

The Recording Collective and other artists within the emerging gospel fusion subgenre continue to transform the sounds, sources, and potential audiences for gospel music. The musical endeavors of these artists, plus the arrangements and recordings put forth in this project, build upon the great legacies of both gospel music and the modern worship movement in America. Andrew Wilson-Dickson, recognizing the impact that gospel music has had outside the walls of black churches says, “the black community in

America has proffered a great gift to the legacy of Christian music” (Wilson-Dickson

1992, 193).

This project places a high value on the use of as a means of instruction, analysis, and transmission. The use of accurate lead sheets and rhythm charts can be a helpful tool for musicians from non-gospel backgrounds, or for those who lack the aural skills needed to decipher the advanced harmonic and rhythmic elements found in these arrangements. While these transcriptions are helpful, one must remember that gospel music has typically been transmitted and absorbed aurally. Citing these aural traditions, M. Roger Holland II says, “the music is communicated in the doing of it, not in the reading of it” (Holland 2014, 27). Holland views live performances and recordings as “aural scores” to be studied and that these “should be the true source of understanding when interpreting gospel music” (Holland 2014, 27). Another distinction should be made in the context of a live worship service, in which—depending on the congregation and

118 119 stylistic appropriateness—elements like song length, roadmap, and even the notes on the page are all fair game to be rearranged and/or deconstructed to follow the whims of the worship leader and the spiritual promptings that may come about in a charismatic worship setting. Holland argues for this spirit of flexibility in gospel music performance, saying,

It is soul music. It must be felt. It cannot be rigid or restrictive in its expression. One cannot be slave to the written score, to the printed page. One must flow with the life source, with the feeling that exists in the living moment (Holland 2014, 29).

While the musical analyses of the gospel fusion arrangements presented in

Chapters Four and Five of this paper provide a helpful understanding of the mechanical and technical aspects of this genre, they should not be untethered from the church contexts for which they were written. The cultural and spiritual aspects of this music should be taken into account, and the reader is encouraged to explore more of the gospel artists and culturally significant events referenced in Chapter One in order to gain a greater fluency in both the musical and non-musical aspects of this impactful genre.

Trineice Robinson-Martin reinforces the need for curious musicians to dig deep into gospel music, emphasizing that it is learned “through listening, imitation, immersion in the culture / community of its performers and audiences, and, more recently, through instruction by pedagogues” (Robinson-Martin 2009, 598).

The most significant impact of the gospel fusion movement is the diversification of the musical experience in congregational worship settings. This project aims to continue this trend of cross pollination between various cultural groups in order to create powerful, unifying, and Kingdom-minded worship experiences. The technological

119 120 revolution of the early twenty-first century has certainly accelerated this cross pollination.

As Deborah Smith Pollard points out,

Not only are today’s praise and worship artists crossing the boundaries to perform, but audiences are crossing boundaries to experience this music together, sometimes in performance settings, sometimes in church settings and arenas, but more frequently in virtual togetherness as they buy the same music and the listen to it in their individual cars, homes, or on their desktops and iPods (Pollard 2008, 34-35).

One of the most essential elements in all of the worship songs studied in this paper has been the vocal melody, the unifying factor that, regardless of changes in harmony and rhythm, remains largely unchanged. While these gospel fusion arrangements transform songs in myriad ways, the preservation of the melody is a critical component to ensure congregational participation, which after all, is one of the primary goals for any worship leader.

Placing songs from artists like Hillsong Worship and Bethel Music into gospel music settings creates opportunities to bridge musical and cultural gaps; some listeners may be familiar with these songs but not with the gospel style, while others may be well- versed in gospel music yet unfamiliar with these non-gospel songs. Indeed, the use of gospel fusion music in corporate worship may prove to be a highly effective means of bridging cultural divides and uniting the Church in a new and fresh style of worship.

By creating new gospel fusion arrangements, recordings, and sheet music, this project seeks to be another resource for worship leaders, instrumentalists, music educators, and congregants of all sorts of musical and cultural backgrounds. By fusing together the lyrics and melodies of one worship tradition with the harmonic, timbral, and rhythmic elements of another, this emerging genre has the potential to reach a large and diverse audience with the gospel message of Jesus Christ.

Appendix A: Chapter Four Scores

This Is Amazing Grace (Phil Wickham version) ...... 122

This Is Amazing Grace (The Recording Collective version) ...... 128

King of My Heart (Bethel Music version) ...... 142

King of My Heart (The Recording Collective version) ...... 148

Good Good Father (Chris Tomlin version) ...... 160

Good Good Father (The Recording Collective version) ...... 165

121 122

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE Music and Lyrics by PHIL WICKHAM VERSION Jeremy Riddle, Josh Farro, & Phil Wickham

98 q = Intro Bbunis. Bb Ebmaj7 b œ œ œ œ b 4 . œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ . & 4 | J J J J œ œ f

Verse 6 Bb Ebmaj7 b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b & b ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 1. Who breaks the pow - er œ . of sin and dark - ness?œ . Whose love is might - y œ and so much strong - er? œ

10 G m F Ebmaj7 b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b & b ‰ j ‰ j Œ Ó ∑ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . The King of Glo œ- ry,œ the King a - bove allœ œ kings.œ œ

14 Bb Ebmaj7 b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b & b ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Who shakes the whole earthœ . with ho - ly thun - derœ . and leaves us breath - lessœ . in awe and won - der?œ

123

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (PHIL WICKHAM VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 2 of 6

18 G m F Ebmaj7 b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ | . Œ

b j & b ‰ j ‰ j Œ Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ The King of Glo œ- ry,œ the King a - bove allœ œ kings.œ œ This is a - maz - ing grace,

Chorus 22 Bb Ebmaj7 bb œ œ œ . œ œ œ . & œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’

b j j & b Œ Ó ‰ Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ this is un - fail - ing love. œ œ That You would take my place,

26 G m F b & b œ œ œ . œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’

b b Œ Ó ‰ j . Œ ‰ j & œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ that You would bear myœ cross.œ ˙ You laid down Your life

30 Bb Eb bb œ œ œ . œ œ œ . & œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’

b j & b Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ . j Œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ that I would be set free. Oh,

34 G m Funis. Bb œ œ bb Û Œ Ó œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ & ’ ’ ’ ’ J J

b & b ‰ j ‰ j Ó ∑ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Je-sus I singœ forœ all that You've doneœ forœ œ me,œ ˙

124

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (PHIL WICKHAM VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 3 of 6 Verse

38 Ebmaj7 Bb bb œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ & J J œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b & b ∑ ∑ ‰ j ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Who brings our cha - os œ . back in - to or - der?

42 Ebmaj7 G m F b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b & b ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ Who makes the or - phanœ a son and daugh - ter?œ The King of Glo œ- ry,œ the King of Glo - ry.

46 Bb Ebmaj7 b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b & b ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Who rules the na - tionsœ . with truth and jus - tice, shines like the sun in œ all of its bril - liance?œ

50 G m F Ebmaj7 b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b j & b ‰ j ‰ j ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ The King of Glo œ- ry,œ the King a - bove allœ œ kings.œ ˙ . Yeah! This is a - maz - ing grace,

Chorus 54 Bb Ebmaj7 bb œ œ œ . œ œ œ . & œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’

b j j & b Ó ‰ Ó ‰ ˙ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ this is un - fail - ing love. œ œ That You would take my place,

125

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (PHIL WICKHAM VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 4 of 6

58 G m F b & b œ œ œ . œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’

b j j & b Œ Ó ‰ œ . Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ that You would bear my cross. You laid down Your life

62 Bb Eb bb œ œ œ . œ œ œ . & œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’

b j & b Ó ‰ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ œ œ œ that I would be set free. œ ˙ Oh,

66 G m F Bb b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ | |

b & b ‰ j ‰ j Ó ∑ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Je - sus I sing œ forœ all that You've done œ forœ me,œ ˙

Bridge 70 Bb Eb2 b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ P b & b Œ Ó Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Worœ - thyœ œis the Lamb whoœ wasœ slain worœ - thyœ œis the Kingœ whoœ con - quered the grave.œ œ

74 Bb Eb2 b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b & b Ó Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Worœ - thyœ œis the Lamb whoœ wasœ slain worœ -thyœ œis the Kingœ whoœ con - quered the grave.œ œ

126

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (PHIL WICKHAM VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 5 of 6

Bridge 78 Bb Eb2 b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ F b & b Œ Ó Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Worœ - thyœ œis theœ Lamb who was slain worœ - thyœ œis the Kingœ whoœ con - quered the grave.œ œ

7 82 Gm Bb Eb2 b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

bb ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Wor - thy is the Lamb who was slain. Wor - thy!œ Wor - thy!œ Wor - thy! Oh!

Chorus 85 Bb Ebmaj7 bb œ œ œ . œ œ œ . & | œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ f b j & b œ Œ Ó ‰ Ó œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ This is a - maz - ing grace this is un - fail - ing love. œ œ

89 G m F b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ . œ œ œ

b j j & b ‰ Œ Ó ‰ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w That You would take my place, that You would bear my cross.

93 Bb Eb bb œ œ œ . œ œ œ . & ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ

b j j & b ‰ Ó ‰ œ j œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ You laid down Your life œ œ that I would be set free. œ

127

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (PHIL WICKHAM VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 6 of 6

97 G m F Bb b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ‰ J

b j & b Œ Œ ‰ j ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ w œ Oh, Je-sus I singœ forœ all that You've done for me.

101 Ebmaj7 Bb œ œ bb ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ & J J J œ œ J

bb Œ ‰ j j & w ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ All that You've done for me!

105 Ebmaj7 Bb œ œ bb ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ & J J J œ œ |

b j & b œ . Ó ∑ ∑ œ œ . œ œ œ ˙

128

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE Music and Lyrics by RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION Jeremy Riddle, Josh Farro, & Phil Wickham Arr. The Recording Collective

105 (swung 16ths) q = Intro B œ~ b ~~~ y y y y ~~~ œ œ bb 4 J ~~~ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ & 4 J ~ J J f

E /G /G A 7(#5) D7(#5b9) 4 b # b œ œ^ œ^ b œ œ œ ‰ œ bœ œ ‰ œ œ œ & J œ J

Verse G m9 E maj7 D m7 C m7 B maj7 A m7 G m7 E maj7 D m7 6 b b b b & b Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û R R R b & b ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ . œ Who breaks the pow - erœ of sin and dark - ness?œ Whose love is might - œy

C m7 A maj7 G m7 F m9 B 13 /D E maj7 A7(#5#9) D7(#5b9) 9 b b b b ^ ^ & b Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ Û Û R R b & b ‰ j œ ‰ j œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ ≈ and so much strong œ- er? The King of Glo -œ ry,œ the King a - bove allœ œ kings.œ

G m9 E maj7 D m7 C m7 B maj7 A m7 G m7 E maj7 D m7 12 b b b b & b Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û R R R b j & b ‰ j ≈ œ . ‰ j œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ Who shakes the whole earthœ with ho - ly thun - der? œ œ And leaves us breath - lessœ

129

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 2 of 14

C m7 A maj7 G m7 F m9 B 13 /D E maj7 G m11 C 7 15 b b b b & b Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û R R R b j & b ≈ œ . ‰ j œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ in awe and won - der? The King ofœ Gloœ - ry, the King a - bove allœ œ kings.

Chorus

E maj7/F N.C. B unis. B maj7 18 b b b b ^ œ œ . . & b Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û J

bb ‰ j ‰ & ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ˙ . j This is a - maz - ing grace, yeah,œ

bb ∑ ‰ j Œ & œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ˙ . This is a - maz - ing grace,

Funis. F m9 E unis. E maj9 Cunis. C m11 21 b b b ...... & b Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û J J J

b j & b ‰ œ . j ‰ Ó ‰ . r Œ Œ ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ this is un - fail - ing, yes it is, place,

b j j & b ‰ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ this is un - fail - ing love. œ ˙ That You would take my place,

130

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 3 of 14

Gunis. G m11 Gunis. G m11 A unis. A maj7 24 b b b . . . . & b Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û . J J J

b j & b ‰ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ that You would bear my cross. œ

b j & b Œ ‰ œ . Œ ˙ . œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ . that You would bear my cross.

Funis. E maj7/F B unis. B maj7 B unis. F m9 B 7 27 b b b b b b - - & b Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û Û J J b & b ∑ ‰ . r œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Youœ laidœ it down for me œ that I would be set

b j j & b ‰ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ You laid down Your life œ ˙ that I would be set

E unis. E maj9 Cunis. A7(#9b13) D7(#5b9) Gunis. G m7 30 b b b - - & b Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û J J

b j & b Ó œ ‰ j Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ free, (ee) œ œ Je - sus I sing for b & b j j ‰ j ‰ j ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ free. ˙ Oh,œ Je - sus I sing œ forœ

131

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 4 of 14

E maj7/F B 33 b b œ œ bb Û Œ Ó œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ & J J f b j & b ∑ ∑ ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ Oh,

b & b ‰ j Œ ∑ œ œ œ œ . all that You've done forœ œ me.œ ˙ .

E /G /G A7(#5#9) D7(#5b9) 36 b # b œ œ^ œ^ b œ œ œ ‰ œ bœ œ ‰ œ œ œ & J œ J

b j & b Ó ‰ œ œ Œ ‰ j œ œ œ œ ooh, œ mmm,œ œ

b & b ∑ ∑

Verse G m9 E maj7 D m7 C m7 B maj7 A maj7 G m7 E maj7 D m7 38 b b b b b & b Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û R R R b & b ‰ j ≈ Œ ‰ Ó œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . Who brings our cha - osœ . back in - toœ orœ - der? Who makes the or - phanœ

b & b ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ Who brings our cha - os back in - to or - der?œ Who makes the or - phan

132

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 5 of 14

C m7 A maj7 B /C F m9 B 13 /D E maj7 A7(#5#9) D7(#5b9) 41 b b b b b ^ ^ & b Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ Û Û R R b & b ∑ ‰ œ Ó œ œ œ J œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ The King of Glo - ry, œ œ Glo - ry. œ b & b ‰ j ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ a son and daugh - œter? The King of Glo - œ ry,œ the King ofœ Glo - ry.

G m9 B D m7 E maj7 F/G C m11 B maj7 A m7 G m7 E maj7 D m7 44 b b b b b & b Û Û ‰ . Û ≈ Û ≈ Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û R R R

b œ . & b Œ ‰ œ œ œ Ó Œ ≈ œ Œ J œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ The na - tions, shines like the sun œ œ b & b ‰ j œ œ œ œ ‰ j ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ WhoJ rules the na - tions with truth and jus - tice, shines like the sun in

C m7 A maj7 B /C F m9 B 13 /D E maj7 G m11 C 7 47 b b b b b & b Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û Û Û Œ ‰ . Û Û Û R R R 3 bb ‰ j œ œ ‰ Œ ‰ œ . œ ∑ & œ œ œ œ œ J œ œ all of its bril - liance? It's the King,

b & b ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ ballœ ofœ itsœ bril - liance?œ The King of Glo - ry, the King a - bove allœ œ kings.

133

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 6 of 14 Chorus

E maj7/F N.C. B unis. B maj7 50 b b b b ^ œ œ & b Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û J

bb Œ œ œ œ œ ∑ Œ ‰ œ œ . & J œ œ œ oh, yeah, yeah! Oh, ooh, j bb ‰ œ œ œ œ . Œ & w œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ˙ . This is a - maz - ingœ œ grace,œ ˙ .

Funis. F m9 E unis. E maj9 Cunis. C m11 53 b b b & b Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û J J J 3 b j & b ∑ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ Ó œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ ooh, un - fail - ing love, j j bb ‰ œ œ œ œ . Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . & œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ this is un - fail - ing love. œ ˙ That You would take my Jplace,

Gunis. G m11 Gunis. G m11 A unis. A maj7 56 b b b & b Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û J J J

bb Œ ≈ œ œ j ∑ Œ œ œ y œ œ œ & œ œ œ J œ that You would take my place, Je - sus, bear

b j & b ˙ . Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . bœ ˙ . Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ œ œ that You would bear myœ œ cross.

134

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 7 of 14

Funis. E maj7/F B unis. B maj7 B unis. F m9 B 7 59 b b b b b b - - & b Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û Û J J

bb œ . y Œ Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ Ó & J œ œ œ œ œ œ my cross. You laid it down for me that I would be, j j b . . œ & b ‰ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ You laid down Your life œ œ ˙ that I would be set

E unis. E maj9 Cunis. A7(#5#9) D7(#5b9) Gunis. G m7 62 b b b - - & b Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û J J

bb Ó œ œ œ . œ œ ‰ ‰ . œ œ œ . Ó Œ ‰ œ & œ R œ J free my soul for - ev - er. Yes, You did. Oh! j b j œ & b ˙ . œ œ ˙ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ free.˙ . œ Oh,œ Je - sus I sing œ forœ

E maj7/F B E m7(b5)/B E m6/B 65 b b b b b b & b | | | Û Û

3 b & b ∑ Ó Œ œ . œ œ œ œ b œ œ Oh, œ whoa.œ œ j b œ & b ‰ œ œ œ . œ œ œ w ∑ œ œ œ œ . all that You've done forœ œ me.œ w

135

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 8 of 14

Bridge B A maj7/B B maj7 E E add2 68 b b b b b b b & b ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ P b & b Œ ‰ j Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Wor - thy is the Lamb who wasœ slain, yeah, wor - thy is the King whoœ con -

B F m9 A maj7/B G m7/B 71 b b b b b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ Û ’ ’ J b & b Œ Ó œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ - quered the grave.œ œ Worœ - thyœ is the Lamb whoœ œ was slain, œ

Bridge 74 Eb Ebadd2 Bb Abmaj7/Bb b & b ’ ’ Û ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ J

b j & b ‰ Œ Ó œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ worœ - thyœ œis the King œ whoœ con - quered the grave.œ You say: œ

b & b ∑ ∑ œ œ œ Worœ - thyœ œis the Lamb whoœ wasœ slain,

B maj7 E E add2 77 b b b b & b ’ ’ Û ’ ’ ’ ’ Û ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ J J 3 b & b Œ Œ ∑ Ó Œ œ œ œ œ œ Hey, hey, œ callœ You

b & b Œ Ó Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ worœ - thyœ œis the King œ whoœ con quered the grave.œ œ

136

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 9 of 14

B F m9 A maj7/B G m7/B E E add2 80 b b b b b b b & b ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ Û ’ ’ ’ ’ Û ’ ’ J J b & b œ œ Œ Ó Œ ‰ j Ó ∑ wor - thy, yeah,œ

b & b Œ Ó œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Worœ - thyœ œis the Lamb whoœ wasœ slain, worœ - thyœ œis the King œ whoœ con -

Bridge

B F m9 A maj7/B B maj7 83 b b b b b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ Û ’ ’ J F 3 3 b b Ó ‰ œ . & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œwhoa,œ Wor - thyœ œis the Lamb whoœ was slain, He is wor - thy,

b & b Œ œ œ œ œ Œ Ó œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ - quered the grave.œ œ Worœ - thyœ œis the Lamb whoœ wasœ slain,

E E add2 G m7 86 b b b & b ’ ’ Û ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ J b & b ∑ Œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ ∑ ooh, there's no-one like You.

b œ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ worœ - thyœ œis the Kingœ whoœ con - quered the grave.œ œ Wor - thy is the Lamb who was slain,

137

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 10 of 14

E add2 N.C. 89 b b ^ œ œ & b ’ ’ ’ ’ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ f b j j œ & b Ó ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ . œ œ Ó Œ ≈ œ Hey,œ hey,œ worR - thy! Comeœ onœ and

j j j j bb œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ wor - thy,œ wor - thy,œ wor - thy, This is a - maz - ing grace,

Chorus drums only! B 7/F B 7 E maj9 92 b b b yj yj y y yj b ‰ ≈ . . ‰ . . . & b œ ‰ j Û Û Û Œ Ó J ‰ Œ Ó bœ œ nœ . œ. # œ. bb œ œ œ . œ ‰ œ Œ ‰ œ Œ Œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ . & œ y œ œ œ put yo' hands to-geth-er!. Hey!J Come on! Ooh,J j b œ œ œ œ . & b œ Œ Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ this is un - fail - ing love. œ ˙

B /A /D 95 b bb ‰ j Û. Û. ∑ ∑ & œ œ bœ œ. nœ. b œ. b & b Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ Œ Ó Œ ‰ œ ∑ come on! . Oh!J j j b . œ . b ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ˙ . Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ bœ & œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ That You would take my place, that You would bear my cross.

138

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 11 of 14

A maj7 E maj7/F B unis. B maj7 98 b b b b b & b Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û J

bb Œ ‰ j œ œ . œ œ . Œ Ó Ó ‰ . œ œ œ . & œ œ œ R Whoa! Laid it j b œ œ œ . œ . & b ˙ . Œ ‰ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ Œ ˙ . œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ You laid down Your life œ ˙

B unis. F m9 B 7 E unis. E maj9 Cunis. A7(#5#9) D7(#5b9) 101 b b b b b - - - - & b Û Û ’ Û Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û Û J b & b œ Œ Ó Œ œ œ œ œ . ≈ œ down, set me free, andœ whoœ theœ Sonœ setsœ freeœ œis freeœ œ inœ - deed,œ œ oh! œ j b œ œ œ œ œ ˙ j œ & b ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ ˙ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ œ œ that I would be set free. Oh,œ

Gunis. G m7 Funis. E maj7/F B B 2/D C 7/G C 7 104 b b b b & b Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û J J

b œ & b ‰ Œ Œ ‰ œ œ Œ Ó Œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ J R œ For all, one more time, say: j j b œ & b ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ˙ . Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . Je - sus I singœ forœ all that You've done forœ œ me.œ ˙ .

139

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 12 of 14 Chorus

E maj7/F N.C. B /D G m9 B maj7/F /C B 7 /F 107 b b b b b œ œ & b Û Û Û Û œ œ œ œ œ œ Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û J J

bb ∑ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ∑ & J œ A - maz - ing grace, j j bb ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ˙ . Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ This is a - maz - ing grace, this is un - fail - ing love.

E E maj7 C m11 /D /F G m7 G m9 110 b b b & b Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û J J J

bb Œ œ œ œ . Œ ∑ Œ ‰ . œ œ œ ‰ . œ & y R œ R so un - fail - ing, took my place, took j b œ œ œ œ . & b œ œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ˙ . Œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ˙ . œ ˙ That You would take my place,

Gunis. G m11 A unis. A maj7 Funis. E maj7/F 113 b b b b & b Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û J J J

b œ œ & b œ œ . œ œ Ó Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ . œ Œ Ó 3 3 my place, said He bled and died for me, j j b œ . . . b ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ bœ ˙ . Œ ‰ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ that You would bear my cross. You laid down Your life

140

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 13 of 14

B unis. B maj7 B unis. F m9 B 7 E unis. E maj9 116 b b b b b b b - - & b Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û ’ Û Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û J J

b . . & b Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ∑ Ó œ œ œ œ yesR You did, free my soul for- j b œ œ œ œ œ & b œ œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ œ ˙ that I would be set free.

Cunis. A7(#5#9) D7(#5 9) Gunis. G m7 Funis. 119 b b - - & b Û Û ’ Û Û Û Û ’ Û ≈ Û ‰ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û J

bb œ œ ‰ ‰ . œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ . œ ∑ & R œ J ev - er, yes, You did. Je - sus I sing for j j b ˙ j œ œ & b ˙ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . Oh,œ Je - sus I sing œ forœ all that You've done forœ œ me.œ

B E 122 b b œ œ œ^ œ^ bb œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ & J J J J f b j & b ∑ ‰ j œ ∑ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Oh,œ Oh,

b & b w œ Œ Ó ∑ ∑ w œ

141

THIS IS AMAZING GRACE (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 14 of 14

B E m7(b5)/F E m6 B /D B E 126 b b b b b œ œ bb œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ & J J J

3 b j & b Ó ‰ j ∑ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Oh,œ Je - sus I sing forœ

C m9 Ebmaj7/F Bb 129 œ œ œ œ^ œ^ w > bb ‰ œ œ œ Û Œ Ó & J |

b j & b ‰ œ ∑ ∑ œ œ œ œ . œ all that You've done for me.w

142

KING OF MY HEART Music and Lyrics by BETHEL MUSIC VERSION John Mark McMillan & Sarah McMillan

68 q = Intro A5 A D A F#m7 E sus # # U # 4 . ‰ & 4 | œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ ˙ œ œ œ p

Verse 5 D A A D A # # & # j | | | œ . œ ˙ # # & # Ó Œ ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ Letœ theœ King ofœ myœ heartœ be the moun - tain where I run, the foun -

8 F#m7 E sus D A A # # & # | | Û . Û | | J # # & # œ j j Œ ‰ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ - tain I drink from. Oh, He œis myœ song.œ Letœ theœ King ofœ myœ heartœ be the sha -

11 D A F#m7 E sus D A # # & # | | | | Û . Û | J # # & # œ ‰ œ œ œ j j j ‰ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ - dow where I hide, the ran - som for my life. Oh, He œis myœ œsong.œ You areœ œ

143

KING OF MY HEART (BETHEL MUSIC VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 2 of 6

Chorus 14 F#m E sus D A F#m E sus # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ J # # & # ‰ . r Œ j ‰ ‰ . r Œ œ good,œ You'reœ good.œ ˙Oh. œ You areœ œ good,œ You'reœ good.œ

17 D A F#m E sus D A # # & # Û . Û ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û ’ ’ J J # # & # j ‰ ‰ . r Œ j ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ˙Oh, œ You are good, You're good. Oh. œ œ œ You areœ œ

Verse 20 F#m E sus D A A # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û | ’ ’ ’ ’ J P # # & # ‰ . r Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ good,œ You'reœ good.œ Oh.˙ . Letœ theœ King ofœ myœ heartœ be the wind

23 D A F#m7 E sus D A # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û ’ ’ J # ## & œ . œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ j j Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ in-side my sails, the an - chor in the waves. Oh, He is myœ song.œ Letœ the

26 A D A F#m7 E sus # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # & # œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ King ofœ myœ heartœ be the fire in - side my veins, the ech - o of my days. Oh, He

144

KING OF MY HEART (BETHEL MUSIC VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 3 of 6

Verse 29 D A A D A # # & # Û . Û ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ J F # ## & j j Œ ‰ œ œ . œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ is myœ song.œ Letœ the King of myœ heartœ be the wind in-side my sails, the an -

32 F#m7 E sus D A A # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ J # ## & œ . œ œ j j Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ - chor in the waves. Oh, He is myœ song.œ Letœ the King of myœ heartœ be the fire

35 D A F#m7 E sus D A # # >y & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û ’ J 3 # # j j # œ . œ œ œ . œ œ ‰ . r œ œ & œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ in - side my veins, the ech - o of my days. Oh, He is my song. 'Cause You are

Chorus 38 F#m E sus D A F#m E sus # # & # Û Û Û Û ’ Û Û Û Û ’ Û . Û ’ ’ Û Û Û Û ’ Û Û Û Û ’ J f # # r j r & # œ ‰ . œ œ Œ ˙ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ . œ œ Œ good, You're good. Oh. You are good, You're good.

41 D A F#m E sus D A # # & # Û . Û ’ ’ Û Û Û Û ’ Û Û Û Û ’ Û . Û ’ ’ J J # # j r j & # ˙ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ . œ œ Œ ˙ œ ‰ œ œ œ Oh, You are good, You're good. Oh. You are

145

KING OF MY HEART (BETHEL MUSIC VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 4 of 6

Bridge 44 F#m E sus D A # # & # Û Û Û Û ’ Û Û Û Û ’ Û . Û | | J P # # r & # œ ‰ . œ œ Œ ˙ . Œ V Œ œ œ œ œ œ good, You're good. Oh. You're nev - er gon - naœ let,œ . You're

47 # # & # | | |

# # V # Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nev -er gon-naœ letœ me down. œ œ . You're nev - er gon - naœ let,œ . You're nev -er gon-naœ letœ me down. œ œ .

50 A A sus A A # # & # | | | |

# # V # Œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ You're nev - er gon - naœ let,œ . You're nev -er gon-naœ letœ me down. œ œ . You're nev - er gon - naœ let,œ . You're

Bridge 53 A sus A A A sus A # # & # | | ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ f # # œ œ œ œ œ œ V # Œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ nev -er gon-naœ letœ me down. œ œ . You're nev - er gon - na let, You're nev- er gon-na let me down.

56 A A sus A A # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ V # Œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ Œ œ œ œ . You're nev - er gon - na let, You're nev-er gon-na let me down. You're nev - er gon - na let, You're

146

KING OF MY HEART (BETHEL MUSIC VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 5 of 6

59 D E F#m E D A # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ V œ œ . œ . œ & œ œ nev-er gon-na let me down. You're nev -er gon -na let, You're nev - er gon - na let me down, 'cause You are

Chorus 62 F#m E sus D A F#m E sus # # & # Û Û Û Û ’ Û Û Û Û ’ Û . Û ’ ’ Û Û Û Û ’ Û Û Û Û ’ J ƒ # # r j r & # œ ‰ . œ œ Œ ˙ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ . œ œ Œ good, You're good. Oh. You are good, You're good.

65 D A F#m E sus D A # # & # Û . Û ’ ’ Û Û Û Û ’ Û Û Û Û ’ Û . Û ’ ’ J J # # j r j & # ˙ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ . œ œ Œ ˙ œ ‰ œ œ œ Oh, You are good, You're good. Oh. You are

Bridge 68 F#m E sus D A F#m E sus # # & # Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û ’ Û Û Û Û ’

# # r œ œ œ œ & # œ ‰ . œ œ Œ ˙ œ . œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ . good, You're good. Oh. I know that, You're nev - er gon - na let, You're

71 D A F#m E sus D A # # & # Û . Û ’ ’ Û Û Û Û ’ Û Û Û Û ’ Û . Û ’ ’ J J

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . & # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . Œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ nev-er gon-na let me down. You're nev - er gon - na let, You're nev-er gon-na let me down.

147

KING OF MY HEART (BETHEL MUSIC VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 6 of 6

74 F#m E sus D A F#m E sus # # & # Û Û Û Û ’ Û Û Û Û ’ Û . Û ’ ’ Û Û Û Û ’ Û Û Û Û ’ J

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & # Œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . Œ œ œ œ . You're nev - er gon - na let, You're nev-er gon-na let me down. You're nev - er gon- na let, You're

Chorus 77 D A F#m E sus D A # # & # Û . Û | | | Û . Û | J J p # # œ œ & # œ œ œ œ œ . ‰ . r Œ j ‰ œ œ œ nev - er gon - na let me down, 'cause You areœ œ good,œ You'reœ good.œ ˙Oh. œ You areœ œ

80 F#m E sus D A repeat and fade # # & # . | | Û . Û | . J # # & # . ‰ . r Œ j ‰ . œ good,œ You'reœ good.œ ˙Oh, œ You areœ œ

148

KING OF MY HEART Music and Lyrics by RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION John Mark McMillan & Sarah McMillan Arr. The Recording Collective

67 q = Intro 7 7 Bb F/A Gm Bb/F Eb Bb Gm Bb/F b 4 œ & b 4 œ . ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ . œ œ œ œ . P

Verse 4 Eb Bb Bb Bb/D Ebmaj7 Bb b & b Û . Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ J œ œ œ p b & b Ó Œ ‰ j ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 1. Let the King of my heart be the moun - tain where I run, thefoun-

7 Gm D m/F Eb Bb Bb Bb/D b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ œ J œ œ œ b & b œ œ œ œ j ‰ j ‰ j ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ - tain I drink from. Oh, He is my song. Let the King of my heartœ be the sha -

10 Ebmaj7 Bb F/A Gm D m/F Eb Bb Bb F/A b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û Û Û Û . J

b . & b œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ j œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . - dow where I hide, the ran - som for my life. Oh, He is my song. 'Causeœ You are

149

KING OF MY HEART (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 2 of 12

Chorus 7 7 13 Gm Bb/F Eb Bb Bb F/A Gm Bb/F b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û Û Û Û . ’ ’ ’ ’ P J b & b Œ Œ Œ j ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ good, good. Oh. You are good, good.

7 7 16 Eb Bb Bb/D Dm Gm Bb/F Eb Bb Bb F/A b & b Û . Û Û Û Û . ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û Û Û Û . J J b & b j Œ Œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . Oh, You are good, good. Oh. You are

7 Verse 19 Gm Bb/F Eb Bb Bb b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ œ J œ œ œ P b & b Œ Œ ‰ j ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ good, good. Oh. 2. Let the King of my heartœ be the wind j œ b œ œ œ œ œ & b V ∑ Ó Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 2. Let the King of my heart be the wind

22 Ebmaj7 Bb Bb/A Gm Bb/F Eb Bb b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b & b œ œ œ œ Ó Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ in - side my sails, Oh, He is my Let the King of my œ œ œ œ œ œ œ j j b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ V b œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ in - side my sails, the an - chor in the waves. Oh, He is my song. Let the

150

KING OF MY HEART (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 3 of 12

7( 9) 25 Bb Bb/D Ebmaj7 Bb D b Gm D m/F b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b & b Œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ j ‰ Ó Œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ heart, be the fire in - side my veins, Oh, He j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ j . b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ V b œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ King of my heart be the fire in - side my veins, the ech - o of my days. Oh, He

Chorus 7 28 Eb Bb Bb F/A Gm Bb/F Eb Bb Bb F/A b & b Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û . ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û Û Û Û . F J b b œ œ nœ œ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ . œ Œ œ . œ œ Ó œ œ œ œ . is my song. J You are good, good. Yes you are, You are

œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . b œ œ œ V b œ œ œ œ ‰ œ . œ Œ œ Œ œ . œ œ œ . J J J J is my song. You are good, good. Oh. You are

7 7 7 31 Gm Bb/F Eb Bb Bb/D Dm Gm Bb/F b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û Û Û Û . ’ ’ ’ ’ J œ bb Œ œ œ œ œ ‰ . r œ j ‰ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∑ & œ œ œ œ œ œ so good, You're good to me. So good. œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ bb œ Œ œ Œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ Œ œ Œ V J good, good. Oh. You are good, good.

151

KING OF MY HEART (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 4 of 12

7 34 Eb Bb Bb F/A Gm Bb/F Eb Bb Bb F/A b & b Û . Û Û Û Û . ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û Û Û Û . J J

b . r œ œ . œ œ œ œ & b Ó ‰ œ Œ Œ œ Ó Œ And You are good, hey, You are œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ b b œ . œ œ œ œ . œ Œ œ Œ œ . œ œ & œ œ . V J J œ œ . Oh. You are good, good. Oh. You are

Chorus 7 7 37 Gm Bb/F Eb Bb Bb F/A Gm Bb/F b & b Û Û Û Û Œ Û Û Û Û Œ Û . Û Û Û Û . Û Û Û Û Œ Û Û Û Û Œ J f b œ œ . œ œ . & b Œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ Ó ≈ œ Œ Ó ‰ . œ œ œ . œ œ

so good, yes You are. Hey, And I'm grate - ful, Lord, b j b œ Œ œ Œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ Œ œ Œ & œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ good, good. Oh. You are good, good.

7 7 40 Eb Bb Bb/D Dm Gm Bb/F Eb Bb Bb F/A b & b Û . Û Û Û Û . Û Û Û Û Œ Û Û Û Û Œ Û . Û Û Û Û . J J

bb j ‰ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ . œ Ó ‰ . r œ œ . & œ R J œ œ r œ œ œ œ You nev - er let me down. You're good, You'reœ good, Yes, You are j b j b œ . œ œ œ œ . œ Œ œ Œ œ . œ œ œ œ . & œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . Oh. You are good, good. Oh. You are

152

KING OF MY HEART (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 5 of 12

Bridge 7 43 Gm Bb/F Eb Bb Bb b & b Û Û Û Û Œ Û Û Û Û Œ Û . Û | | J p b œ œ œ .bœœ œ œœ . & b œ Œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œœœœ ‰ Œ œ œ ≈ œ J œ œ œ œ œ good, good. Oh. You're nev - er gon - na let, You're j b œ . & b œ Œ œ Œ œ ˙ ∑ œ œ œ . œ ˙ good, good. Oh.

46 F/A Gm Bb/F Eb Bb b & b | . Û | | Û . Û | J 3 b & b œ Œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nev-er gon-na let me down. You're nev - er gon - na let, You're nev - er gon - na let meœ down. No, no, no, no.

49 Bb Eb Bb/F D7(#5#9)/F# G m Bb/F b & b | | Û Û | |

b & b Œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ Œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ You're nev - er gon - na let, You're nev-er gon-na let me down. . You're nev-er gon-na let, œ

Bridge 7( 9) 52 Eb Bb Bb Bb7/D Eb Bb/F D b b & b Û . Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ J œ œ œ P b & b œ Ó Œ ‰ j Œ Œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nev-er gon-na let meœ down.Help me sing: Hey, And You nev- b & b ∑ Œ œ œ j‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ You're nev-er gon-na let, nev-er gon-na let me down.

153

KING OF MY HEART (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 6 of 12

55 Gm Bb/F Eb Bb Bb Bb7/D b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ œ J œ œ œ 3 b & b Œ Ó Ó Œ ‰ Œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ er will. No, no, no, no. œ œ nev-er gon-na b & b Œ œ œ j ‰ œ Œ Œ œ œ j ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ You're nev-er gon-na let, nev-er gon-na let meœ down. You're nev-er gon-na let,

7( 9) 58 Eb Bb/F D b Gm Bb/F Eb Bb b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û Û œ J œ œ œ bb j ‰ Œ Œ ‰ ‰ Œ Œ ‰ j Ó Œ ‰ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J let, Hey, No, You're b & b œ Œ œ œ j ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nev-er gon-na let me down. You're nev-er gon-na let, nev-er gon-na let me down.

Bridge 7( 9) 61 Bb Bb7/D Eb Bb/F D b Gm Bb/F b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ F b . . . b œ œ œ Œ Œ œ bœ œ œ Ó Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ . Œ Œ œ & œ 3 œ nev -er, No, No, no, no, no, Hey, b j & b Œ œ œ œ œ j ‰ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ j ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ You're nev-er gon-naœ let,œ nev-er gon-naœ letœ me down. You're nev-er gon-naœ let,œ

154

KING OF MY HEART (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 7 of 12

7( 9) 64 Eb Bb Bb Bb7/D Eb Bb/F D b b & b Û Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

œ œ bb Ó Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ Œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Œ œ œ œ & 3 œ 3 3 No, no, no, nev-er. Nev-er gon - na let, And You nev- b & b œ œ œ œ œ Œ Œ œ œ œ œ j ‰ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nev-er gon-naœ letœ meœ down. You're nev-er gon-naœ let,œ nev-er gon-naœ letœ me down.

67 Gm Bb/F Eb Bb Bb F/A b & b Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û .

bb œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ Ó ≈ œ œ œ œ œ & 3 œ œ er will. Hey, 'Cause You are j b œ œ . & b œ ‰ œ œ œ œ j ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ You're nev - er gon-naœ let,œ nevœ - erœ gonœ - naœ letœ me down. You are

Chorus 7 7 69 Gm Bb/F Eb Bb Bb F/A Gm Bb/F b & b Û Û Û Û Œ Û Û Û Û Œ Û . Û Û Û Û . Û Û Û Û Œ Û Û Û Û Œ J f b œ œ œ œ œ œ & b ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ . Œ œ œ ‰ . œ œ œ 3 J 3 R so good, yes You are. Oh. You are faith - ful, You're true, b j b œ Œ œ Œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ Œ œ Œ & œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ good, good. Oh. You are good, good.

155

KING OF MY HEART (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 8 of 12

7 7 72 Eb Bb Bb/D Dm Gm Bb/F Eb Bb Bb F/A b & b Û . Û Û Û Û . Û Û Û Û Œ Û Û Û Û Œ Û . Û Û Û Û . J J 3 œ bb Ó ≈ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . & 3 3 œ œ œ and You are so, so, so good, so good, Oh. You are j b j b œ . œ œ œ œ . œ Œ œ Œ œ . œ œ œ œ . & œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . Oh. You are good, good. Oh. You are

Praise Break

7 75 Gm Bb/F Eb Bb F7(#5#9) Bb7(#9) Bb7/D b > > & b ’ ’ ’ ’ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ ƒ bœ bb Œ œ Œ œ Ó œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ Œ ‰ œ & J good, good. Oh. No, j b j b œ Œ œ Œ œ . bœ ˙ ‰ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ & œ œ œ . œ ˙ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ good, good. Oh. You're nev - er gon - na let me down,

7 7( 5) 7( 9) 7 78 Eb Am b D b Gm Bb/D Gm b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b j œ œ . œ & b œ ‰ Œ Ó ‰ œ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ no. No, You won't be - cause You're good.

b bœ œ œ œ nœ œ œ & b ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ Œ œ Œ bœ œ œ œ You're nev - er gon - na let me down, good,

156

KING OF MY HEART (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 9 of 12

7 80 Cm Funis. Bb7(#9) Bb7/D b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ œ bb Ó ‰ œ bœ œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ ‰ . œ bœ œ œ œ & J J R Hey. You're nev - er gon - na j b j bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ & b œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ You are good! You're nev - er gon - na let me down,

7 7( 5) 7( 9) 7 82 Eb Am b D b Gm Bb/D Gm b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b . b bœ œ œ œ œ bœ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ≈ œ & œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ let me down, hey, no. be - cause You're good.

b b ‰ bœ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ Œ Ó & œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ #œ œ You're nev - er gon - na let me down,

7 84 Cm F7(#5#9) Bb7(#9) Bb7/D b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

œ œ bb ‰ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ ‰ . œ œ œ bœ œ & 3 3 3 3 J R You're so good to me, ooh, yeah. You're nev - er gon - na j bb Ó bœ œ œ œ ‰ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ & œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ You are good! You're nev - er gon - na let me down,

157

KING OF MY HEART (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 10 of 12

7 7( 5) 7( 9) 7 86 Eb Am b D b Gm Bb/D Gm b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b œ bœ œ nœ œ œ . & b œ ‰ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . ‰ œ œ œ J 3 J let me down. No, no, no, no, no. Good, good, yeah,

b bœ œ œ œ nœ œ œ & b ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ Œ œ Œ bœ œ œ œ You're nev - er gon - na let me down, good,

7 88 Cm F7(#5#9) Bb7(#9) Bb7/D b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b œ œ b Œ ‰ . œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œbœ Œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ & R œ R You'll nev - er see the right - eous for - sak - en. You'll nev - er see them j b j bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ & b œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ You are good! You're nev - er gon - na let me down,

7 7( 5) 7( 9) 7 90 Eb Am b D b Gm Bb/D Gm b & b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b bœ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ & b Œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ R 3 beg - ging bread. Be - cause You are good, yes You are,

b bœ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ & b ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ œ œ Œ œ Œ bœ œ œ œ You're nev - er gon - na let me down, good,

158

KING OF MY HEART (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 11 of 12

7 92 Cm C m/F Bb b & b Û Û Û | | |

b . r & b Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ Ó Ó Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Ooh, Ooh, Let the j j bb Nœ œ œ ˙ ˙ Ó ∑ & œ œ Nœ ˙ ˙ You are good.

Verse 95 Bb Ebmaj7 Bb F/A G m7 D m/F b & b | | Û Û | | p b & b j ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œœ œ . œ King of my heart be the moun - tain where I run, the foun - tain I drink from. Oh, He

98 Eb Bb Bb Ebmaj7 Bb F/A b & b Û . Û | | | Û Û J b & b j ‰ j ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ is my song. Let the King of my heartœ be the sha - dow where I hide, the ran -

Chorus 7 101 G m7 D m/F Eb Bb Bb F/A Gm Bb/F b & b | | Û . Û Û Û Û . ’ ’ ’ ’ J b & b œ œ œ œ j ‰ j ‰ Œ Œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ - som for my life. Oh, He is my song. You are good, good.

159

KING OF MY HEART (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 12 of 12

7 104 Eb Bb Bb F/A Gm Bb/F Eb Bb Bb F/A b & b Û . Û Û Û Û . ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û Û Û Û . J J b & b Œ j ‰ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . Oh. You are good, good. Oh. You are

7 7 107 Gm Bb/F Eb Bb D7(#5#9) Gm Bb/F Eb Bb b U & b ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û | J J b U & b ‰ Œ œ œ Œ Œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ good, so good. Oh. You are good, good. Oh,

160

GOOD GOOD FATHER Music and Lyrics CHRIS TOMLIN VERSION by Anthony Brown & Pat Barrett

48 q. = Intro A Asus A Asus A # # 6 & # 8 Û Û ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . Strummed acoustic guitar P # # 6 j & # 8 ‰ ∑ ∑ ∑ Œ . ‰ ‰ œ Oh,

Verse 5 Asus A Asus A # # & # ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

# # & # œ . œ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ . œ . œ . œ œ œ I’ve heard a thous - and sto - ries of what they think You’re like. But I’ve

Pre-Chorus 9 Asus A Asus A D # # & # ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

# # r j # ≈ œ . œ . œ œ ≈ r œ . œ . œ œ ‰ ‰ & œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ heard the ten - der whis - per of love in the dead of night. And You tell me

A 7 14 Bm E Esus E C# # # & # ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . | .

# # & # œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ ˙ . ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ that You’re pleased and that I’m nev - er a - lone. You’re a good, good Fa -

161

GOOD GOOD FATHER (CHRIS TOMLIN VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 2 of 5

Chorus 7 18 D A Bm E # # & # ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . light band in P # ## œ œ œ . r œ œ œ . r œ œ œ . œ & œ œ . œ ‰ ‰ ≈ œ ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . - ther, it’s who You are, it’s who You are, it’s who You are. And I’m loved by

A 22 D E Esus C# # # & # ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

# # r r r & # œ ≈ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ . Œ . You, it’s who I am, it’s who I am, it’s who I am.

Verse 26 E A Asus A Asus A # # & # ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . F # # # Œ . ‰ œ . œ . œ œ œ . œ . œ ‰ & œ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ . œ . œ œ Oh and I’ve seen man - y search - ing for an - swers far and wide. But I’ve

31 Asus A Asus A # # & # ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

# # r # ≈ œ . œ . œ œ œ . œ . œ œ & œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ known that we’re all search - ing for an - swers on - ly You pro - vide. ’Cause You know

Pre-Chorus A 35 D Bm7 E C# # # & # ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . Û Û Û Û Û Û

# # & # œ . œ . œ . œ . œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ just what we need be-fore we say a word. You’re a good, good Fa

162

GOOD GOOD FATHER (CHRIS TOMLIN VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 3 of 5

Chorus 7 39 D A Bm E # ## ...... & ’ full band ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ f # ## œ œ œ . r œ œ œ . r œ œ œ . œ & œ œ . œ ‰ ‰ ≈ œ ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . ther, it’s who You are, it’s who You are, it’s who You are. And I’m loved by

43 D A E C# # # & # ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . Û Û Û Û Û Û

# # r r r & # œ ≈ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . You, it’s who I am, it’s who I am, it’s who I am. Be-cause You are

Bridge 7 7 47 D F#m Bm A # # & # . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . driving ƒ # # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & # . œ œ œ . ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ . ‰ œ œ . per - fect in all of Your ways, You are per - fect in all of Your ways, You are

1. 7 51 D F#m E # # & # ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . .

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ & # œ œ œ ‰ œ . ˙ . Œ . ‰ œ œ . . per - fect in all of Your ways to us. You are

2. Verse 55 A Asus A Asus A # # & # | . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ac. gtr. p # # j & # Œ . ‰ œ œ œ . œ . œ . œ . œ œ œ . œ ‰ œ œ œ . œ . œ ‰ Oh, it's love so un - de - ni - a-ble, I, I can hard - ly speak.

163

GOOD GOOD FATHER (CHRIS TOMLIN VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 4 of 5

60 Asus A # # & # ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . | . | .

# # j & # œ . œ . œ . œ . œ œ œ . œ ‰ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ Peace so un - ex - plain - a - ble, I, I can hard - ly think. As you call

Extended Pre-Chorus A 7 A 64 D Bm A C# C# # # & # ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . P Band in lightly, building to chorus # # & # œ . œ . œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ . œ . œ . œ œ œ œ me deep - er still, as You call me deep - er still, as You call

A D Bm7 E 68 C# # # & # Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û cresc. poco a poco F # # & # œ . œ . œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ me deep - er still in - to love, love, love. You’re a good, good Fa -

Chorus 7 72 D A Bm E # ## ...... & ’ driving ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ f # ## œ œ œ . r œ œ œ . r œ œ œ . œ & œ œ . œ ‰ ‰ ≈ œ ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . - ther, it’s who You are, it’s who You are, it’s who You are. And I’m loved by

76 D A Bm7 E # # # ...... Û Û Û Û Û Û & ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ -

# # r r r & # œ ≈ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ You, it’s who I am, it’s who I am, it’s who I am. You’re a good, good Fa

164

GOOD GOOD FATHER (CHRIS TOMLIN VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 5 of 5

Chorus 7 80 D A Bm E # # & # ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

# ## œ œ œ . r œ œ œ . r œ œ œ . œ & œ œ . œ ‰ ‰ ≈ œ ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . ther, it’s who You are, it’s who You are, it’s who You are. And I’m loved by

7 84 D A Bm E # # & # ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

# # r œ r r & # œ ≈ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ You, it’s who I am, it’s who I am, it’s who I am. You’re a good, good Fa -

Chorus D A Bm7 E 88 # # # ...... & ’ acoustic picking’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ p piano diamonds # ## . œ œ œ . r œ œ œ . r œ œ œ œ & . œ œ . œ ‰ ‰ ≈ œ ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ - ther, it’s who Youare, it’s who You are, it’s who You are. And I’m loved by You,

1. 7 92 D A/C# Bm E # # & # ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . .

# # r r r & # œ ≈ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . it’s who I am, it’s who I am, it’s who I am. You’re a good, good Fa

2. 96 E D A Bm7 E D # # & # ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . | .

# # & # œ . Œ . ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑

165

GOOD GOOD FATHER Music and Lyrics RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION by Anthony Brown & Pat Barrett Arr. The Recording Collective

49 Intro q. = 13 Cb Gb2/Bb Ebm7(b5)/A Db/Ab b b 6 j b b œ . . œ & b 8 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . P

7 7( 9) 3 Eb2/G Gbdim Bb b Gbmaj7/Ab Eb(#5#9) Gbmaj7/Ab b b . . . . & b b b . Û Û Û Û Û ‰ ‰ œ J

Verse 7 5 Db/F Gbmaj7 Ab Bbm b b & b b b Û . Û ‰ ‰ ∑ Û . Û ‰ ‰ ∑ J J P b b bb j ‰ . j ‰ ‰ j ‰ ‰ j ‰ . & b œ . œ r œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ r I’ve heard œa thous - and sto - ries of what they think You’re like. Butœ

7 9 Db/F Gbmaj7 Ab Bbm b b & b b b Û . Û ‰ ‰ ∑ Û . Û ‰ ‰ ∑ J J b b bb j ‰ . j ‰ ‰ j ‰ . œ . & b œ . œ r œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ r œ . œ œ œ œ I’ve heard theœ ten - der whis - pers of love in theœ dead of night. And You tell

Pre-Chorus 7( 5) 7( 9) 7 13 Gbmaj7 Gm b /C Db/F F7(#5b9) Bb b Bbm7/Eb Eb bb b œ . œ œ œ & b b œ . œ œ œ œ . œ .

b b bb ‰ . j ‰ . & b œ . œ . œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ r œ œ œ œ me, tellœ meœ that You’re pleased and that I, I'mœ nev - er a - lone.

166

GOOD GOOD FATHER (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 2 of 13

Chorus 16 Absus Ab Gbmaj7 b b & b b b | . | . ’ . ’ .

b b bb ‰ ‰ . ‰ ‰ ‰ ≈ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ r œ œ . œ 'Causeœ You're a good, good Fa - ther,œ it’sœ

b b bb ∑ ‰ ‰ & b œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ ≈ œ œ œ . You're a good, good Fa - ther, it’sœ who You are,

7 19 Db/F Ebm Ab Db/F b b & b b b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

bb b Œ . ‰ ‰ ‰ j & b b œ œ œ . œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ who You are, Oh, œ œ œ . I’m loved byœ œ

b b bb ‰ ‰ ≈ ‰ ‰ ≈ & b r œ œ œ . r œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ . it’sœ who You are, it’sœ who You are. And I’m loved by

7 22 Gbmaj7 Db/F Ebm b b & b b b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

b b bb j ‰ ≈ ‰ j ‰ ‰ ‰ ≈ Œ . & b œ r œ œ œ . œ r œ œ œ . œ You, it’sœ who I am, yeah, it'sœ who I am.

b b bb j ‰ ≈ ‰ ‰ ≈ ‰ ‰ ≈ & b œ r œ œ œ . r œ œ œ . r œ œ œ . You, it’sœ who I am, it’sœ who I am, it’sœ who I am.

167

GOOD GOOD FATHER (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 3 of 13

Verse 25 Absus Ab Db/F Gbmaj7 b b & b b b | . | . Û . Û ‰ ‰ ∑ J

b b & b b b Œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ r j ‰ ‰ œ œ b œ œ œ . œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ Oh, œ . œ . Andœ I've seen man - y search - ing for an -

b b bb Œ . j ‰ ‰ ∑ & b ˙ . œ . œ . œ I've seen

bass gtr. 29 A B m7 D /F G maj7 b b œ b b b ? ≈ œ œ b bb Û . Û ≈ ≈ œ œ ≈ œ & Û . Û ‰ ‰ & b œ œ œ œ J œ œ J 3 b b bb ‰ ‰ ‰ Œ . & b œ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . - . - swers far and wide. œ I know

b b bb ∑ Œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ r ‰ ‰ & b œ œ . But I knowœ œ

7 32 Ab Bbm Db b b & b b b ∑ Û . Û ‰ ‰ Œ . Û . J b b bb œ ‰ ‰ œ œ . & b œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ we’re all search - ing for an - swersœ on. - lyœ You can pro - vide. ’Cause You

b b bb ∑ ∑ Œ . ‰ œ & b œ œ 'Cause You know

168

GOOD GOOD FATHER (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 4 of 13

Pre-Chorus 7( 5) 7( 9) 7 35 Gb Gm b /C Db/F F7(#5b9) Bb b Bbm7/Eb Eb bb b œ . œ œ œ & b b œ . œ œ œ œ . œ .

b b bb ‰ ‰ . œ ‰ œ . & b œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ know just what we need be - fore œ we say a

b b bb œ . ‰ œ œ œ . ‰ j & b œ œ œ . œ œ what we need be - fore we say a

Chorus 9 38 Abm Db/F Gbmaj7 Db/F b b & b b b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . F b b bb j ‰ ‰ Œ . ‰ . œ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ≈ & b œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ r word. Good, good Fa - ther, oh, it'sœ

b b & b b b ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ r œ œ œ . bœ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . word. You're a good,œ goodœ . Faœ - ther,œ it’sœ who You are, it’sœ who You are,

7 41 Ebm Ab Db/F Gbmaj7 b b & b b b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

b b bb ‰ . j ‰ . ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ≈ & b œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . j r who You are, yeah, Andœ I’m loved by You.œ It'sœ

b b & b b b ‰ ‰ ≈ r œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . it’sœ who You are. Andœ I’m lovedœ byœ . You,œ it’sœ who I am,

169

GOOD GOOD FATHER (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 5 of 13

7 44 Db/F Ebm Ab Db/F b b & b b b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

3 bb b ‰ . ‰ ‰ . r œ . & b b œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . who I am. Oh, œ œ . 'causeœ You are a good, good

b b & b b b ‰ ‰ ≈ r œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ r œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . it’sœ who I am, it’sœ who I am. am, You're a good,œ goodœ .

Chorus 7 47 Gbmaj7 Db/F Ebm b b & b b b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

b b b b ‰ . b œ ‰ ‰ ≈ r œ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Fa - ther, yeah, yeah, œ . it's who You are.

b b bb ≈ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ r œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ r œ œ œ . & b œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . Faœ - ther,œ it’sœ who You are, it’sœ who You are, it’sœ who You are.

7 50 Ab Db/F Gbmaj7 Bbm b b & b b b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . Û Û Û Û Û Û

b b b b œ œ Œ . ‰ œ . œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ & b œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ I am loved, com-plete - ly loved. œ

b b & b b b œ . œ œ œ œ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ r œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . Andœ I’m lovedœ byœ . You,œ it’sœ who I am, it’sœ who I am,

170

GOOD GOOD FATHER (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 6 of 13

Bridge 7 7 53 Ebm Ab Db/F Gbmaj7 Bbm b b & b b b Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . f bb b ∑ œ œ ‰ ∑ œ œ . & b b œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ Yeah! Per - fect in all Your ways,

b b & b b b ‰ ‰ ≈ r œ œ œ . œ . Œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ . œ œ . it’sœ who I am. Per - fect in all of Your ways, You are

7 57 Ebm Db/F Gbmaj7 b b & b b b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

bb b ‰ . œ . œ ‰ ‰ ≈ r & b b J œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . per - fect œ inœ allœ Your ways, œ . inœ

b b bb œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ & b œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ per - fect in all of Your ways, You are per - fect in all of Your ways

7 9 60 Bbm Eb Ab b b & b b b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

b b . . œ & b b b œ œ œ œ œ œ . ‰ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ all Your ways to us.

b b bb ‰ & b œ . œ œ œ ˙ . œ . œ œ . to us. You are

171

GOOD GOOD FATHER (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 7 of 13

Bridge 7 7 63 Gbmaj7 Bbm Ebm b b & b b b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ƒ bb b Œ . ‰ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ Œ . & b b œ . œ œ œ œ œ You do all things per - fect. J

b b bb œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ per - fect in all of Your ways, You are per - fect in all of Your ways,

7 9 66 Db/F Gbmaj7 Bbm Eb b b & b b b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

3 bb b ‰ ‰ œ . œ ‰ ‰ . ‰ & b b œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . Youœ can do all things per - fect. œ œ Oh,

b b œ œ œ œ œ & b b b œ . ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ You are per - fect in all of Your ways to

Chorus 7( 5) 69 Ab Gbmaj7 Gm b /C b b œ & b b b | . | . œ . œ œ F p b b & b b b ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ . to us, to œ œus. œ You’re a good, good Fa - ther,œ it’sœ who You are,

b b & b b b ˙ . ∑ ∑ ˙ . us.

172

GOOD GOOD FATHER (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 8 of 13

7( 9) 7 7 72 Db/F F7(#5b9) Bb b Bbm7/Eb Eb Abm Db2/F Db bb b Û . Û . Û . & b b œ . œ œ œ œ . œ .

b b b b ‰ ‰ ≈ ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ & b r œ œ œ . r œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ it’sœ who You are, it’sœ who You are. And I’m loved by

7( 5) 7( 9) 7 75 Gbmaj7 Gm b /C Db/F F7(#5b9) Bb b Bbm7/Eb Eb bb b œ . œ œ œ & b b œ . œ œ œ œ . œ .

b b bb ‰ ‰ ≈ ‰ ‰ ≈ r œ & b ‰ ≈ œ œ œ . r œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . You,œ it’sœ who I am, it’sœ who I am, it’s who I am.

Chorus 7 7( 5) 7( 9) 78 Abm Db2/F Db Gbmaj7 Gm b /C Db2/F F7(#5b9) Bb b b b . . . . œ œ & b b b Û Û Û œ œ œ . œ œ œ P bb b ‰ Œ . Œ . j ‰ ‰ & b b œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ Oh, oh, œ

b b & b b b ‰ ‰ ≈ ‰ ‰ ≈ r œ œ œ œ œ . - œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . You're a good, good Fa - ther, it’s who You are, it’s who You are,

7 7 7( 5) 81 Bbm7/Eb Eb Abm Db2/F Db Gbmaj7 Gm b /C bb b Û . Û . Û . œ . œ œ œ & b b œ . œ . F bb b Œ . Œ . ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ œ œ & b b œ œ œ œ œ œ whoœ You are, I am loved, com-plete - ly

b b bb ‰ ‰ ≈ r œ œ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ . & b œ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . it’s who You are. And I’m lovedœ byœ . You,œ it’sœ who I am,

173

GOOD GOOD FATHER (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 9 of 13

7( 9) 7 7 84 Db2/F F7(#5b9) Bb b Bbm7/Eb Eb Abm Db2/F Db b b . . & b b b œ . œ œ œ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û

b b . . b œ œ œ . . & b b b œ . œ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ . œ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ loved, œe - ter - nal - ly loved, yes,J You're a good, good

b b œ œ œ & b b b ‰ ‰ ≈ r œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ r œ œ œ . œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . - it’sœ who I am, it’sœ who I am. You're a good, good

Chorus 9 7 87 Gbmaj9 Bbm Ebm b b & b b b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

f 3 b b œ . r œ œ . œ & b b b œ ‰ ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ Œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 3 Fa - ther, it's who You are, yes, œ

b . r . r b bb œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ Fa - ther, it’s who You are, it’s who You are, it’s who You are.

7 9 90 Db/F Gbmaj9 Bbm Eb Ab b b & b b b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

bb b œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ ‰ Œ . ∑ & b b œ œ œ œ and I am loved by You, J oh, oh, œ .

b . . r . b bb œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ . Œ ≈ œ œ œ œ . œ ≈ r œ œ œ œ & b œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ And I’m loved by You, it’s who I am, it’s who I am, it’s who I am.

174

GOOD GOOD FATHER (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 10 of 13 Chorus

94 Ab/C Db Db/F Gb drums only! b b > > > > & b b b ’ . ≈ Û Û Û Û ‰ ‰ Œ . ∑ J ƒ b b œ . œ œ & b b b œ . œ . Œ . œ ‰ ‰ . œ œ œ ‰ You are good. Yes, You are. It'sœ who You are,

b b œ œ œ œ œ œ . r œ œ œ . & b b b œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . - œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . You're a good, good Fa - ther, it’s who You are, it’s who You are,

97 F Db C Ab Eb2/G Ebm7(b5)/Gb b b >œ . >œ . > > & b b b ∑ œ . œ . ’ . ’ .

b b . œ . œ & b b b ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ myJ Fa - ther, I'm loved, say, I'm j b r . b bb ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ ≈ r ∫œ œ œ . & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . nœ œ b œ œ œ it’s who You are. I’m loved by You, it’s who I am,

100 Db/F Eb/Db Ab/C Eb7/Bb Ab Db Eb F Gb b b . . . . ˘ & b b b ’ ’ ’ ’ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û œ œ J œ œ

b b œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ . & b b b œ Œ . Œ . œ œ 4 loved by You, oh, good, good,

b œ œ œ . œ . œ b bb œ ‰ œ œ œ . œ ‰ œ . œ ‰ ‰ & b œ nœ œ œ nœ œ œ . who I am, I am! You are

175

GOOD GOOD FATHER (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 11 of 13

Bridge 13 103 Cb Gbmaj7/Bb Ebm7(b5)/A b b & b b b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

b b œ œ œ œ & b b b ∑ ‰ œ œ ‰ ∑ in all, in all Your ways,

b b bb œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ per - fect in all of Your ways, Youare per - fect in all of Your ways,

D maj7/A E 2/G G dim7 D /F Cm7( 5) F7( 9) B m7 E 9 106 b b b b b b b b b b b > > > > & b b b ’ . Û . Û . Û . Û . Û . ’ . ’ .

b . b bb ‰ œ œ œ ‰ Œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ ‰ œ . & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . yeah, ooh, œ œ to us,

b b œ œ œ œ œ & b b b œ . ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ You are per - fect in all of Your ways to

Chorus 7( 5) 109 Ab Gbmaj7 Gm b /C b b œ & b b b | . | . œ . œ œ p b b b b œ ‰ b œ ‰ œ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ . to us. You’re a good, good Fa - ther,œ it’sœ who You are,

b b & b b b ˙ . ∑ ∑ ˙ . us.

176

GOOD GOOD FATHER (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 12 of 13

7( 9) 7 7 112 Db2/F F7(#5b9) Bb b Bbm7/Eb Eb Abm Db2/F Db bb b Û . Û . Û . & b b œ . œ œ œ œ . œ .

bb b ‰ ‰ ≈ r ‰ ‰ ≈ r & b b œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ it’sœ whoœ You are, it’sœ who Youœ are.œ Andœ I’m loved by œ

b b & b b b ∑ ∑ ∑

7( 5) 7( 9) 7 115 Gbmaj7 Gm b /C Db2/F F7(#5b9) Bb b Bbm7/Eb Eb bb b œ . œ œ œ & b b œ . œ œ œ œ . œ .

3 3 bb b ‰ ‰ ≈ r ‰ œ ‰ & b b ‰ ≈ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ You,œ it’sœ who I am, it’sœ who I œ am,œ saidœ it is who I œ

b b & b b b ∑ ∑ ∑

Chorus 7( 5) 7( 9) 118 Abm9 Db9 Gbmaj7 Gm b /C Db2/F F7(#5b9) Bb b b b . . . œ œ & b b b ’ ’ œ œ œ . œ œ œ

3 bb b Œ . j ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ & b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ am. Yeah,œ œI can de - pend on œ You,œ

b b bb ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ≈ r & b œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . You’re a good, good Fa - ther, it’s who You are, it’s who You are,

177

GOOD GOOD FATHER (RECORDING COLLECTIVE VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 13 of 13

7 7 7( 5) 121 Bbm7/Eb Eb Abm Db2/F Db Gbmaj7 Gm b /C bb b Û . Û . Û . œ . œ œ œ & b b œ . œ .

3 bb b ‰ ‰ ‰ . ‰ ‰ ‰ ≈ r & b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ . œ Iœ can trust in œ You,œ andœ I am loved by You.œ . It'sœ

b b bb ‰ ‰ ≈ r & b œ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ . it’s who You are. And I’m loved by You, it’s who I am,

7( 9) 7 124 Db2/F F7(#5b9) Bb b Bbm7/Eb Eb Abm9 Db9 bb b . . & b b œ . œ œ œ œ . œ . ’ ’

3 4 bb b ‰ . ≈ r ‰ ‰ & b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ . who I am, œ œa child, we say, Youœ are a good, good,œ good, good,

b b bb ‰ ‰ ≈ r ∑ ∑ & b œ œ œ œ . it’s who I am,

127 G maj7 œ U b œ œ œ ˙ . œ . bb b œ . œ . œ . œ . ‰ & b b 3

3 bb b ‰ Œ . ∑ & b b œ œ œ œ Faœ . - ther.œ Youœ are my Fa - ther. œ œ

b b & b b b ∑ ∑ ∑

Appendix B: Chapter Five Scores

Lion and the Lamb (Bethel Music version) ...... 179

Lion and the Lamb (Gospel fusion version) ...... 183

King of Kings (Hillsong Worship version) ...... 192

King of Kings (Gospel fusion version) ...... 197

Who You Say I Am (Hillsong Worship version) ...... 212

Who You Say I Am (Gospel fusion version) ...... 216

178 179

LION AND THE LAMB Music and Lyrics by BETHEL MUSIC VERSION Brenton Brown, Brian Johnson, & Leeland Mooring

90 q = B maj7 E maj7/B # ## 4 y y y y & # # 4 ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ y y π f

Intro 1. 5 B C#m E # ## # . œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . . & # . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ .

Verse 2. 9 B C#m # ## # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . . & # œ œ œ . ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ F # ## & # # Ó Œ ‰ . r . Œ j œ œ . œ œ ‰ œ œ œ . œ œ œ 1. He'sœ comœ . - ing on the clouds, kingsœ . and king - doms will bow (2.) o - pen up the gates, make way be - fore the King of

12 E G#m # ## & # # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# ## & # # Ó Ó Œ ‰ . r œ œ . œ œ œ . down.˙ Andœ evœ . - 'ry chain will break, asœ kings. The God who comes to save is

15 F# E F# # ## & # # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# ## & # # ‰ . r œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ broœ . - ken hearts de - clare His praise.œ Forœ who can stop theœ Lord Al - might - œy? here to set the cap - tives free. For who can stop the Lord Al - might - y?

180

LION AND THE LAMB (BETHEL MUSIC VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 2 of 4

Chorus 7 18 B F# G#m # ## & # # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ - F f # # # ## Œ ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j & œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ Our God is the Li - on,œ the Li - on of Ju - dahœ He's roar - ing with pow-

21 F# E F# B # ## & # # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # # ## ‰ j ‰ . Œ ‰ j & œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ r œ . œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ - er,œ and fight - ing our bat - tles.œ Andœ ev - 'ry knee willœ bowœ be - foreœ Him.œ Our God is the Lamb,

7 25 F# G#m F# # ## & # # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# ## j j & # # ‰ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ the Lamb that was slain. For the sins of the world, œ His blood breaks the chains.

1. 28 E F# F# # ## & # # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ |

# ## & # # ‰ j Œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ And ev - 'ry knee will bow beœ -foreœ . the Li - on and theœ Lamb.œ ev - 'ry knee will bow be - fore Him.œ

32 B C#m E # ## # œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . . & # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . f # ## & # # ∑ ∑ ∑ Ó Œ ‰ . r . 2.œ So

181

LION AND THE LAMB (BETHEL MUSIC VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 3 of 4

2. B 36 F C m E F # # D# # # ## & # # ’ ’ ’ ’ | | | | P # ## & # # ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ œ œ œ œ bow be - fore Him.

Bridge B 41 C m E F # D# # # ## & # # . | | | | . P # ## & # # . Ó Ó . œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ Who can stop the Lord Al - migh - ty?œ Who can stop the Lord Al - migh - ty?œ

Bridge 1. B 45 C m E F # D# # # ## & # # . ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ . F # ## & # # . Ó Ó . œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ Who can stop the Lord Al - migh - ty?œ Who can stop the Lord Al - migh - ty?œ

2. 49 E F# N.C. # ## # . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . . & # ’ ’ ’ ’ | . œ œ œ . f drums / gtr. only # # # ## Ó . ∑ . & œ . œ œ . œ w Who can stop the Lord?

Chorus 7 52 B F# G#m # ## & # # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # # ## Œ ‰ j ‰ j ‰ j & œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ Our God is the Li - on,œ the Li - on of Ju - dahœ He's roar - ing with pow-

182

LION AND THE LAMB (BETHEL MUSIC VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 4 of 4

55 F# E F# # ## & # # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# ## j & # # ‰ ‰ . r œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ - er,œ and fight - ing our bat - tles.œ Andœ ev - 'ry knee will bow be - fore Him.œ

7 58 B F# G#m # ## & # # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # # ## Œ ‰ j ‰ j ‰ & œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ Our God is the Lamb, the Lamb that was slain. For the sins of the world,

61 F# E F# # ## & # # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# ## j & # # ‰ œ œ ‰ j œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ His blood breaks the chains. œ And ev - 'ry knee will bow beœ -foreœ . the Li - on and theœ

Outro 64 F# B # ## # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ

# ## & # # Œ ∑ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ Lamb.œ ev - 'ry knee will bow be - fore Him.œ

67 # ## # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . & # ‘ ‘ œ œ œ ¿ ¿ ¿ ¿ sn. # ## & # # ∑ ∑ ∑

183

LION AND THE LAMB Music and Lyrics by GOSPEL FUSION VERSION Brenton Brown, Brian Johnson, & Leeland Mooring Arr. Tyler B. Williams

105 q = N.C. D m9 N.C. C m9 # 4 y y y yyy y y y >œ & 4 ‰ y y y y œ . œ œ œ œ œ w œ . œ œ œ œ Jdrum fill œ . > œ . f

A m7 G Fmaj9 E m7 D m9 A m7 G/B C G/D F 13 5 # w >œ ˙ > > > > & œ . œ œ œ œ œ w œ . œ œ œ œ Û Û ‰ Û Û ‰ œ . > œ . SOLO # r V ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ Ó Œ ‰ . œ He's

Verse (swing 16ths) G G G/D F/G Cmaj7 Cmaj7 B m7 A m7 10 # ˘ . - ˘ & Û Œ Û . Û Û Û Ó Û Û Û Œ Û . Û Û Û

# j œ œ Œ œ œ œ Œ Œ ‰ V œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ com - ing on the clouds, kings and king - doms will bow down. Yeah.

A m7/D A m7(b5)/D E m9 E m9 E m7/B E m9 D m9 13 # # . - ˘ . - & Ó Û Û Û Œ Û . Û Û Û Ó Û Û

# Œ Œ ‰ . r œ œ ‰ j œ œ œ V œ . œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ . And ev - 'ry chain will break, as bro - ken hearts de - clare His

184

LION AND THE LAMB (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 2 of 9

Chorus Cmaj7 Cmaj7 B m7 A m7 A m7/D G 16 # & Û Œ Û . Û Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# ‰ . r œ . œ œ œ œ œ ∑ V œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ praise. For who can stop the Lord Al - might - y? BGVs & SOLO # . ∑ ∑ Œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ OurJ God is the Li -

G 7 Cmaj7 F 9 19 # & ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# œ œ . œ œ j œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ & œ œ œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œœ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J œ œ - on, the Li - on of Ju - dah He's roar - ing with pow - er, and fight - ing our bat-

E m9 A m7 A m7/D G 22 # . - & ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’

# œ . . œ œ . œ œ & œ œ œ Œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ Œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ J œ œ - tles. Ev - 'ry knee will bow be - fore Him. Our God is the Lamb,

G 7(#5) Cmaj7 F 9 F m7(b5) B 7(b9) 25 # # & ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ & œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ theJ Lamb that was slain. Forœ theœ sins of the world, HisJ blood breaks the chains.

185

LION AND THE LAMB (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 3 of 9

E m7 D m9 G 7(#5)/D Cmaj7 28 b # & ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# Œ œ . œ œ . œ . Œ œ . œ œ . & œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ Ev - 'ry knee will bow be-fore the Li - on and the Lamb. ev - 'ry knee will

Turn (straight 16ths)

A m7/D A m7 G Fmaj9 E m7 D m9 31 # ˘ Û ‰ œ . œ œ œ w & ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ . J > SOLO # j & œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ∑ Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ bow be - fore Him.œ Oh!

Verse (swing 16ths) A m7 G/B C G/D F 13 G G G/D F/G 34 # > > > > > ˘ œ . œ œ œ ˙ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ Û Œ Û . Û Û Û & œ œ œ .

# Ó Œ ‰ . œ œ . œ œ . Œ ∑ V R œ œ So o - pen up the gates. BGVs # r j & ∑ Ó Œ ‰ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ ‰ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ Soœ œo . - pen up the gates, makeœ

Cmaj7 Cmaj7 B m7 A m7 A m7/D A m7(b5)/D# 37 r œ œ. . œ œ # . - . œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ. œ & Ó Û Û ‰ œ ‰ ‰ J Jsynth lick

# r & œ . œ œ . œ œ œ Œ Ó Ó Œ ‰ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ wayœ . be - fore the King of kings. Theœ

186

LION AND THE LAMB (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 4 of 9

9 Em E m9 E m7/B E m9 D m9 Cmaj7 Cmaj7 B m7 A m7 40 r r # œ œ œ œ œ ˘ . - & Û . Û Û Û Ó Û Û Û Œ Û . Û Û Û

# r & œ . œ œ . œ œ ‰ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ ‰ . r œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ Godœ . who comes to save œis hereœ . to set the cap - tives free. For who can stop the

Chorus A m7/D G G 7 43 # & ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# œ œ .nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ V Ó ‰ J Œ Ó Œ ‰ œ œ . Our God! OurJ God is the Li -

# œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ & œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ Œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Lord Al - might - œy? OurJ God is the Li - on, œ theJ Li - on of Ju -

Cmaj7 F 9 E m9 46 # & ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# œ œ Œ Ó ∑ Œ ‰ . r œ . œ œ . V œ œ - on! And ev - 'ry knee will

# j œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ & œ œ œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œœ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ - dahœ He'sœ roar - ing with pow - er, œ andJ fight - ing our bat - tles.œ Ev - 'ry knee will

A m7 A m7/D G G 7(#5) 49 . # . œ. œ œ œ . Û. Û- ? œ œ œ œ œ œ. & ’ ’ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & .bass. gtr. .lick . . # œ ∑ ∑ V œ œ œ œ œ bow be - fore Him.

# œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ & œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ Œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bow be - fore Him.œ OurJ God is the Lamb, theJ Lamb that was slain.

187

LION AND THE LAMB (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 5 of 9

Cmaj7 F 9 F m7(b5) B 7(b9) E m7 52 # # & ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# œ œ œ V ∑ ∑ ‰ J œ Ó Ev - 'ry,

# œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . . & œ ‰ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ For the sins of the world, His blood breaks the chains. Ev - 'ry knee will

Inst. D m9 G 7(#5)/D Cmaj7 A m7/D A m7 55 b # & ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ | P # œ . Œ œ . œ œ . œ œ & œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ~~~~~w œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ~~~~~w bow be-fore the Li - on and the Lamb. ev - 'ry knee will bow be - fore Him.

D 9 A m7 D 9 59 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ & | œ œ œ œ œ keys lick œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

Bridge A m7 D 9 A m7 62 # & | | |

P SOLO # V Ó œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . Ó œ . œ œ œ œ Who can stop the Lord Al - migh - ty? Who can stop the

188

LION AND THE LAMB (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 6 of 9

D maj9 B maj7 A m7 D 9 65 b # & | | | |

# V œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . Ó œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . Lord Al - migh - ty? Who can stop the Lord Al - migh - ty? BGVs # & ∑ Ó œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ . Who can stop the Lord Al - migh -œ ty?œ

Bridge A m7 F maj7 D maj9 B maj7 A m7 68 b # & | | | | œ ≈ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ keys lick œ F # V Ó œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . ∑ Who can stop the Lord Al - migh - ty? # Œ Œ & œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ Who can stop the Lord Al - migh œ- ty?œ Who can stop the

A m/G F m7(b5) F maj7 Am(add4)/EE7(#5#9) 71 # # & ‰ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ keys lick continues # V Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ ∑ ∑ Come on, yeah. # Œ œ . & œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . Lord Al - migh - ty? Who can stop the Lord Al - migh - ty?

189

LION AND THE LAMB (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 7 of 9

A m7 D 9 A m7 /B /C /C 74 # # & ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ f # œ œ œ œ œ V Ó œ œ œ œ Œ Ó ∑ Who can stop the Lord?

# œ . œ œ œ & Œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ Œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ Who can stop the Lord Al - migh œ- ty?œ Who can stop the

Band Jam! D 9 G 13 G 13 A m D 7 C7(#5#9) B7(#5#9) 77 # œ ≈ œ œ # ˘ ˘ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & Û Û Û Û Û Û œ œ ≈ œ œ ‰ ‰ . Û ≈ Û . Û R J ƒ # j ˙ œ œ j œ ‰ œ œ œ œ~~~~~˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Ó & œ œ œ œ œ~~~~~~ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Lord Al - migh - ty?

A m D 7 E m9 F 9 A m7 A m7 G m9 F m7(b5b9) 80 b # œ ≈ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ ≈ œ œ ‰ ‰ . Û ≈ Û . Û œ œ ≈ œ R J

# œ œ œ & ∑ Ó Œ œ œ œ Œ Ó œ œ œ œ œ Who can stop the Lord?œ

F m7 E 7(#5) E 7 D 7 A m7 E /F B maj7 E 13(#11) D 13 E 13 E m9 F 9 83 b b b b b œ ≈ œ œ # œ > > œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > > & œ ‰ ‰ . Û ≈ Û . Û œ œ ≈ œ œ ‰ ‰ . Û ≈ Û . Û R J R J # œ œ œ V ∑ ∑ Ó ‰ . R Say, "Our

190

LION AND THE LAMB (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 8 of 9 Chorus G 86 # > & Û Œ Ó ∑ ∑ ∆ drums only # œ V õ Œ Ó ∑ ∑ God!"

# œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ j œ . œ œ & Œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ J œ œ œ œ œ J œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Our God is the Li - on, the Li - on of Ju - dah He's roar - ing with pow-

Cmaj7 B m7 A m7 A m7/D 89 # & ∑ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ band back in f # œ œ .nœ œ V ∑ ∑ Ó ‰ J Our God!

# œ œ . œ œ œ . . œ & œ œ œ ‰ œ œœ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ - er, and fight - ing our bat - tles. Ev - 'ry knee will bow be - fore Him.

G G/F C maj7/E 92 # & ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# œ V Œ Ó ∑ ∑

# œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ & œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ J œ œ œ J œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Our God is the Lamb, the Lamb that was slain. For the sins of the world,

191

LION AND THE LAMB (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 9 of 9

C m/E G/D A/C C G/B Am G F m7(b5) B 7(b9) 95 b # # # > > > > & ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ Û Û Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’

# œ œ œ V ∑ ∑ Ó ‰ J œ œ 3 The Li -

# œ œ . œ & œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ #œ œ Œ nœ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ œ . œ HisJ blood breaks the chains. Ev - 'ry knee willœ bow beœ -foreœ . the Li - on and theœ

Outro E m9 A m7 A m7/D A m7 G Fmaj9 E m7 D m9 98 # ˘ & ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ Û ‰ œ . œ œ œ œ œ J œ . > # œ Œ Ó Ó Œ ∑ V œ . œ on, Hey! # Œ œ . œ œ . œ œ ∑ & œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ Lamb. ev - 'ry knee will bow be - fore Him.

A m7 G/B C G/D F 13 G 7 101 # >œ Uw > > & w œ . œ œ œ œ Û . Û Û Ó œ . bassæ gtr. ad lib. ∆ # œ œ œ V Ó ‰ J ∑ ∑ ∑ Our God!

192

KING OF KINGS Music and Lyrics by HILLSONG WORSHIP VERSION Brooke Ligertwood, Jason Ingram, & Scott Ligertwood

Intro 68 q = D # # 4 ‰ ‰ & 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ P œ œ œ œ œ

Verse

4 D/F# G A D ## & œ œ ˙ | | | |

# # Ó Œ ‰ ≈ & œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 1. In the dark - ness, we were wait - ing with - out hope, with -out light. 'Till from heav -

7 D/F# G A D D/F# G # & # | | | | | |

# & # œ œ œ ‰ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ - en you came run - ing, there was mer - cy in your eyes. To ful-fill the law and pro - phets to a vir -

10 A D D/F# G A # 2 4 & # | | | | 4 | 4

# 2 4 & # ≈ œ œ œ œ 4 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ - gin came the Word. From a throne of end - less glo - ry, to a cra - dle in the dirt.

193

KING OF KINGS (HILLSONG WORSHIP VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 2 of 5

Chorus

13 D D G 2 # # 4 ‰ j & 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ | | œ œ P # # 4 Ó ∑ œ œ Œ & 4 ˙ œ œ œ œ œ Praise the Fa - ther, praise the Son,

17 B m7 Asus A D G 2 # & # | | | | |

# # œ Œ œ œ œ Œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ praise the Spir - it, three in one. God of Glo - ry, Maj - es - ty.

21 B m7 G 2 A D # # 2 4 ‰ j & | | 4 | 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # # 2 ‰ j 4 Œ Ó Œ ≈ & œ œ œ œ œ œ 4 œ œ 4 ˙ . œ œ œ Praise for - ev - er to the King of Kings. 2. To re - veal

Verse 25 D/F# G A D D/F# G # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ F # # ‰ ≈ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ the king - dom com - ing and to rec - on - cile the lost, to re - deem the whole cre - a - tion, you did not

28 A D D/F# G A D # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# & # ≈ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ de- spise the cross For ev - en in your suf - f'ring, you saw to the oth - er side. Know-ing this

194

KING OF KINGS (HILLSONG WORSHIP VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 3 of 5

31 D/F# G A D # # 2 4 ‰ j & ’ ’ ’ ’ 4 ’ ’ 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # 2 4 & # œ œ œ ‰ œ 4 4 Œ ∑ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ . was our sal - va - tion, Je - sus for our sake You died.

Chorus

35 D G 2 B m7 Asus A # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ f ## & œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Praise the Faœ - ther,œ praise the Son, praise the Spirœ - œit, three in one.œ

39 D G 2 B m7 G 2 A # 2 4 & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ 4 ’ ’ 4

## œ œ 2 4 & œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ 4 ‰ j 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ God of Gloœ - ry,œ Maj - es - ty.œ Praiseœ forœ - evœ - erœ toœ the Kingœ ofœ

Verse

43 D Bm G # # 4 ‰ j & 4 œ œ œ œ œ | | œ œ œ œ œ œ p ## 4 j & 4 Œ Ó Œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ ˙ . œ œ œ œ œ œ Kings.˙ . 3. And the morn - ing that You rose, all of heav -

46 A D Bm G A D # & # | | | | | |

# j j & # ‰ ≈ œ œ œ ‰ œ j ‰≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ - en held it's breath 'Till that stone was moved for good, for the Lamb had con - quered death. And the dead

195

KING OF KINGS (HILLSONG WORSHIP VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 4 of 5

49 Bm G A D Bm G # & # Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û F # # j ‰ j ‰ j ‰ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ rose from their tombs, and the an - gels stood in awe, for the souls of all who'd come to the Fa -

Verse A D D/F G 52 # # & # Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ f # œ œ œ j & # ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ - ther are re - stored. 4. Andœ theœ church ofœ Christ was born,œ œ then the Spir -

54 A D D/F# G # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# j & # œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ - œit œlit œ the flame. Nowœ thisœ gos - pelœ œtruth œ of old shall not kneel,

56 A D D/F# G # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# j j œ œ & # œ ≈ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œshall œ notœ œfaint. œ Byœ Hisœ blood andœ œin œ His Name in His free -

58 A D D/F# G A # 2 4 & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ 4 ’ ’ 4

# œ j j 2 4 & # œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ 4 œ 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ - dom I am free,œ œ forœ theœ love ofœ Jeœ -œ sus Christ who has res - urœ - rectœ œ- edœ œme.

196

KING OF KINGS (HILLSONG WORSHIP VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 5 of 5

Chorus D D G 2 61 # # 4 ‰ j & 4 œ œ œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ œ œ œ ƒ ## 4 & 4 w ∑ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ w œ œ œ œ œ œ œ w Praise the Faœ - ther,œ praise the Son,

65 B m7 Asus A D G 2 # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

## œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ praise the Spirœ - œit, three in one.œ God of Gloœ - ry,œ Maj - es - ty.œ

Tag

69 B m7 G 2 A D D/F# G A # 2 4 & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ | | 4 | 4 P ## 2 4 & œ œ œ œ ‰ j Œ œ œ œ œ 4 ‰ j 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Praiseœ forœ - evœ - erœ toœ the Kingœ ofœ Kings.œ Praise for - ev - er to the King of

73 D rit. # U # 4 ‰ j & 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ p œ œ œ w # # 4 Ó ∑ ∑ & 4 ˙ Kings.

197

KING OF KINGS Music and Lyrics by GOSPEL FUSION VERSION Brooke Ligertwood, Jason Ingram, & Scott Ligertwood Arr. Tyler B. Williams

Piano Solo Freely Db Bbm Ab Db Dbsus/Eb Db/F Gb Db/F ˙ . œ œ œ œ œ œ bb b 4 œ œ . œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & b b 4 œ œ . œ œ ˙ . œ œ œ œ p ˙ œ œ ˙ œ ˙ œ œ ? b 4 œ œ b bb 4 œ b œ

D dim7 F dim7 E m C B 7 E m C B 7 E m D /F 4 b b b b b b b b œ . œ b b n œ . œ œ & b b b n œœ . œœ bœ œ ˙ . œ J bœ nœ œ œ œ œ bœ nœ ˙ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ . œ nœ . œ œ P ‰ j . ? b b J bœ œ bœ œ nœ œ bœ b b b œ . œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ ˙ .

G maj7 G 6 D /F G m7(b5) A A /G 7 b b b b b b b b j œ . b bb œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & b œ nœ œ bœ œ . œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? b b gœ nœ œ bœ œ œ b b b g˙ œ nœ œ˙ œ˙

D /F D (#5)/F G (#4) G B 7 E D /F E /G 9 b b b b b b b b b b œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ . œ œœ œ & b b b œ œ œ nœ œ ˙ œ œ œ nœ . œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ nœ œ œ œ F . œ œ . ? b œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ b b œ œ œ n œ œ n œ œ œ œ b b œ˙ œ œ œ˙ Óœ nœ

198

KING OF KINGS (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 2 of 15

D /A Cb7 b b Ebm7/Db C m7(b5) F 13(b9) 12 œ ∫œ bœ œ œnœ œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ œnœ œ œ œ œ . œ œ n œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ b bb ∫œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ & b œ œ œ œ œ 3 œœ œœ œœ. œ #œ . nœ 3 œ œ œ . ‰ n œ . œ > 3 œ œ œ . p n œ . n œ f ˙ œ ˙˙ ∫œ bœœ œœ œ ? b b bœ œ j ‰ œ œ b b b ∫œ ˙ . œ œ bœ ∫œ ˙ . œ b>œ

15 B m7 E 13 A m11 D 7 G maj7 C 7 D /A A m7 D 7 b b b b b b 3 3 b b b b j b b œ œ œ œ b b œ b œ œ œ bœ œ & b œ œ œ œ . œœ œ ˙œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœœ bbœœ . œ œ ˙˙ ∫œ œ œ œ . P bœ ? b œ œ œ ˙ œ œ b bb œ œ œ œ ˙ b˙ ˙ œ œ b œ œ ˙

18 Gb(#4) Gb D dim7 F dim7 Ebm7(b5) /A Db/Ab Ab7sus ˙ b b œ œ œ & b b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nnœ œœ ∫œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œœ œœ - œ- - œ- œ œ œ œ œ œ œ p œ œ œ œ- - - - œ ˙ . ? b b œ nœ œ œ œ œ b b b œ ∫œ w w

Intro 68 q = 21 Db Gbm/Db Db Gbm/Db bb b ‰ ‰ & b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∫œ œ œ œ œ œ ∫œ P SOLO b b bb ∑ ∑ ∑ Ó Œ & b œ œ œ 1. In the dark -

Verse 25 Db/F Gb Ab Db b b & b b b | | | |

b b bb ‰ ‰ j ‰ ≈ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ - ness, we were wait - ing with - out hope, with - out light. 'Till from heav -

199

KING OF KINGS (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 3 of 15

27 Db/F Gb Ab Db b b & b b b | | | |

b b & b b b œ œ œ ‰ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ - en you came run - ing, there was mer - cy in your eyes. To ful - fill

29 Db/F Gb Ab Db b b & b b b | | | |

b b bb ‰ ≈ œ ≈ ‰ ≈ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ the law and pro - phets to a vir - gin came the Word. From a throne

31 Db/F Gb Ab b b 2 4 & b b b | | 4 | 4

b b 2 4 & b b b œ œ œ ‰ œ 4 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ of end - less glo - ry, to a cra - dle in the dirt.

Chorus

33 Db Gbm/Db Db Gb2 bb b 4 ‰ j & b b 4 œ œ œ œ œ | | œ œ œ œ œ ∫œ b b bb 4 Ó ∑ œ . . j ‰ œ . Œ & b 4 ˙ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ Praise the Fa - ther, praise the Son,

37 Bbm7 Gbmaj7 Ab Ab/Gb Db/F b b & b b b | | Û Û |

b b bb œ . j ‰ Œ œ . j ‰ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ praise the Spir - it, three in one. God of Glo - ry,

200

KING OF KINGS (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 4 of 15

40 Gb2 Bbm7 Gb2 Ab Db bb b 2 4 ‰ j & b b | | | 4 | 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ b b bb œ œ Œ 2 ‰ j 4 Œ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 4 œ œ 4 ˙ . Maj - es - ty. Praise for - ev - er to the King of kings.

44 Gbm/Db Db Gbm/Db Db/Cb Ebm7(b5)/A Ebdim/Gb bb b ‰ j & b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∫œ œ œ œ œ œ ∫œ 3 3 b r b bb Œ ‰ . œ œ Ó ‰ Œ & b œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ For-ev - er, Lord. Oh. BGVs b b bb ∑ ∑ Ó Œ ≈ & b œ œ œ 2. To re - veal

Verse

47 Db/F Gbmaj7 Ab/C Db b b > > & b b b Û Û . Û Ó Û Û . Û Ó

b b & b b b ∑ Ó ‰ œ œ œ To re - deem,

b b bb ‰ ≈ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ the king - dom com - ing and to rec - on - cile the lost, to re - deem

201

KING OF KINGS (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 5 of 15

49 Db/F Gbmaj7 Ab/C Db Db Ebm7 b b > > > > & b b b Û Û . Û Ó Û Û . Û ‰ . Û ≈ Û . R J

b b & b b b ∑ Ó ≈ œ œ œ œ œ . for ev - en,

b b & b b b œ œ œ ‰ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ the whole cre - a - tion, you did not de - spise the cross For ev -

51 Db/F Gbmaj7 Ab/C Db b b > ? œ œ > & b b b Û Û . Û ‰ . R ≈ œ & Û Û . Û Ó bass gtr. œ

bb b ∑ ‰ & b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ the oth - er side.

b b bb ‰ ≈ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ - en in your suf - f'ring, you saw to the oth - er side. Know-ing this

53 Db/F Gbmaj7 Ebm7(b5)/A /Ab Db > bb b Û Û . Û Ó 2 Û Û 4 ‰ j & b b 4 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ b b bb Ó Œ 2 4 Œ & b œ œ œ 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ 4 œœœ . ˙ Je - sus for our sake You died.

b b 2 4 & b b b œ œ œ ‰ œ 4 4 Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ . was our sal - va - tion, Je - sus for our sake You died.

202

KING OF KINGS (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 6 of 15 Chorus

56 Gbm/Db Ebdim/Ab Db Gb2 b b bb & b œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ∫œ f b b bb œ . œ œ œ ‰ œ . . j ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ & b œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ Oh, Praise the Fa - ther, praise the, praise the Spir - it,

bb b ∑ Œ & b b œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ Praise the Fa - œ ther,œ praise the Son,

59 Bbm7 Gbmaj7 Ab Ab/Gb Db/F b b & b b b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b b bb ˙ Ó œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ . j ‰ & b œ œ œ . œ œ three in one. God of Glo - ry,

bb b Œ & b b œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ praise the Spir -œ œit, three in one. God of Glo -œ ry,œ

G 2 B m7 G 2 A 62 b b b b b b 2 4 & b b b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ 4 ’ ’ 4

b b œ œ j 2 4 & b b b œ ‰ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ . 4 ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ 4 Maj - es - ty. Oh praise, praise for - ev - er, to You a - lone.

b b œ œ 2 4 & b b b œ Œ œ œ œ œ 4 ‰ j 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Maj - es - ty.œ Praiseœ forœ - evœ - erœ toœ theœ Kingœ ofœ

203

KING OF KINGS (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 7 of 15

D G m/D G dim 65 b b b b bb b 4 ‰ j & b b 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∫œ b b bb 4 Œ Œ ≈ œ œ œ & b 4 œ œ œ . ˙ œ œ œ . œ œ œ Oh, the King of kings,

b b 4 & b b b 4 ∑ w kings.w

67 Db/F Ebm7(b5) Db/F Gbm6 /Ab /A b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > > ˘ & b b b ‰ J œ œ Û Û Û Œ SOLO b b bb Œ ‰ . r Œ ≈ & b œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ we praise You. 3. And the morn -

Down Verse

69 Bbm11 Gb2 Ab/C Db b b & b b b | | | | keys only p b b j j & b b b œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ≈ œ - ingœ œthat œ You rose, all of heavœ œ- enœ œheld œ it's breath 'Tillœ thatœ stone

71 Bbm11 Gb2 Ab/C Db b b & b b b | | | |

b b j & b b b œ œ œ ‰ œ j ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ was moved for good, for the Lamb had con - quered death. And the dead

204

KING OF KINGS (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 8 of 15

Build 6 73 Bbm9 Cb9 Absus/C Db b b > > > > & b b b Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û F b j b bb ‰ œ ‰ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ rose from their tombs, and the an - gels stood in awe, for the souls BGVs bb b j ‰ j ‰ & b b œ . œ œ . œ . œ œ . œ . œ œ . œ . œ œ . Ooh, Ooh,

6 75 Bbm9 Cb9 Absus/C Db Db/Ab Ebm/Gb Db/F b b > > > > > & b b b Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û ≈ Û Û Û

b b j & b b b œ œ œ ‰ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ of all who'd come to the Fa - ther are re - stored. 4. And the church

b b j j & b b b œ . œ œ . ‰ œ . œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ œ Ah,œ œ œ Ah, 4. Andœ the church j b b j j œ œ & b b b ‰ j j œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œœ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J JAh,

Church Verse! 77 Db/F Gbmaj7 Ab/C Db Db/Ab Ebm/Gb Db/F b b > > > & b b b Œ Û . Û Ó Û Û . Û Œ ≈ Û Û Û

b b bb œ œ œ j ‰ ‰ ≈ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ of Christ was born, then the Spir - it lit the flame. Now this gos -

b b œ œ œ j & b b b œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ofœ Christ was born,œ œ then the Spir - œit œlit œ the flame. Nowœ thisœ gos -

205

KING OF KINGS (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 9 of 15

G maj7 A /C D D E m7 E dim7 D /F D /A E m/G D /F 79 b b b b b b b b b b b > bb b Œ Û . Û ? ‰ . œ ≈ œ œ Û Û . Û ≈ œ & b b R œ œ nœ œ œ bœ & œ œ n œ œ >œ j bb b ≈ ≈ ‰ ≈ & b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ - pelœ truthœ œ of old shall not kneel, shall not faint. Byœ His blood

b b & b b b œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ - pelœ œtruthœ of old shall not kneel, œshall œ œnot œ œfaint.œ Byœ Hisœ blood

F m7(b5) G maj7 E m D A /C D 81 b b b b b b b > ˘ & b b b Œ Û . Û ‰ Û Û Û Û . Û Û Û Û Û J b j b bb œ ‰ œ œ œ j ‰ ≈ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ and in His Name in His free - dom I am free, for the love j b j b bb œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ≈ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ andœ œin œ His Name in His free - dom I am free, for the love

83 Db/Cb Gb2/Bb Ebm7(b5)/A /Ab b b 2 4 & b b b Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û 4 Û Û Û Û 4

b b j 2 4 & b b b œ œ œ ‰ œ 4 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ of Je - sus Christ who has res - ur - rect - ed me.

b b j 2 4 & b b b œ œ œ ‰ œ 4 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ of Je - sus Christ who has res - ur - rect - ed me.

206

KING OF KINGS (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 10 of 15

D G m/D G m /A /A C 9 85 b b b b b b > bb b 4 ‰ j ∫œ œ bœ . & b b 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ b œ b bb 4 j ‰ ˙ . œ ∫œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ ‰ & b 4 œ J Oh, res - ur - rect - ed me!

bb b 4 ≈ ∫œ œ œ bœ ∫œ œ . ‰ & b b 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ Forœ the love of Christ has res - ur - rect - ed me!

b b 4 w œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . V b b b 4 ‰ (me.) Res - ur - rect - ed me!

Chorus

87 Db Gbmaj7 Bbm7 b b & b b b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ƒ b b j j & b b b ∑ Ó ‰ œ œ . œ Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ Oh, praise the Spir - it,

b b bb œ œ œ . œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ . & b œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ Praise the Fa - œ ther,œ praise the Son, praise the Spir -œ œit,

90 G m7(b5) Gbm6 /Eb /F /Gb Db/Ab Gb2 Gb/Bb Db/Ab Gb bb b œ & b b ’ ’ œ œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ

b b & b b b œ . œ œ œ œ œ ∫œ Œ ∑ ∑ three in one.

b b œ œ & b b b œ œ . ∫œ œ Œ œ œ œ . œ œ Œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ three in one. God of Glo -œ ry,œ Maj - es - ty.œ

207

KING OF KINGS (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 11 of 15

93 Db/F Gb2 Ab A dim7 Bbm7 Db13 Gbmaj9 Db/F b b & b b b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

bb b ‰ j ‰ & b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Praise for - ev - er to the King of kings. Praise for - ev - er to the

b b j & b b b œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Praise for - ev - erœ toœ the King ofœ kings.œ Praise for - ev - erœ toœ the

Dropout!

96 C m7(b5) F7(#5b9) Bbm11 F 2/A Abm7(13) Gbmaj7 Ebm7(b5)/Ab b b 2 4 & b b b ’ ’ Û Û Û Û Û Û | 4 | 4 subito p b b bb œ Œ Ó œ . 2 ‰ j 4 & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ 4 œ œ 4 King, Praise for - ev - er to the King of

b b j 2 4 & b b b œ ‰ ∫œ œ . ‰ ∑ 4 ∑ 4 œ œ œ . King of kings.

99 Db Gbm/Db Gbm6 b b bb 4 ‰ & b 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ P œ œ ∫œ b b bb 4 Œ & b 4 œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ kings. Oh,

b b 4 & b b b 4 Œ ˙ œ ∫w King˙ ofœ kings,w

208

KING OF KINGS (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 12 of 15

101 Db/F Gbm6 Cb9 Ebm7(b5)/A bb b ‰ & b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∫œ

b b . & b b b Ó Œ ≈ œ œ ∫œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Oh, we praise You, Lord,

b b bb Œ & b ˙ œ w Maj˙ - esœ - ∫ty,w

Db/Ab Gbm/Db B A A G F E D B A 103 b b b b œ bœ b b œ œ œ œ œ ? ∫œ œ œ œ œ œ & b b b ‰ œ œ œ œ bœ ∫œ & bass gtr. F b b œ ˙ & b b b ∑ Œ ∫œ Ho - ly Ghost!

b b bb Œ ˙ œ ∫w & b ˙ œ w Fath - er, Son,

rit.

D /A D /C A dim7 D /A G m6 D /F E m7(b5) D /F G m6 E m7(b5) 105 b b b b b b b b b b b b b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ > > > > & b b b œ œ Û Û Û Û

b b œ œ & b b b ∑ Ó Œ You are!

b j œ- œ œ- ˙- b bb ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ∫œ œ œ ∫˙ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Ho - ly Spir - it Three in One!

209

KING OF KINGS (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 13 of 15

Total Praise 63 q = 107 Db/Ab Ebm9 F7(#5#9) Bbm7 Eb9 Abm9 Db9 b b & b b b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ Û ’ ’ ’ ’ f b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & b b b Œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ Ó Œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ J œ J You are the source of my strength, You are the strength

110 Gbmaj9 Cb7 Db/Ab Abm7 Db Ab/Gb Gb D dim7 Ebm7(b5) b b & b b b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & b b b œ œ œ ∫œ Ó Œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ of my life, I lift my hands in to - ∫talœ

113 Db/Ab Ab7sus Ab7 Db Ebm7(b5) Db/F Gbm6 E m7(b5) Db/Ab b b & b b b ’ ’ ’ ’ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ f b b œ œ œ œ œ œ & b b b Ó Œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ ˙ ˙œ œ ˙ œ J œ nœ b˙ ˙ praise to You. You are the source

116 Ebm9 C m7(b5) F 13(b9) Bbm7 A7(#9b13) Abm9 G7(#9b13) Gbmaj9 Cb7 E m7(b5)/A b b & b b b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ Û Û

b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & b b b œ œ œ œ Ó Œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ∫œ Ó œ J œ of my strength, You are the strength of my life,

210

KING OF KINGS (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 14 of 15

119 Db/Ab Abm7 Db Ab/Gb Gb D dim7 Ebm7(b5) Db/Ab Ab7sus Ab7 b b & b b b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b œ œ b bb Œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ ˙œ bœ ∫œ œ nœ b˙ œ I lift my hands in to - tal praise to

Amen 122 Db Cb2 Db/Cb Gbm/A Db/Ab Gbm Db7/F Gbm Db Cb2 Db/Cb b b & b b b ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

Soprano bb b j ‰ j ‰ & b b œ œ You.œ Aœ - men,˙ w œ Aœ -

Alto b b & b b b j ‰ j ‰ j ‰ œ œ ∫œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ ˙ You. Aœ œ - men, A - - - men, A - men, Tenor b j b bb j ‰ ‰ œ j ‰ œ V b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ You. A - men, A - - - men, A -

125 Gbm/A Db/Ab Gbm Db7/F Gbm Db/F Db Cb2 Db/Cb b b & b b b ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b b j j & b b b œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ men, A - - - - men, A - - -

b b bb j ‰ & b w œ œ œ œ A - - -

b j b bb ∫œ ‰ œ œ bœ œ œ ‰ œ ˙ V b J men, A - - - - men, A - men,

211

KING OF KINGS (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 15 of 15

127 Gbm/A Db/Ab Gbm Db7/F Gbm Db Cb2 Db/Cb b b & b b b ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

b j b bb ∫œ ‰ œ œ bœ œ œ ‰ œ ˙ & b J men, A - - - - men, A - men!

b b j j & b b b œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ men, A - - - - men, A - - -

b b w œ œ œ œ V b b b J ‰ A - - -

rit.

129 Gbm/A Db/Ab Gbm Db7/F Gbm Db b b > > & b b b ’ Û Û ’ ’ Ó | | Û Œ

b b ˙ . . w ˙ & b b b ‰ Ó (men!)

b b bb ∫œ ‰ œ œ bœ œ ‰ w ˙ Ó & b J J men, A - - - men! œ b b œ œ œ œ w ˙ V b b b J ‰ J ‰ Ó men, A - - - men!

212

WHO YOU SAY I AM Music and Lyrics by HILLSONG WORSHIP VERSION Ben Fielding & Reuben Morgan

Intro 86 q = Gb b b 6 & b b bb 8 | . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . p Verse 6 Gb Ebm Db Gb b b & b b bb ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

b b bb b ‰ ‰ Œ . & b œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ . j j 1. Who am I thatœ the high - est Kingœ wouldœ welœ . - comeœ . me.œ .

10 Gb Ebm Db Cb b b & b b bb ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

b b bb b ‰ ‰ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ . I was lost, butœ He brought me in.œ Oh,œ Hisœ loveœ . forœ . me.œ . Oh,œ Hisœ

Chorus 14 Ebm Db Cb Gb b b & b b bb ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . | . | . P bb b b ‰ ‰ & b b œ œ œ . œ . œ . œ œ loveœ . forœ . me.œ . Who the Son sets free, oh, is

18 Db Ebm Db Cb b b & b b bb | . | . Û . Û . | .

bb b b ‰ œ œ . ‰ œ œ & b b œ . œ . œ . œ œ . œ J free in - deed. I'm a child of God, yes I

213

WHO YOU SAY I AM (HILLSONG WORSHIP VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 2 of 4

Verse 22 Gb Gb b b œ œ œ œ œ œ & b b bb œ œ œ œ œ œ ’ . ’ . F b b bb b œ œ Œ . ∑ ‰ & b œ œ œ œ œ œ am. 2. Free at last, Heœ has

25 Ebm Db Gb b b & b b bb ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

b b bb b ‰ Œ . ‰ . j & b œ . œ . j j œ . œ œ ran - somed me.œ Hisœ graceœ . runsœ . deep.œ . While I wasœ a

29 Gb Ebm Db Cb Ebm Db b b & b b bb ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

b b bb b ‰ œ œ . œ . & b œ . œ . œ slave to sin,œ Jeœ - susœ diedœ . forœ . me.œ . Yes, He died for

Chorus

C G D 33 b b b b b & b b bb Û Û Û Û Û Û ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . f bb b b ‰ ‰ & b b œ . œ œ œ . œ . œ . œ œ œ . œ . me. Who the Son sets free, oh, is free in -

37 Ebm Db Cb Gb b b œ œ œ & b b bb ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . œ œ œ

bb b b ‰ œ œ . ‰ œ œ œ Œ . & b b œ . œ œ . œ J œ œ deed. I'm a child of God, yes I am.

214

WHO YOU SAY I AM (HILLSONG WORSHIP VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 3 of 4

41 Gb Db b b œ œ œ & b b bb œ œ œ ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

bb b b Œ . ‰ ‰ ‰ œ & b b œ œ œ . œ . œ . œ œ œ . œ . œ . œ In my Fa - ther's house is a place for me. I'm a

46 Ebm Db Gb b b œ œ œ œ œ œ & b b bb ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . œ œ œ œ œ œ

bb b b œ . ‰ œ œ œ Œ . Œ . ‰ & b b œ . œ J œ œ œ œ child of God, yes I am. I am

Bridge 50 Ebm Db/F Gb Cb b b & b b bb . Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û

b b j & b b bb . œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . ‰ œ œ cho - sen, not for - sak - en. I am who You say I am. You are

1. 54 E m D /F G b b b Cb b b & b b bb Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û .

b b j j & b b bb œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . ‰ œ œ . for me, not a - gainst me. I am who You say I am. I am

2. 58 E m D /F Cb b b b b & b b bb Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û

bb b b ‰ ‰ j œ œ œ ‰ & b b œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ I am who You say I am. Who the

215

WHO YOU SAY I AM (HILLSONG WORSHIP VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 4 of 4

Chorus 61 Gb Db Ebm Db b b & b b bb ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ƒ bb b b ‰ ‰ œ œ . & b b œ . œ . œ . œ œ œ . œ . œ . œ œ . Son sets free, oh, is free in - deed. I'm a child of

66 Cb Gb Gb b b œ œ œ œ œ œ & b b bb ’ . ’ . œ œ œ œ œ œ ’ . ’ .

bb b b ‰ œ œ œ Œ . Œ . ‰ & b b œ J œ œ œ œ œ . œ . God, yes I am. In my Fa - ther's

70 Db Ebm Db Cb b b & b b bb ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ .

bb b b ‰ ‰ œ œ . ‰ œ œ & b b œ . œ œ œ . œ . œ . œ œ . œ J house is a place for me. I'm a child of God, yes I

Tag 75 Gb Gb b b œ œ œ œ œ œ & b b bb œ œ œ œ œ œ | . | .

bb b b œ Œ . Œ . ‰ ‰ & b b œ œ œ œ œ . œ . œ . œ œ am. In my Fa - ther's house is a

79 Db Ebm Db Cb Gb b b & b b bb | . | . Û . Û . | . | . p bb b b ‰ œ œ . ‰ œ œ œ Œ . & b b œ . œ . œ . œ œ . œ J œ œ place for me. I'm a child of God, yes I am.

216

WHO YOU SAY I AM Music and Lyrics by GOSPEL FUSION VERSION Ben Fielding & Reuben Morgan Arr. Tyler B. Williams

Bb Bb7 G m/Bb Bbaug Bb Bb7 G m/Bb Bbaug Ebm6/F b 6 y & b 8 . y y œ œ œ œ drum fill œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ F

Verse B G m7 F/A B E m/F F 13(b9) 5 b b b b & b ’ . Û ‰ ‰ ∑ ’ . ’ . ’ . Û Û SOLO J J œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ . bb ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . Œ . V J J 1. Who am I that the high - est King would wel - come me.

B G m7 F m7 E maj7 C m9 D m7 9 b b b & b ’ . Û ‰ ‰ ∑ ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . J

b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ . bœ œ œ . V b ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ . œ . œ œ . ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ I was lost, but He brought me in. Oh, His love for me. Oh, His love for

Chorus

E maj9 E /F B F D m7 14 b b b b & b Û Û Û Û ‰ ‰ ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . J

b œ . bœ œ V b œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ . œ . ‰ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . ‰ œ me. Who the Son sets free, oh, is free in - deed. I'm a

217

WHO YOU SAY I AM (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 2 of 10 Turn G m7 F E C m7/F E maj7/F B B 7 G m/B B aug 19 b b b b b b b . . . & b ’ ’ ’ Û Û œ œ œ œ œ œ J œ œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ . œ œ V b œ œ . œ œ œ . œ ‰ œ œ ˙ . ∑ child of God, yes I am.

Verse

B D 7(b9) C 7 B 7(b9) B 23 b b b bb œ œ Û Û Û Œ . & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ

b r œ œ œ œ œ œ V b ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∑ œ 3 Some-bod - y help me say, BGVs bb ∑ ∑ ‰ & œ œ œ œ œ œ 2. Free at last, He has

G m7 F/A B 26 b b bœ œ nœ œ & b Û Û Û Œ . ’ . ’ . œ b œ œ œ n #œ œ œ œ n œ œ œ #œ œ keys lick œ bœ b œ œ V b ∑ ∑ Œ . ≈ œ œ œ Oh,

bb ‰ j Œ . & œ . œ . j œ œ . . bœ ran - somed me.œ His grace runsœ œ deep.œ .

B B C7(#5#9) C 7(#5#9) D7(#5#9) G m7 F m7 E maj7 29 b b # b b > > > ˘ & b Û Û Û Œ . Û Û Û Û ‰ ‰ ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . J b œ œ œ œ œ V b œ . Œ . ∑ ∑ ≈ œ œ Oh, He died for me,

b j & b ‰ . ‰ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ . œ .bœ œ œ œ While I was a slave to sin,œ Jeœ - sus died for me.œ . Yes,œ Heœ

218

WHO YOU SAY I AM (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 3 of 10 Chorus C m9 B A maj7 A maj7 A 7(b9) B 33 b b b b œ . b & b Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û ‰ Û Û ’ . ’ . ’ . f œ b œ . œ œ . œ œ õ V b œ J ‰ ∑ ∑ yeah,

b b œ . œ . ‰ œ œ . œ . œ . ‰ œ & œ . œ . œ . œ œ œ . œ . œ . œ œ diedœ . for me. Who the Son sets free, oh,œ is

F D 7(#5) E maj7 D m7 C m7 E /F E maj7/F B B 7/D 37 b b b b b œ . œ . œ . œ b œ . œ œ œ œ œ & b ’ . ’ . ’ . Û Û J

b œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ V b ∑ ‰ œ œ . Œ . Œ . œ œ œ 3 I'm a child, yes I am.

b . œ . b œ . œ . œ . ‰ œ œ œ . œ . œ ‰ œ œ . œ ˙ . & œ . œ . œ . œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ . œ ˙ . free in - deed. I'm a child of God, yes I am.

E 7 E m7(b5) E /F B E m7(b5) C 7 42 b b b œ b œ œ œ œ œ & b œ . ’ . ’ . ‰ Û Û

œ bb œ . Œ . ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ . œ œ ‰ ‰ V J In my Fa - ther's house, yeah,

bb Œ . ‰ œ œ . œ . œ . ‰ œ & œ œ œ . œ . œ . œ œ In my Fa - ther's house there'sœ a

219

WHO YOU SAY I AM (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 4 of 10

F D 7(#5) E maj7 F/G C m7 E /F E maj7/F 45 b b b . œ . . b œ œ œ . & b ’ . ’ . ’ . Û Û J œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ V b ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ . Œ . there's a place for me, yeah, Yes I

b . œ . b œ . œ . œ . ‰ œ œ œ . œ . œ ‰ œ œ . œ & œ . œ . œ . œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ . œ place for me. I'm a child of God, yes I

B A 13 G 7 G 7 B /F G 7 E 9 D7(#5#9) 49 b b b b b œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & b SOLO bb œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ . œ ‰ ‰ Œ . Œ . ‰ œ œ V J am. Oh. I am

bb ˙ . ∑ ∑ ∑ & ˙ . am.

Bridge G m7 F/A B B /D E 53 b b b b & b ˙ . | . Û . Û . | . keys / loop only p b œ œ œ V b œ . œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ . ‰ œ œ cho - sen, not for - sak - en. I am who You say I am. You are

G m7 F/A B B /D E 57 b b b b & b | . | . Û . Û . | .

bb œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œœ . V J œ J œ for me, not a - gainst me. I am who You say I am. You say, BGVs b & b ∑ ∑ ∑ Œ . ‰ œI amœ

220

WHO YOU SAY I AM (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 5 of 10

Bridge G m7 F/A A m7(b5) D 7(b9) G m7 F m9 61 b > & b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ‰ Û band in, lightly P . b j . œ œ . œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . V b œ ‰ ‰ Œ ‰ ‰ J œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ ‰ I am, oh,

bb ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ & j œ œ œ choœ œ- sen,œ notœ forœ - sakœ œ- en.œ œI am who You sayœ œI œam. œ . Youœ areœ

E maj9 D7(#5#9) G7(#5#9) C m9 D m7 E maj7 /E /F D 7/F 65 b b # Bb A b & b ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . Û Û Û Û Û Û

b œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ V b ∑ ‰ ‰ œœ ∑ J I am, Sing it a-gain, say,

bb ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ œ œ & j œ œ œ œ œ forœ œ me,œ notœ œa - gainstœ œ me.œ œI am who You sayœ œI œam. œ . I am

Bridge G m7 D7(#5#9)/F B /F D7(#5#9) G m7 B /F 69 # b b b œ . œ . & b œ . ’ . œ . ’ . œ . ‰ Û F b œ œ œ . œ œ œ V b ∑ ‰ ‰ œ œ ∑ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ I am, yeah, 3 j bb œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . ‰ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ cho - sen, not for - sak - en. I am who You say I am. œ You are

221

WHO YOU SAY I AM (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 6 of 10

C 7/E E m6 B /D E m6 73 b b b b œ . bœ . œ . œ . & b ’ . ’ . œ . ’ .

œ b . œ œ œ œ œ œ . . œ V b œ œ ‰ Œ ‰ ‰ J J œ Œ ‰ œ œ J I am, said, I am,

b j j b œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ œ & nœ œ œ œ Abœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ . œ for me,J not a - gainst Jme. I am who You say I am. I

"I Am Who You Say" 6 B /F A maj7 E 9 B /F G m7 77 b b b b œ . b œ . œ . & b ’ . Û Û Û ’ . Û Û Û ’ . f b œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ V b œ œ Œ . ‰ Œ . ‰ œ œ œ œ œœ oh, I am. You said, I am, 3 j j bb œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ am who You say I am. œ I am who You say I am. I

C m9 E m6 B /F G m7 81 b b b & b Û Û Û ’ . Û Û Û ’ . Û Û Û ’ . Û Û Û ’ .

b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ V b œ Œ . ‰ ‰ J ‰ Œ . ‰ œ œ œ J 3 yeah, You said, 'cause I am,

b j j b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . ‰ ‰ œ & œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ am who You say I am. I am who You say I am. I

222

WHO YOU SAY I AM (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 7 of 10 "Yes I Am!"

C m D m7 E m6 A 13 A 13 B 13 B 7/D E 7 E dim7 85 b b b b b b ˘ > ˘ & b Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ Û Û ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ Û J J J J J ƒ b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ bœ bœ . œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ V b ∑ ‰ Œ . œ œ œ . come on say it, Yes I am! Oh, yes I am,

b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . Œ . œ œ œ Œ . œ œ œ Œ . & œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ . am who You say I am. Yes I am! Yes I am!

B /F G7(#5#9) C 7(b9) E 13 F 9 B 13 B 7/D E 7 E dim7 89 b b b b b ˘ > ˘ & b Û ‰ ‰ Û . Û . Û Û Û ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ Û Û ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ Û J J J J J J b bœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ b œ . bœ ‰ ‰ ‰ bœ bœ ‰ ≈ bœ œ œ œ ‰ V œ œ bœ Oh, I'm a child of God, I am cho - sen by You, Lord,

b & b œ œ œ Œ . œ œ œ Œ . œ œ œ Œ . œ œ œ Œ . Yes I am! Yes I am! Yes I am! Yes I am!

B /F A 9 G 7(#9) F dim7 F 7sus B 7 B 7/D 93 b b # # b ˘ > # ## ˘ & b Û ‰ ‰ Û . Û . Û Û # # Û ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ Û J J J J œ œ œ œ nœ . œ #œ nœ # # œ œ œ œ œnœ œ bb ‰ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ . nœ nœ # # ‰ ‰ J V R # 3 Yeah, some - bod - y sing it with me, say! You thought of me,

b # ## & b œ œ œ Œ . œ œ œ Œ . # # Nœ œ œ Œ . Yes I am! Yes I am! Yes I am!

223

WHO YOU SAY I AM (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 8 of 10

E 7 F dim7 B/F G 7(b9) C 7(b9) E m/F 96 # # # # # ## & # # Û ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ Û Û ‰ ‰ Û . Û . Û . J J J # # œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ nœ œ . nœ #œ # # œ œ ‰ nœ . œ œ œ œ œnœ œ œ V # 3 3 on Cal - va - ry, You bled and You died for me, oh,

# ## & # # œ œ œ Œ . œ œ œ Œ . œ œ œ Œ . Yes I am! Yes I am! Yes I am!

B dim7 B 7 D 7 D 7 E 7 C m7 D m7 E maj7 99 # # # # ## > ˘ > > ˘ & # # ‰ Û Û ‰ Û Û Û ‰ ‰ Œ . Û Û Û Û J J J # # œ nœ #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ # # œ œnœ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ V # 3 3 hey! Sing it out with me, yeah!

# ## & # # œ œ œ Œ . œ œ œ Œ . œ œ œ Œ . Yes I am! Yes I am! Yes I am!

Chorus F dim7 F 13 G 13 G 13 A 13 A 13 B /D B dim/D C dim7 B C m7 D dim7 B/D E 7 F dim7 102 # # # # # # # œ . # ## & # # Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û

# ## œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ y œ V # # œ ‰ Œ . ‰ J ‰ Œ . ‰ œ Hey! Oh, is

# # # ## Œ . ‰ œ œ . œ . œ . ‰ œ & œ œ œ . œ . œ . œ œ Who the Son sets free, oh,œ is

224

WHO YOU SAY I AM (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 9 of 10

F 7 F 7 /F /E D 7(#5) E maj7 F /G C m7 E/F E maj7/F 105 # # # # # # # # # œ . œ . œ . œ . ## # . œ . & # ’ œ œ #œ Û Û #œ n œ œ . J

# ## œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . V # # J œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ . ‰ ‰ J œ œ . œ 3 3 free, in - deed. I am. Hey!

# # . œ . # ## œ . œ . œ . ‰ œ œ œ . œ . œ ‰ œ œ . œ & œ . œ . œ . œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ . œ free in - deed. I'm a child of God, yes I

B A 7 G 7 G 7(#5) F 7sus B 109 # # œ œ œ . # ## œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & # # ’ . ’ . ’ .

# ## # j . . œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . . œ œ œ œ . œ . œ V # œ ‰ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ ‰ R œ In my Fa-ther's house, oh, there's a place,

# # # ## ˙ . Œ . ‰ œ œ . œ . œ . ‰ œ & ˙ . œ œ œ . œ . œ . œ œ am. In my Fa - ther's house there'sœ a

D 7 G m7 F m7 E maj7 C m7/F C m9 113 # # # # # # œ . œ . nœ . # ## œ . & # # ’ . ’ . ’ . Û Û J # # ‹œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ # # œ . œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ . œœ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ V # 3 I'm a child, hey, yes I 3

# # # # œ . œ . œ . ‰ œ œ œ . œ . œ ‰ œ œ . œ & # ‹œ . œ . ‹œ . œ œ œ . nœ . œ œ œ . œ place for me. I'm a child of God, yes I

225

WHO YOU SAY I AM (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 10 of 10

B B 7 G m/B B aug B G 7 E 9 D 7(#5#9) 117 # # # œ œ œ œ # ## œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & # #

# ## œ œ œ . œ . œ œ . j V # # ˙ . Œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ am. Yes I am, Lord. In my

# # # ## ˙ . ˙ . ∑ ∑ & ˙ . ˙ . am.

Tag G m7 F m9 F m7/B B aug/F 121 # # # # ## & # # | . | . | . Û . Û . p # ## œ œ œ . œ œ V # # œ . œ . œ . ‰ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ ‰ Fa - ther's house there's a place for me. I'm a

rit.

E maj7 D m7 C m7 E/F F 13 B 125 # # # # œ œ œ # ## U œ . & # # Û . Û . Û . Û Û Û . J # # U # # œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . V # J child of God, yes I am.

Appendix C: Additional Gospel Fusion Arrangements

Christ Be Magnified (Cody Carnes version) ...... 227

Christ Be Magnified (Gospel fusion version) ...... 233

Yes I Will (Vertical Worship version) ...... 243

Yes I Will (Gospel fusion version) ...... 246

226 227

CHRIST BE MAGNIFIED Music and Lyrics by CODY CARNES VERSION Cody Carnes, Ethan Hulse, &

72 q = Intro A 2 A D A D # ## 4 œ œ œ œ & 4 | œ œ w œ œ w p # # 4 & # 4 ∑ ∑ ∑ ∑ Ó Œ œ œ Were cre -

Verse 6 A5 D 2 A5 D 2 # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# ## œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ . Œ Œ œ œ . Œ Œ œ a - tion sud - den-ly ar - tic - u-late, with a thou - sand tongues to lift one cry, then from

10 A/C# D 2 A/E E(add4) A # # œ & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ

# # j # œ . œ œ . j j ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ Ó & œ œ . J œ œ œ J œ ˙ north to south and east to west, we’d hear "Christ be mag - ni - fied."

Verse 14 D A D 2 A A/C# # ## & w ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ P # # # Ó Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ & œ œ . J Were the whole earth ech - o - ing His em - i-nence, His name would burst from sea and

228

CHRIST BE MAGNIFIED (CODY CARNES VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 2 of 6

18 D 2 A/C# D 2 A/E E(add4) # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # j # œ Œ Œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ . j j ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ & œ . J œ œ . J œ œ œ J œ sky. From riv - ers to the moun - tain - tops, we’d hear "Christ be mag - ni - fied."

Chorus 22 A A A sus/B # ## & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’ F # # œ œ œ œ œ œ & # ˙ Ó ∑ ‰ . R œ O, Christ be mag - ni - fied,

25 D 2 E sus F#m7 E sus D 2 A A sus/B # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & # ‰ . R œ ‰ . R œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ Œ ‰ . R œ let His praise a - rise, Christ be mag - ni - fied in me. O, Christ be mag - ni - fied,

29 D 2 E sus F#m7 E sus D 2 # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & # ≈ œ œ œ ‰ . R œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ Œ from the al - tar of my life, Christ be mag - ni - fied in me.

Verse

32 A E D A5 D 2 # ## œ œ & œ œ w ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ F # # j œ r & # ∑ Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . Œ ‰ . œ œ œ When eve - ry crea - ture finds its in - most mel - o - dy, and eve - ry

229

CHRIST BE MAGNIFIED (CODY CARNES VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 3 of 6

36 A5 A/C# D 2 A/C# D 2 # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # j j # œ œ œ . œ œ . œ Œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ . j j ‰ œ & œ œ œ œ œ . J œ œ œ hu - man heart its na - tive cry, O then in one en - rap - tured of praise, we’ll sing

Chorus 40 A/E E(add4) D 2 A A sus/B # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ f # ## œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ & J œ œ ˙ ≈ ≈ J Œ ‰ R "Christ be mag - ni - fied." O, be lift - ed high, Je - sus! O, Christ be mag - ni - fied,

44 D 2 E sus F#m7 E sus D 2 A A sus/B # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & # ‰ . R œ ‰ . R œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ Œ ‰ . R œ let His praise a - rise, Christ be mag - ni - fied in me. O, Christ be mag - ni - fied,

48 D 2 E sus F#m7 E sus D 2 # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & # ≈ œ œ œ ‰ . R œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ Œ from the al - tar of my life, Christ be mag - ni - fied in me.

Inst. Bridge 51 D E(add4) F#m7 A/C# D # # & # | | | | | P # # # ∑ ∑ ∑ Ó Œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & R œ . œ I won’t bow to i - dols, I’ll stand strong

230

CHRIST BE MAGNIFIED (CODY CARNES VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 4 of 6

56 E(add4) F#m7 # # & # | |

# # œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ & J œ and wor - ship You. If it puts me in the fi - re, I’ll re - joice

58 A/C# D # # & # | ’ ’ ’ ’

# # œ œ œ œ # œ œ œ ‰ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ & J ‘cause You’re there too. I won’t be formed by feel - ings, I hold fast

60 E(add4) F#m7 # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # # œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ & œ œ œ œ to what is true. If the cross brings trans - for - ma - tion, then I’ll be cru -

Bridge 62 A/C# D # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ F # # œ œ œ œ & # œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ - ci - fied with You. 'Cause death is just the door - way in - to res -

64 E(add4) F#m7 # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ & J œ - ur - rec - tion life. If I join You in Your suf - f'rings, then I’ll join

231

CHRIST BE MAGNIFIED (CODY CARNES VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 5 of 6

66 A/C# D # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ & J You when You rise. And when You re - turn in glo - ry, with all the an -

68 E(add4) F#m7 # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & # œ ≈ œ . ≈ - gels and the saints, my heart will still be sing - ing, my song

Chorus

70 E sus A A sus/B D 2 E sus # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ f # # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & # œ Œ ‰ . R œ ‰ . R œ will be the same. O, Christ be mag - ni - fied, let His praise a - rise,

73 F#m7 E sus D 2 A A sus/B # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & # ‰ . R œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ Œ ‰ . R œ Christ be mag - ni - fied in me. O, Christ be mag - ni - fied,

76 D 2 E sus F#m7 E sus D 2 # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & # ≈ œ œ œ ‰ . R œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ Œ from the al - tar of my life, Christ be mag - ni - fied in me.

232

CHRIST BE MAGNIFIED (CODY CARNES VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 6 of 6

Chorus 79 A A sus/B D 2 E sus F#m7 E sus # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & # ‰ . R œ ‰ . R œ ‰ . R œ œ œ O, Christ be mag - ni - fied, let His praise a - rise, Christ be mag - ni - fied

82 D 2 A/E F#m7 # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & # œ œ . œ œ Œ ‰ . R œ ≈ œ œ œ in me. O, Christ be mag - ni - fied, from the al - tar of my life,

85 A/C# E sus D 2 A # # U & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ |

# # œ œ œ œ & # ‰ . R œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ Œ ∑ Christ be mag - ni - fied in me.

233

CHRIST BE MAGNIFIED Music and Lyrics by GOSPEL FUSION VERSION Cody Carnes, Ethan Hulse, & Cory Asbury Arr. Tyler B. Williams

77 Intro q = A C#m7 D F maj7(#5) ? # # 4 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # 4 œ & ’ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ f

Verse 3 F#m7 C#m7 D D/E A C#m7 # # œ œ ˘ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Û Û Û Û Û Œ & œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ ’ SOLO F # # œ V # ∑ Ó Œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ Were cre - a - tion sud - den-ly ar - tic -

6 D A C#m7 D A/C# # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # j # œ j ‰ Œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ Œ Œ œ œ . ‰ œ V œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J u-late, with a thou - sand tongues to lift one cry, then from north to south and

10 D maj7 A/E D maj7/E B m/E A C#m7 # # œ œ # ≈ œ œ œ œ œ & ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ f # # # œ . j j ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ Ó V œ œ œ J œ œ ˙ east to west, we’d hear "Christ be mag - ni - fied."

234

CHRIST BE MAGNIFIED (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 2 of 10

Verse 13 D D/E A C#m7 D # # ˘ & # Û Û Û Û Û Œ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ keys staccato 8ths F # # # Ó Œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ ‰ œ V œ œ œ œ J Were the whole earth ech - o - ing His em - i - nence, His

16 A C#m7 D A/C# D maj7 # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # j # œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ Œ Œ ‰ œ œ . ‰ œ œ . j j ‰ œ V œ . J œ œ J œ œ œ name would burst from sea and sky. From riv - ers to the moun - tain - tops, we’d hear

A/E D maj7/E B m/E A C m7 D A/C B m7 D/E 20 # # n œ œ # # œ œ œ n œ œ œ # ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ & ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ œ

# # # œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ Ó ∑ V J œ œ ˙ "Christ be mag - ni - fied."

Chorus 23 A A/C# D maj9 F maj7(#5) F#m7 E # # œ & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ f # # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ V # ‰ . R œ œ ‰ . R œ œ ‰ . R œ œ œ œ O, Christ be mag - ni - fied, let His praise a - rise, Christ be mag - ni - fied

26 D A/C# B m7 D/E A A/C# D maj9 G#m7(b5) C#7(#5#9) # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ V # œ ‰ œ . œ œ Œ ‰ . R œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ in me. O, Christ be mag - ni - fied, from the al - tar of my life,

235

CHRIST BE MAGNIFIED (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 3 of 10

29 F#m7 E D A/C# B m7 D/E A C#m7 # # œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ V # œ œ ‰ . R œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ Œ Ó ‰ J œ œ Christ be mag - ni - fied in me. Oh,

32 D F maj7(#5) F#m7 C#m7 D D/E # # œ œ œ œ ˘ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Û Û Û Û Û Œ & œ œ œ œ œ

# ## . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ j œ V œ œ Œ ‰ R œ Œ ‰ J œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ 3 Oh, Yeah, When eve - ry

Verse 35 A C#m7 D A C#m7 # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ keys staccato 8ths F # # r # œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ . œ œ œ ‰ œ . œ œ œ œ V œ œ œ œ J crea - ture finds its in - most mel - o - dy, and eve - ry hu - man heart its na - tive

38 D maj7 C#7(#5#9) F#m7 E m9 G/A D maj7 D#m7(b5) B 9 A/E D maj7/E B m/E # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # j œ œ . j # œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . j ‰ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ V œ . œ . œœ J œ œ œ J cry, O then in one en - rap - tured hymn of praise, we’ll sing "Christ be mag - ni - fied."

236

CHRIST BE MAGNIFIED (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 4 of 10

D D A/C B m7 D/E 42 # œ œ œ œ # # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ V # œ Œ Ó ≈ œ œ œ O, be lift - ed high,

Mag - ni - fied, mag - ni - fied! Œ ‰ . # # r & # œ œ œ . œ œ œœ œœ ˙˙ . ‰ œ œœ œœ œ . œ œ œ œ ˙ . BGVs œ œ œ Be mag - ni - fied, mag - ni - fied! # # # œ œ . œ œ ˙ . V œ œ . œ œ œ Mag - ni - fied, mag - ni - fied!

Chorus A 44 œ A/C# D maj9 F maj7(#5) F#m7 E # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ f # # œ œ œ œ œ V # Œ Ó Œ Ó Œ ‰ . R œ œ œ œ O, yeah, Christ be mag - ni - fied # # r r r & # œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ O, Christ be mag - ni - fied, let His praise a - rise, Christ be mag - niœ - œfied

47 D A/C# B m7 D/E A A/C# D maj9 G#m7(b5) C#7(#5#9) # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ V # œ ‰ œ . œ œ Œ ‰ . R œ Œ Ó in me. O, Christ be mag - ni - fied, r # # œ & # œ . œ œ Œ œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ in œ me.œ O, Christ be mag - ni - fied, from the al - tar of my life,

237

CHRIST BE MAGNIFIED (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 5 of 10

Inst. 50 F#m7 E D A/C# B m7 D/E D maj7 # # œ & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ œ . œ œ œ ˙ P # # œ œ œ œ .nœ œ œ . V # ‰ œ Ó Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . Œ Ó Come on! Ooh, # # r & # œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ Œ ∑ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ Christ be mag - niœ - œfied œ in œ me.œ

53 C#7(#5#9) F#m9 E m7 G/A # # œ œ œ . œ œ œ . & # œ . œ œ œ ˙ œ . œ œ œ ˙ œ œ

# # r œ œ œ œ V # Ó ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ Ó œ œ œ .nœ œ œ œ Oh, ooh, ooh, oh,

56 D maj7 C#7(#5#9) F#m9 # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # j r V # Ó ‰ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ Ó Œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Be mag - ni - fied, Mmm,

59 E m7 G/A D maj7 C#7(#5#9) # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ | | drums continue lightly P # # # œ . œ œ . œ Œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ V R J Mmm, I won’t bow to i - dols, I’ll stand strong and wor - ship You. If it puts

238

CHRIST BE MAGNIFIED (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 6 of 10

62 F#m9 E m7 G/A A 7 # # & # | | Û Û

# # œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ V J me in the fi - re, I’ll re - joice ‘cause You’re there too. I won’t

64 D maj7 C#7(#5#9) # # & # | |

# # œ V # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ ≈ œ œ œ be formed by feel - ings, I hold fast to what is true. If the cross

66 F#m9 E m7 B 2/D# # # & # | | |

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ V # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ brings trans - for - ma - tion, then I’ll be cru - ci - fied with You. 'Cause death

68 D maj7 C#7(#5#9) F#m9 # # & # ’ ’ ’ Û . Û ’ ’ ’ Û . Û F # # # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ V J is just the door - way in - to res - ur - rec - tion life. If I join # # # Œ j ‰ & ˙ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ Ooh, Ooh, œ

239

CHRIST BE MAGNIFIED (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 7 of 10

70 E m7 G/A F#/A D maj7 # # & # ’ ’ ’ Û . Û ’ ’ ’ Û . Û

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ V J You in Your suf - f'ring, then I’ll join You when You rise. And when You # # & # ≈ j ‰ ˙ . œ nœ œ œ œ aœ œ œ œ . œ Ooh, œ nœ œ #œOoh,. nœ

72 D m(maj7) C#m7 F#m7 G maj7 # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ V # ≈ œ œ œ J ‰ ≈ re - turn in glo - ry, with all the an - gels and the saints, my heart # ## & œ œ œ . œ œ ≈ œ œ œœ œœ œ œ . œœ œœ œœ . œ œ œ . œœ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ . nœ œ œ . œ œ œ . then my heart,

Chorus 74 D A/C# B m7 D/E A A/C# # # & # | ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ f # # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ V # y . ≈ œ œ Œ Ó will still be sing - ing, my song will be the same. O, r # # œ & # ˙ . Œ œ œ œ œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙˙ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ . œO, œ Christ be mag - ni - fied,

240

CHRIST BE MAGNIFIED (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 8 of 10

77 D maj9 F maj7(#5) F#m7 E D A/C# B m7 D/E # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # œ œ œ # ‰ œ Ó Œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Œ œ V R œ œ œ œ œ Come on! Christ be mag - ni - fied, help me sing,

# # r r & # œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ let His praise a - rise, Christ be mag - niœ - œfied œ in œ me.œ

80 A A/C# D maj9 G#m7(b5) C#7(#5#9) # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

# # œ œ . œ . nœ œ œ œ V # œ Œ Œ œ Ó O, yeah, Oh,

r # # œ & # œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ O, Christ be mag - ni - fied, from the al - tar of my life,

82 F#m7 E D A/C# B m7 D/E A maj7 # # > & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ Û . Û

# # œ . nœ œ œ V # ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ ∑ Oh,

# # r j & # œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ ‰ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ Christ be mag - niœ - œfied œ in œ œme. And O,

241

CHRIST BE MAGNIFIED (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 9 of 10

Chorus 84 A 13 D maj9 F maj7(#5) F#m7 (bass gtr.) E D # # > ˘ ? œ # Û Û Û Œ Û . Û œ œ œ & Û . Û & ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ # # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ V # Œ ‰ . R œ Œ Œ ‰ . R ‰ Œ Christ be mag - ni - fied, Oh! # # r r r & # œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ õ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Christ be mag - ni - fied, let His praise a - rise, Christ be mag - niœ - œfied

F maj7 C maj7 Bbmaj7 A maj7 Eb7 87 # # >œ n œ œ >œ n œ œ >œ . > ˘ & # Û ‰ Û Û Û Û Û Û ‰ Œ Û J J

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ V # Œ nœ œ œ . õ ‰ . R œ œ in me, and O, Christ be mag - ni - fied, r # # j œ . & # ‰ œ . nœ œ œ . #œ œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ . œ œ nœ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ in œ me,œ and O, Christ be mag - ni - fied,

89 D maj9 D#dim7 F dim7 F#m7 E # # & # ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’ ’

œ œ # # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ V # ≈ õ ‰ . R œ œ œ œ from the al - tar of my life, Christ be mag - ni - fied # # r & # œ Œ œ œœ . œœ œœ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ nnœ . #œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Ooh, my life, Christ be mag - niœ - œfied

242

CHRIST BE MAGNIFIED (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 10 of 10

Outro D A/C B m7 D/E A C m7 D F maj7(#5) 91 # # # œ œ ## œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & ’ ’ ’ ’ œ œ œ

# # # œ œ . œ œ œ œ . Ó ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œ œ œ œ V R J in me. Oh, Oh, # # & # œ . œ œ Œ ∑ ∑ œ œ . œ œ œ in œ me.œ

F m7 C m7 D A/C B m7 D/E A 94 # # #

# # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ U # œ œ œ œ œ n œ & œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ w

# ## œ nœ œ œ œ œ . nœ V œ œ œ œ Ó ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ∑ ooh, ooh. # # & # ∑ ∑ ∑

243

YES I WILL Music and Lyrics by VERTICAL WORSHIP VERSION Eddie Hoagland, Jonathan Smith, &

75 Intro q = F C G A m F C G A m 4 & 4 œ . œ œ œ ˙ œ . œ œ œ ˙ œ . œ œ œ ˙ œ . œ œ œ ˙ P 4 j & 4 ∑ ∑ ∑ Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ I count on one

Verse 5 F C G A m F C G A m

& . ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’

. œ Œ Œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J J œ thing, the same God that nev-er fails will not fail me now, You won't fail me now. In the wait-

9 F C G A m F C G A m

& ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’

r œ Œ Œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J J - ing, the same God who's nev-er late is work-ing all things out, is work-ing all things out.

Chorus

13 F C G A m F C C/G G

& ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ F œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ & J ‰ œ Yes, I will lift You high in the low - est val - ley. Yes, I will bless Your name. Oh,

244

YES I WILL (VERTICAL WORSHIP VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 2 of 3

17 F C G A m F C

& ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’

œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ‰ œ yes, I will sing for joy when my heart is heav - y. All my days, oh

1. 20 G A m F C G A m F C G A m j Û Û œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ Ó . & ’ ’ ’ œ œ ˙ J œ J œ œ ˙ J œ

œ œ j & œ Œ ∑ ∑ ∑ Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ . yes, I will. I count on one

Bridge 2. 25 G A m F C G A m F C

& ’ Û Û ’ ’ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û . ’ Û Û ’ ’ f œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . ˙ . ‰ œ œ & œ 3 . yes, I will. For all my days, oh yes, I will. I choose to praise, to glo -

29 G A m F C C/G G

& ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û Û ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ .

œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . & 3 R 3 - ri - fy, glo - ri - fy the name of all names that noth-ing can stand a - gainst. And I choose to

32 N.C.

& ∑ ∑ ∑ drums only

˙ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ . œ & 3 R praise, to glo - ri - fy, glo - ri - fy the name of all names that

245

YES I WILL (VERTICAL WORSHIP VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 3 of 3

35 F/C C G/B A m

& ∑ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û F œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ ˙ . ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & 3 œ 3 noth-ing can stand a - gainst. And I choose to praise, to glo - ri - fy, glo - ri - fy the name of all

Chorus

38 F C C/G G F C

& Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û ’ Û Û ’ ’ f œ œ ˙ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & R J names that noth-ing can stand a - gainst. And yes, I will lift You high

41 G A m F C C/G G

& ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û Û ’

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ & J ‰ œ in the low - est val - ley. Yes, I will bless Your name. Oh,

44 F C G A m F C G A m

& ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’

œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ yes, I will sing for joy when my heart is heav - y. All my days, oh yes, I will. For

48 F C G A m F C G C U & ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ Û . Û | | | J

œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ ‰ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ . Œ œ Œ all my days, oh yes, I will. For all my days, yes, I will.

246

YES I WILL Music and Lyrics by GOSPEL FUSION VERSION Eddie Hoagland, Jonathan Smith, & Mia Fieldes Arr. Tyler B. Williams

75 Intro q = F C G A m7 F C G A m7 œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ? 4 œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ 4 œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ Ó & P SOLO 4 j V 4 ∑ ∑ ∑ Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ I count on one

Verse

5 F C G A m7 F C

& ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’

j V œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ thing, the same God who nev - er fails will not fail me now, You won't fail

8 G A m7 F C G A m7

& ’ Û Û ’ ’ œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ œ

œ œ œ ‰ Œ œ œ œ . œ œ ≈ V œ œ J J œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ me now. In the wait - ing, the same God who's nev - er late is work - ing all

Chorus

11 F C G A m7 F C ˘ & ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û Û Û Û ‰ œ œ œ ’ ’ J œ F ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ . Œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ V œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J œ things out, You're work - ing all things out. Yes, I will lift You high

247

YES I WILL (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 2 of 10

14 G A m7 F C A m7 G

& ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ V ‰ œ œ . œ œ œ œ ≈ ‰ œ œ in the low - est val - ley. Yes, I will bless Your name. Oh,

17 F C G A m7 F C

& œ œ œ ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ œ

œ œ . œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ V œ J œ œ yes, I will sing for joy when my heart is heav - y. All my days, oh

20 G A m7 E A m7 F C G A m7 F C ˘ œ & Û Û Û Û Û Û ‰ ’ œ ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ œ œ ’ ’ J j œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ ‰ Œ ‰ œ œ . œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ V œ J R œ œ R yes, I will. Yeah, Yes, I will, yes, I will. Oh, ooh.

Verse

24 G A m7 F C G A m7 ˘ & Û . Û Û Û Ó ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ P

œ œ r r œ œ œ Ó Œ ‰ œ œ Œ ‰ . œ œ œ Œ V J œ œ œ œ œ œ Mmm, Who nev - er fails, BGVs j j j & Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ I count on one thing, the same God who nev - er fails will not fail

248

YES I WILL (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 3 of 10

27 F C G A m7 F C œ œ œ & ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ œ ’ ’

œ ∑ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ Ó V J J You're nev - er fail - ing me.

j ‰ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ j ‰ œ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ me now, You won't fail me now. In the wait - ing, the same God

30 G A m7 F C G A m7 œ œ ˘ & ’ Û Û ’ ’ œ œ ’ ’ Û Û Û Û Û

œ œ Œ ‰ œ œ ∑ Œ ‰ œ œ œ . œœ V J œ œ œ J Mmm, Yes, I will!

œ & œ . œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ who's nev - er late is work - ing all things out, You'reœ workœ - ing all things out!

Chorus

33 F C G A m7 F C œ œ œ & œ ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ f œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ V œ . œ Œ Ó Ó Œ œ œ œ Ó In the low - est val - ley,

j j & œ œ . œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Yes, I will lift You high in the low - est val - ley. Yes, I will bless Your name.

249

YES I WILL (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 4 of 10

36 A m7 G F C G A m7 œ œ œ & ’ Û Û ’ ’ œ ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’

œ . Ó Œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Ó Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ œ V œ J Yeah, oh, Oh, whoa, ooh,

j j j & œ . œ œ Œ œ œ . œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . yes, I will sing for joy when my heart is heav - y.

39 F C G A m7 F C

& ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ V Œ Ó Ó ‰ . R œ œ Ó For all my days,

j & œ œ œ Œ œ œ . œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ All my days, yes, I will. For all my days,

42 G A m7 F C G A m7 œ œ œ & Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û œ ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’

œ . œ œ .bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Ó ≈ J œ œ œ . œ Œ ‰ . œ œ œ bœ œ œ V 3 R œ Oh, oh, BGVs ad lib. j œ œ œ . œ w œ œ ∑ & œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ ˙ J yes, I will.

250

YES I WILL (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 5 of 10

45 F C G A m7 N.C. F C œ œ œ œ œ & œ ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ œ ’ ’ œ œ œ œ œ

œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ ‰ œ œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ Œ V J oh, for all my days, for all my days, I am Yours.

48 G A m7 F C G

& ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ |

SOLO œ ‰ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ . œœ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ œ œ V J œ J œ œ œ 3 Yeah, come on, yeah, I choose to

Bridge

51 F C G A m7 F C

& Û . Û | Û . Û | Û . Û | J J J

p r r œ œ . œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ . œ V 3 R praise, to glo - ri - fy, glo - ri - fy the name of all names that

Bridge

54 A m7 G C/E F C G A m

& Û . Û Û Û ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ J P œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ V œ œ Ó œ œ œ œ Œ noth-ing can stand a- gainst, oh, help me sing, I choose to praise, BGVs 3 3 & Ó Œ ‰ œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ I choose to praise, to glo - ri-fy, glo - ri- fy the name of all

251

YES I WILL (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 6 of 10 Bridge

57 F C A m7 G C/E F C/E D C

& ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û F Œ ‰ œ œ ‰ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ Ó ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ V J œ R Yeah, come on, oh, ooh, 3 ‰ . r j ‰ ‰ & œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ names that noth-ing can stand a - gainst. œI choose to praise, to glo -

60 G/B A m7 G F C A m7 G C/G D m/F C/E > > > Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û œ œ œ & 3

œ œ œ œ œ ∑ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ Ó ‰ J œ V R 3 oh, oh, I choose to 3 3 r j & œ œ œ œ œ ˙ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ - œri - œfy, œ glo -œri - fyœ theœ nameœ ofœ all names thatœ nothœ -ing can stand œa - gainst.œ œ I choose to

Bridge

D m9 A m11 C/A C/G C/E F maj7 C 63 b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ f œ .bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Ó ‰ J œ œ œ œ ‰ Œ Œ ‰ . œ V R praise! oh, that 3 j œ œ r & œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ praise, to glo - ri - fy, glo - ri - fy the name of all names that

252

YES I WILL (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 7 of 10

Chorus

66 A m7 G F C G A m7 ˘ œ œ œ & ’ Û Û Û Û Û Û Û ‰ œ ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ J ƒ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Ó ‰ . œ œ œ Ó Œ V R noth-ing can stand a - gainst. Yeah, in the low-

j j & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ . œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . noth-ing can stand a - gainst. Yes, I will lift You high in the low - est val - ley.

69 F C A m7 G F#7(b5) F E 7 œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ ’ ’ ’ Û Û Û Û œ ’ ’

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ V Œ ∑ J ‰ - est val - ley, Yes, I will sing for joy

j r & œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Yes, I will bless Your name. Yes, I will sing for joy

A m7 G m9 B maj7/C F C/E G/B A m7 72 b œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’

œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ V J ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ Œ ‰ œ when my heart is heav - y. All my days, oh, yes I will!

œ œ œ j & œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ Œ œ œ . œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ when my heart is heav - y. All my days, yes, I will. For

253

YES I WILL (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 8 of 10

Dropout

75 F C G A m7 F C G(add4) œ œ ˘y & œ œ ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’ Û . Û | | . subito J œ p œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ .bœ œ V Ó ≈ Œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ . ‰ œ œ œ Œ For all my days! For all my days, oh, yes, I will.

& œ œ œ Œ œ œ . œ œœ . ‰ ∑ ∑ œ œ œ œ œ . œ œœ . all my days, yes, I will. .

Yes F C G sus G A m F 79 œ œ œ œ œ œ J œ œ & Û Û ‰ ’ Û Û ’ ’ Û Û ‰ J ƒ œ œ œ œ . ∑ Œ œ œ ∑ V œ 3 My mind says, "Yes!" Yes, yes, yes, yes, ‰ j ‰ ˙ . j j œ j & ˙ œ œœ œ˙ . œ œ Œ ˙ . œ ˙ œ œ œ œ ˙ . ˙ œ œ œ œ œ œ Yes, yes,

G E m7 F 2 F C 2/E A m11 A m 82 œ œ œ J œ & ’ Û Û ’ ’ Û Û ‰ Û Û Û Û Û . J œ œ œ œ . bœ œ œ . œ Œ œ Œ Ó Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ œ V œ 3 J My heart says, "Yes!" Oh,

j j œ Œ ˙ œ œ œ . Œ & ˙œ . œ œ œ ˙ ˙ . ˙ œ œ œ œ ˙ yes, .

254

YES I WILL (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 9 of 10

85 Bbmaj7 F maj7 G 7sus C/E F C œ œ > > > œ œ œ œ œ & Û . Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û Û œ œ œ J

œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ . œ œ V Œ Ó Œ ‰ J œ Œ Ó Yes, I will. Yes, yes, . j ‰ j œ . œ œ œ ˙ . Œ ˙ . œ & œ . œ œ œ ˙ . ˙ œ œ œ œ œ yes. Yes,

G sus G G dim7 A m F E sus E A/C 88 # # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & ’ Û Û ’ ’ ’ Û Û ’ ’

r Ó ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ . œ Œ ∑ V 3 In my pain, I will praise. yes, yes, j ‰ j œ j j j & œ˙ . œ œ Œ ˙ . œ œ #œ #œ œ Œ ˙ . ˙ œ œ œ ˙ . œ œ yes,

D m7 D dim7 C 2/E A m11 A m B maj7 F maj7 91 # b œ œ œ œ œ 3 > > 4 & œ œ œ Û Û Û Û Û . 4 Û . Û Û 4 J J

3 4 V ∑ ∑ 4 ∑ 4

j 3 œ . 4 & ˙ œ œ œ œ ˙ . Œ 4 œ . œ œ 4 œ œ . œ œ ˙ œ œ yes. yes, œ ˙ .

255

YES I WILL (GOSPEL FUSION VERSION) - Lead/Rhythm - Page 10 of 10

Verse Tag

94 G 7sus F C G A m7 4 j & 4 | | œ . œ œ œ . œ ˙ œ . œ ˙ œ . œ ˙ p 4 V 4 ∑ Ó Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ . œ œ œ œ œ ≈ œ œ œ œ In the wait - ing, the same God who's nev -er late is work-ing all

4 w ∑ ∑ ∑ & 4 w

rit.

98 F C G A m7 U & Û . Û | Û . Û | J J U œ ≈ œ œ œ œ œ œ ˙ V œ œ œ œ œ œ J J things out, is work-ing all things out.

References

Allen, Ray. 1987. “Singing in the Spirit: Ethnography of Gospel Performance in ’s African-American Church Community.” PhD diss., University of Pennsylvania.

Backer, Matt. 2011. “The Guitar.” In The Cambridge Companion to Blues and Gospel Music, edited by Allan F. Moore. 116-129. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CCOL9780521806350.

Bethel Music. 2017. “King of My Heart (Live).” Track 6 on Starlight (Live). Bethel Music. Spotify streaming audio, 320 kbps.

Bethel Music and Leeland Mooring. 2016. “Lion and the Lamb.” Track 7 on Have It All (Live). Bethel Music. Spotify streaming audio, 320 kbps.

Boyer, Horace Clarence, and Deborah Smith Pollard. 2013. “Crouch, Andraé.” Grove Music Online. 16 October 2013. Accessed 29 March 2020. https://doi-org.bunchproxy.idm.oclc.org/10.1093/gmo/9781561592630.article. A2249246.

Boyer, Horace Clarence, and Harry Eskew. 2001. “Gospel Music.” The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, edited by Stanley Sadie. Volume 10: 172- 185. New York: Grove.

Bush, John. 2020. “Fred Hammond: Biography & History.” AllMusic. Accessed June 4, 2020. https://www.allmusic.com/artist/fred-hammond-mn0000148305/biography.

Butler, Melvin R. 2005. “Globalization of Gospel Music.” In Encyclopedia of American Gospel Music, edited by W.K. McNeil, 139-41. London: Taylor & Francis Group. Accessed May 16, 2020. ProQuest Ebook Central.

Carlin, Richard. 2005. “Guitar.” In Encyclopedia of American Gospel Music, edited by W.K. McNeil, 166-68. London: Taylor & Francis Group. Accessed May 16, 2020. ProQuest Ebook Central.

Carnes, Cody. 2020. “Christ Be Magnified.” Carnes Music Group LLC, under exclusive license to Capitol CMG / . Spotify streaming audio, 320 kbps.

256 257

Cox, Donna M. 2005. “Fred Hammond.” In Encyclopedia of American Gospel Music, edited by W.K. McNeil, 172-73. London: Taylor & Francis Group. Accessed May 16, 2020. ProQuest Ebook Central.

Clack, Cristabel. 2020. “Cristabel Clack.” Accessed May 17, 2020. http://www.cristabelclack.com

Curry, Devon. 2015. “In the Pocket: An Instruction in Contemporary Urban Gospel, R&B / Soul, and Jazz-Fusion Drumming.” Master’s thesis, Belmont University.

Cusic, Don. 2011. “The Development of Gospel Music.” In The Cambridge Companion to Blues and Gospel Music, edited by Allan F. Moore. 44-60. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CCOL9780521806350.

Darden, Robert. 2004. People Get Ready!: A New History of Black Gospel Music. New York: Continuum Press.

Darden, Robert. 2005. “Alex Bradford.” In Encyclopedia of American Gospel Music, edited by W.K. McNeil, 48-9. London: Taylor & Francis Group. Accessed May 16, 2020. ProQuest Ebook Central.

Darden, Robert. 2014. Nothing but Love in God’s Water. University Park, Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania State University Press.

Gersztyn, Bob. 2005a. “Andrae Crouch.” In Encyclopedia of American Gospel Music, edited by W.K. McNeil, 92-93. London: Taylor & Francis Group. Accessed May 16, 2020. ProQuest Ebook Central.

Gersztyn, Bob. 2005b. “Kirk Franklin.” In Encyclopedia of American Gospel Music, edited by W.K. McNeil, 132-33. London: Taylor & Francis Group. Accessed May 16, 2020. ProQuest Ebook Central.

Gress, Jesse. 2014. “Under Investigation: The Art of Reharmonization (with a Twist).” Guitar Player 48, no. 13: 84-90.

Hal Leonard. 2008. Music Dictionary: Paperback Lessons. Milwaukee: Hal Leonard Corporation.

Headlam, Dave. 2011. “Appropriations of Blues and Gospel in Popular Music.” In The Cambridge Companion to Blues and Gospel Music, edited by Allan F. Moore. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CCOL9780521806350.

Hillsong Worship. 2018. “Who You Say I Am.” Track 1 on There Is More (Studio Sessions). T/A Australia, under exclusive license to Capitol CMG, Inc. Spotify streaming audio, 320 kbps.

258

Hillsong Worship. 2019. “King of Kings.” Track 6 on Awake. Hillsong Church T/A Hillsong Music Australia, under exclusive license to Capitol CMG, Inc. Spotify streaming audio, 320 kbps.

Holland, M. Roger, II. 2014. “The Keys to Soulful Worship.” Pastoral Music 38, no. 5: 26-29.

Houchens, Wilton. 2013. “A Graduate Piano Recital: An Overview of Commercial Styles.” Master’s thesis, Belmont University.

Jabir, Johari. 2009. “On Conjuring Mahalia: Mahalia Jackson, , and the Sanctified Swing.” American Quarterly 61, no. 3: 649-69. http://www.jstor.org.bunchproxy.idm.oclc.org/stable/27735012.

Jefferson, Onaje. 2020. “Onaje. The Journey. The Calling.” Onaje Jefferson Music. https://www.onajejefferson.com/bio.

Jefferson, Thomas W. 2013. I Hear Music in the Air: Gospel-Style Piano Technique. Franklin Park, : World Library Publications.

Jungr, Barb. 2011. “Vocal Expression in the Blues and Gospel.” In The Cambridge Companion to Blues and Gospel Music, edited by Allan F. Moore. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CCOL9780521806350.

Kinchen, James Benjamin. 1986. “Black Gospel Music and Its Impact on Traditional Choral Singing.” The Choral Journal 27, no. 1: 11-19. Accessed May 28, 2020. www.jstor.org/stable/23547200.

Larkin, Colin. 2006. “Israel and New Breed.” Encyclopedia of Popular Music. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

LaRue, Jan. 1970. Guidelines for Style Analysis. New York: W.W. Norton.

Leeuw, Gerard van der. 1963. Sacred and Profane Beauty: The Holy in Art. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.

Maultsby, Portia K. 2010. From Jubilee to Hip Hop: Readings in African American Music. Edited by Kip Lornell, 173-187. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

McNeil, W.K. 2005a. “Charles Tindley.” In Encyclopedia of American Gospel Music, edited by W.K. McNeil, 400-01. London: Taylor & Francis Group. Accessed May 16, 2020. ProQuest Ebook Central.

McNeil, W.K. 2005b. “Isaac Watts.” In Encyclopedia of American Gospel Music, edited by W.K. McNeil, 419-20. London: Taylor & Francis Group. Accessed May 16, 2020. ProQuest Ebook Central.

259

McNeil, W.K. 2005c. “Tambourines.” In Encyclopedia of American Gospel Music, edited by W.K. McNeil, 394. London: Taylor & Francis Group. Accessed May 18, 2020. ProQuest Ebook Central.

Monger, James Christopher. 2020. “Tye Tribbett: Biography & History.” AllMusic. Accessed June 5, 2020. https://www.allmusic.com/artist/tye-tribbett- mn0000111969/biography.s

Passion & Sean Curran. 2017. “Worthy of Your Name.” Track 12 on Worthy of Your Name (Live). sixsteprecords / Sparrow Records. Spotify streaming audio, 320 kbps.

Pleasants, Henry, , and Roxanne R. Reed. 2013. “Jackson, Mahalia.” Grove Music Online. 16 October 2013. Accessed 29 March 2020. https://www-oxfordmusiconline-com.bunchproxy.idm.oclc.org/grovemusic/view/ 10.1093/gmo/9781561592630.001.0001/omo-9781561592630-e-1002249902.

Pollard, Deborah Smith. 2008. When the Church Becomes Your Party: Contemporary Gospel Music. African American Life Series. Detroit: Wayne State University Press.

Powell, Mark Allan. 2005. “Larnelle Harris.” In Encyclopedia of American Gospel Music, edited by W.K. McNeil, 176-77. London: Taylor & Francis Group. Accessed May 16, 2020. ProQuest Ebook Central.

Price, Emmett G, III. 2005. “Hezekiah Walker.” In Encyclopedia of American Gospel Music, edited by W.K. McNeil, 414. London: Taylor & Francis Group. Accessed May 16, 2020. ProQuest Ebook Central.

Randel, Don Michael. 2003. The Harvard Dictionary of Music. 4th ed. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.

The Recording Collective. 2017a. “Good Good Father” (feat. Onaje Jefferson). Track 4 on Gospel Vol. 2: Every Praise, The Recording Collective. Spotify streaming audio, 320 kbps.

The Recording Collective. 2017b. “King of My Heart” (feat. Cristabel Clack). Track 10 on Gospel Vol. 2: Every Praise, The Recording Collective. Spotify streaming audio, 320 kbps.

The Recording Collective. 2017c. “This Is Amazing Grace” (feat. Onaje Jefferson). Track 2 on Gospel Vol. 2: Every Praise, The Recording Collective. Spotify streaming audio, 320 kbps.

The Recording Collective. 2019. “Recordings as a Resource for Worship Leaders.” Accessed February 18, 2020. https://therecordingcollective.com/.

260

Reed, Teresa L. 2012. “Shared Possessions: Black Pentecostals, Afro-Caribbeans, and Sacred Music.” Black Music Research Journal 32, no. 1: 5-25.

Reich, Howard. 2010. Let Freedom Swing: Collected Writings on Jazz, Blues, and Gospel. Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press.

Robinson-Martin, Trineice. 2009. “Performance Styles and Musical Characteristics of Black Gospel Music.” Journal of Singing 65, no. 1 (May/June): 595-599.

Shearon, Stephen, Harry Eskew, James C. Downey, and Robert Darden. 2012. “Gospel music.” Grove Music Online. 10 July 2012. Accessed 19 February 2020. https://www.oxfordmusiconline.com/grovemusic/view/10.1093/gmo/9781561592 630.001.0001/omo-9781561592630-e-1002224388

Simmons-Hodo, Simmona E. 2005. “The Winans.” In Encyclopedia of American Gospel Music, edited by W.K. McNeil, 427-29. London: Taylor & Francis Group. Accessed May 16, 2020. ProQuest Ebook Central.

Sound Field. 2019. “What Makes Black Gospel Musicians So Skilled? (feat. Donald Lawrence and Tye Tribbett.” PBS. November 21, 2019. YouTube video, 15:56. https://youtu.be/kJ20nm_g3Uc

Tomlin, Chris. 2015. “Good Good Father.” Track 1 on Never Lose Sight. sixsteprecords / Sparrow Records. Spotify streaming audio, 320 kbps.

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. 2007. Sing to the Lord: Music in Divine Worship. Washington, D.C.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Vertical Worship. 2018. “Yes I Will.” Track 2 on Bright Faith Bold Future, Provident Label Group LLC, a unit of Sony Music Entertainment. Spotify streaming audio, 320 kbps.

Wickham, Phil. 2013. “This Is Amazing Grace.” Track 4 on The Ascension. Phil Wickham. Spotify streaming audio, 320 kbps.

Wilhoit, Mel R. 2005a. “Gospel Choirs.” In Encyclopedia of American Gospel Music, edited by W.K. McNeil, 144-47. London: Taylor & Francis Group. Accessed May 16, 2020. ProQuest Ebook Central.

Wilhoit, Mel R. 2005b. “Performance Styles.” In Encyclopedia of American Gospel Music, edited by W.K. McNeil, 293-94. London: Taylor & Francis Group. Accessed May 16, 2020. ProQuest Ebook Central.

Wilhoit, Mel R. 2005c. “Piano.” In Encyclopedia of American Gospel Music, edited by W.K. McNeil, 300-01. London: Taylor & Francis Group. Accessed May 16, 2020. ProQuest Ebook Central.

261

Wilson-Dickson, Andrew. 1992. The Story of Christian Music: From Gregorian to Black Gospel: An Authoritative Illustrated Guide to All the Major Traditions of Music for Worship. 1st ed. Oxford, England: Lion Publishing.

Wise, Raymond. 2002. “Defining African-American Gospel Music by Tracing its Historical and Musical Development from 1900 to 2000.” PhD diss., The Ohio State University.

York, Adrian. 2011. “Keyboard Techniques.” In The Cambridge Companion to Blues and Gospel music, edited by Allan F. Moore. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CCOL9780521806350.

Young, Alan. 1997. Woke Me Up This Morning: Black Gospel Singers and the Gospel Life. Jackson: University Press of .