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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-1001 (6) Introductory Anthropology (3 hrs and ANTH-1001 | ANTH-1002. Lecture) This course provides a general introduction to the four main branches of anthropology: archaeological, ANTH-2100 (3) Method and Theory in Cultural cultural, linguistic, and physical (biological). Topics include Anthropology (3 hrs Lecture) This core course surveys , the of culture and language, the the essentials of theory and method in the anthropological diversity of and societies and their ways of study of culture and society. It examines central concepts , and the causes and consequences of social and and perspectives in relation to their past development and cultural change. Some instructors may devote substantially current status, and their applications in ethnographic and more to certain topics than do others. Students are ethnological research. advised to consult with individual instructors for details. Requisite Courses: ANTH-1001(6), ANTH-1002(3) or Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course ANTH-1005(3) or permission of the instructor and ANTH-1002 | ANTH-1003 | ANTH-1005. [prerequisite(s)].

ANTH-1002 (3) Introductory Cultural Anthropology ANTH-2103 (3) Ethnography of North American First and Linguistics (3 hrs Lecture) This course is a general Peoples (3 hrs Lecture) This course surveys the cultures introduction to the comparative study of culture and and societies of Indigenous peoples in Canada and select language. Topical emphases vary. In cultural anthropology regions of the United States from the beginnings of they may include economic and political organization, European contact to the present . Topics include kinship and marriage, ritual and belief, and the causes and economy, social structure, mythology, religion, and culture consequences of cultural change in the contemporary change. . In Linguistic Anthropology they may include language structure, pragmatics, sociolinguistics and the ANTH-2108 (3) Myth, Magic and Shamanism (3 hrs ethnography of language. Some instructors may devote Lecture) In this course, the related concepts of myth, substantially more time than others to certain topics. magic, and shamanism, which form the core of religion in Students are advised to consult with individual instructors oral societies, are examined with the intent of discovering for details. the conceptions of nature, humanity, and the supernatural Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course that are symbolically expressed in these phenomena and and ANTH-1001 | ANTH-1005. give them unity.

ANTH-1003 (3) Introductory Biological Anthropology ANTH-2116 (3) Visual Anthropology (3 hrs Lecture) and (3 hrs Lecture) This is a general Visual Anthropology is the study of the visual aspects of introduction to the study of the biological nature and origins culture. This includes material culture photographs, films of the human species, and of the cultural and biological and videos. In this course we focus on ethnographic films record of the past. Topical emphases vary but may include and videos. With roots in the late 19th , basic principles of biological evolution, the human ethnographic films have flourished as a way of record, modern human variation, and archaeological documenting many different cultures. The advent of digital evidence of the development and diversification of society cameras in the 1980s transformed and democratized the and culture from earliest to the rise of ancient practice of ethnographic filming. In this course students civilization. critically examine the words of influential ethnographic Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course filmmakers. They also learn to make videos, thereby gaining and ANTH-1001. a deeper understanding of some of the challenges by filmmaking. ANTH-1005 (3) Introduction to Cultural Anthropology: Requisite Courses: ANTH-1001(6), ANTH-1002(3) or Indigenous Focus (3 hrs Lecture) This course is a ANTH-1005(3) or permission of the instructor general introduction to the comparative study of human [prerequisite(s)]. social and cultural life. Topical emphases vary but may include language, economic and political organization, ANTH-2119 (3) Medical Anthropology (3 hrs Lecture) kinship and marriage, ritual and belief, and the causes and Medical anthropology is a subfield of anthropology. It consequences of social and cultural change in the informs our understandings of the experiences and contemporary world. This course focuses primarily on distribution of health, the prevention and the treatment of Indigenous peoples in . Some instructors may the sick in different cultural groups and the role of devote substantially more time than others to the study of pluralistic medical systems. Critical health disparities linguistics. Students are advised to consult with individual between marginalized populations in developed countries instructors of details. as well as between developing and developed countries Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial are increasingly prevalent and complex in nature. This basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who course looks at ethnomedicine, disease and successfully complete this course receive credit as Indigenous perspectives on health and illness. indicated. Cross-listed: BANT-2119(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and BANT-2119. archaeology and development of the methodologies Requisite Courses: ANTH-1001(6), ANTH-1002(3) or employed. ANTH-1005(3) or permission of the instructor Requisite Courses: ANTH-1001 or ANTH-1003 or [prerequisite(s)]. permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)].

ANTH-2121 (3) Traditional Japanese Culture (3 hrs ANTH-2202 (3) Archæology of North America (3 hrs Lecture) This course surveys traditional Japanese culture Lecture) This course surveys the archaeology of North through an exploration of visual and dramatic arts, American indigenous peoples before European contact. literature, philosophy, and religion. Special emphasis is Major culture areas are examined, including the Southwest, placed on cross-cultural roots that bridged Japan with its Northwest Coast, Arctic, Plains, and Northeast. The neighbouring countries in East . The historical regional focus may vary from to year. foundations of popular Japanese contemporary culture - Manga, Anime, and high technology to name a few - are ANTH-2210 (3) Rise of New World Civilization (3 hrs also discussed. Lecture) This course covers the period from the origins of Cross-listed: EALC-2721(3) and REL-2721(3). agriculture to the rise of historically recorded New World Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course civilizations such as Aztec, Inca, and Maya. Special and EALC-2721 | REL-2721. emphasis is given to the background and origin of food production through the domestication of and , ANTH-2122 (3) Anthropologists in the (3 and to the development of urban centres. Regional hrs Lecture) Anthropologists are often engaged in emphasis may vary from year to year. research directly with communities. This may involve Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course partnerships, collaboration or supporting communities and ANTH-2206. directly as they lead their own research. Applied anthropology is a sub-field of anthropology which explores ANTH-2211 (3) Rise of Old World Civilization (3 hrs ways anthropologists work in communities to help identify Lecture) This course examines the origins and and resolve challenges and grow opportunities using development of civilization in the Old World with emphasis anthropological knowledge and methods. This course on the prehistoric archaeological record. Topics discussed provides students with an introduction to community based include the forces behind an increase in population density, research methods and research design in anthropology. the role of civilization and urbanism in state formation, and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course the problem of collapse of Old World civilizations, such as and ANTH-3103. ancient Egypt, the Near East, China, and the Indus Valley. Requisite Courses: ANTH-1001(6), ANTH-1002(3) or Regional emphasis may vary from year to year. ANTH-1005(3) or permission of the instructor Cross-listed: CLAS-2004(3). [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-2004. ANTH-2160 (3) Indigenous People and the Industrial State (3 hrs Lecture) The course considers the situation of ANTH-2214 (3) Archaeological Field School (3 hrs Field Indigenous peoples in the regions of , the Americas, Study) This course number allows students who complete Asia and the Pacific. While these people have distinct a recognized archaeological field school weighted at three cultural , their relations to nation-states are similar credit to transfer equivalent credit to the University in important ways. Tensions between indigenous people of . Only field schools offering both a theoretical and the industrial state centre on such issues as external lecture component and an intensive field component are market dependency, diversification, and size of the accepted. Students must meet all requirements set by government sector. Students critique standard definitions individual field schools. of progress and efficiency. The implications of contemporary industrial development projects for the ANTH-2216 (3) Archaeology in Popular Culture (3 hrs of human societies are studied within the framework of the Lecture) From Indiana Jones to Tomb Raider to YouTubers primal insights, values and definitions shared by Indigenous covering the discovery and excavation of prior sites of peoples throughout the globe. human occupation, Archaeology holds a special place in Cross-listed: IDS-2160(3). the public imagination. Archaeologists have been depicted Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course in popular culture through many formats, including movies and IDS-2160. and TV shows, literature and comics, news media, video Requisite Courses: ANTH-1001 or ANTH-1002 or games and more. This course critically assesses the ways IDS-1100 or permission of the IDS Coordinator or in which archaeology is presented to the general public, by Anthropology Chair [prerequisite(s)]. both archaeologists and non-archaeologists, and evaluates how the representation of archaeologists matters (or ANTH-2200 (3) Method and Theory in Archæology (3 should matter) to a general audience. hrs Lecture) This is a core course designed to convey the Cross-listed: BANT-2216 essentials of archaeological method and theory as they Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial relate to each other. Theoretical and procedural trends are basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who examined to illuminate the nature of contemporary successfully complete this course receive credit as archaeological research. Selected findings of this research indicated. are reviewed in accord with the major concepts of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and BANT-2216. (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces key aspects of Requisite Courses: Minimum 18 credit hours in any forensic anthropology in a framework that is not dependent subject, or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. upon prior knowledge of scientific methods. Topics include approaches to the interpretation of skeletal remains and ANTH-2220 (6) Archæological Field School (3 hrs Field DNA evidence, and the application of information from other Study) This course number is designated for students who to forensic analysis. complete a recognized archaeological field school Cross-listed: BANT-2304(3). weighted at six credit hours to transfer equivalent credit to Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course the . Only field schools offering both and BANT-2304. a theoretical lecture component and an intensive field Requisite Courses: Completion of 30 credit hours component are accepted. Students must meet all [prerequisite(s)]. requirements set by individual field schools. Note: Students must receive departmental permission to ANTH-2400 (3) Method and Theory in Linguistic enrol in an outside field school for academic credit. Anthropology (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This course Students may receive credit in ANTH-3206(6) and either examines the relationship between language and culture, ANTH-2214(3) or ANTH-2220(6). including the theories and principles of linguistic anthropology. More than 20 languages are compared and ANTH-2221 (3) Archæology of the Ancient Near East contrasted in order to understand the concepts of (3 hrs Lecture) This course traces the development of language structure. Topics include the basic principles of Syrian Palestinian Archaeology, including a study of phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax, pragmatics, archaeological remains and sites from the Neolithic period language change, literacy, nonverbal communication and (ca. 8500 B.C.) to the Byzantine period (ca. 330A.D.) in the signed languages. Levant, or countries bordering on the eastern Cross-listed: LING-2102(3). Mediterranean Sea from Turkey to Egypt. Emphasis is Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course placed on techniques of recovering ancient remains as and LING-2102. well as the interpretation of artifacts, including those associated with Biblical text or documents from other ANTH-2401 (3) Phonetics and Phonology (3 hrs ancient Near Eastern cultures. Lecture) This course describes all English consonant and vowel sounds in terms of place and manner of articulation. ANTH-2229 (3) Food, Diet and Dining in Antiquity (3 It also identifies how sounds are organized into syllables hrs Lecture) This course explores the techniques, issues, and words by studying the concepts of phonemes, and controversies involved in reconstructing the role of allophones and phonological rules. Although the course food, diet and dining in Greek and Roman antiquity. Topics focuses on English phonology, it also draws heavily on addressed include examination of lines of evidence other languages to illustrate the key concepts. Students will (broadly encompassing ancient literary and textual be required to master characters and diacritics from the evidence, depictions from art, and material remains from International Phonetic Alphabet. archaeological excavation); the economic basis for Cross-listed: LING-2001(3) and ENGL-2803(3). production, trade, transport and consumption of foodstuffs Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course in antiquity; practicalities and limitations involved in cooking, and ENGL-2803 | LING-2001. preserving and preparing food stuffs; the social and philosophical context of eating and dining; the role of food ANTH-2402 (3) Morphology (3 hrs Lecture) This course in ancient religious and cult practices; medical approaches introduces students to the concepts and methods of word to food, diet and health in antiquity. analysis. Students investigate the nature of morphemes Cross-listed: CLAS-2920(3). (smallest units of meaning), their different types and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course functions, and the different ways they are organized into and CLAS-2920. words. The course explores the process of word formation through derivation and compounding as well as ANTH-2300 (3) Method and Theory in Biological grammatical uses of inflectional morphemes. Based largely Anthropology (3 hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This core in English, both lectures and exercises also draw on course examines the theoretical framework of Biological various other languages to highlight key morphological (Physical) Anthropology and the nature of current human features and constructs. biological variation. Topics include evolutionary theory, Cross-listed: ENGL-2805(3) and LING-2002(3). human genetics, modern human biological variation, human Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course adaptation to the environment, and demographic and ENGL-2805 | LING-2002. processes. Cross-listed: BANT-2300(3). ANTH-2403 (3) Syntax (3 hrs Lecture) Syntax is the study Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course of the arrangement of words into groups, clauses and and BANT-2300. sentences. In this course students use morphological, Requisite Courses: ANTH-1001 or ANTH-1003 or any syntactic, semantic, and lexical criteria to define traditional 1000-level Biology course, or permission of the instructor parts of speech, in order to understand how these [prerequisite(s)]. combine to form a variety of clauses and sentences types. Form, function, class and structure are introduced from the ANTH-2304 (3) Introduction to Forensic Anthropology perspective of systemic functional and communication linguistics. These descriptive frameworks are contrasted led to language shift, loss, and death. Students learn about with transformational generative models and others. the importance of diverse languages, and also about Cross-listed: ENGL-2802(3) and LING-2003(3). strategies and programs that communities have applied to Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course maintain or regain their languages. Key language and ENGL-2802 | LING-2003. revitalization methods are taught, including language healing, language development, language learning ANTH-2404 (3) Languages of the World (3 hrs Lecture) technologies, language nests, and master-apprentice Taking a general overview of the linguistic map of the programs. world where approximately 7000 languages are currently Cross-listed: LING-2104 and IS-2407. spoken, this course looks at some of the main language Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial families and examines evidence for genetic relationships basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who within them. Variations within a single language, principles successfully complete this course receive credit as underlying different writing systems, as well as issues of indicated. language contact, endangered languages, and the role of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course English as an emerging world language are also and IS-2407 | LING-2104. considered. Examples are drawn from a wide range of languages. ANTH-2408 (3) Indigenous Languages, Contact and Cross-listed: LING-2103(3). Change (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines Indigenous Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course languages of and the changes that have and LING-2103 | LING-2404. occurred due to colonization and assimilation as well as the processes of Indigenous language endangerment which is ANTH-2405 (3) Semantics (3 hrs Lecture) Semantics is now occurring on a global scale. Discussions also focus the branch of linguistics concerned with how we construct on suggested solutions to endangerment and loss of meaning using language. It is arguably the most diverse Indigenous linguistic diversity. Languages such as Ojibwe, branch, situated between the highly formalizable "inner Cree, Ojibwe-Cree, Dakota, and Michif are highlighted for layers" of phonology, morphology and syntax and the analysis. fuzzier "outer layer" of pragmatics. Key ideas covered in Cross-listed: LING-2105 the course include: the difference between sense and Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial reference, the application of basic rules in formal logic, basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who prototype theory, componential analysis, and cognitive successfully complete this course receive credit as semantics; how to identify thematic roles in sentences; the indicated. functions of noun classifiers, deictics, and adpositions in Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course different languages; and, the nature of metaphors, and LING-2105. metonyms and image schemas. Cross-listed: ENGL-2806(3) and LING-2004(3). ANTH-3100 (3) of Anthropology (3 hrs Lecture) Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course This course examines the development and influence of and ENGL-2806 | LING-2004. select schools of anthropological thought and practice from the nineteenth century to the present. Emphasis is given to ANTH-2406 (3) Language and Culture (3 hrs Lecture) the approach and contribution of individual scholars, and to The course examines how language encodes cultural the impact of institutions and historically significant events dialects from different regions and time periods within and trends in shaping disciplinary ideas. Additional in-depth various social and cultural contexts. Selected British, work is required to receive credit at the 4000 level. American, and Canadian dialects are studied from specific Cross-listed: ANTH-4100(3). historical and contemporary periods. Social factors such Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course as , gender, ethnicity, class, socio-economic, and ANTH-4100. educational, political, and religious factors are considered Requisite Courses: ANTH-2100 or permission of the from a sociolinguistic perspective. The course also instructor [prerequisite(s)]. examines language and dialects related to various registers, such as student-teacher classroom exchange, ANTH-3113 (3) Indigenous Peoples of Central Canada job interviews, work talk, and casual conversation. To (3 hrs Lecture) Students in this course read ethnographies, examine the differences in these registers, functional and myths and oral histories in order to gain an understanding systemic perspectives of communication linguistics are of the culture of Ojibwe and Cree peoples living in northern introduced. Manitoba and . A holistic approach is used to stress Cross-listed: ENGL-2804(3) and LING-2101(3). the interrelationship of traditional subsistence activities, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course spirituality, language and world view. Contemporary and ENGL-2804 | LING-2101. economic, social and political issues are also discussed to give students an appreciation of how traditional practices ANTH-2407 (3) Language Revitalization (3 hrs Lecture) continue to be adapted to meet the challenges of This course examines the need for language revitalization contemporary life. in the context of language endangerment that is now Cross-listed: ANTH-4113(3). occurring on a global scale. Students learn about factors Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course that contribute to languages remaining strong, as well as and ANTH-4113. processes such as colonization and assimilation that have Requisite Courses: ANTH-2100 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. ANTH-3126 (6) Material Culture in the History of the ANTH-3116 (3) Symbolic Anthropology (3 hrs Lecture) Indigenous Peoples of Canada (3 hrs Lecture) This Symbolic anthropology is a school of cultural anthropology lecture/seminar course traces Canadian Indigenous history that seeks to understand culture through the interpretation from pre-contact times to the early 20th century through a of symbols in the context of rituals and performances, close examination of Indigenous and fur trade material myths and stories, art and other creative human culture. Throughout the course of the fur trade Indigenous expressions. Students in this seminar-based course read people and Europeans exchanged and adopted various and discuss the works of prominent practitioners in the technologies. These exchanges were of critical importance field, including Mary Douglas, Victor Turner and Clifford in shaping relations between Euro-American traders and Geertz. They also interpret a variety of cultural Indigenous peoples. This course explores various ways in performances. which Indigenous and European technologies Cross-listed: ANTH-4116(3). complemented each other and highlights the non-material Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course meanings associated with particular artefacts. We examine and ANTH-4116. the social, cultural and spiritual connotations that Requisite Courses: ANTH-2100 or permission of the Indigenous artefacts held and that European-introduced instructor [prerequisite(s)]. technologies and materials acquired. Cross-listed: HIST-3515(6). ANTH-3117 (3) Ethnohistoric Methods and Theory (3 Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course hrs Lecture) Ethnohistory combines ethnographic and and HIST-3515. historical methods to study changes in cultures over time. In this course students gain a theoretical understanding of ANTH-3127 (3) History of the Indigenous Peoples of ethnohistory through a of readings that explore the Northern Plains (3 hrs Lecture) This lecture-seminar differences between oral and written texts. They also gain traces the history of Indigenous Peoples on the Northern a practical understanding of the discipline through the Plains from the pre-contact period to the mid-20th century transcription of an oral text, which is contextualized on both sides of the present Canadian-U.S. border. Ancient through library and/or archival research. plains cultures, the introduction of European technologies, Cross-listed: HIST-3526(3), HIST-4526(3), and the fur trade, struggles for regional dominance and control ANTH-4117(3). over resources, advancing European settlement, and the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course establishment of reservations/reserve constitute the major and ANTH-4117 | HIST-3526 | HIST-4526. topics of this lecture seminar. In a comparative approach, Requisite Courses: ANTH-2100 or permission of the this course explores critical differences and similarities in instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Indigenous history on both sides of the Canadian and US border. ANTH-3120 (3) Indigenous Peoples of Arctic Canada Cross-listed: HIST-3518(3). (3 hrs Lecture) This course focuses on the Inuit and their Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course ancestors, inhabitants of Canada's Arctic and adjacent and HIST-3518. regions for nearly 5000 . It examines the origins and development of their pre-and post-contact culture in light of ANTH-3128 (3) History of Eastern and Subarctic archaeological and ethnographic evidence, with emphasis Algonquian Peoples (3 hrs Lecture) This lecture/seminar on regional variations in subsistence and settlement course traces the histories of eastern and subarctic patterns, social organizations, intellectual life, and contact Algonquian peoples from the Powhatans and Mi'kmaq to the with Euro-Canadian institutions, ideas, and state policy. The Ojibwe and Cree, from earliest times to the early twentieth course concludes by considering Inuit culture identity in the century. Oral records, documentary sources, and 21st century. secondary materials are used to present and juxtapose Cross-listed: HIST-3522(3). Indigenous and European perspectives throughout the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course course. Topics include origins, languages, gender and ANTH-2118 | HIST-3522. relations, and cultural, political, and social history, as well as the effects of contact and governmental policies. ANTH-3125 (3) Ethnographic Research Methods (3 Cross-listed: HIST-3528(3). hrs Lecture) This course offers students an opportunity to Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course learn and apply ethnographic research and field and HIST-3528. techniques. Areas of instruction include participant observation, surveys, and interviews, the recording of ANTH-3132 (3) History of the Iroquoian Peoples (3 hrs data in field notes and by such means as video, Lecture) This lecture/seminar course examines the history photography and mapping, and ethical considerations in of the Iroquoian peoples in Eastern North America from the contemporary research settings. Additional in-depth work precontact time until the present. Emphasis is placed on the is required to receive credit at the 4000 level. Iroquois Confederacy and the Huron (Wendat) peoples Cross-listed: ANTH-4125(3). living in Canada and the United States. Topics include the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course origins of the Iroquois Confederacy, the fur trade and and ANTH-4125. Christian missions, the Iroquois Wars and the destruction of Requisite Courses: ANTH-2100 or permission of the Huronia in 1649, the dispersal and migration of Iroquois and instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Huron communities through the Great Lakes region and the Saint Lawrence Valley, and the influence of the and globally. The course provides insights into attitudes Canada-US border on Iroquois communities. toward Indigenous community development from within as Cross-listed: HIST-3532(3). well as from outside Indigenous communities and the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course implications of those attitudes on theories, practices and and HIST-3532. policies. Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial ANTH-3133 (3) Public Anthropology (3 hrs Lecture) basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who Contemporary anthropology has changed drastically over successfully complete this course receive credit as the last several . Anthropologists no longer indicated. exclusively study "primitive" societies; cultural anthropology Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course is engaged and confronting important contemporary social, and IS-3162. economic and political issues. In response, anthropologists Requisite Courses: IS-1016 (3) or IS-1017(3) or the now engage in these modern issues and at times take a former IS-1015(6), or permission of the Instructor public position. Public anthropology explores such issues [prerequisite(s)]. as race and tolerance, health and well-being, global terror and militarism, forensic anthropology, and the Internet and ANTH-3170 (3) Ethnoecology as a Research Approach other forms of the digital media. This course is designed to (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course underscores the inform students about the development of anthropology as traditional ecological knowledge systems of Indigenous and a relevant field of inquiry. local communities by examining the interactions among Requisite Courses: ANTH-2100 [prerequisite(s)]. these communities, their knowledge, and the local environments that have sustained over time. Key themes ANTH-3134 (3) Anthropology of Food (3 hrs Lecture) include traditional food and medicinal plants, traditional Anthropology is interested in the role of food and the natural resources management systems, and learning relationship to . Food is vital to our health and within indigenous knowledge and indigenous cultural well-being, however there remains a constant struggle to landscapes. Such learning is explored through global case produce, exchange and eat the food that we need to live a studies. Research approaches, tools, methods and ethical healthy and productive life. Our relationship with food is issues surrounding ethnoecological research within local complex. This course examines the ways in which we and Indigenous communities are also explored. This course understand food as essential, chosen, patterned, and helps in developing academic and research skills in dynamic. Students examine how culture shapes our food conducting interdisciplinary research that examines the production, distribution methods, and dietary habits in all relationships between nature and culture. stages of our . Cross-listed: IS-3012(3). Requisite Courses: ANTH-2100 [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and IS-3012. ANTH-3160 (3) Cultural Perspectives on Global Requisite Courses: IS-1015, UIC-1001, IDS-1100, Processes (3 hrs Lecture) The focus of this course is ANTH-1001, or ANTH-1002 or permission of instructor threefold. First it seeks to apply cultural perspectives on [prerequisite(s)]. 'global scale theory.' , we discern the linkages among some of the main processes at work in 'global ANTH-3203 (6) Archaeological Field School (3 hrs systems.' Main processes include communications, Lecture) An intensive course planned and programmed to transportation, migration, capital, manufacture of export provide students with practical archaeological experience goods, non-state political organizations, and environmental through excavation of one or more sites. Instruction begins and human health research. The emphasis is on how two shortly after regular session examinations, and employs or more of these interact. Third, we discuss the effects of lecture, field, and laboratory components in order to teach these processes in local and regional contexts. The excavation techniques, processing, analyzing and specific processes and their salient interrelationships are interpreting of archaeological data. chosen in response to interests of those taking the course, Restrictions: Department Permission Required. and are developed by group reading and discussion, and Requisite Courses: ANTH-1001 or ANTH-1003 and individually in paper projects. ANTH-2200 [prerequisite(s)]. Cross-listed: IDS-3160(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course ANTH-3204 (3) Issues in Prehistoric Archaeology (3 and IDS-3160. hrs Lecture) This course examines select issues in Requisite Courses: IDS-1100(6) or ANTH-1001(6) or methodology and/or interpretation of the archaeological ANTH-1002(3), or permission of the Coordinator/Chair record of New World and/or Old World populations prior to [prerequisite(s)]. the end of the last , 10,000 years ago. Content may vary from year to year and be thematic, ANTH-3162 (3) Old Ways, New Money: Indigenous regional, and/or chronological in nature. Information about Social Enterprise (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) Students each year's topic can be obtained from the instructor. study theories and practices related to Indigenous social Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course enterprise. Of particular interest is the relationship between and ANTH-4204. social enterprises, related policies, and indigenous Requisite Courses: ANTH-2200 or permission of the sovereignty or self-determination. Students become familiar instructor [prerequisite(s)]. with a range of Indigenous social enterprises in Canada ANTH-3206 (3) The Origins of Human Culture (3 hrs ANTH-3260 (3) Classical Archæology (3 hrs Lecture) Lecture) Looking at developments in the Old World, this This course examines methodological, theoretical, and course examines the two million year period from the first topical issues in Classical Archaeology, broadly, that is, in appearance of human culture to the agricultural revolution the archaeology of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations. some twelve thousand years ago. It emphasizes the Particular emphasis focuses upon directions within the increase in cultural complexity and specialization over time, discipline over the past . Topics discussed include and the way that culture has permitted humans to adapt to the integration of archaeological, scientific, artistic, and their environment. As well as discussing the general nature textual evidence in the reconstruction of classical cultures; of the prehistoric record, the course examines such the assessment of ancient Greco-Roman ecological, social, general questions as the origins of cultural behaviour, the ritual, and economic life on the basis of recovered artifacts ecology and of the period, and ecofacts; and the use of archaeological survey data to demographic evolution and reconstruction, and the examine ancient settlement patterns. relationship between cultural and biological evolution. Additional in-depth work is required to receive credit at the ANTH-3261 (3) Death in Antiquity (3 hrs Lecture) This 4000 level. course approaches various aspects relating to death in Cross-listed: BANT-3206(3), ANTH/BANT-4206(3). antiquity (emphasizing Roman antiquity) from the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course perspective of two disciplines, Anthropology and Classics. and ANTH-3202 | ANTH-4206 | BANT-3206 | BANT-4206. Topics include beliefs and philosophies about the afterlife; Requisite Courses: ANTH-2200 or permission of the causes of death, with emphasis on diseases and instructor [prerequisite(s)]. demographics; the practicalities of planning for death and disposing of the dead; the methods and significance of ANTH-3207 (3) Zooarchaeology (3 hrs Lecture) This commemoration; rituals of grief and mourning; spatial course introduces analytical and theoretical aspects of distribution of cemeteries in antiquity; methods and theories zooarchaeology through lectures and laboratory exercises in mortuary archaeology from classical sites; and analysis focusing on the comparative skeletal anatomy of various of osteological, artifactual, and architectural data from such , , fish, and species. Topics sites. Contemplation of cross-cultural comparisons on include post-depositional changes to bones, sampling and these and other topics under study is encouraged. recovering faunal remains, ageing and sexing of bone, Cross-listed: CLAS-3320(3). reconstructing past environments and human dietary Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course strategies, evidence of domestication, and bone tool and CLAS-3320. technology. Requisite Courses: 3 credits from either Anthropology or Cross-listed: BANT-3207(3). Classics [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and BANT-3207. ANTH-3262 (3) Health in Antiquity (3 hrs Lecture) This Requisite Courses: ANTH-2200 or permission of the course explores health, disease, and medicine in the Greek instructor [prerequisite(s)]. and Roman world. It draws upon evidence from the ancient textual sources (especially Galen and Hippocrates), social ANTH-3210 (3) Archæological Laboratory Methods (3 history, and archaeology (the latter including all manner of hrs Lecture) This course focuses on processing, finds - architecture, art, artifacts, environmental materials, analyzing, and interpreting archaeological materials. It and skeletal remains) to examine how residents of the examines a range of specialized techniques for studying Greek and Roman world perceived and experienced health lithic, ceramic, botanical, and geological evidence and disease, and how they sought to combat illness and to recovered at archaeological sites, and for establishing their promote healing. temporal context. Additional in-depth work is required to Cross-listed: CLAS-3060(3)and KIN-3060(3). receive credit at the 4000 level. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Cross-listed: ANTH-4210(3). and CLAS-3060 | KIN-3060. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: 3 credits in any Classics, and ANTH-4210. Anthropology, or Kinesiology course [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: ANTH-2200 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. ANTH-3273 (3) Material Culture in Northern Plains Indigenous History, Field Course (3 hrs Field Study) In ANTH-3213 (3) Advanced Archæological Theory (3 hrs this experiential-learning course, we explore various ways Lecture) Major trends in the development and application of in which Indigenous and European technologies archaeological theory are explored, with special emphasis complemented each other. The first half of the course on perspective initiated since the beginning of the 20th consists of seminar discussions and lectures at the century. Additional in-depth work is required to receive University of Winnipeg. The second half of the course credit at the 4000 level. takes place in the field, where students can work with Cross-listed: ANTH-4213(3). Indigenous Elders from nearby First Nations communities. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Students learn about and experience traditional and ANTH-4213. technologies, such as tanning hides and/or manufacturing Requisite Courses: ANTH-2200 or permission of the archery equipment, while being accommodated in traditional instructor [prerequisite(s)]. tipis and/or modern tents. Notes: Students should notify the instructor in case of dietary restrictions, -, animal-, or food allergies. There is a surcharge per student for this (phonology), seeing (graphology), wording (lexis), course to cover honoraria for Elders and other knowledge arranging (syntax), meaning (semology and semantics), keepers, food-related costs and costs for materials the and ornamenting (rhetoric). Textual analysis considers the students will be using. Please consult the History effect of writers' choices to create different reader Department. responses to literary elements such as developing Cross-listed: HIST-3573(3), HIST-4573(3), characters, building suspense, creating humour, and ANTH-4273(3). achieving particular rhetorical purposes. Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. Students Cross-listed: LING-3001(6) and ENGL-3800(6). may not hold credit for this course and ANTH-4273 | Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course HIST-3573 | HIST-4573. and ENGL-3800 | LING-3001.

ANTH-3306 (3) Human Osteology (3 hrs Lecture) This ANTH-3406 (3) Comparative Indo-European course covers basic human osteological development and Linguistics and Mythology (3 hrs Lecture) This course identification. Topics include indicators of age and sex and proposes an integrated overview of Indo-European comparison of and non-primate features. Emphasis tradition based on comparative linguistics, mythology, is on the laboratory identification of complete and archaeology, social structure and religion. A survey of incomplete human skeletal material. Indo- European languages, ancient and modern, including Cross-listed: BANT-3306(3). their relationships, writing systems, and sociolinguistic Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course context, is followed by an examination of problems in and ANTH-4306 | BANT-3306. analysis and reconstruction of Indo-European Requisite Courses: Credit in at least one course in proto-language and proto- culture. The course further Physical/Biological Anthropology, or permission of the explores major Indo-European mythological and poetic instructor [prerequisite(s)]. traditions, and possible reconstruction of their common sources. It also examines belief systems, literary ANTH-3308 (3) (3 hrs Lecture) This continuations of mythopoetic material, archeological course examines the evolution of our species, from the evidence and historiographic records. Additional in-depth earliest hominins to the appearance of anatomically modern work is required to receive credit at the 4000 level. humans. Emphasis is on the material evidence for human Cross-listed: ANTH-4406(3), LING-3406(3) and evolution, and in particular the fossil record. Topics include LING-4406(3). the environmental context of human evolution, the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course anatomical features of bipedalism, and the debates and ANTH-4406 | LING-3102 | LING-4102. surrounding the origins of Anatomically Modern Homo sapiens: Occasional laboratory sessions enhance and ANTH-3407 (3) Registers of Our Daily Life (3 hrs expand upon the material presented in lectures. Lecture) Students are introduced to issues involved in the Cross-listed: BANT-3308(3), ANTH/BANT-4308(3). research being done by linguists, text analysts, discourse Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course analysts, and sociolinguists concerning various types of and ANTH-4308 | BANT-3308 | BANT-4308. institutional discourse. They are required to carry out a Requisite Courses: ANTH-2300 or BANT-2300 or research project on a register of their choice. Experimental permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. investigations and contemporary research focus on medical, scientific, legal, business, financial, political, ANTH-3400 (3) Language Typology (3 hrs classroom, and media discourse. Seminar/Discussion) This course examines and classifies a Cross-listed: LING-3101(3), ENGL-3802(3). number of languages by applying the basic concepts of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Anthropological Linguistics to analysis of the phonology, and ENGL-3802 | LING-3101. morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics of various Requisite Courses: ANTH-2406 or LING-2101 or languages. The structure of these languages is compared ENGL-2804 [prerequisite(s)]. and contrasted to explore typological patterns and explain structural diversity of human languages. Relations between ANTH-3408 (3) Sociolinguistics (3 hrs Lecture | the grammar and pragmatic features of the languages are Seminar/Discussion) Sociolinguistics is the systematic also explored. Additional in-depth work is required to study of language as a social phenomenon with a focus on receive credit at the 4000 level. the relationship between language and various social Cross-listed: ANTH-4400(3), LING-3006(3) and variables such as age, class, ethnicity and gender. This LING-4006(3). course examines language variations on regional (regional Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course dialects), social (sociolects) and personal (styles and and LING-3006 | LING-3400 | LING-4006. registers) level, as well as topics such as standard Requisite Courses: ANTH-2400 or LING-2102 or language, slang, jargon, politeness and taboo. It introduces permission of instructor [prerequisite(s)]. students to the concepts of language ideologies, communities of practice, multilingualism, diglossia and code ANTH-3405 (3) Textual Analysis (3 hrs Lecture) This switching, and explores the problems of language in the course examines the principles and methods of textual contact and of language shift, revival and planning. analysis as a language-centered approach to literary and Cross-listed: LING-3103(3). non-literary discourse. Various texts are analyzed using Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course six descriptive linguistic tools, namely sounding and LING-3103. Requisite Courses: LING-1001 or ANTH-1001 or this process by first, preparing a research paper of ANTH-1002 [prerequisite(s)]. publishable quality in accordance with the standards of a professional journal, and second, demonstrating the ethics ANTH-3409 (3) Language Policy and Planning (3 hrs and practice of peer review, peer critique, peer Lecture) Language Policy and Planning addresses the collaboration and oral and public presentation, grant writing ways in which people, organizations, and governments and ethical research writing. Students must be prepared to have tried to control or influence how languages are consult with the course professor on the choice topic learned, developed and used. It includes the development within one of the beginning of the class. of standardized languages, writing systems, and creation Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial of grammars and dictionaries. It also addresses language basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who legislation, and governments' and organizations' attempts to successfully complete this course receive credit as promote or prescribe certain languages, including in K-12 indicated. education. The implementation of language policies and Restrictions: Honours Form Required. plans is shaped by many factors including history, politics, Requisite Courses: 30 credit hours in Anthropology or and ideologies. Students in this course examine methods permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. and theories of language policy and planning development and implementation with specific application to Indigenous ANTH-4011 (6) Anthropology Honours Thesis (3 hrs languages. Thesis) This course is intended for but not restricted to Cross-listed: LING-3109 students in the Honours program. Students undertake an Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial independant research project in an area of anthropological basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who interest. Presentation of the results verbally and in thesis successfully complete this course receive credit as form to the Anthropology Department is an integral part of indicated. the course. Each project is supervised by a faculty Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course member. and LING-3109. Cross-listed: BANT-4011(6). Requisite Courses: 18 Credit hours completed in any Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not subject area [prerequisite(s)]. hold credit for this course and BANT-4011. Requisite Courses: 9 credit hours from ANTH-2100, ANTH-3411 (3) Indigenous Languages of South ANTH-2200, ANTH-2300, or ANTH-2400 (as appropriate to America (3 hrs Lecture) Presenting an integrated thesis topic) plus at least 6 credit hours at the 3000 level overview of the indigenous languages of , and 6 credit hours at the 4000 level [prerequisite(s)]. this course looks at main language families spoken there, their spatial distribution, history and classification, as well ANTH-4024 (3) Biocultural Diversity Conservation (3 as their cultural background. With 53 language families and hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course focuses on the 55 isolates, South America is not only the most diverse interrelationship between indigenous peoples and their region in linguistic terms, but also a storehouse of unusual environment. Indigenous and local communities contribute structural features important for understanding the full with understanding, practices and innovations regarding range of possible variants of human language. The course the use and conservation of biodiversity and natural also explores typological characteristics of South American resources in diverse . The value of indigenous languages, potential linguistic areas, proposals of more knowledge is recognized in international agreements and distant relationships, and the current situation of efforts are made to integrate traditional ecological endangered languages in this region. Additional in-depth knowledge into conservation and management programs. work is required to receive credit at the 4000-level. The tensions arising from the confluence of indigenous and Cross-listed: ANTH-4411(3), LING-3104(3), scientific knowledge, the opposition of different LING-4104(3), and IS-3104(3). epistemological approaches, the increasing loss of bio Restrictions: Department Permission Required. Students diversity and indigenous cultures, the interconnectedness may not hold credit for this course and ANTH-4411 | between biological and cultural diversity are the central IS-3104 | LING-3104 | LING-4104. themes of this course. Cross-listed: IDS-4824(3) and IS-4024(3). ANTH-4001 (3 or 6) Directed Readings/Research in Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not Anthropology (3 hrs Directed Reading) This is a course hold credit for this course and IDS-4824 | IS-4024. which enables a student to acquaint himself or herself with the frontiers of Anthropological knowledge. In conjunction ANTH-4100 (3) History of Anthropology (3 hrs Lecture) with an Instructor the student prepares a formal paper. This course examines the development and influence of This may be based upon specialized library research, select schools of anthropological thought and practice from laboratory work or field work. the nineteenth century to the present. Emphasis is given to Cross-listed: BANT-4001 the approach and contribution of individual scholars, and to Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. the impact of institutions and historically significant events and trends in shaping disciplinary ideas. Additional in-depth ANTH-4010 (3) Anthropology Research Seminar (3 work is required to receive credit at the 4000 level. hrs Lecture/Seminar) This capstone course is for senior Cross-listed: ANTH-3100(3). anthropology students to pursue a research topic of their Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not choosing within the discipline. Students are guided through hold credit for this course and ANTH-3100. Requisite Courses: ANTH-2100 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. instructor [prerequisite(s)]. ANTH-4117 (3) Ethnohistoric Methods and Theory (3 ANTH-4102 (3) Problems in Cultural Anthropology (3 hrs Lecture) Ethnohistory combines ethnographic and hrs Lecture) This seminar offers senior students a chance historical methods to study changes in cultures over time. to investigate specific problems in cultural anthropology. In this course students gain a theoretical understanding of Emphasis is on preparation and presentation of individual ethnohistory through a series of readings that explore projects based on laboratory, library, museum, or field differences between oral and written texts. They also gain experience. a practical understanding of the discipline through the Restrictions: Honours Form Required. transcription of an oral text, which is contextualized Requisite Courses: ANTH-2100 or permission of the through library and/or archival research. instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Cross-listed: ANTH-3117(3), HIST-3526(3) and HIST-4526(3). ANTH-4105 (3 or 6) Indigenous Peoples and Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not Newcomers in Encounter: Selected Topics (3 hrs hold credit for this course and ANTH-3117 | HIST-3526 | Seminar/Discussion) This course examines the history of HIST-4526. Canadian Indigenous Peoples from the pre-contact period Requisite Courses: ANTH-2100 or permission of the to the early 20th century through the study of Indigenous instructor [prerequisite(s)]. biographies and material culture. This allows us to examine the history of Indigenous/non-Indigenous interaction from ANTH-4125 (3) Ethnographic Research Methods (3 the perspective of individuals involved in the events we hrs Lecture) This course offers students an opportunity to study. It familiarizes students with the cultures of Canadian learn and apply ethnographic research and field Indigenous Peoples, major events in the history of contact techniques. Areas of instruction include participant between Indigenous and European peoples, and the observation, surveys, and interviews, the recording of construction of historical argument and interpretation, data in field notes and by such means as video, based on an interdisciplinary ethnohistorical approach. photography and mapping, and ethical considerations in Cross-listed: HIST-4570(3/6). contemporary research settings. Additional in-depth work Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not is required to receive credit at the 4000 level. hold credit for this course and HIST-4570. Cross-listed: ANTH-3125(3). Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not ANTH-4113 (3) Indigenous Peoples of Central Canada hold credit for this course and ANTH-3125. (3 hrs Lecture) Students in this course read ethnographies, Requisite Courses: ANTH-2100 or permission of the myths and oral histories in order to gain an understanding instructor [prerequisite(s)]. of the culture of Ojibwe and Cree peoples living in northern Manitoba and Ontario. A holistic approach is used to stress ANTH-4145 (3) Urban Indigenous Seminar (3 hrs the interrelationship of traditional subsistence activities, Seminar/Discussion) This seminar examines selected spirituality, language and world view. Contemporary topics dealing with urban Indigenous issues. Topics may economic, social and political issues are also discussed to include the viability of urban Indigenous governance, urban give students an appreciation of how traditional practices reserves, and Indigenous education and economic continue to be adapted to meet the challenges of development issues in the inner city. The issue of differing contemporary life. Additional in-depth work is required to conceptions of Indigenous representation and identity held receive credit at the 4000 level. by various Indigenous organizations is a particularly Cross-listed: ANTH-3113(3). challenging and contentious issue in the urban context. The Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not portability and applicability of Indigenous and treaty rights in hold credit for this course and ANTH-3113. the urban environment may also be explored. We may also Requisite Courses: ANTH-2100 or permission of the analyze the unique problems created by the range of instructor [prerequisite(s)]. jurisdictional responsibilities towards Indigenous people in the urban environment. ANTH-4116 (3) Symbolic Anthropology (3 hrs Lecture) Cross-listed: IS-4445(3) and UIC-4445(3). Symbolic anthropology is a school of cultural anthropology Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not that seeks to understand culture through the interpretation hold credit for this course and IS-4445 | UIC-4445. of symbols in the context of rituals and performances, Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in UIC courses, or myths and stories, art and other creative human permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. expressions. Students in this seminar-based course read and discuss the works of prominent practitioners in the ANTH-4200 (3) Archæological Problems (3 hrs field, including Mary Douglas, Victor Turner and Clifford Seminar/Discussion) This seminar is designed to give Geertz. They also interpret a var iety of cultural senior students an opportunity to delve into specific performances. Additional in-depth work is required to problems in archaeology. Attention is paid to the receive credit at the 4000 level. presentation of individual projects involving library, Cross-listed: ANTH-3116(3). laboratory, or field experience. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not Restrictions: Honours Form Required. hold credit for this course and ANTH-3116. Requisite Courses: A course in Archaeology/ Requisite Courses: ANTH-2100 or permission of the at the 2000 or 3000 level or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. instructor [prerequisite(s)].

ANTH-4206 (3) The Origins of Human Culture (3 hrs ANTH-4230 (6) International Field School (Project / Lecture) Looking at developments in the Old World, this Thesis with variable meeting hours) This field school in course examines the two million year period from the first Archaeology and Bioarchaeology provides in-depth training appearance of human culture to the agricultural revolution in excavation, documentation, and analysis of material from some twelve thousand years ago. It emphasizes the an archaeological site and is typically located outside increase in cultural complexity and specialization over time, Canada (previous sessions were held in Serbia and and the way that culture has permitted humans to adapt to Jamaica). Undergraduate students from University of their environment. As well as discussing the general nature Winnipeg are given preference in registration, however, of the prehistoric record, the course examines such the field course is open to upper undergraduate and general questions as the origins of cultural behaviour, the graduate students from other universities. Students are ecology and chronology of the Pleistocene period, required to consult the Department chair regarding the demographic evolution and reconstruction, and the yearly location of the field course. relationship between cultural and biological evolution. Cross-listed: BANT-4230(6). Additional in-depth work is required to receive credit at the Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. Students 4000 level. may not hold credit for this course and BANT-4230. Cross-listed: ANTH/BANT-3206(3), BANT-4206(3). Requisite Courses: ANTH-2200 and ANTH-2300 Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not [prerequisite(s)]. hold credit for this course and ANTH-3202 | ANTH-3206 | BANT-3206 | BANT-4206. ANTH-4273 (3) Material Culture in Northern Plains Requisite Courses: ANTH-2200 or permission of the Indigenous History, Field Course (3 hrs Field Study) In instructor [prerequisite(s)]. this experiential-learning course, we explore various ways in which Indigenous and European technologies ANTH-4210 (3) Archæological Laboratory Methods (3 complemented each other. The first half of the course hrs Lecture) This course focuses on processing, consists of seminar discussions and lectures at the analyzing, and interpreting archaeological materials. It University of Winnipeg. The second half of the course examines a range of specialized techniques for studying takes place in the field, where students can work with lithic, ceramic, botanical, and geological evidence Indigenous Elders from nearby First Nations communities. recovered at archaeological sites, and for establishing their Students learn about and experience traditional temporal context. Additional in-depth work is required to technologies, such as tanning hides and/or manufacturing receive credit at the 4000 level. archery equipment, while being accommodated in traditional Cross-listed: ANTH-3210(3). tipis and/or modern tents. Notes: Students should notify the Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not instructor in case of dietary restrictions, plant-, animal-, or hold credit for this course and ANTH-3210. food allergies. There is a surcharge per student for this Requisite Courses: ANTH-2200 or permission of the course to cover honoraria for Elders and other knowledge instructor [prerequisite(s)]. keepers, food-related costs and costs for materials the students will be using. Please consult the History ANTH-4212 (3) Advanced Zooarchaeology (3 hrs Department. Seminar/Discussion) This lecture, lab, and seminar course Cross-listed: HIST-3573(3), HIST-4573(3), offers in depth examination of select issues in ANTH-3273(3). zooarchaeological research and analysis, with special Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not emphasis on the interpretation of human animal relations in hold credit for this course and ANTH-3273 | HIST-3573 | past cultures. Topics vary but may include microscopic HIST-4573. analysis of bone and teeth, , quantification of taxonomic abundance, economic utility indices, mortality ANTH-4305 (3) Problems in Biological Anthropology profiles, and determination of animal domestication. (3 hrs Lecture) This is an advanced seminar designed to Cross-listed: BANT-4212(3). examine selected aspects of method and/or theory in Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not biological anthropology. hold credit for this course and BANT-4212. Cross-listed: BANT-4305(3). Requisite Courses: ANTH-3207 or BANT-3207 or or Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. hold credit for this course and BANT-4305. Requisite Courses: ANTH-2300 or BANT-2300 or ANTH-4213 (3) Advanced Archæological Theory (3 hrs permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Lecture) Major trends in the development and application of archaeological theory are explored, with special emphasis ANTH-4307 (3) Advanced Human Osteology (3 hrs on perspective initiated since the beginning of the 20th Seminar/Discussion) This course covers analysis and century. Additional in-depth work is required to receive interpretation of human osteological material. Topics include credit at the 4000 level. skeletal indicators of demographic, pathological, and Cross-listed: ANTH-3213(3). nutritional factors, and approaches to the analysis of these Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not types of data. An understanding of basic skeletal hold credit for this course and ANTH-3213. identification is assumed. Requisite Courses: ANTH-2200 or permission of the Note: Permission of the Department Chair is required to register. Students registering with a GPA of less than 3.0 in texts). Readings include selected works by Saussure, Anthropology require the instructor's signature. Peirce, Jakobson, Barthes, Derrida, Lévi-Strauss and Cross-listed: BANT-4307(3). others. Special emphasis is given to Lévi-Strauss' Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not structural analysis of myths. Through a variety of projects, hold credit for this course and ANTH-4304 | BANT-4307. students learn how to apply Lévi-Strauss' method to Requisite Courses: ANTH-3306 (or the former segment related myths and other texts into discrete units of ANTH-4306) or BANT-3306 or permission of the instructor plot, organize these into concordances, and determine [prerequisite(s)]. patterns of syntagmatic and paradigmatic association. The strengths and weaknesses of this method are also ANTH-4308 (3) Human Evolution (3 hrs Lecture) This discussed. course examines the evolution of our species, from the Cross-listed: LING-4005(3). earliest hominins to the appearance of anatomically modern Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not humans. Emphasis is on the material evidence for human hold credit for this course and LING-4005. evolution, and in particular the fossil record. Topics include Requisite Courses: ANTH-2100 and the environmental context of human evolution, the ANTH-2400/LING-2102 or permission of the instructor anatomical features of bipedalism, and the debates [prerequisite(s)]. surrounding the origins of Anatomically Modern Homo sapiens: Occasional laboratory sessions enhance and ANTH-4402 (3) Contemporary Linguistic Theory (30 expand upon the material presented in lectures. Additional hrs Lecture) In this course students explore several in-depth work is required to receive credit at the 4000 level. contemporary linguistic theories such as Gregory and Cross-listed: ANTH/BANT-3308(3) BANT-4308(3). Malcolm's communication linguistics; Halliday's systemic Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not functional linguistics; Pike's tagmemics; Lamb's hold credit for this course and ANTH-3308 | BANT-3308 | stratificational linguistics; and Chomsky's transformational BANT-4308. generative grammar as well as its development in Requisite Courses: ANTH-2300 or BANT-2300 or government binding theory. In addition certain theories are permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. introduced which explore the relationship between linguistics, society and culture. Examples include ANTH-4311 (3) Human Paleopathology (3 hrs Lecture) pragmatics and linguistic anthropology. This seminar critically examines biological and cultural Cross-listed: LING-4002(3). concepts and perspectives related to the study of health Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not and disease in past populations. Topics include trauma, hold credit for this course and LING-4002. joint disease, infections, paleoparasitology, congenital Requisite Courses: ANTH-3401 or permission of the disorders, and the role of human behaviour as a instructor [prerequisite(s)]. determinant of individual and population health outcomes. Cross-listed: BANT-4311(3). ANTH-4403 (3) History of Linguistics (3 hrs Lecture) In Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not this course students explore the history of linguistics from hold credit for this course and BANT-4311. Panini, Plato, and before the common , through Requisite Courses: ANTH-3306 (or the former the until the nineteen sixties. Theorists ANTH-4306) or BANT-3306 or permission of the instrcutor considered may include Thrax, Priscian, Sweet, Jespersen, [prerequisite(s)]. Humboldt, Malinowski, Bloomfield, Sapir, and Saussure. Cross-listed: LING-4001(3). ANTH-4400 (3) Language Typology (3 hrs Lecture) This Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not course examines and classifies a number of languages by hold credit for this course and ENGL-4801 | LING-4001. applying the basic concepts of Anthropological Linguistics Requisite Courses: ANTH-3401 or LING-3001 or to analysis of the phonology, morphology, syntax, permission of instructor [prerequisite(s)]. semantics, and pragmatics of various languages. The structure of these languages is compared and contrasted ANTH-4406 (3) Comparative Indo-European to explore typological patterns and explain structural Linguistics and Mythology (3 hrs Lecture) This course diversity of human languages. Relations between the proposes an integrated overview of Indo-European grammar and pragmatic features of the languages are also tradition based on comparative linguistics, mythology, explored. Additional in-depth work is required to receive archaeology, social structure and religion. A survey of credit at the 4000 level. Indo- European languages, ancient and modern, including Cross-listed: ANTH-3400(3), LING-3006(3) and their relationships, writing systems, and sociolinguistic LING-4006(3). context, is followed by an examination of problems in Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not analysis and reconstruction of Indo-European hold credit for this course and LING-4400. proto-language and proto- culture. The course further Requisite Courses: ANTH-2400 or permission of the explores major Indo-European mythological and poetic instructor [prerequisite(s)]. traditions, and possible reconstruction of their common sources. It also examines belief systems, literary ANTH-4401 (3) Semiotics and Structuralism (3 hrs continuations of mythopoetic material, archeological Seminar/Discussion) This course provides a theoretical evidence and historiographic records. Additional in-depth overview of semiotics (the study of signs and of sign work is required to receive credit at the 4000 level. systems) and structuralism (a specific method of analyzing Cross-listed: ANTH-3406(3), LING-3102(3) and LING-4102(3). Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not hold credit for this course and ANTH-3406 | LING-3102 | LING-4102.

ANTH-4411 (3) Indigenous Languages of South America (3 hrs Lecture) Presenting an integrated overview of the indigenous languages of South America, this course looks at main language families spoken there, their spatial distribution, history and classification, as well as their cultural background. With 53 language families and 55 isolates, South America is not only the most diverse region in linguistic terms, but also a storehouse of unusual structural features important for understanding the full range of possible variants of human language. The course also explores typological characteristics of South American languages, potential linguistic areas, proposals of more distant relationships, and the current situation of endangered languages in this region. Additional in-depth work is required to receive credit at the 4000-level. Cross-listed: ANTH-3411(3), LING-3104(3), LING-4104(3), and IS-3104(3). Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not hold credit for this course and ANTH-3411 | IS-3104 | LING-3104 | LING-4104. APPLIED COMPUTER

ACS-1453 (3) Introduction to Computers (3 hrs concurrently). Lecture) This course introduces students to the basic concepts of computers: types of computers, hardware, ACS-1904 (3) Programming Fundamentals II (3 hrs software, and types of application systems. Students Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course examines more advanced receive instruction in a variety of software intended for programming concepts using an object-oriented personal use. Software used include word processing, programming language. Topics to be covered include spreadsheets, databases, charting and graphing tools, and inheritance, polymorphism, sorting techniques, string common Internet clients and resources. There is an processing, interfaces, files and packages. extensive laboratory component. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Note: This course does not apply toward the Major or the and ACS-1905 | BUSC-1901 | BUSC-1902 | BUSC-1904 | Minor in Applied Computer Science. BUSC-1905. Requisite Courses: ACS-1903 with a minimum grade of ACS-1803 (3) Introduction to Information Systems (3 C [prerequisite(s)]; ACS-1904L (lab) (must be taken hrs Lecture) This course examines applications of concurrently). information technology to businesses and other organizations. After an introduction to computers and data ACS-1905 (3) Programming Fundamentals (3 hrs management, the course outlines various categories of Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course assumes that students information systems, (e.g., systems for transaction already have working knowledge of an object-oriented processing, managerial reporting, customer relationship programming language as well as effective use of data management, decision support, enterprise resource types and control structures. This course begins with an planning, and e-commerce), with examples from current overview of the object-oriented programming language and practice. development, system security, systems then more advanced topics in order to extend the student's consulting, and IT administration are also discussed. Focus programming skill. Topics to be covered include inheritance, is mostly on functional aspects of systems providing a polymorphism, sorting techniques, string processing, valuable background for students in applied computer interfaces, files and packages. science, business and administration, and other disciplines. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Students who require an introduction to personal and ACS-1904 | BUSC-1901 | BUSC-1902 | BUSC-1905. computers and productivity software should take Requisite Courses: Computer Science 40S with a ACS-1453(3). minimum grade of 75 or equivalent, plus ACS-1805 with a minimum grade of C or Pre-Calculus Math 40S or Applied ACS-1805 (3) Introduction to Programming (3 hrs Math 40S [prerequisite(s)]; ACS-1905L (lab) (must be taken Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course covers elementary concurrently). procedural programming concepts. Topics include: primitive data types and their manipulation, basic input and output ACS-2102 (3) Scientific Computing (3 hrs Lecture) and elementary control structures. In addition, topics Many problems arising in science are too difficult to solve related to a specific programming paradigm that is chosen analytically, and thus require analysis of some form by a for the course is covered. Students will gain hands-on computer. Using the language of C/C++, this course programming experience in the laboratory component of the introduces the most common programming constructs used course. in scientific computing. The critical importance of data Requisite Courses: ACS-1805L (lab) (must be taken structures to represent information is emphasized, which concurrently). naturally leads to an object-oriented approach to problem solving. The use of external libraries, such as those for ACS-1809 (3) Website Design and Development (3 numerical analysis, to solve more advanced problems are hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to the explored, with attention paid to checks that can be made on concepts, programming skills, and tools related to website the reliability of the results. design and development. The topics include: website Cross-listed: PHYS-2102(3). layout; creating tables, frames, menus and forms; Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course presenting multimedia on web pages; and Internet Protocols and PHYS-2102. such as HTTP and FTP. Students gain hands-on programming experience in designing websites using HTML ACS-2103 (3) Numeric and Symbolic Computing (3 and Cascading Style Sheets. hrs Lecture) This course provides an introduction to modern scientific software packages for numeric and ACS-1903 (3) Programming Fundamentals I (3 hrs symbolic computation that are commonly used in teaching, Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course introduces fundamental research and industry. Topics covered include functions, programming concepts using an object-oriented arrays, plotting, and data visualization. In an algorithmic programming language. Topics to be covered include self-contained way, this course introduces and discusses primitive data types and their manipulation, control algebra, linear algebra, integration, differentiation, and the structures, classes, objects and arrays. solution of differential equations with a focus on real world Requisite Courses: Pre-Calculus Math 40S or Applied and scientific applications. Although there is no Math 40S or ACS-1805 with a minimum grade of C university-level mathematics prerequisite, comfort with [prerequisite(s)]; ACS-1903L (lab) (must be taken basic algebra and rudimentary ideas in pre-calculus is assumed. it's important to businesses. Aside from security Cross-listed: PHYS-2103(3). technologies that can be implemented to safeguard assets, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course aspects of governance and management of information and PHYS-2103. security are considered. The development of good Requisite Courses: Pre-calculus Mathematics 40S or corporate information technologies policies and permission of the Physics Department [prerequisite(s)]; procedures, management of operational framework and Strongly recommended: Some knowledge in Introductory controls, and information security culture and awareness Calculus (recommended prerequisite). are discussed in this course. Requisite Courses: A minimum grade of C in ACS-2112 (3) Scientific Computing with Python (3 hrs ACS-1803(3) [prerequisite(s)]. Lecture) This Python language course shows students how to create basic programming structures in Python ACS-2906 (3) Computer Architecture and System including decisions, loops and more advanced topics such Software (3 hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) The course begins as object-oriented programming with classes and with discussions of the architecture of computer hardware exceptions. Unique Python data structures such as tuples and progresses to an examination of system software, and dictionaries are introduced. Students learn how to including its relationship to the hardware, its structure and create Python programs with graphic elements as well as design, and its impact on application software, system data visualization and publication quality figures. developers, and end-users. Operating system concepts Applications from a variety of scientific fields are such as memory management, process management, and discussed when appropriate. I/O sub-systems are covered. Other topics include Note: Experience with elementary computer programming language processors, system utilities, security issues, and is recommended. performance management. The course provides students a Cross-listed: PHYS-2112(3). hands-on experience of programming at different levels Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial such as high level, assembly, and machine code. basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who Requisite Courses: ACS-1904 or ACS-1905 with a successfully complete this course receive credit as minimum grade of C [prerequisite(s)]; ACS-2906L (lab) indicated. (must be taken concurrently). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and PHYS-2112. ACS-2909 (3) Internet Programming (3 hrs Lecture) This course provides students with an overview of Internet ACS-2814 (3) Applications of Database Systems (3 and World Wide Web programming, development tools, hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course introduces students resources, utilities, multimedia, and security issues. with limited computing experience to the principles of data Students will gain hands-on experience in a scripting management. The emphasis is on practical database language such as JavaScript, Rich Internet Applications experience reinforced through assignments and weekly (RIAs), Web Services, and Mobile Application Development. laboratory work. Students learn first to work with a Students not familiar with HTML and CSS are strongly workstation-based database system and subsequently encouraged to take ACS-1809(3). they are introduced to the design of databases and their Requisite Courses: ACS-1903 or ACS-1905 with a implementation in relational systems. Topics include tables, minimum grade of C [prerequisite(s)]. queries, forms, reports, importing and exporting data, structured query language, entity relationship models, the ACS-2913 (3) Software Requirements Analysis and relational data model, and normalization of databases. Design (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to Examples, assignments, and laboratory work are drawn the requirements definition phase of software from a variety of different disciplines. development. It provides coverage of both traditional and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course object-oriented approaches to requirements analysis and and ACS-2914. design of software used in business, real-time and Requisite Courses: ACS-2814L (lab) (must be taken embedded applications. Models, notations and processes concurrently). for requirements elicitation, representation, and design are discussed. ACS-2816 (3) Health Information Systems (3 hrs Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Lecture) This course provides an overview of the and ACS-2911 | ACS-2912. important topics in Health Informatics. It discusses data as Requisite Courses: ACS-1903 or ACS-1905 with a the building block for health care information including the minimum grade of C [prerequisite(s)]. basic concepts of data flow, data storage, and health record management within both private and public health ACS-2916 (3) Business Application Systems (3 hrs care systems. It then addresses important issues such as Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course firstly presents structured security, privacy, and standards. models for business processes and data needed in Requisite Courses: ACS-1803 with a minimum grade of common transaction processing systems such as order C or permission of the Department Chair [prerequisite(s)]. entry, invoicing, accounts receivable and payable, purchasing, inventory and general ledger. Also, system ACS-2821 (3) Information Security in Business (3 hrs support for manufacturing (e.g., supply chain management, Lecture) The course focuses on the business aspect of robotics), for marketing (e.g., sales force automation, information security, what information security is, and why customer relationship management), and for human resource management (e.g., candidate selection, collective have completed 30 credit hours in the Health Informatics bargaining support) is highlighted, and inter-system Stream and a 3.0 GPA or Department Chair's permission. interfaces are considered. Large, organization-wide, Cross-listed: COOP-3999(0 or 3). integrated enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems are Restrictions: Department Permission Required. Students discussed in the context of a business case. System may not hold credit for this course and COOP-3999. controls and security issues are outlined for the systems studied. ACS-3801 (3) Principles in Information Systems (3 Requisite Courses: ACS-1803 with a minimum grade of hrs Lecture) This course is the final course for the 3 year C [prerequisite(s)]; ACS-2916L (lab) (must be taken degree in the Information Systems and the Health concurrently). Informatics streams. The course can provide integration (e.g., project management), or provide more depth in ACS-2941 (3) Unix (3 hrs Lecture) This course provides specific areas of Information Systems in order to address students with advanced concepts and knowledge of Unix, specific thematic needs. one of the most widely used operating systems. The Note: Students cannot hold credit in ACS-3901. course introduces students to such topics as shells, filters Requisite Courses: ACS-2814 (or the former and pipelines, the Unix file system, processes and job ACS-2914), ACS-2909, ACS-2913, and ACS-2816 or control, and Internet communications. Emphasis is placed ACS-2916 with a minimum grade of C [prerequisite(s)]. on Unix shell programming, which provides valuable tools for developing powerful applications with a minimal amount ACS-3830 (3) Topics in Information Systems (3 hrs of written code. Lecture) This course treats specific topics in various areas Requisite Courses: ACS-1903 or ACS-1805 with a of Information Systems of interest to the students, faculty minimum grade of C [prerequisite(s)]. members, and industry partners. This course integrates practical experience with the study of information systems ACS-2947 (3) Data Structures and Algorithms (3 hrs in large organizations. The course is specifically designed Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course introduces fundamental for Information Systems stream students entering the work data structures using an object-oriented programming force. Students learn the strict professional requirements language. Topics to be covered include vectors, like quality assurance, standard compliances, risk multidimensional arrays, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, containments, and integration issues. The industry partner graphs, recursion and algorithms. provides students with organizational level requirements Requisite Courses: ACS-1904 or ACS-1905 with a and input. minimum grade of C [prerequisite(s)]; ACS-2947L (lab) Note: Students cannot hold credit in ACS-3901(3). (must be taken concurrently). Restrictions: Department Permission Required. Requisite Courses: ACS-2814, ACS-2909, ACS-2913, ACS-2951 (3) System Administration and and ACS-2916 with a minimum grade of C and permission Networking (3 hrs Lecture) This course covers basic of the Department Chair [prerequisite(s)]. system administration issues of Unix and Windows operating systems (OS), principles of networking, and ACS-3901 (3) Principles of Software Project TCP/IP (the Internet). Students are introduced to topics Management (3 hrs Lecture) This course covers such as system installation and maintenance, system, and principles and techniques of software project management, network security and setting up different application with emphasis on the theoretical underpinnings of the servers such as web and SQL. Students will gain competencies that are associated with software project considerable hands-on experience in installing, managing, management. The key concepts of project planning, and trouble-shooting networks on the Linux and Windows organization, and control are covered. Specific topics platforms. covered include task breakdown; estimating, scheduling, Note: In addition to Le3 there is also a La1. and tracking; process and project metrics; change control; Requisite Courses: ACS-2941 with a minimum grade of risk analysis and management; software quality and C [prerequisite(s)]. reliability models; quality assurance; and configuration management. ACS-3700 (3) Health Informatics Practicum (3 hrs Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) Health Informatics and BUSC-3901 | BUSC-3920. Practicum is a work placement in a healthcare environment. Requisite Courses: ACS-1904, ACS-2913 (or the former The course facilitates professional working experience in a ACS-2911 and ACS-2912), and ACS-2814 (or the former sponsoring health-related organization. The evaluation of ACS-2914), with a minimum grade of C [prerequisite(s)]. the student's performance is determined by the employer's performance evaluation, a work-term performance report ACS-3902 (3) Database Systems (3 hrs Lecture) This submitted by the student, and the departmental course introduces the theory of relational, network, and co-operative supervisor's evaluation. This course is graded hierarchical models. It covers in detail the techniques on a pass/fail basis. Approval must be obtained from the utilized in various stages of a relational database software supervising faculty member as well as from the Department development life cycle. These techniques include ERDs, Chair before enrollment. relational models, functional dependencies, normalization, Note: This course can only be take once for credit and physical data storage mechanisms. Query language towards a 3-year BA/BSc ACS degree program (Health fundamentals including relational algebra and SQL are also Informatics Stream). Requisites: Students should normally covered. A project involving the design and implementation of a database is required. concepts of design, implementation, and evaluation of Requisite Courses: ACS-2913 (or the former ACS-2911 human-computer interfaces. Topics include human and ACS-2912) and ACS-2814 (or the former ACS-2914) cognitive aspects; user-centred design; design goals and with a minimum grade of C [prerequisite(s)]. principles; interface and interaction types; prototyping and construction; and evaluation methods. In order to make a ACS-3907 (3) eCommerce (3 hrs Lecture) In this course balance between theory and practice, emphasis is placed our students will explore new opportunities, risks, and on a course-end project involving design, implementation technologies related to electronic commerce. Both business and evaluation of the user interface for a specific and technical issues are addressed. Business issues will application. In this double-numbered course, the include the role of eCommerce in the marketing plan and course-end project work in ACS-3916(3) is oriented organizational strategy in both business-to-customer and toward the Applied Computer Science stream, while in business-to-business contexts. Technical topics will ACS-3816(3) it is adapted to the Information Systems and include architecture, application models, payment strategies Health Informatics streams. and security. This course is designed for double majors in Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Applied Computer Science and Business and and ACS-3816. Administration. Requisite Courses: ACS-2909 and ACS-2814 (or the Requisite Courses: ACS-1803 with a minimum grade of former ACS-2914) with a minimum grade of C C or permission of the Department Chair [prerequisite(s)]; [prerequisite(s)]. ACS-1809 (must be taken previously or at the same time as this course). ACS-3921 (3) Computer Security and Privacy (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to the security ACS-3909 (3) Advanced Internet Programming (3 hrs and privacy issues in computer systems. It covers the Lecture) This course provides students with a thorough fundamental computer security techniques such as knowledge of server-side web programming. Topics encryption methods, public key cryptography, hash include n-tiered systems, session tracking, interfaces and function and signature schemes, key exchange protocols, stereotypes, dynamic web page design, database authentication and access control models. The course also connections, and XML processing. Students gain examines the applications of these techniques for considerable knowledge and experience by learning multimedia security, intrusion detection, copyright and important features needed for e-commerce, applying password protection, and protection from malicious advanced web application techniques, and utilizing web programs. Privacy preserving techniques such as data databases. aggregation, perturbation, k-anonymity and l-diversity, and Requisite Courses: ACS-1904, ACS-2909, ACS-2814 ethical issues are also discussed. Students at the (or the former ACS-2914) with a minimum grade of C ACS-4921(3) level additionally undertake comprehensive [prerequisite(s)]. project on a topic related to computer security and privacy. Cross-listed: ACS-4921(3). ACS-3911 (3) Computer Networks (3 hrs Lecture) This Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course course is an introduction to fundamental concepts in and ACS-4921. computer networks. It covers the principles, technology, Requisite Courses: ACS-2906 and ACS-2947 with a protocols, and algorithms of computer networks. The minimum grade of C, or permission of the Department Chair layers of the network stack are discussed, with particular [prerequisite(s)]. focus on the internet network stack. Topics of discussion include network technologies, simple and sliding window ACS-3923 (3) Technical Communications in ICT protocols, routing and routing algorithms, congestion Professions (3 hrs Lecture) This course addresses control, quality of service, security, and network written and oral communication in Information and applications. Communication Technology (ICT) work environments. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Effective communication with technical personnel, system and ACS-3811. users and organizational executives are emphasized. This Requisite Courses: ACS-2909 and ACS-2913 (or the will include items of business correspondence, common former ACS-2911 and ACS-2912) with a minimum grade of technical documents in system development and items of C [prerequisite(s)]. end-user documentation. Students will not only learn about content and format of items of writing but will also develop ACS-3913 (3) Software Design and Architecture (3 writing skills through numerous practical exercises. Oral hrs Lecture) This is an advanced course in software communication in requirements elicitation, meetings, and design that examines recent advances in the design of professional presentations will also be included. larger application systems. Topics include software Requisite Courses: ACS-2913 (or the former ACS-2911 architecture, object-oriented analysis and design, software and ACS-2912) with a minimum grade of C or permission of patterns, and the Unified Modeling Language (UML). the Department Chair [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: ACS-2913 (or the former ACS-2911 and ACS-2912) and ACS-2947 with a minimum grade of C ACS-3930 (3) Topics in Applied Computer Science (3 [prerequisite(s)]. hrs Lecture) This course treats specific topics in various areas of applied computer science of interest to the ACS-3916 (3) Human Computer Interaction (3 hrs student and faculty member. Lecture) This course covers the fundamentals and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and BUSC-3930. development project undertaken by students in teams. A Requisite Courses: ACS-2913 (or the former ACS-2911 project proposal, project plan, regular status reports, and a and ACS-2912) and ACS-2947 with a minimum grade of C completion report are required. All work must conform to [prerequisite(s)]. proper analysis, design, programming, and documentation standards. Each team holds status reviews at appropriate ACS-3931 (3) Principles of Operating Systems (3 hrs life-cycle milestones. A final presentation and a formal Lecture) This course covers the principles and design of demonstration of the system are required at the end of the operating systems. In the first half of the course students project. are introduced to multiprogramming and become familiar Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course with the process and thread abstractions. Students are and BUSC-3920 | BUSC-4901. introduced to concurrent programming. Topics include: Requisite Courses: ACS-2814 (or the former mutual exclusion, synchronization, and inter-process ACS-2914), ACS-3901, ACS-3902, and ACS-3913 with a communication. The second half of the course introduces minimum grade of C, and a minimum Average GPA of 2.0 in students to the roles and components of operating all ACS-xxxx courses previously taken [prerequisite(s)]. systems, and how these components interact. Topics include process control, memory management, file ACS-4902 (3) Advanced Database Systems (3 hrs systems, and input/output. Lecture) This course is a continuation of ACS-3902(3). It Requisite Courses: ACS-2906 and ACS-2947 with a deals with advanced topics in database design, use, and minimum grade of C [prerequisite(s)]. administration. Database design topics include enhanced ER diagrams and object-oriented data modelling. Other ACS-3941 (3) Implementation Issues in Object topics include transaction processing, concurrency control Oriented Languages (3 hrs Lecture) This course and recovery, security, and integrity. Object-oriented focuses on advanced features of a contemporary OO databases and client-server architectures will also be language. Emphasis is on implementation issues and discussed. strengthening programming skills of students. Requisite Courses: ACS-2947 and ACS-3902 with a Requisite Courses: ACS-2913 (or the former ACS-2911 minimum grade of C [prerequisite(s)]. and ACS-2912) and ACS-2947 with a minimum grade of C [prerequisite(s)]. ACS-4904 (3) Data Warehousing (3 hrs Lecture) This course explores the role of data warehouses in supporting ACS-3947 (3) Algorithm Design (3 hrs Lecture) This decision-making in organizations. Topics include definition course focuses on the connection between data of a data warehouse; extracting, cleansing, and structures and the corresponding algorithms, including transforming data; building and maintaining the warehouse; simple analysis of computational complexity. The emphasis meta data; dimensional analysis and multidimensional is on comparative study of alternate ways to implement modeling; multidimensional data structures; schemas; solutions to computing problems. OLAP (On Line Analytical Processing); drilling down and Requisite Courses: ACS-2913 (or the former ACS-2911 across; and web deployment. and ACS-2912) and ACS-2947 with a minimum grade of C Requisite Courses: ACS-2913 (or the former ACS-2911 [prerequisite(s)]. and ACS-2912), ACS-2947, and ACS-3902 with a minimum grade of C [prerequisite(s)]. ACS-4306 (3) Applied Parallel Programming (3 hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course focuses on parallel and ACS-4906 (3) Conceptual Modeling (3 hrs Lecture) This distributed computing in high-performance scientific course explores the role of conceptual modeling in the application, using the parallel execution model, a development of information systems. A conceptual model is generalization of the traditional single threaded paradigm. an abstraction of reality that serves as a communication The course covers multi-core processors, concurrency, mechanism between the stakeholders of a system and its parallel execution, latency, communication and coordination developers. The course covers various approaches among processes, message passing, shared-memory proposed for conceptual modeling including UML, EERD, models, optimization techniques, parallel algorithms, and ORM. Students gain considerable practical experience decomposition strategies, system architecture, and with pertinent software tools. performance analysis and tuning. Using the language Requisite Courses: ACS-3902 with a minimum grade of C/C++, students gain hands on experience writing scalable C [prerequisite(s)]. parallel applications for Graphics Processing Units. Note: Students who have taken ACS-4306 will not be ACS-4921 (3) Computer Security and Privacy (3 hrs eligible to take the Master of Science course GACS-7306. Lecture) This course introduces students to the security Requisite Courses: ACS-2947 with a minimum grade of and privacy issues in computer systems. It covers the C+ and ACS-3913 with a minimum grade of C fundamental computer security techniques such as [prerequisite(s)]; ACS-4306L (lab) (must be taken encryption methods, public key cryptography, hash concurrently). function and signature schemes, key exchange protocols, authentication and access control models. The course also ACS-4901 (6) Senior Systems Development Project examines the applications of these techniques for (3 hrs Lecture | Project / Thesis) This course applies the multimedia security, intrusion detection, copyright and principles and techniques of software project management password protection, and protection from malicious covered in ACS-3901(3) to a significant systems programs. Privacy preserving techniques such as data aggregation, perturbation, k-anonymity and l-diversity, and agglomeration of computational resources are discussed. ethical issues are also discussed. Students at the Other topics include implementation challenges such as ACS-4921 level additionally undertake a comprehensive synchronization and replication in the presence of faults. project on a topic related to computer security and privacy. Common system architectures that address some of these Cross-listed: ACS-3921(3). challenges are also introduced. Students are expected to Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course implement some of these architectures to reinforce the and ACS-3921. lecture material. Requisite Courses: ACS-2906 and ACS-2947 with a Requisite Courses: ACS-2906, ACS-3911, and minimum grade of C or permission of the Department Chair MATH-1401 with a minimum grade of C [prerequisite(s)]. [prerequisite(s)].

ACS-4930 (6) Research Project in Applied Computer Science (3 hrs Directed Reading) This course is designed to allow a student to conduct a specific research project under the supervision of a faculty member. An essential component of the course is an oral presentation and a written report of the results. Approval for the planned project must be obtained from the supervising faculty member as well as from the Department Chair before enrolment. Restrictions: Department Permission Required. Students may not hold credit for this course and BUSC-4930. Requisite Courses: 30 credit hours of course work in Applied Computer Science and written permission from the Department Chair [prerequisite(s)].

ACS-4931 (3) Research Project in Applied Computer Science (3 hrs Directed Reading) This course is designed to allow a student to conduct a specific research project under the supervision of a faculty member. An essential component of the course is an oral presentation and a written report of the results. Approval for the planned project must be obtained from the supervising faculty member as well as from the Department Chair before enrolment. Restrictions: Department Permission Required. Students may not hold credit for this course and BUSC-4931. Requisite Courses: 30 credit hours of course work in Applied Computer Science and written permission from the Department Chair [prerequisite(s)].

ACS-4953 (3) Introduction to Machine Learning (3 hrs Lecture) This course is an introduction to the broad field of machine learning. Machine learning provides the technical basis for data mining. This course examines the foundations and implementations of several machine learning algorithms. Specific topics include: rule and tree-based classifiers, bayesian models, clustering techniques and numeric prediction. Popular machine learning tool sets will be used to gain practical hands-on experience in i) preparing the data, ii) applying the various learning techniques and iii) interpreting the credibility of the results. Requisite Courses: ACS-3902, MATH-1401, and any 3 credit Statistics course with a minimum grade of C [prerequisite(s)].

ACS-4954 (3) Introduction to Distributed Systems (3 hrs Lecture) This course is an introduction to the broad field of distributed systems. It focuses on introducing students to the benefits, challenges, methods, and implementations of distributed systems. Reasons for deploying distributed systems, such as tolerance and BIOANTHROPOLOGY

BANT-2119 (3) Medical Anthropology (3 hrs Lecture) Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Medical anthropology is a subfield of anthropology. It and ANTH-2304. informs our understandings of the experiences and Requisite Courses: Completion of 30 credit hours distribution of health, the prevention and the treatment of [prerequisite(s)]. the sick in different cultural groups and the role of pluralistic medical systems. Critical health disparities BANT-3206 (3) The Origins of Human Culture (3 hrs between marginalized populations in developed countries Lecture) Looking at developments in the Old World, this as well as between developing and developed countries course examines the two million year period from the first are increasingly prevalent and complex in nature. This appearance of human culture to the agricultural revolution course looks at ethnomedicine, disease ecology and some twelve thousand years ago. It emphasizes the Indigenous perspectives on health and illness. increase in cultural complexity and specialization over time, Cross-listed: ANTH-2119(3). and the way that culture has permitted humans to adapt to Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course their environment. As well as discussing the general nature and ANTH-2119. of the prehistoric record, the course examines such Requisite Courses: ANTH-1001(6), ANTH-1002(3) or general questions as the origins of cultural behaviour, the ANTH-1005(3) or permission of the instructor ecology and chronology of the Pleistocene period, [prerequisite(s)]. demographic evolution and reconstruction, and the relationship between cultural and biological evolution. BANT-2216 (3) Archaeology in Popular Culture (3 hrs Additional in-depth work is required to receive credit at the Lecture) From Indiana Jones to Tomb Raider to YouTubers 4000 level. covering the discovery and excavation of prior sites of Cross-listed: ANTH-3206(3), ANTH/BANT-4206(3). human occupation, Archaeology holds a special place in Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course the public imagination. Archaeologists have been depicted and ANTH-3202 | ANTH-3206 | ANTH-4206 | BANT-4206. in popular culture through many formats, including movies Requisite Courses: ANTH-2200 or permission of the and TV shows, literature and comics, news media, video instructor [prerequisite(s)]. games and more. This course critically assesses the ways in which archaeology is presented to the general public, by BANT-3207 (3) Zooarcheology (3 hrs Lecture) This both archaeologists and non-archaeologists, and evaluates course introduces analytical and theoretical aspects of how the representation of archaeologists matters (or zooarchaeology through lectures and laboratory exercises should matter) to a general audience. focusing on the comparative skeletal anatomy of various Cross-listed: ANTH-2216 mammal, bird, fish, amphibian, and reptile species. Topics Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial include post-depositional changes to bones, sampling and basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who recovering faunal remains, ageing and sexing of bone, successfully complete this course receive credit as reconstructing past environments and human dietary indicated. strategies, evidence of animal domestication, and bone tool Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course technology. and ANTH-2216. Cross-listed: ANTH-3207(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course BANT-2300 (3) Method and Theory in Biological and ANTH-3207. Anthropology (3 hrs Lecture) This core course examines Requisite Courses: ANTH-2200 or permission of the the theoretical framework of Biological (Physical) instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Anthropology and the nature of current human biological variation. Topics include evolutionary theory, human BANT-3306 (3) Human Osteology (3 hrs Lecture) This genetics, modern human biological variation, human course covers basic human osteological development and adaptation to the environment, and demographic identification. Topics include indicators of age and sex and processes. comparison of primate and non-primate features. Emphasis Cross-listed: ANTH-2300(3). is on the laboratory identification of complete and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course incomplete human skeletal material. and ANTH-2300. Cross-listed: ANTH-3306(3). Requisite Courses: ANTH-1001 or ANTH-1003 or any Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course 1000-level Biology course, or permission of the instructor and ANTH-3306 | ANTH-4306. [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: Credit in at least one course in Physical/Biological Anthropology, or permission of the BANT-2304 (3) Introduction to Forsensic instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Anthropology (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces key aspects of forensic anthropology in a framework that is not BANT-3308 (3) Human Evolution (3 hrs Lecture) This dependent upon prior knowledge of scientific methods. course examines the evolution of our species, from the Topics include approaches to the interpretation of skeletal earliest hominins to the appearance of anatomically modern remains and DNA evidence, and the application of humans. Emphasis is on the material evidence for human information from other sciences to forensic analysis. evolution, and in particular the fossil record. Topics include Cross-listed: ANTH-2304(3). the environmental context of human evolution, the anatomical features of bipedalism, and the debates Topics vary but may include microscopic analysis of bone surrounding the origins of Anatomically Modern Homo and teeth, paleoecology, quantification of taxonomic sapiens: Occasional laboratory sessions enhance and abundance, economic utility indices, mortality profiles, and expand upon the material presented in lectures. determination of animal domestication. Cross-listed: ANTH-3308(3), ANTH/BANT-4308(3). Cross-listed: ANTH-4212(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and ANTH-3308 | ANTH-4308 | BANT-4308. and ANTH-4212. Requisite Courses: ANTH-2300 or BANT-2300 or Requisite Courses: ANTH-3207 or BANT-3207 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)].

BANT-4001 (3 or 6) Directed Readings/Research in BANT-4230 (6) International Field School (Project / Anthropology (3 hrs Directed Reading) This is a course Thesis with variable meeting hours) This field school in which enables a student to acquaint himself or herself with Archaeology and Bioarchaeology provides in-depth training the frontiers of Anthropological knowledge. In conjunction in excavation, documentation, and analysis of material from with an Instructor the student prepares a formal paper. an archaeological site and is typically located outside This may be based upon specialized library research, Canada (previous sessions were held in Serbia and laboratory work or field work. Jamaica). Undergraduate students form University of Cross-listed: ANTH-4001 Winnipeg are given preference in registration, however, Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. the field course is open to upper undergraduate and graduate students from other universities. Students are BANT-4011 (6) Anthropology Honours Thesis (6 hrs required to consult the Department Chair regarding the Thesis) This course is intended for but not restricted to yearly location of the field course. students in the Honours program. Students undertake an Cross-listed: ANTH-4230(6). independant research project in an area of anthropological Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. Students interest. Presentation of the results verbally and in thesis may not hold credit for this course and ANTH-4230. form to the Anthropology Department is an integral part of Requisite Courses: ANTH-2200 and ANTH-2300 the course. Each project is supervised by a faculty [prerequisite(s)]. member. Cross-listed: ANTH-4011(6). BANT-4303 (3) Problems in Human and Primate Restrictions: Department Permission Required. Students Evolution (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This is an advanced may not hold credit for this course and ANTH-4011. seminar designed to examine selected aspects of human Requisite Courses: 9 credit hours from ANTH-2100, and/or primate evolution in detail. ANTH-2200, ANTH-2300, or ANTH-2400 (as appropriate to Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course the thesis topic) plus at least 6 credit hours at the 3000 and ANTH-4303. level and 6 credit hours from the 4000 level Requisite Courses: At least one course in Biological [prerequisite(s)]. Anthropology or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. BANT-4206 (3) The Origins of Human Culture (3 hrs Lecture) Looking at developments in the Old World, this BANT-4305 (3) Problems in Biological Anthropology course examines the two million year period from the first (3 hrs Lecture) This is an advanced seminar designed to appearance of human culture to the agricultural revolution examine selected aspects of method and/or theory in some twelve thousand years ago. It emphasizes the biological anthropology. increase in cultural complexity and specialization over time, Cross-listed: ANTH-4305(3). and the way that culture has permitted humans to adapt to Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course their environment. As well as discussing the general nature and ANTH-4305. of the prehistoric record, the course examines such Requisite Courses: ANTH-2300 or BANT-2300 or general questions as the origins of cultural behaviour, the permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. ecology and chronology of the Pleistocene period, demographic evolution and reconstruction, and the BANT-4307 (3) Advanced Human Osteology (3 hrs relationship between cultural and biological evolution. Seminar/Discussion) This course covers analysis and Additional in-depth work is required to receive credit at the interpretation of human osteological material. Topics include 4000 level. skeletal indicators of demographic, pathological, and Cross-listed: ANTH/BANT-3206(3), ANTH-4206(3). nutritional factors, and approaches to the analysis of these Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course types of data. An understanding of basic skeletal and ANTH-3202 | ANTH-3206 | ANTH-4206 | BANT-3206. identification is assumed. Requisite Courses: ANTH-2200 or permission of the Note: Permission of the Department Chair is required to instructor [prerequisite(s)]. register. Students registering with a GPA of less than 3.0 in Anthropology require the instructor's signature. BANT-4212 (3) Advanced Zooarcheology (3 hrs Cross-listed: ANTH-4307(3). Lecture) This lecture, lab, and seminar course offers in Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course depth examination of select issues in zooarchaeological and ANTH-4304 | ANTH-4307. research and analysis, with special emphasis on the Requisite Courses: ANTH-3306 (or the former interpretation of human animal relations in past cultures. ANTH-4306) or BANT-3306 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)].

BANT-4308 (3) Human Evolution (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines the evolution of our species, from the earliest hominins to the appearance of anatomically modern humans. Emphasis is on the material evidence for human evolution, and in particular the fossil record. Topics include the environmental context of human evolution, the anatomical features of bipedalism, and the debates surrounding the origins of Anatomically Modern Homo sapiens: Occasional laboratory sessions enhance and expand upon the material presented in lectures. Additional in-depth work is required to receive credit at the 4000 level. Cross-listed: ANTH-4308(3), ANTH/BANT-3308(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and ANTH-3308 | ANTH-4308 | BANT-3308. Requisite Courses: ANTH-2300 or BANT-2300 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)].

BANT-4311 (3) Human Palaeopathology (3 hrs Lecture) This seminar critically examines biological and cultural concepts and perspectives related to the study of health and disease in past populations. Topics include trauma, joint disease, infections, paleoparasitology, congenital disorders, and the role of human behaviour as a determinant of individual and population health outcomes. Cross-listed: ANTH-4311(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and ANTH-4311. Requisite Courses: ANTH-3306 (or the former ANTH-4306) or BANT-3306 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. BIOLOGY

BIOL-1005 (6) Concepts in Science (3 hrs Lecture) This to satisfy the requirements for a major in Biology. Students course explores science at a qualitative level from this can elect to take up to 6 additional credit hours at the 1000 interdisciplinary viewpoint, with an aim to foster scientific level; however, these additional credit hours will not count literacy and develop critical thinking skills that are so crucial towards the requirement for a major in Biology. Students in today's society. Topics are drawn from biology, who wish to use BIOL-1112(6) (Human Anatomy and chemistry, geography, and physics, and range from the Physiology) as a prerequisite for advanced courses in large - the universe, the , and ecosystems - to the Biology must obtain the permission of the Department Chair. small - cells, , and atoms. Emphasis is placed on Requisite Courses: BIOL-1112L (lab) (must be taken the unifying concepts running through such diversity, with concurrently). activities and demonstrations forming an integral component. BIOL-1115 (3) Cells and Cellular Processes (3 hrs Cross-listed: MULT-1005(6) and PHYS-1005(6). Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course will focus on the structural Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course components, biochemistry, and physiology of cells. Topics and MULT-1005 | PHYS-1005. to be covered will include structure and function of macromolecules, introduction to metabolism, cells and cell BIOL-1102 (6) Biology and Human Concerns (3 hrs structure, cellular respiration, , mitosis and Lecture) This course deals with the chemistry of life, meiosis, life cycles, Mendelian genetics, chromosomes and cellular structure and function, genetics, natural heredity, DNA structure and replication, transcription and ecosystems, impact of human populations and activities, translation, and DNA technology. The laboratory component food and safety issues, consumer health of this course will both supplement and support the lecture awareness, global and Manitoban environmental concerns. material. The course is designed for students who intend to (a) major in Biology, (b) take a teaching Major or Minor in BIOL-1103 (6) Human Biology (3 hrs Lecture) This Biology in the BEd program, (c) take a BSc in Environmental course deals with the fundamental principles of anatomy, Studies, or (d) take a BA in the B stream of Developmental physiology, reproduction, and development. It deals with Studies. biological theories and practices using humans as the Note: Students who have credit in one of Chemistry 40S principal example. and Pre-Calculus Mathematics 40S, but not in both, may, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course under certain conditions, qualify to register in this course. and KIN-2204. Note: Cells and Cellular Processes is a prerequisite for all 2000-, 3000- and 4000-level courses in Biology It is also a BIOL-1106 (3) Environmental Biology (3 hrs Lecture) required course for entry to Agriculture, Dentistry, Human This course will provide students with an understanding of Ecology, Medical Rehabilitation, Nursing Education, the interrelationship of living with each other and Optometry, Pharmacy, and Veterinary Medicine. Note: with their environment. The course will examine the Students must obtain credit in both BIOL-1115(3) and following: the biological basis of environmental damage BIOL-1116(3) to satisfy the requirements for a major in caused by human population growth; the use and depletion Biology. Students can elect to take up to 6 additional credit of resources; pollution; and ways in which environmental hours at the 1000 level; however, these additional credit problems can be minimized. hours will not count towards the requirement for a major in Note: BIOL-1106 may be used towards fulfilling the Biology. Students who wish to use BIOL-1112(6) (Human science requirement for the BA degree. This course cannot Anatomy and Physiology) as a prerequisite for advanced be used to fulfill the requirements for the Biology major. courses in Biology must obtain the permission of the Note: Students must obtain credit in both BIOL-1115(3) and Department Chair. BIOL-1116(3) to satisfy the requirements for a major in Requisite Courses: Pre-Calculus Math 40S or Applied Biology. Students can elect to take up to 6 additional credit Math 40S, and Chemistry 40S [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-1115L hours at the 1000 level; however, these additional credit (lab) (must be taken concurrently). hours will not count towards the requirement for a major in Biology. Students who wish to use BIOL-1112(6) (Human BIOL-1116 (3) Evolution, Ecology and Biodiversity (3 Anatomy and Physiology) as a prerequisite for advanced hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course surveys evolution, courses in Biology must obtain the permission of the ecology and biodiversity. Specific topics include Department Chair. evolutionary mechanisms, microevolution, speciation, phylogeny, systematics, and BIOL-1112 (6) Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hrs diversity, behavioural, population, community and Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course deals with the biological ecology, and conservation biology. The study of the human ; microscopic and gross laboratory emphasizes the diversity of living organisms. anatomy; cellular and general physiology, and human Note: Students who have credit in one of Chemistry 40S genetics. This course is a prerequisite for the Degree and Pre-Calculus Mathematics 40S, but not in both, may, program in Athletic Therapy. under certain conditions, qualify to register in this course. Note: Students who wish to use this course as a Note: Evolution, Ecology and Biodiversity is a prerequisite prerequisite for advanced courses in Biology must obtain for all 2000-, 3000- and 4000-level courses in Biology It is the permission of the Department Chair. Note: Students also a required course for entry to Agriculture, Dentistry, must obtain credit in both BIOL-1115(3) and BIOL-1116(3) Human Ecology, Medical Rehabilitation, Nursing Education, Optometry, Pharmacy, and Veterinary Medicine. Note: (3 hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course provides Students must obtain credit in both BIOL-1115(3) and an introduction to the morphology, life histories, evolution BIOL-1116(3) to satisfy the requirements for a major in and ecology of the , fungi, mosses and their allies. Biology. Students can elect to take up to 6 additional credit Emphasis will be placed on local organisms. The laboratory hours at the 1000 level; however, these additional credit work is a major component of the course. hours will not count towards the requirement for a major in Requisite Courses: BIOL-1115 and BIOL-1116 Biology. Students who wish to use BIOL-1112(6) (Human [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-2152L (lab) (must be taken Anatomy and Physiology) as a prerequisite for advanced concurrently). courses in Biology must obtain the permission of the Department Chair. BIOL-2153 (3) Biology of Vascular Plants (3 hrs Lecture Requisite Courses: Pre-Calculus Mathematics 40S or | 3 hrs Lab) This course explores the evolution and ecology Applied Mathematics 40S, and Chemistry 40S of the nine extant groups of vascular plants. Their success [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-1116L (lab) (must be taken in ancient and contemporary environments is examined concurrently). through consideration of structural diversity, life history, and reproductive biology. Emphasis will be placed on local BIOL-2111 (6) Comparative Zoology (3 hrs flora. Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course deals with the functional Requisite Courses: BIOL-1115 and BIOL-1116 anatomy, adaptations, and evolution of the Protochordata, [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-2153L (lab) (must be taken , Chrondrichthyes, , Amphibia, concurrently). Reptilia, Aves, and Mammalia. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course BIOL-2301 (3) Genetics (3 hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) and BIOL-2116. Genetics is central to the study of Biology. It deals with the Requisite Courses: BIOL-1115 and BIOL-1116 processes of heredity at all levels, from molecules to [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-2111L (lab) (must be taken populations. Genetic analysis is a logical process; the concurrently). steps we use today are much the same as those employed by Mendel. Genetic phenomena are analyzed using BIOL-2115 (3) Biology of the (3 hrs chemical, biochemical, mathematical, and physical Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course provides a synopsis of the techniques. This course will give you an understanding of major taxa of invertebrates to demonstrate the richness in the subject as a whole and provide you with a sound basis diversity of this dominant sub-group of animals and to for evaluating contemporary issues such as genetic illustrate their importance to the functioning of natural engineering, environmental mutagens, heritable human ecosystems. Major aspects of biology that diseases etc. Topics to be covered will include: extensions distinguish invertebrates from and unite them with other to Mendelian analysis, mapping techniques, gene mutation, taxa are considered in detail. The major biological pillars - the effects of changes in chromosome number and anatomy, physiology, behaviour, ecology and evolution - chromosome structure, the genetics of and their are emphasized from a systems approach with viruses, the nature of the gene, recombinant DNA appropriate, comparative examples drawn from different technology, and population genetics. invertebrate groups to explain how disparate animal groups Requisite Courses: BIOL-1115 and BIOL-1116 solve similar survival and reproductive problems posed by [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-2301L (lab) (must be taken a common environment. concurrently). Requisite Courses: BIOL-1115 and BIOL-1116 [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-2115L (lab) (must be taken BIOL-2401 (1) Forest Field Skills Camp (3 hrs Lecture) concurrently). This intensive two-week field course is mandatory for students in the Forest Ecology program and is designed to BIOL-2116 (3) Biology of the (3 hrs give students field survival and basic forestry skills. Topics Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course introduces students to the include bush camp construction; safe use of boats, ATVs, evolution, diversity and functional anatomy of and chain saws; and basic bush survival skills. Students animals including fishes, , , , and also learn how to correctly use topographical maps, . We focus on major transformations in vertebrate compasses, air photos, GIS maps and other forestry life (e.g., the basic body plan; the move from water to ; equipment. This course is offered at University College of the origin of flight; endothermy) and the evolutionary and the North at The Pas, Manitoba. ecological processes underlying these transformations. Cross-listed: ENV-2401(1). Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who and ENV-2401. successfully complete this course receive credit as indicated. BIOL-2403 (3) Principles of Ecology (3 hrs Lecture | 3 Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course hrs Lab) This course is concerned with general concepts and BIOL-2111. in ecology. Topics covered will include energy flow, Requisite Courses: BIOL-1115 and BIOL-1116 biochemical cycles, populations, communities, and human [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-2116L (lab) (must be taken ecology. concurrently). Requisite Courses: BIOL-1115 and BIOL-1116 [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-2403L (lab) (must be taken BIOL-2152 (3) Introduction to Algae, Fungi and concurrently). of the origin and present composition of the Manitoba flora, BIOL-2451 (3) Introduction to Animal Behaviour (3 hrs identification, description, collection, nomenclature, Lecture) This course provides an introduction to the classification, and evolutionary relationships of plants. evolutionary basis of animal behaviour, covering such Laboratory work consists of examination of the more topics as the relationship between genes and behaviour, important plant families and habitats in the province. communication, foraging, locomotion, mating behaviour, and Requisite Courses: BIOL-2153 [prerequisite(s)]; the social interactions that contribute to the biological BIOL-3152L (lab) (must be taken concurrently). success of animals. Each of the major topics is outlined with respect to cost and benefits of different behaviours BIOL-3163 (3) Plant Anatomy and Physiology (3 hrs within particular ecological contexts and explicit examples Lecture) This course examines the anatomy and are drawn from different animal taxa to illustrate the physiology of plants. Topics include plant and cell concepts. The course is expected to provide a foundation architecture, energy flow, acquisition and transport of and context for other related disciplines in biology, resources, signal transduction, growth and allocation, and especially physiology and ecology, and to illustrate how life cycles. Readings and assignments emphasize behaviours function to solve problems for animals. interactions between plants and their environments, Requisite Courses: BIOL-1115 and BIOL-1116 or interdependence between plants and other organisms, and BIOL-1102 [prerequisite(s)]. plant adaptations to stress, disturbance, and competition. Requisite Courses: BIOL-2153 [prerequisite(s)]. BIOL-2477 (3) Forest Measurement (3 hrs Lecture) Students study the various methods, techniques, and BIOL-3202 (3) Histology (3 hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This statistical approaches to measuring tree growth and course examines the microscopic structure of vertebrate assessing forest inventory. This course examines tissues and organs, with stress on mammalian histology. individual tree growth and measurement(growth and yield) Consideration is also given to structure-function and the measurement of standing and harvested trees from relationships. an inventory and volume perspective. Requisite Courses: BIOL-1115 and BIOL-1116 Note: This course is intended for students enrolled in the [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-3202L (lab) (must be taken Forest Ecology Program in Environmental Studies. Students concurrently). not in this program but wishing to take this course need the permission of the instructor. BIOL-3221 (3) Cell Biology (3 hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) Requisite Courses: STAT-1301 or STAT-1501 (or the This course examines the ultrastructure of cells and former STAT-1201) or PSYC-2101 or GEOG-2309 (must be sub-cellular organelles. The study includes the taken previously or at the same time as this course). interrelationship of structure and function, cellular biochemistry, bioenergetics, and cellular differentiation. BIOL-2902 (3) Biology of Bacteria and (3 hrs Note: Students are advised not to attempt this course Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course provides an introduction to unless they have obtained a grade of at least C in the morphology, cellular physiology, ecology and CHEM-2202(3) and CHEM-2203(3). biotechnology applications of the domains Bacteria and Requisite Courses: BIOL-1115 and BIOL-1116 Archaea. In the laboratory, emphasis is placed on [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-3221L (lab) (must be taken examining the fundamental principles and methods used in concurrently). culturing, characterizing, and classifying Bacteria. Requisite Courses: BIOL-1115 and BIOL-1116 and BIOL-3303 (3) Molecular Genetics and Genomics (3 CHEM-1111 and CHEM-1112 [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-2902L hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course deals with basic (lab) (must be taken concurrently). genetic techniques and phenomena at the molecular level. Topics covered include transcription, translation and the BIOL-3112 (3) Ecology and Evolution of Mammals (3 genetic code, regulation of gene expression in hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) The ecology and evolution of living and , recombinant DNA technology and its mammals is examined by considering aspects of their applications, genomics, manipulation of sequence database evolutionary history, behaviour and ecology, drawing information and sequence data analysis. comparisons with other vertebrate groups. Lab exercises Requisite Courses: BIOL-2301 [prerequisite(s)]; expose students to a variety of methods used in research BIOL-3303L (lab) (must be taken concurrently). on mammals (e.g., analysis of carnivore diet, acoustic analysis, behavioural research, radio-telemetry). Guest BIOL-3410 (3) Freshwater Ecology (3 hrs Lecture | 3 hrs presentations and field trips expose students to Lab) This course examines the environmental and biotic opportunities for professional work with mammals and processes which operate in aquatic environments. Special other vertebrates (e.g., work in wildlife biology, zoos, emphasis is placed on Manitoba ecosystems. Topics provincial or federal parks). covered include the following: water quality, physical and Requisite Courses: BIOL-2403 and either BIOL-2451 or chemical processes operating in freshwaters, and an BIOL-2111 (or equivalent) [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-3112L overview of freshwater organisms that constitute aquatic (lab) (must be taken concurrently). communities. Requisite Courses: BIOL-2403 [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-3152 (3) Flora of Manitoba (3 hrs Lecture | 3 hrs BIOL-3410L (lab) (must be taken concurrently). Lab) Because knowledge of the flora of Manitoba is essential to field biologists, this course includes discussion BIOL-3452 (3) Behavioural Ecology and the Prairie Grasslands: Field Course (3 hrs Field Study) This two-week field course takes place at two significant prairie BIOL-3492 (3) Quantitative and Theoretical Biology (3 sites: Grasslands National Park in Saskatchewan, and the hrs Lecture) This course explores quantitative and McIntyre Ranch in Alberta. Students learn to design and theoretical biology. Topics include the relationship of theory conduct observational studies on the behaviour and to data, hypothesis testing, spreadsheet modelling, ecology of diverse animal species and learn about the bootstrapping and other resampling methods. ecology and conservation of Canada's prairie grasslands Requisite Courses: BIOL-2301 and BIOL-2403 while working alongside biologists, resource professionals [prerequisite(s)]. and people from First Nations in the region. Students stay in tents and must be prepared to live and work outside in BIOL-3562 (3) Human Reproductive Biology (3 hrs inclement conditions. Students complete their Lecture) This course presents a comprehensive overview research reports after returning to Winnipeg. of the biology of human sex and reproduction including the Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. anatomy and physiology of the male and female Requisite Courses: BIOL-2111 or BIOL-2116 or reproductive systems, sexual response, fertilization, BIOL-2403 or BIOL-2451 [prerequisite(s)]. contraception, and sexually transmitted diseases. It provides the biological background required for critical BIOL-3471 (3) Forest Ecology (3 hrs Lecture) This evaluation of many current issues surrounding human course provides an integrative, interdisciplinary discussion reproduction and sexuality. Tutorial times will be used for on structure and function of forest ecosystems, with a the presentation of additional course information and special reference to forests in North America. supplemental activities such as class presentations, Topics to be covered will include the following: the concept peer-editing exercises, videos and group projects. of ecosystem studies; global and local variations in forest Requisite Courses: BIOL-1115 and BIOL-1116, or type; forest ecosystem classification; processes BIOL-1102 or BIOL-1103 or BIOL-1112 [prerequisite(s)]. controlling ecosystem structure and function; disturbances, , and ecosystem function of boreal forests; and BIOL-3563 (3) Human Embryology (3 hrs Lecture) This computer modelling in ecosystem studies. course provides a comprehensive overview of the Requisite Courses: BIOL-2403 or GEOG-2213 and structural, functional and developmental anatomy of the GEOG-2214 [prerequisite(s)]. human body. Consideration is given to the important events of the first three of development. The normal BIOL-3473 (3) Principles of Silviculture (3 hrs Lecture) development of several organ systems including the This course integrates biological principles of tree growth urogenital, cardiovascular, respiratory and digestive is and regeneration (silvics) with the application of this examined as well as examples of abnormalities that may knowledge to forest management (silviculture). Silvics is arise. defined as biological life histories and environmental Requisite Courses: BIOL-1115 and BIOL-1116, or requirement of forest trees. Silviculture is the theory and BIOL-1102 or BIOL-1103 or BIOL-1112 [prerequisite(s)]. practice of influencing forest regeneration, species composition, and growth to accomplish a variety of BIOL-3602 (3) Comparative Animal Physiology I (3 hrs resource management objectives. Silvicultural practices Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course introduces the concepts include coverage of even-aged and uneven-aged of physiological homeostasis, physiological control systems management, and ecological reforestation principles and and excitable cells. Principal topics are nerve physiology, techniques. muscle physiology and cardiovascular physiology. Requisite Courses: BIOL-2153 and BIOL-2403 Requisite Courses: BIOL-1115 and BIOL-1116 [prerequisite(s)]. [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-3602L (lab) (must be taken concurrently); CHEM-1111 and CHEM-1112 (recommended BIOL-3476 (3) Forest Policy and Management (3 hrs to be taken previously or at the same time as this course). Lecture) This course addresses the principles and practices of sustainable forestry in Canada. It outlines the BIOL-3603 (3) Comparative Animal Physiology II (3 evolution of the Canadian forest industry, examining past hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course continues the study of and current forestry policy, practices, and legal animal physiology. Principal topics are respiratory frameworks. Topics include harvesting, reforestation, physiology, whole animal metabolism, osmoregulation, forest protection, private woodlot forestry, and specialty digestion and endocrine physiology. products, as well as the acts, regulations, codes, and Requisite Courses: BIOL-3602 or permission of the guidelines which govern these aspects of forestry. The instructor [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-3603L (lab) (must be course examines the place of Canadian forestry within the taken concurrently). larger context of multi-resource management, multi-stakeholder processes, and the global market. The BIOL-3702 (3) Parasites and Disease (3 hrs Lecture) environmental impact of forest management activities on This course provides a synopsis of the major taxa of natural landscapes is reviewed under ever changing parasites that inhabit tissues and organs of metazoan environmental codes and restrictions and the need to animals and a detailed consideration of the biology of produce "green products." organisms that reside within other organisms as parasites. Cross-listed: ENV-3476(3). Some of the course deals with clinical manifestations and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course treatment of endo-parasitic infections as well as the use of and ENV-3476. knowledge about life cycles for the design of effective programs of control and intervention. The synopsis of of man-made organic chemicals; and bio-remediation. major taxa is structured to emphasize diversity of Requisite Courses: BIOL-2902 [prerequisite(s)]. endo-parasitic organisms and to demonstrate their importance as limiting, biological factors for their hosts. BIOL-3910 (3) Summer Institute in Infectious Requisite Courses: BIOL-2115 or permission of the Diseases (3 hrs Lecture) instructor [prerequisite(s)]. BIOL-4111 (6) Biology Honours Thesis (3 hrs Project / BIOL-3703 (3) Ectoparasitology (3 hrs Lecture) This Thesis) This course is intended for but not restricted to course provides a synopsis of the major taxa of parasites students in the Honours program. Students undertake a and blood-feeding arthoropods that live on other metazoan research project in an area of biological interest. animals and a detailed consideration of the ways in which Presentation of the results verbally and in thesis form to the these organisms act directly as parasites and as vectors Biology Department is an integral part of the course. Each of other parasitic organisms. Emphasis is placed on project will be supervised by a faculty member. ecological associations between host organisms and Note: Enrolment in this course is limited by the availability of parasites as a means of understanding the of faculty to serve as supervisors. Students must obtain vector-borne, parasitic diseases. Most of the course deals written permission from the Department Chair to register for with the biology of parasitic as well as the use the course. A written agreement between the student and of biological information about life cycles to consider the faculty supervisor is required before permission will be effective means of control and intervention. The synopsis granted. of major taxa is structured to emphasize diversity of Restrictions: Department Permission Required. ectoparasitic organisms as a means of demonstrating the Requisite Courses: BIOL-1115 and BIOL-1116, 24 credit significant evolutionary success of the blood-feeding habit. hours of coursework in BIOLOGY at or above the 2000 Requisite Courses: BIOL-2115 or permission of the level, 1 course from STAT-1301, STAT-1201, STAT-1501, instructor [prerequisite(s)]. or PSYC-2101, and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in Biology, and an overall GPA of 2.75, or permission of the Department BIOL-3801 (3) General Entomology (3 hrs Lecture | 3 Chair [prerequisite(s)]. hrs Lab) The course deals with the life history, structural and behavioral adaptations, and the economic effects of BIOL-4112 (3) Fish Biology and Conservation (3 hrs , and control. The laboratory period will Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course presents the biology of include the collection, preservation, dissection and fishes, including their morphology, physiology, behaviour, identification of insects. ecology, evolution, and distribution. Students study human Note: Students are required to submit a mounted and interactions with fishes and conservation of fish stocks in identified collection of insects as part of the laboratory Manitoba and Canada. exercises. This collection should be initiated in the summer Requisite Courses: BIOL-2111 or BIOL-2116 or preceding registration in the course. Students should BIOL-2403 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]; contact the instructor for further details. BIOL-4112L (lab) (must be taken concurrently). Requisite Courses: BIOL-2115 [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-3801L (lab) (must be taken concurrently). BIOL-4191 (3) Directed Studies in Biology (3 hrs Directed Reading) This course allows students to BIOL-3901 (3) and Disease (3 hrs undertake research in their areas of interest. The research Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) The course will include a study of may take the form of a literature review, it may be medically important microorganisms with emphasis on experimental in nature, or it may involve analysis of existing viruses and bacteria, including chlamydiae, mycoplasmas, data. Evaluation is based on an extensive written report and rickettsias. Topics to be covered will include summarizing the student's findings. Permission to enrol is mechanisms of microbial pathogenicity and virulence; the dependent on the availability of an instructor in the etiology and epidemiology of important human pathogens; student's field of interest. A student may receive credit for public health and nosocomial infections; antimicrobial this course only once. agents and chemotherapy; and basic principles of host Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. defence mechanisms. Attention will also be paid to Requisite Courses: BIOL-1115 and BIOL-1116 and 4 diseases of important animal species and to plants of other Biology courses above the 1000 level economic importance. [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: BIOL-2902 and CHEM-1111 and CHEM-1112 [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-3901L (lab) (must be BIOL-4303 (3) Population Genetics (3 hrs Lecture) This taken concurrently). course covers the basics of detection and quantification of genetic variation in natural populations, and how genetic BIOL-3902 (3) Microbial Ecology (3 hrs Lecture) This variation is affected by mutation, recombination, migration, course examines the ecologically important activities of mating patterns and changes in population size. Students microorganisms, including interactions between are introduced to the theories of the maintenance of microorganisms, plants, and animals; the cycling of carbon, genetic variation by exploring versus nitrogen, sulphur, and phosphorus through terrestrial and genetic drift and how these forces affect the genetic aquatic ecosystems; bio-deterioration; soil, waste, and variability of populations. Examples of the application of water management; resource recovery; fuel and biomass population genetics principles in the areas of conservation production; biological pest control; microbial transformation biology, evolution and human health are illustrated. The final part of the course is dedicated to the application of found in Manitoba. Students will examine the methods for population genetics principles in the analysis of actual DNA sampling and analyzing data on the chemical, physical, and and protein data. biological components of these habitats. The adaptations of Requisite Courses: BIOL-2301 [prerequisite(s)]. animals and plants to freshwater ecosystems will be emphasised. BIOL-4331 (3) Evolutionary Biology (3 hrs Lecture) Requisite Courses: BIOL-2403 (or the former Biologists use Darwin's framework to study the living BIOL-3403) or BIOL-3402 [prerequisite(s)]. world. This course will examine the development of evolutionary thought; evolutionary genetics; natural, sexual, BIOL-4471 (3) Ecological Methods (3 hrs Lecture | 3 hrs and developmental selection; the levels of selection; Lab) This course deals with the statistical properties and speciation and extinction. Topics of direct relevance to analysis of ecological data. Students study the practical humans will be emphasized. and conceptual bases of good statistical practice 'from the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course ground up', including study design, presentation of and BIOL-3331. scientific results, and high quality graphics. Topics include Requisite Courses: BIOL-2301 and BIOL-2403, and 1 the nature of data and variables, exploratory analysis, course from BIOL-2111, BIOL-2115, BIOL-2152, BIOL-2153, statistical distributions and probability, study design, BIOL-2113, or BIOL-2114 [prerequisite(s)]. replication, and pseudoreplication. Students use real ecological data sets to perform simple and multiple linear BIOL-4402 (3) Current Topics in Ecology (3 hrs regression, ANOVA, and ANCOVA. In the laboratory, Lecture) This course involves students in current issues students learn how to use the R open source statistical and topics in ecology. The Instructor supplies a range of language to produce high quality graphics and to perform potential topics from which students can select ones of elementary statistical programming. interest. Students may also offer their own topics for Requisite Courses: GEOG-2203 or BIOL-2403 or presentation. Students present a review of their topic to BIOL-3471, and 1 course from STAT-1301, STAT-1501, the class in the form of a seminar. Success in the course GEOG-2309, GEOG-2310 or BIOL-3492, or permission of depends on substantial class participation and will involve the instructor [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-4471L (lab) (must be peer assessment and review. Students cannot hold credit taken concurrently). for this class and GBIO-7402. Requisite Courses: BIOL-2403 and either BIOL-3471 or BIOL-4473 (3) : Principles and BIOL-3902 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Applications (3 hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course constitutes an introduction to dendrochronology; the BIOL-4411 (3) Water Quality and Health (3 hrs Lecture | science of tree-ring analysis. Dendrochronology is 3 hrs Lab) This course deals with inorganic, organic, and particularly appropriate for students with interests in the biotic components of water which affect water quality. The chronological and dynamical aspects of tree growth, forest impacts on aquatic ecosystems and on recreational, ecology, climatology, hydrology, geomorphology, and industrial, and agricultural uses are studied. The greatest anthropology/archaeology. The history, principles and emphasis is on drinking water quality as it relates to public applications of dendrochronology are reviewed in this health and water-borne illness. course. Problems related to the sampling and dating of Requisite Courses: BIOL-1115 and BIOL-1116 and tree-ring series; the development of chronological series, CHEM-1111 and CHEM-1112 [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-4411L the analysis and interpretation of dendrochronological data (lab) (must be taken concurrently); CHEM-2202 and are also be emphasized. This course includes a CHEM-2203 (recommended prerequisite). compulsory field trip during the second or third weekend of the course. BIOL-4451 (2) Forest Ecosystems Field Course (3 hrs Requisite Courses: BIOL-2403 and BIOL-2153 or Field Study) This is an intensive three-week field course permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-4473L designed to give students a comprehensive overview of (lab) (must be taken concurrently). forest ecology field skills. Topics include field and laboratory exercises in boreal and urban forestry; tree and BIOL-4474 (3) Forest Health and Protection (3 hrs plant identification; classification of forest types; forest Lecture) This course focuses on the effect of fire, insect, management and environmental impact; soil classification; disease, and abiotic disturbances on the sustainable forest succession; dendrochronology; forest management of commercial forests in Canada. The course measurement; forest protection and silviculture. covers historic practices, current activities, and future Note: This course is intended for students enrolled in the trends in protecting commercial forests and ensuring the Forest Ecology Program in Environmental Studies. Students integrity of forest ecosystems. Students focus on the not in this program but wishing to take this course need the impact of forest health activities on the general ecological permission of the instructor. components of forest systems and the relationship Requisite Courses: BIOL-2153 and BIOL-2403 between forest successions. Students examine the [prerequisite(s)]. evolution of Canadian forestry protection policy and industry regulation. BIOL-4453 (3) Wetlands Ecosystems Field Course (3 Requisite Courses: BIOL-2403 [prerequisite(s)]. hrs Field Study | 3 hrs Lab) This course deals with the methods for studying the ecology of lakes, rivers and BIOL-4475 (3) Urban Forestry (3 hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) streams, and marshes: three major freshwater habitats This course focuses on the biology, ecology, and management of urban forests. Students examine the impact BIOL-3602 or BIOL-3603 or BIOL-3492; a minimum of 15 of both natural and human-induced stresses on the urban credit hours of coursework in BIOLOGY at or above the forest, including forest protection and enhancement in 2000 level [prerequisite(s)]. relation to other competing interests in the urban environment. Students discuss the development of urban BIOL-4902 (3) Microbial Physiology (3 hrs Lecture) This forest planning and management. Students study the role course examines the principal reactions of the energy and of Canadian policies and regulations in influencing urban biosynthetic metabolism of bacteria using Escherichia coli forest tree species and integration of urban forests into our as the model system. Additional topics to be discussed communities. include metabolic diversity and catabolic activities of Requisite Courses: BIOL-2403 [prerequisite(s)]; aerobic heterotrophs; regulation of bacterial metabolism; BIOL-4475L (lab) (must be taken concurrently). bacterial fermentations; chemolithotrophic and phototrophic metabolism, and fixation of molecular nitrogen. BIOL-4501 (3) Developmental Biology (3 hrs Lecture | 3 Requisite Courses: BIOL-2902 and BIOL-3901 and hrs Lab) This course examines the molecular basis of, and CHEM-3502 and CHEM-3503 or permission of the instructor the regulatory mechanisms involved in, cellular [prerequisite(s)]. differentiation, the interaction of cells during the formation of tissues, growth, and aging in animal development. BIOL-4904 (3) Virology (3 hrs Lecture) This course Requisite Courses: BIOL-3221 [prerequisite(s)]; examines variations in viral architecture; molecular BIOL-4501L (lab) (must be taken concurrently); BIOL-2301 processes that characterise the common steps of the and CHEM-3502 and CHEM-3503 (recommended reproductive cycles of viruses within a host cell; host cell prerequisite). responses to viral infections; and viral evolution. It includes a survey of adaptive strategies viruses use to meet BIOL-4502 (3) Molecular Cell Biology (3 hrs Lecture) specific situations, with illustrations taken from bacterial, Topics to be covered will include the following: cell animal, and plant viruses. signalling; the cytoskeleton; extracellular matrices and cell Requisite Courses: BIOL-2902 and BIOL-2301 adhesion; the cell division cycle; apoptosis and cell death; [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-3221 (must be taken previously or at the immune system and the genetic basis of cancer. the same time as this course). Instruction will involve lectures and discussion; students will be required to write a paper and present a seminar BIOL-4931 (3) Immunology (3 hrs Lecture) Immunology based on a review of the primary research literature. is the study of the defence system which the body has Requisite Courses: BIOL-2301 and BIOL-3221 and evolved to protect itself from external threats such as CHEM-3502 and CHEM-3503 [prerequisite(s)]; BIOL-3303 viruses and internal threats such as tumour cells. Topics to (or the former BIOL-3302 or BIOL-4302) (must be taken be covered include non-specific immunity, acquired previously or at the same time as this course). immunity, the structure, function and genetics of antibodies, antigen-antibody interactions, cells and organs of the BIOL-4601 (3) Ecological Animal Physiology (3 hrs immune system, autoimmunity, MHC and T-cell receptors, Lecture) This course considers physiological adaptations cytokine signalling and applications of immunology. of animals, primarily non-mammalian vertebrates and Requisite Courses: BIOL-2301 and BIOL-3221 and invertebrates, to their environments. It examines short term BIOL-3901 [prerequisite(s)]. adaptations to specific environmental stressors, and physiological strategies associated with long term BIOL-4950 (3) Human Neurobiology (3 hrs Lecture) This adaptation to particular ecological niches. course explores the field of neuroscience from a biological Requisite Courses: CHEM-1111 and CHEM-1112, and perspective. Neuroanatomy and cells of the nervous any one of the following: BIOL-2111, or BIOL-3602 and system are discussed in terms of cellular networks and BIOL-3603, or CHEM-3502 and CHEM-3503 molecular mechanisms that govern neurological function, [prerequisite(s)]. specifically in terms of homeostasis, motor control, perception, cognition and disease processes. This course BIOL-4602 (3) Field Research in Animal Ecology and also introduces fundamental concepts in medical Energetics (3 hrs Field Study) This course covers field neurobiology, with clear examples related to human health and laboratory methods for studying ecological energetics and disease. and evolutionary physiology of free-ranging wild animals. Requisite Courses: BIOL-3221 [prerequisite(s)]. During a field camp before the start of fall term, students learn techniques for studying metabolism and energy balance in animals including small mammal trapping/identification, temperature radiotelemetry, and open-circuit respirometry. The course focuses on small mammals, but there are opportunities to study songbirds, and some non-endothermic vertebrates and invertebrates. Each student conducts an independent research project during the field camp, and presents this work in a seminar and term paper during fall term. Note: Permission of the instructor is required to register. Requisite Courses: BIOL-2403 or BIOL-2451 or BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION

BUS-1201 (3) Introduction to Business I (3 hrs Lecture) BUS-4920(3). This course introduces fundamental concepts related to Requisite Courses: ECON-1201(3) or MATH-1301(3), current business trends, business ownership, either course with a minimum grade of C+; AND entrepreneurship, and general management, including BUS-1201(3) and BUS-1202(3), both with a minimum grade organizational behaviour and human resource of C+ [prerequisite(s)]. management. Emphasis is placed on relating course material to current events in the business world. Course BUS-2030 (3) Management and Financial delivery is primarily by lecture, and may be complemented Administration For Community Leadership (3 hrs by videos and guest speakers. Lecture) As small-scale and not-for-profit structures, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course community-based and Indigenous organizations often face and AS-1101. unique challenges and political/cultural realities in terms of Requisite Courses: Pre-Calculus Mathematics 40S or overall management and operations. This course provides Applied Mathematics 40S or equivalent [prerequisite(s)]. students with a good understanding of the key facets of management and administrative structures and BUS-1202 (3) Introduction to Business II (3 hrs management controls, financial statements and budgeting, Lecture) This course introduces basic terminology, performance measures, strategic planning and operations concepts, theories and some qualitative and quantitative analysis and evaluation. analytic techniques of key functional areas in business Cross-listed: UIC-2030(3) and IS-2030(3). such as: accounting; finance; marketing; and, production Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and operations management. Student participation in an and IS-2030 | UIC-2030. online business simulation allows students to experience a Requisite Courses: UIC-1001(3); or IS-1016(3) and practical application of these primary business functions. IS-1017(3); or the former IS-1015(6) [prerequisite(s)]. Emphasis is placed on relating course material to current events in the business world. Course delivery is primarily BUS-2103 (3) Fundamentals of Organizational by lecture, and may be complemented by videos and guest Behaviour (3 hrs Lecture) This course is designed to speakers. introduce students to the theories and concepts of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course organizational behaviour. The principal topics examined and AS-1101. include the bases of individual behaviour in groups and Requisite Courses: Pre-Calculus Mathematics 40S or organizations; the structural and functional imperatives of Applied Mathematics 40S or equivalent [prerequisite(s)]. formal organizations, and administration in formal organizations. BUS-2002 (3) Fundamentals of Financial Accounting Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course (3 hrs Lecture) An introduction to the accounting and AS-2101 | PSYC-2101_6 | PSYC-2440. postulates used in preparing and presenting financial Requisite Courses: ECON-1201(3) or MATH-1301(3), statements and a brief study of the role of accounting in either course with a minimum grade of C+; AND the creation and application of business information. BUS-1201(3) and BUS-1202(3), both with a minimum grade Requisite Courses: ECON-1201(3) or MATH-1301(3), of C+ [prerequisite(s)]. either course with a minimum grade of C+; AND BUS-1201(3) and BUS-1202(3), both with a minimum grade BUS-2210 (3) Fundamentals of Marketing (3 hrs of C+ [prerequisite(s)]. Lecture) This course explores concepts and theories that lay the foundation for the understanding of marketing BUS-2003 (3) Managerial Accounting (3 hrs Lecture) theory and practice. Students are introduced to topics on This course is an introduction to the accounting methods environmental scanning, segmentation and targeting, used by managers for financial evaluation and product life-cycle and new product development, decision-making. It deals primarily with corporate consumer behaviour, marketing research, and marketing management's point of view. channels and distribution. Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) with a minimum grade Requisite Courses: ECON-1201(3) or MATH-1301(3), of C+ [prerequisite(s)]. either course with a minimum grade of C+; AND BUS-1201(3) and BUS-1202(3), both with a minimum grade BUS-2010 (3) Fundamentals of Financial Management of C+ [prerequisite(s)]. and Administration (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to basic financial terms, procedures BUS-2300 (3) Fundamentals of Co-Operatives (3 hrs and concepts that provide the foundation for organizational Lecture) Co-operatives have been working within our financial management. It also examines planning, budgeting, economic system for centuries. Millions of Canadians are and control within an organization as well as gathering, members of co-operatives, but very few know what a using, and reporting of the financial information resulting co-operative actually is. This course highlights the nature from an organization's activities. of a co-operative and the unique management and Note: May not be taken for credit if students have governance features that exist within this business completed any of BUS-3003(3), BUS-3102(3), enterprise. Upon completing this course students have a BUS-3103(3), BUS-3120(3), BUS-3550(3), BUS-3600(3), basic understanding of what a co-operative is and what it BUS-4002(3), BUS-4005(3), the former BUS-4050(3), or does within our economy and society. This course introduces the factors that encourage the development of Cross-listed: ECON-2819(3). co-operatives and how these factors could affect the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course future development of co-operatives in Canada. and ECON-2819. Requisite Courses: BUS-1201(3) and BUS-1202(3), both Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) with a minimum grade with a minimum grade of C+; OR permission of the of C+ OR ECON-1102(3) and ECON-1103(3), both with a Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; AND ONE of STAT-1301(3), STAT-1401(3), STAT-1501(3) or the former BUS-2440 (3) Fundamentals of Human Resource STAT-1201(6) with a minimum grade of C+ Management (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their students to the theory and practice of managing an university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ organization's human resources. Topics include human (or exemption); OR permission of the Instructor resource planning, job analysis and design, recruitment and [prerequisite(s)]. selection, onboarding, training and development, compensation and benefits, performance evaluation, BUS-2820 (3) Corporate Finance II (3 hrs Lecture) This employeee discipline and de-selection, and course builds on the fundamentals introduced in labour-management influences on the employer-employee BUS-2819(3)/ECON-2819(3) and discusses theories and relationship. Underlying foundational concepts include tools used for evaluating risks and returns associated with employment law, diversity, and organizational strategy. financial assets. There is an intensive study of economic Requisite Courses: ECON-1201(3) or MATH-1301(3), theories and principles of financial management. Topics either course with a minimum grade of C+; AND include Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), market BUS-1201(3) and BUS-1202(3), both with a minimum grade efficiency, the cost of capital, optimal capital structure, and of C+ [prerequisite(s)]. risk management. Cross-listed: ECON-2820(3). BUS-2501 (3) Fundamentals of Operations Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Management (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces and ECON-2820. students to the concepts related to operations Requisite Courses: BUS-2819(3) or ECON-2819(3), management. These include basic linear programming, either with a minimum grade of C+; OR permission of the product and service design, layout of production systems, Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. materials requirement management, aggregate planning, scheduling, inventory management, forecasting, and quality BUS-3003 (3) Cost Accounting (3 hrs Lecture) This is an control; as well as quantitative techniques to problem intermediate-level, case-based course in managerial solving. accounting which concentrates on the topics in Requisite Courses: ECON-1201(3) or MATH-1301(3), organizational planning, financial control, and cost either course with a minimum grade of C+; AND specifications needed to determine income and cost BUS-1201(3) and BUS-1202(3), both with a minimum grade requirements for policy and non-routine decision-making. It of C+ [prerequisite(s)]. follows on from BUS-2003(3) (Managerial Accounting). Requisite Courses: BUS-2003(3) and BUS-2501(3), both BUS-2755 (3) Business Planning Basics (3 hrs Lecture) with a minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students This fundamentals course introduces students to the must have met their university writing requirement with a nature of entrepreneurship and necessary components for minimum grade of C+ (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. the development of a successful business plan. As part of this process, students have an opportunity to experience BUS-3102 (3) Intermediate Accounting Assets (3 hrs some of the distinctive financing, marketing, operational, Lecture) This is an intermediate-level course which follows management and personal challenges of starting and BUS-2002(3) (Financial Accounting). It concentrates on managing a small business or operating as a self-employed policies and practice related to the measurement and contractor. Course methodology is a combination of lecture recording of an organization's assets and the asset side of and discussions, case studies and guest lectures. an organization's balance sheet. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) with a minimum grade and BUS-3755. of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; AND students must have met their Requisite Courses: KIN-1101(3) with a minimum grade of university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ C, AND a minimum of 60 credit hours completed (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]; AND take BUS-2820(3) or [prerequisite(s)]. ECON-2820(3) (must be taken previously or at the same time as this course). BUS-2819 (3) Corporate Finance I (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to the fundamentals of finance BUS-3103 (3) Intermediate Accounting Equities (3 hrs and presents theories and tools to be used in addressing Lecture) This is an intermediate-level course which follows corporate finance problems and issues. The course BUS-2002(3) (Financial Accounting). It concentrates on examines the theories and principles of financial policies and practice related to the measurement and management that relate to the practices used by recording of shareholders equity, liabilities, and the equity corporations in the procurement, management and side of an organization's balance sheet. disbursement of capital funds. Topics include methods of Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) with a minimum grade capital acquisition and valuation of capital and financial of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their assets. university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]; AND BUS-2820(3) or (or groups) select, purchase, use and/or dispose of ECON-2820(3) (must be taken previously or at the same products and services. Topics include the consumer time as this course). decision-purchase process, perception, memory and learning, motivation, self-concept, personality, reference BUS-3110 (3) Ethics in Management (3 hrs Lecture) groups, and attitude formation and change. Students learn This course considers the social and ethical responsibilities how to analyze and interpret marketing phenomena such of management at both the individual and organizational as retail image/environment and persuasion in marketing levels. Issues considered include managers' obligations to communications. their organizations and to individuals within those Requisite Courses: BUS-2210(3) with a minimum grade organizations, and organizations' responsibilities to a of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their variety of stakeholders in the broad society. university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) or BUS-2010(3), either (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. with a minium grade of C+; AND BUS-2103(3) or the former PSYC-2440(3), either with a minimum grade of C+; AND BUS-3250 (3) Not-For-Profit Management (3 hrs BUS-2210(3), BUS-2440(3), and BUS-2501(3), all with the Lecture) This course explores the distinctive management minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must challenges inherent in a not-for-profit organization. Topics have met their university writing requirement with a include mission, governance, social marketing, minimum grade of C+ (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. volunteerism, fundraising, stakeholder services, and the impact of technology. Through case studies of actual BUS-3120 (3) Canadian Taxation (3 hrs Lecture) This not-for-profit organizations, students develop a framework course deals with the applications of federal and provincial for analyzing contemporary issues in the not-for-profit income tax regulations and their impact on corporations, sector and for making management decisions in a businesses, and individuals. Problems, issues, and not-for-profit context. planning associated with the Income Tax Act are examined. Requisite Courses: BUS-2210(3) or BUS-2103(3) or The computation of taxable income and taxes payable by BUS-2440(3) or KIN-2100(3), with a minimum grade of C+ individuals, corporations, partnerships and trusts are also [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their studied. university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3), BUS-2103(3), (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. BUS-2210(3), BUS-2440(3), and BUS-2501(3), all with a minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must BUS-3255 (3) Social Enterprise: From Theory to have met their university writing requirement with a Practice (3 hrs Lecture) With their multiple bottom lines minimum grade of C+ (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. (financial, social and environmental) and ultimate goal of bettering society, social enterprises are playing an BUS-3135 (6) The Hudson's Bay Company and the increasingly important role in the current economy. This Modern Department Store (3 hrs Lecture) In this course is designed to examine the role of social lecture/seminar course, students will examine the history enterprises, to identify and assess their different types, to of modern retail business organization, with special explore management issues unique to social enterprises, attention being given to the Hudson's Bay Company's urban and to measure their impacts. Students also critically retail stores. The extensive archives of the company will analyze examples of social enterprises in Canada and afford students an excellent opportunity to study major elsewhere. issues in accounting, personnel, management, and Requisite Courses: BUS-2103(3) or BUS-2210(3) or marketing. The external social and political context in which BUS-2440(3) with a minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; the stores operated will also be studied. and students must have met their university writing Cross-listed: HIST-3135(6). requirement with a minimum grade of C+ (or exemption) Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course [prerequisite(s)]. and HIST-3135. BUS-3260 (3) Retail Management (3 hrs Lecture) This is BUS-3230 (3) Advertising (3 hrs Lecture) This course a lecture and case-based course designed to introduce provides students with a thorough understanding of students to the concept of retail management. This course advertising/sales promotion principles and methods. Topics enables students to practice the variables of the retail mix include the role of advertising agencies; the function and in order to develop appropriate retail strategies. Further, benefits of advertising and sales promotion for business this course emphasizes the management of merchandise and other institutions, including not-for-profits; and the resources, human resources, and financial resources, and economic, social, legal, and ethical responsibilities which examines trading area analysis, location/site decisions, attend mass communication with the public. store operations, and retail information systems. Requisite Courses: BUS-2210(3) with a minimum grade Requisite Courses: BUS-2210(3) with a minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their academic writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)].

BUS-3240 (3) Consumer Behaviour (3 hrs Lecture) This BUS-3271 (3) Marketing Research (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to concepts and theories that course introduces students to marketing research, which explain a variety of processes involved when consumers involves the acquisition and analysis of data for use as a decision-making tool in organizations. Various marketing minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must research methods are discussed, including qualitative have met their university writing requirement with a methods such as focus groups and in-depth interviews, as minimum grade of C+ (or exemption); OR permission of the well as quantitative methods such as survey research and Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. conjoint analysis. Requisite Courses: BUS-2210(3) with a minimum grade BUS-3320 (3) Managerial Finance (3 hrs Lecture) This of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their course presents an intensive study of the economic university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ theories and principles of financial management essential (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. for the growth of business firms and hence the growth of the Canadian economy. It relates financial theory to BUS-3300 (3) Management of Co-Operative financial management within a Canadian context. Organizations (3 hrs Lecture) This course is an Cross-listed: ECON-3320(3). introduction to the unique challenges involved in the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course management of co-operative organizations. It builds and ECON-3320. students' appreciation of co-operatives as a viable model Requisite Courses: ECON-2101(3) with a minimum grade of economic development. The course focuses on the of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their methods by which mainstream governance, accounting, university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ personnel, and marketing practices can be adapted to fit (or exemption); OR permission of the Instructor the co-operative model. A combination of lectures, [prerequisite(s)]. readings, guest speakers, case studies and discussions help students develop an understanding of co-operative BUS-3321 (3) Gender and Organizations (3 hrs principles and values and the history of co-operatives. Lecture) Exploring gender's relevance to organizations of Students learn about Manitoba's co-operatives, as well as various types, including corporations and not-for-profits, national and international co-operative networks. this course addresses how gendered analysis can benefit Requisite Courses: BUS-2103(3) or UIC-1001(3) with a a variety of perspectives on organizations. Taking critical minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must and postmodern approaches to organizational theory and have met their university writing requirement with a practice, the course considers gender with respect to minimum grade of C+ (or exemption); OR permission of the such topics as leadership; management; communication; Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. conflict resolution; diversity, inclusion, and intersectionality; power; negotiation; organizational change; organizational BUS-3301 (3) Co-operative Entrepreneurship justice; ethics; healthy workplaces; volunteer workers; Enterprises (3 hrs Lecture) This course addresses the management; human resources; and globalization. specific challenges involved in developing a co-operative Cross-listed: POL-3321(3) and WGS-3321(3). enterprise. Students learn about the competitiveness and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course innovation in co-operatives. The course focuses on four and POL-3321 | WGS-3321. areas of interest: 1) start--ups and scaling up models; 2) Requisite Courses: WGS-1232(6), BUS-2103(3), or marketing the co-operative value; 3) capitalization and POL-2300(3); OR permission of the Instructor accounting; and 4) internationalization strategies and new [prerequisite(s)]. enterprises. The course requires active analysis and research. BUS-3410 (3) Compensation and Benefits (3 hrs Requisite Courses: BUS-3300(3) with a minimum grade Lecture) This course presents students with the current of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their theories on compensation, benefits, and pensions, and university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ provides an opportunity to learn practical skills to manage (or exemption); OR permission of the Instructor compensation systems from the dual perspective of both [prerequisite(s)]. the organization and the employee. Students explore issues surrounding compensation (direct and indirect) from BUS-3302 (3) Co-operative and Credit Union the organizational perspective to ensure compliance, Accounting and Performance Measures (3 hrs internal and external equity, and consider how Lecture) Co-operatives and Credit Unions utilize similar compensation relates to strategic goals. The compensation accounting practices as corporate firms. What issues are also discussed from the perspective of a differentiates co-operatives and credit unions is the current or prospective employee as they relate to addition of social, cultural, and environmental performance motivation, satisfaction, and turnover intentions. measures. Many different accounting and performance Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) or BUS-2010(3), either measures have been developed to keep track of the social, with a minimum grade of C+; AND BUS-2103(3) and cultural, and environmental contributions offered by BUS-2440(3), both with a minimum grade of C+ co-operatives to their communities. This course examines [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their the different strategies that co-operative firms have university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ adopted to measure these differentiating activities. An (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. examination of how these accounting and performance measurements assist co-operatives in developing BUS-3420 (3) Recruitment and Selection (3 hrs sustainable business practices are conducted during the Lecture) Attracting, hiring, and retaining the right people is course. key to organizational success in a competitive global Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) or BUS-3300(3) with a market. This course provides a conceptual and practical understanding of the key aspects of the recruitment and successfully complete this course receive credit as selection functions in Human Resource Management indicated. (HRM). The material builds on concepts and theories Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) or BUS-2010(3), introduced in the Fundamentals of HRM course. Knowing BUS-2103(3), BUS-2210(3), BUS-2440(3) and how crucial good staffing decisions are to an BUS-2501(3), all with a minimum grade of C+ organization's success, students learn the principles, [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their current techniques and practical applications for university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ recruitment and selection. Material is discussed both from (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. the perspective of the organization and from the perspective of potential and existing employees. BUS-3600 (3) Public Sector Financial Management (3 Requisite Courses: BUS-2103(3) and BUS-2440(3), both hrs Lecture) This course offers an overview of with a minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students governmental units for accountants. The course deals with must have met their university writing requirement with a financial management concepts, methods, and standards minimum grade of C+ (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. used in the public sector. The focus is on the federal and provincial governments in Canada, although international BUS-3502 (3) Applications of Decision Sciences to issues are also covered. The course familiarizes students Business (3 hrs Lecture) This course provides students with planning, control, and reporting in govenment. with quantitative techniques (modeling, optimization, and Students learn to: prepare, review, and analyze simulation) applicable to various areas of management: government annual reports and budget documents; finance, marketing, and accounting. The methods critically analyze public-sector performance information; presented to students serve as decision-making tools by review, evaluate, and/or recommend cost management and helping the future manager to obtain the best decision control practices in public-sector enterprises; and identify under predefined criteria. Both the applicability and and manage risk. limitations of these techniques are discussed. Students Requisite Courses: BUS-2003(3), BUS-3102(3), and learn a variety of quantitative techniques that are useful in BUS-3103(3), all with a minimum grade of C+ dealing with complexities, such as multiple objectives and [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their uncertainty. The course focuses on applications of university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ quantitative methods in decision-making using software (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. such as Excel. Requisite Courses: BUS-2501(3) with a minimum grade BUS-3660 (3) Commercial Law (3 hrs Lecture) This of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their course provides an introduction to the legal environment in university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ which Canadian businesses operate. Students learn (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. background material on the Canadian constitution, courts, and legislative system. They then discuss the most BUS-3510 (3) Supply Chain Management (3 hrs common forms of business organization in Canada: sole Lecture) A supply chain is a network of value-adding proprietorships, partnerships, co-operatives, and activities including the original acquisition of raw materials, corporations. Finally, students explore the law of torts and production of the item at a manufacturing facility, the law of contract. Students who do well in this course distribution to a retailer, sale of the finished item to the may customarily apply it toward the Chartered Professional customer, and service activities that follow the sale. How Accountant program. to effectively manage the supply chain is a central issue Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) or BUS-2010(3), either for all levels of management, regardless of industry. with a minimum grade of C+; AND BUS-2103(3), Students learn about updated topics and issues covered in BUS-2210(3), BUS-2440(3), and BUS-2501(3), all with a supply chain management including supply chain design, minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must purchasing, operations, logistics, and coordination. have met their university writing requirement with a Requisite Courses: BUS-2501(3) with a minimum grade minimum grade of C+ (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ BUS-3755 (3) Entrepreneurship and Small Business (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. Management (3 hrs Lecture) This course considers the nature of entrepreneurship and the distinctive financing, BUS-3575 (3) Business Data Analytics (3 hrs Lecture) marketing, operational, management and personal This course introduces students to the breadth and depth challenges of starting and managing a small business. to which data analytics and artificial intelligence (AI) can be Course methodology is a combination of lectures, applied within today's business environment. Students are discussions, case studies, and visits with members of the introduced to various data analysis concepts and Winnipeg business community. Requirements include a applications, such as data visualization, data mining, text feasibility study for an entrepreneurial venture of the and social analytics, and big data. The course explores the student's own choosing. ethical issues and societal impacts surrounding this Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course cutting-edge technology. Theoretical and conceptual and BUS-2755. foundations are covered through lectures and the textbook, Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) or BUS-2010(3), either and reinforced through extensive use of business cases. with a minimum grade of C+; AND BUS-2103(3), Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial BUS-2210(3), BUS-2440(3), and BUS-2501(3), all with a basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their university writing requirement with a Requisite Courses: BUS-3102(3) and BUS-3103(3), both minimum grade of C+ (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. with a minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their university writing requirement with a BUS-3819 (3) Advanced Corporate Finance (3 hrs minimum grade of C+ (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. Lecture) This advanced finance course adds to the technical skill and conceptual understanding of accounting BUS-4220 (3) International Business (3 hrs Lecture) and corporate finance developed in previous courses. It This course examines both theory and application of provides an in-depth study of issues and tools that business in an international context. It offers research financial managers use in making decisions. Topics include insights from around the globe and shows how corporate capital budgeting under uncertainty, valuation and financial practices are adjusted to respond to the realities of the modelling, leasing, and options. international marketplace. Students study social, Cross-listed: ECON-3819(3). environmental, ethical and economic aspects of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course international businesses, and discuss the interaction and ECON-3819. between government and business. This course is Requisite Courses: BUS-2820(3) or ECON-2820(3) with designed to challenge students in their critical thinking as a minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must well as in their ability to manage risks associated with have met their university writing requirement with a international business in foreign domains. minimum grade of C+ (or exemption); OR permission of the Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) or BUS-2010(3), either Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. with a minimum grade of C+; AND BUS-2103(3), BUS-2210(3), BUS-2440(3), BUS-2501(3), BUS-3240(3), BUS-3900 (3) Topics in Business Administration and and BUS-3271(3), all with a minimum grade of C+ Management (3 hrs Lecture) The course examines [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their issues in a specific business related area. The choice of university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ topic depends on the instructor. Students gain a deeper (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. understanding of a particular area of business through examination of its related business issues at a more BUS-4245 (3) Consumer Decision-Making: A in-depth level. This course is designed to include lectures Marketing Perspective (3 hrs Lecture) This course and special guest speakers combined with an interactive, moves beyond fundamentals of marketing, delving deeper discussion-based format. into consumer decision-making. Using a series of readings Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) or BUS-2010(3), either from the Journal of Consumer Research, and other leading with a minimum grade of C+; AND BUS-2103(3), journals in marketing, this course examines factors (i.e., BUS-2210(3), BUS-2440(3), and BUS-2501(3), all with a mood, level of arousal, retail atmosphere variables) that minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must influence consumer decision-making. Furthermore, have met their university writing requirement with a students apply the research findings to help create public minimum grade of C+ (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. policy implications for a number of relevant groups in society including consumers, marketers and businesses. BUS-3990 (3) Directed Readings in Business and Students utilize the research of relevant groups in society Administration (3 hrs Directed Reading) This is a reading including consumers, marketers and businesses. Students course open to students in their third and fourth years utilize the research findings to help create a framework for which involves independent and specialized study in an understanding the thought processes underlying advanced area of Business and Administration. The topic consumers' decisions. and course work requirements are determined by mutual Requisite Courses: BUS-3240(3) with a minimum grade agreement of the student and instructor, and vetted by the of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their Department Chair. A research paper is normally required. university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ This course may be repeated once for credit when the (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. topic varies. Restrictions: Permission of Chair and Instr. BUS-4301 (3) Financing a Co-operative Business (3 Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) or BUS-2010(3), either hrs Lecture) This course provides students with with a minimum grade of C+; AND BUS-2103(3), knowledge of the emerging field of social finance through BUS-2210(3), BUS-2440(3), and BUS-2501(3), all with a case study analysis and development. Students discuss minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must the social impact and financial performance measures have met their university writing requirement with a within the co-operative enterprises model. This includes the minimum grade of C+ (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. strategies that firms must implement in order to ensure that shareholders, stakeholders, and the recipients of the social BUS-4002 (3) Advanced Financial Accounting (3 hrs outcomes are all included in the assessment of the firm's Lecture) This course familiarizes students with current performance. Students are introduced to the concept of advanced accounting concepts and theories. The major impact investing through readings and in-class focus is on the fundamentals and advanced topics related discussions. to corporate consolidations. In addition, students examine Requisite Courses: BUS-3300(3) with a minimum grade the complex accounting and upcoming issues involved in C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their both foreign subsidiaries and foreign currency translation. university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ The course uses a combination of lectures/discussions, (or exemption); OR permission of the Instructor presentations and case studies. [prerequisite(s)]. of C+; OR BUS-2103(3) or the former PSYC-2440(3), and BUS-4440 (3) Contemporary Human Resource Issues BUS-2440(3), and ONE of BUS-3250(3), BUS-3300(3), (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This seminar course allows BUS-3321(3), or BUS-3420(3), all with a minimum grade of students to discuss contemporary issues surrounding the C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their Human Resource Management and Organizational university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ Behaviour fields. This research-based course provides an (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. opportunity for students to explore practical solutions to resource management issues within organizations. The BUS-4500 (3) International Management (3 hrs topics for research and discussion are primarily selected Lecture) This theory- and research-based course relates by students and may include topics such as increasing to developing skills needed for effective management of diversity in the workplace; person-organization fit; people, resources and processes in an international workplace monitoring/privacy issues; motivation of context. Students focus on management functions and employees; change management; personal wellness/stress behaviours necessary to develop global vision and management; work-life balance; and personal management skills at both a strategic (macro) level and an accountability of managers, employees, and volunteers in interpersonal (micro) level. This course is particularly corporations, co-operative enterprises, not for profit useful for students interested in learning about the impact organizations, and the public sector. of culture on international management, negotiations and Requisite Courses: BUS-2103(3) or the former strategy. PSYC-2440(3), either with a minimum grade of C+; AND Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course BUS-2440(3) with a minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and BUS-3500. AND ONE of BUS/WGS/POL-3321(3) or BUS-3410(3) or Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) or BUS-2010(3) either BUS-3420(3) or BUS-4450(3) or BUS-4460(3) or with a minimum grade of C+; AND BUS-2103(3), CRS-3240(3) or CRS-4240(3) or PYSC-3450(3), with a BUS-2210(3), BUS-2440(3), BUS-2501(3), BUS-3240(3), minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must and BUS-3271(3), all with a minimum grade of C+ have met their university writing requirement with a [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their minimum grade of C+ (or exemption); OR permission of the university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)].

BUS-4450 (3) Motivation, Teams, and Power in BUS-4540 (3) International Marketing (3 hrs Lecture) Organizations (3 hrs Lecture) This course builds on the This theory and research-based course provides students fundamentals of organizational behaviour to examine three with an understanding of concepts associated with core topics: motivation, teams, and power, as well as international marketing and builds on the existing underlying processes. Systematic study of these topics knowledge of marketing and consumer behaviour. Topics draws on perspectives from psychology, sociology, include the role of international marketing in promoting anthropology, and political science. Students explore consumer and industrial products in both developed and intersections among topics through ethical, global, emerging markets. The group term-project for this course is analytical, and action-oriented lenses. A range of based on research that recommends appropriate instructional methods are used, including lecture, international marketing strategies for a given country. exercises, film, and case analysis. Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) or BUS-2010(3), either Requisite Courses: BUS-2103(3) or the former with a minimum grade of C+; AND BUS-2103(3), PSYC-2440(3) with a minimum grade B [prerequisite(s)]; BUS-2210(3), BUS-2440(3), BUS-2501(3), BUS-3240(3), and students must have met their university writing and BUS-3271(3), all with a minimum grade of C+ requirement with a minimum grade of C+ (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their [prerequisite(s)]. university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. BUS-4460 (3) Leadership and Fairness in Complex Organizations (3 hrs Lecture) This course delves into BUS-4555 (3) Auditing (3 hrs Lecture) This course issues of leadership, social justice, and fairness in complex familiarizes students with auditing concepts and theories, organizations. Organizational settings explored include the auditor decision-making process, the legal environment corporations, not-for-profit service agencies, of auditing in Canada, the nature and sources of audit self-governing Indigenous communities, and government evidence, and the internal control process. This course institutions. Students examine how organizational uses a combination of lectures/discussion, presentations, structure, policy, social psychology, and the and case studies. interdependencies between different forms of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course organizations can influence fairness, justice and equity. and BUS-3550. Issues are explored from individual, group, organizational, Requisite Courses: BUS-2003(3), BUS-3102(3), and and societal perspectives. The topics for research and BUS-3103(3), all with a minimum grade of C+ discussion include emerging contingency models of [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their leadership, servant and moral leadership, followership, university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ crisis leadership, reconciliation with Indigenous (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. communities, best practices in diversity management, and how to recognize and mitigate toxic leaders. BUS-4602 (3) Topics in International Business (3 hrs Requisite Courses: PSYC-3450(3) with a minimum grade Lecture) This advanced course provides students with the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of a particular movements such as La Via Campesina, Food Sovereignty international business topic. In addition to their research Movement and other grassroots movements. skills, students further develop their critical thinking and Requisite Courses: BUS-3300, AND BUS-3301 OR analysis skills in international business. BUS-3302, all with a minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) or BUS-2010(3); and and students must have met their university writing BUS-2103(3) or the former PSYC-2440(3); and requirement with a minimum grade of C+ (or exemption), OR BUS-2210(3), BUS-2440(3), and BUS-2501(3) all with a Permission of Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; AND ONE of BUS-4220(3) or BUS-4500(3) or the former BUS-3500(3) or BUS-4750 (3) Business Plan (3 hrs Project / Thesis) In BUS-4940(3) or ECON-3301(3) or ECON-3302(3) or this course, students develop a business plan for an IDS/ANTH-3160(3) with a minimum grade of C+ enterpreneurial venture. This project can be undertaken by [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their either an individual or a group. Expectations include university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ submitting the business plan to a business plan competition (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. and/or presenting it to potential sources of funding for the venture. Restriction: Students may not hold credit for this BUS-4603 (3) Topics in Marketing (3 hrs Lecture) This course and BUS-2755(3). advanced course provides students with the opportunity to Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. gain a deeper understanding of a particular marketing topic. Requisite Courses: BUS-3755(3) with a minimum grade In addition to their research skills, students further develop of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their their critical thinking and analysis skills in business university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ marketing. (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) or BUS-2010(3); and BUS-2103(3) or the former PSYC-2440(3); and BUS-4800 (3) Investments (3 hrs Lecture) This course BUS-2210(3), BUS-2440(3), and BUS-2501(3), all with a introduces students to the main financial instruments that minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; AND ONE of are used in the investment industry, including a detailed BUS-3230(3) or BUS-3240(3) or BUS-3260(3) or description of financial instruments and how they are BUS-3271(3) or BUS-4245(3) or BUS-4540(3) or traded in financial markets. A brief review of portfolio ACS-3907(3) with a minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; theory is presented including a discussion of a number of and students must have met their university writing key models of modern finance, including the Capital Asset requirement with a minimum grade of C+ (or exemption) Pricing Model and the Arbitrage Pricing Theory. The course [prerequisite(s)]. also includes a detailed examination of the role and operation of fixed-income securities and equities. The BUS-4604 (3) Topics in Human Resource course concludes with a discussion of the role and Management and Organizational Behaviour (3 hrs techniques of passive versus active portfolio management. Lecture) This advanced course provides students with the Cross-listed: ECON-4800(3). opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of a particular Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course human resource management or organizational behaviour and ECON-4800. topic. In addition to their research skills, students further Requisite Courses: BUS-2820(3) or ECON-2820(3) (or develop their critical thinking and analysis in human the former ECON-2319(6) or BUS-2319(6)) resource management and organizational behaviour. [prerequisite(s)]; and STAT-1302(3) or STAT-2001(3) Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) or BUS-2010(3); and [prerequisite(s)]; and ONE of MATH-1101(6) or BUS-2103(3) or the former PSYC-2440(3); and MATH-1102(3) or MATH-1103(3) or ECON-1201(3); ALL BUS-2210(3), BUS-2440(3), and BUS-2501(3), all with a with a minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; AND ONE of must have met their university writing requirement with a BUS/WGS/POL-3321(3) or BUS-3410(3) or BUS-3420(3) or minimum grade of C+ (or exemption); OR permission of the BUS-4450(3) or BUS-4460(3) or CRS-3240(3) or instructor [prerequisite(s)]. CRS-4240(3) or PSYC-3450(3), with a minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their BUS-4801 (3) Options, , and Derivatives (3 hrs university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ Lecture) This course is designed to provide an in-depth (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. analysis of a number of topics in modern finance theory and applications. The main areas that are examined include BUS-4606 (3) Topics in Co-Operatives & Credit Futures Markets, Option Markets and Derivatives. These Unions (3 hrs Lecture) This topics course focuses on the financial instruments play a key role in the management of development, growth and sustainability of co-operative risk by firms, and have attracted increasing interest from businesses (financial and non-financial). Utilizing case private sector firms and the larger community. The role of studies, literature reviews and environmental scans, these instruments in the financial markets and their effect students gain an understanding of the unique on the financial system are examined in detail. characteristics of the co-operative organizational structure. Note: This course is intended for students in the EFIN The course engages students through in-class discussions program. and lectures with a final outcome of a student paper. Cross-listed: ECON-4801(3). Students gain a greater understanding of the co-operative Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course sector as a business model and social movement, and are and ECON-4801. able to compare the co-operative movement to social Requisite Courses: ECON-2820(3) or BUS-2820(3) (or the former ECON-2319(6) or BUS-2319(6)) take the perspective of the general manager with [prerequisite(s)]; and STAT-1302(3) or STAT-2001(3) responsibility for the overall organization, rather than that [prerequisite(s)]; and ONE of MATH-1101(6) or of a functional specialist. Topics include the nature of MATH-1102(3) or MATH-1103(3) or ECON-1201(3); ALL strategy and its function for an organization; the with a minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students characteristics of effective strategy; and how strategy must have met their university writing requirement with a forms and evolves in relation to an organization's minimum grade of C+ (or exemption); OR permission of the environment, competition, capabilties, and the values and instructor [prerequisite(s)]. ambitions of its leadership. This course is intended for students in their final year of study. BUS-4802 (3) Topics in Finance I (3 hrs Lecture) This Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course course provides an opportunity to study a particular and BUS-4920. finance research topic in depth. The course covers Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) or BUS-2010(3), and primarily theoretical aspects of finance. Possible topics BUS-2103(3) or the former PSYC-2440(3), and include entrepreneurial finance, fixed income analysis and BUS-2210(3), BUS-2440(3), and BUS-2501(3), all with a behavioral finance. This course may be repeated for credit minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and ONE of when the topic varies. BUS-3110(3) or BUS-3255(3) or IDS-3101(3) or Cross-listed: ECON-4802(3). PHIL-2201(3) or PHIL-2230(3) or PHIL-2233(3) or Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course CRS-3231(3); all with a minimum grade of C+ and ECON-4802. [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their Requisite Courses: BUS-2820(3) or ECON-2820(3), and university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ ECON-2201(3) and ECON-3201(3), all with a minimum grade (or exemption); OR permission of the Instructor of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their [prerequisite(s)]. university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ (or exemption); OR permission of the Instructor BUS-4920 (3) Business Strategy for Accountants (3 [prerequisite(s)]. hrs Lecture) This case-based course introduces students to the process of strategic management in organizations BUS-4803 (3) Topics in Finance II (3 hrs Lecture) This from the perspective of senior managers concerned with course provides students an opportunity to study a long-term effectiveness and efficiency. The course particular finance research topic in depth. The course introduces students to various strategic frameworks used content covers primarily empirical aspects in finance. to diagnose and solve critical problems, and/or identify and Possible topics include financial risk and management, take advantage of opportunities, in a complex, valuation and financial statement analysis, and valuation ever-changing business environment. Students focus on and financial modeling. This course may be repeated for accounting aspects of strategy in the context of how it credit when the topic varies. influences, and is influenced by, the other functional Cross-listed: ECON-4803(3). disciplines. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and ECON-4803. and BUS-4901. Requisite Courses: BUS-2820(3) or ECON-2820(3), and Requisite Courses: BUS-3003(3) and BUS-2103(3) or ECON-2201(3) and ECON-3201(3), all with a minimum grade the former PSYC-2440(3) and BUS-2210(3), BUS-2440(3) of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their and BUS-2501(3) [prerequisite(s)]; and ONE of university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ BUS-3110(3), BUS-3255(3), IDS-3101(3), PHIL-2201(3), (or exemption); OR permission of the instructor PHIL-2230(3), PHIL-2233(3), CRS-3231(3), all with a [prerequisite(s)]. minimum grade of C+ (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their university writing requirement BUS-4900 (3) Advanced Topics in Business and with a minimum grade of C+ (or exemption); OR permission Management (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course of the Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. provides students with the opportunity to gain a deeper appreciation of the issues involved in a specific BUS-4940 (3) Emerging Markets and Business business-related area. Students further develop their Practices (3 hrs Lecture) In this course students focus on critical business thinking and analysis, in addition to their prevailing business practices and the process of research skills. This course may be repeated once for globalization on organizations from emerging markets. The credit when the topic varies. growing power of nations and purchasing power of Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. consumers from emerging markets means that business Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) or BUS-2010(3), either managers need to learn to discover new consumer with a minimum grade of C+; AND BUS-2103(3) or the preferences, develop new projects, and devise former PSYC-2440(3), either with a minimum grade of C+, appropriate strategies to market these products. AND BUS-2210(3), BUS-2440(3) and BUS-2501(3) all with Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) or BUS-2010(3), either a minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must with a minimum grade of C+; AND BUS-2103(3), have met their university writing requirement with a BUS-2210(3), BUS-2440(3), BUS-2501(3), BUS-3240(3), minimum grade of C+ (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]. and BUS-3271(3), all with a minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their BUS-4901 (3) Business Strategy (3 hrs university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ Seminar/Discussion) In this case-based course, students (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)].

CHEMISTRY

CHEM-0100 (3) Foundations of Chemistry (3 hrs and CHEM-2101. Lecture) The purpose of this course is to prepare students Requisite Courses: CHEM-1111, CHEM-1112, and either for CHEM-1111 Introduction to the Chemical Properties of MATH-1101, or MATH-1103 and MATH-1104 Matter and CHEM-1112 Basic Principles of Chemical [prerequisite(s)]; CHEM-2102L (lab) (must be taken Reactivity. Topics include the characterization of chemical concurrently). substances, chemical reactions, chemical quantities, and chemical systems. Notes: Standing in this course will CHEM-2103 (3) Atoms, Molecules and Spectroscopy satisfy the prerequisites for CHEM-1111 and CHEM-1112 (3 hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course is an introduction to (in place of Chemistry 40S, Pre-Calculus Mathematics 40S, quantum chemistry, with applications in atomic and and/or Applied Mathematics 40S). Non-science majors molecular structure and spectroscopy. Laboratory work wishing to take a chemistry course for science credit consists of experiments in molecular spectroscopy and should take CHEM-2801 Environmental Issues: A Chemistry computational methods for determining molecular structures Perspective. This course CANNOT be used as a credit and properties. towards the Chemistry or Biochemistry majors. Students Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course with standing in CHEM-1111 or CHEM-1112 cannot register and CHEM-2101. for this course. Requisite Courses: CHEM-1111, CHEM-1112, and either MATH-1101, or MATH-1103 and MATH-1104 CHEM-1111 (3) Introduction to Chemical Properties [prerequisite(s)]; CHEM-2103L (lab) (must be taken of Matter (3 hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course includes concurrently). an introduction to atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, chemical reactivity, to the bulk properties of CHEM-2202 (3) Organic Chemistry I (3 hrs Lecture | 3 matter, and the descriptive chemistry of the elements. The hrs Lab) This course is an introductory study of aliphatic laboratory component introduces students to basic carbon compounds. Topics to be covered include bonding; chemistry laboratory practice and techniques. The hybridization; resonance; acids and bases; the structure, fundamental concepts of chemical reactivity covered in this nomenclature, synthesis and reactions of alkanes, alkenes, course and CHEM-1112 provide the essential foundation alkynes, alkyl halides, alcohols, ethers and amines; the for students who wish to continue with Chemistry or stereo chemistry of organic compounds; and nucleophilic Biochemistry as a major, and for students of Biology, substitution and elimination reactions and their use in Physics, Physical Geography, Environmental Studies, and organic synthesis. The laboratory includes an introduction Experimental Psychology. to techniques commonly used in organic chemistry, through Requisite Courses: Pre-Calculus Mathematics 40S or the preparation, purification and characterization of organic Applied Mathematics 40S, and Chemistry 40S; or compounds. CHEM-0100 [prerequisite(s)]; CHEM-1111L (lab) (must be Note: CHEM-1111 may be used as a corequisite provided a taken concurrently). minimum grade of 75 or equivalent was obtained in Chemistry 40S. CHEM-1112 (3) Basic Principles of Chemical Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Reactivity (3 hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course includes and CHEM-2201. an introduction to chemical kinetics, chemical Requisite Courses: CHEM-1111 and CHEM-1112 thermodynamics and equilibrium, and to acid/base and [prerequisite(s)]; CHEM-2202L (lab) (must be taken oxidation/reduction chemical reactions. The laboratory concurrently). component introduces students to some of the basic techniques of practical chemistry. The fundamental CHEM-2203 (3) Organic Chemistry II (3 hrs Lecture | 3 concepts of chemical reactivity covered in this course and hrs Lab) This course is an introductory study of the CHEM-1111 provide the essential foundation for students chemistry and structural identification of common aliphatic who wish to continue with Chemistry or Biochemistry as a and aromatic organic compounds. Topics include the major, and for students of Biology, Physics, Physical structure, nomenclature, synthesis and reactions of Geography, Environmental Studies, and Experimental aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols, aldehydes, ketones, Psychology. enolates, carboxylic acids, sulfur- and Requisite Courses: Chemistry 40S and Pre-Calculus phosporus-containing compounds, and free-radicals. Math 40S or Applied Math 40S; or CHEM-0100 Spectroscopic instrumentation for structure determination [prerequisite(s)]; CHEM-1112L (lab) (must be taken is discussed, with an emphasis on infra-red (IR) and concurrently). nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry (MS). The laboratory includes an CHEM-2102 (3) Thermodynamics and Kinetics (3 hrs introduction to techniques commonly used in organic Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course describes the principles chemistry, through the preparation, purification and and applications of thermodynamics, and the rates and characterization of compounds. mechanisms of chemical reactions. Laboratory work Note: CHEM-1112 may be used as a corequisite provided a consists of experiments in the thermodynamics and kinetics minimum grade of 75 or equivalent was obtained in of gases and solutions, and computer applications in data Chemistry 40S. analysis and problem solving. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and CHEM-2201. Requisite Courses: CHEM-2202 [prerequisite(s)]; minimum grade of C [prerequisite(s)]; CHEM-2701L (lab) CHEM-2203L (lab) (must be taken concurrently). (must be taken concurrently).

CHEM-2302 (3) Quantitative Chemical Analysis (3 hrs CHEM-2801 (3) Environmental Issues: A Chemistry Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This is a first course in analytical Perspective (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines a chemistry which examines ionic equilibria in aqueous number of environmental and societal issues, such as solutions and their use in chemical analysis. This course global warming and acid rain. Basic chemical and physical covers both volumetric and gravimetric analysis with a concepts are introduced as required to supplement the detailed examination of the pertinent equilibria involved in discussion. Topics include the past, present and future use precipitation, acid-base, complexometric, and of energy in society; plastics; nutrition; and oxidation-reduction systems. The lab consists of a series green/sustainable chemistry. Online discussion groups and of experiments designed to develop strong analytical assignments are used to facilitate debate and conceptual techniques. understanding. This course prepares students for Requisite Courses: CHEM-1111 and CHEM-1112 introductory chemistry and environmental sciences [prerequisite(s)]; CHEM-2302L (lab) (must be taken courses. The course may also serve as a topical survey concurrently). for senior science students. Note: CHEM-2801 may be used to fulfil the Science CHEM-2401 (3) Inorganic Chemistry I (3 hrs Lecture | 3 requirement for the BA degree. It can also be used for hrs Lab) This course provides an introduction to Inorganic credit towards the Chemistry major in the 5-Year BEd/BSc Chemistry with a focus on fundamental concepts. The first degree. CHEM-2801 cannot be used as major credit for the part of the course deals with understanding and predicting Chemistry or Biochemistry degrees. molecular bonding and structure with examples taken mostly from the main group. The second part of the course CHEM-3101 (3) Physical Chemistry of Condensed deals with understanding and explaining the trends in Phases (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines the chemical behaviour with emphasis being placed on the thermodynamics, structures, and physical properties of main group elements. Laboratory work demonstrates liquids, solids and surfaces. Topics include phase reactivity trends discussed in lecture and introduces the transitions, chemical reactions, ionic solutions, and techniques associated with the synthesis and transport properties (conductivity, diffusion, viscous flow, characterization of main group compounds. surface tension, and capillarity). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: CHEM-2102 or permission of and CHEM-3402. instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: CHEM-1111 and CHEM-1112 [prerequisite(s)]; CHEM-2401L (lab) (must be taken CHEM-3102 (3) Quantum Chemistry and concurrently). Spectroscopy (3 hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course examines the quantum theory of chemical bonding, CHEM-2502 (3) Introduction to Biochemistry (3 hrs molecular properties, and spectroscopy. Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This is an introductory course in Requisite Courses: CHEM-2103 [prerequisite(s)]. biochemistry. Topics include: the structural characteristics and biological properties of biomolecules (carbohydrates, CHEM-3202 (3) Reaction Mechanisms in Organic lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids); basic enzymology; and Chemistry (3 hrs Lecture) This course deals with the metabolism. Examples of the application of the principles of application of physical chemical principles to organic biochemistry to the study and treatment of human diseases compounds and their reactions. It includes topics such as are discussed. the effects of structure on reactivity, heterolytic reaction Note: This course can be taken prior to or concurrently mechanisms, acidity functions, catalysis, solvent effects, with CHEM 3502 or CHEM 3503. Students who currently and isotope effects. hold a B or higher in CHEM-3502 or CHEM-3503 may not Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course receive credit for this course. Students may not hold credit and CHEM-3201. for CHEM-2502 and CHEM-2503. Requisite Courses: CHEM-2202 and CHEM-2203 Requisite Courses: CHEM-1111 and CHEM-1112 [prerequisite(s)]. [prerequisite(s)]; CHEM-2202 (must be taken previously or at the same time as this course); CHEM-2502L (lab) (must CHEM-3204 (3) Organic Structure Determination (3 be taken concurrently). hrs Lecture) This course teaches the application of spectroscopic techniques (1D and 2D multinuclear NMR, IR, CHEM-2701 (3) Computer Techniques and MS, UV) to organic structure determination. Classical Applications for Chemistry (3 hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) methods still in common use are briefly covered. This course introduces students to computer applications in Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course the field of Chemistry. Topics include data handling; basic and CHEM-3201. statistical analysis; graphing; drawing chemical structures, Requisite Courses: CHEM-2202 and CHEM-2203 equations, and diagrams; computations; molecular modelling [prerequisite(s)]. and minimum energies; and the incorporation of diagrams, graphs, molecular structures, and equations directly into CHEM-3205 (3) Organic Synthesis (3 hrs Lecture) This scientific documents. course deals with the synthesis of organic compounds. Requisite Courses: CHEM-1111 and CHEM-1112 with a Topics include synthetic strategies, conformational analysis, use of protecting groups, and chiral induction. that a minimum grade of B+ was obtained in CHEM-1111 Molecular orbital theory will be introduced and applied to and CHEM-1112. the study of pericyclic reactions. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and CHEM-3501. and CHEM-4202. Requisite Courses: CHEM-1111 and CHEM-1112 and Requisite Courses: CHEM-2202 and CHEM-2203 CHEM-2202 and BIOL-1115 [prerequisite(s)]; CHEM-3502L [prerequisite(s)]. (lab) (must be taken concurrently).

CHEM-3206 (3) Advanced Organic Chemistry CHEM-3503 (3) Intermediate Biochemistry II: Laboratory (3 hrs Lecture) This course provides students Intermediary Metabolism (3 hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) with advanced laboratory experience in Organic Chemistry. This course examines major catabolic and anabolic Students are exposed to the theory and application of pathways, and their regulation and integration. methods for experimental design; purification of reagents; Note: CHEM-2203 may be used as a corequisite provided working with air/moisture sensitive reagents; and the that a minimum grade of B+ was obtained in CHEM-1111 isolation, purification and identification of natural products. and CHEM-1112. Students set up and conduct several experiments and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course formulate reports on their work. and CHEM-3501. Requisite Courses: CHEM-2203 with a minimum grade of Requisite Courses: CHEM-3502 [prerequisite(s)]; C [prerequisite(s)]. CHEM-3503L (lab) (must be taken concurrently).

CHEM-3302 (3) Methods of Chemical Analysis (3 hrs CHEM-3504 (3) Plant Biochemistry (3 hrs Lecture) This Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course introduces students to the course covers aspects of chemistry that are unique to procedures of analytical chemistry including sampling, plants. Topics include an introduction to basic biochemical preparation of the sample for analysis, instrument concepts: photophosphorylation; photosynthesis; calibration, and statistical treatment of data. Specific carbohydrate metabolism; nitrogen fixation; some aspects analytical methods discussed include potentiometry and of secondary metabolism; and agricultural applications. atomic and molecular spectroscopy. This involves a series Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial of analyses using instrumental techniques. basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course successfully complete this course receive credit as and CHEM-2301. indicated. Requisite Courses: CHEM-2302 [prerequisite(s)]; Requisite Courses: CHEM-2202 [prerequisite(s)]. CHEM-3302L (lab) (must be taken concurrently). CHEM-3601 (3) Environmental Chemistry (3 hrs CHEM-3401 (3) Inorganic Chemistry II: Coordination Lecture) This course in environmental organic chemistry Chemistry (3 hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course describes the properties, partitioning behaviour and examines the bonding, structure, and reactivity of reactivity of organic contaminants and their influence on coordination compounds of the transition metals. Building the distribution, transport and fate of the chemical in the on the fundamentals covered in CHEM-2401(3), we environment. Recent literature is used to discuss current discuss the nature of the metal-ligand bond, including its issues in environmental chemistry, with an emphasis on effect on physical and chemical properties of metal long-range transport and global distribution of persistent, complexes. General trends in transition metal coordination toxic and bioaccumulative contaminants. chemistry are examined with an emphasis on Requisite Courses: CHEM-2202 and CHEM-2203 understanding and predicting the reactivity and structures [prerequisite(s)]. of coordination compounds. Laboratory work involves synthesis and characterization of transition metal CHEM-3611 (3) Environmental Toxicology (3 hrs coordination compounds. Lecture) This course provides an understanding of how Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and why chemicals may damage humans and other and CHEM-3402 | CHEM-3404. organisms. Basic principles of toxicology and Requisite Courses: CHEM-2202 and CHEM-2401 environmental chemical exposure are covered, and detailed [prerequisite(s)]; CHEM-2203 (must be taken previously or analysis is presented of the body's defences against at the same time as this course); CHEM-3401L (lab) (must toxicants and the physiological and/or biochemical be taken concurrently). mechanisms by which toxicants cause effects. Toxicological modeling and environmental risk assessment CHEM-3502 (3) Intermediate Biochemistry I: are introduced. Students apply these principles to explore Structure, Function, and Energetics of Biomolecules emerging topics of interest in their own discipline. (3 hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) Topics to be examined in this Cross-listed: ENV-3611(3). course include the structure and function of biomolecules, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course including carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, proteins, and and ENV-3611. "high energy" phosphate compounds (emphasizing the Requisite Courses: CHEM-2202 and CHEM-2203 inter-relationship of structure and function); mechanisms [prerequisite(s)]. and kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions; membrane transport; and bioenergetics. CHEM-3701 (3) Directed Studies in Chemistry (3 hrs Note: CHEM-2202 may be used as a corequisite provided Project / Thesis) This course is designed to allow students the opportunity to conduct individual research under the compounds featuring transitions metal-carbon bonds. The supervision of a faculty member. The study may take the course explores physical and bonding properties, form of a literature review, may be experimental in nature, characterization methods, and fundamental reaction or may involve the analysis of existing data. mechanisms of organometallic compounds and applications Note: Permission to enrol is dependent on the availability of of transition metal organometallics in homogenous catalysis a suitable faculty member AND students must obtain (i.e., for organic synthesis and industrial chemical written permission from the Chair of Chemistry in addition to preparation). the prerequisite. Note: This course may only be taken once Requisite Courses: CHEM-3401 [prerequisite(s)]. for credit. Requisite Courses: 12 credit hours of Chemistry CHEM-4403 (3) Advanced Main Group Chemistry (3 courses and permission from the Chair of the Chemistry hrs Lecture) Aspects of main group chemistry are covered Department [prerequisite(s)]. in this course, including electron-deficient compounds, main group organometallics, and ring systems and polymers. CHEM-4101 (3) Quantum Chemistry (3 hrs Lecture) Focus is placed on bonding descriptions of main group This course covers the fundamentals of quantum compounds, as well as synthetic methods and chemistry, with an introduction to the electronic structure characterization techniques (NMR, EPR, mass theory of molecules. The course also introduces spectrometry, X-ray diffraction). The industrial applications computational chemistry techniques as valuable tools for of main group compounds are discussed. research in all fields of chemistry. Requisite Courses: CHEM-3401 [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: CHEM-2103 [prerequisite(s)]. CHEM-4502 (3) Molecular Enzymology (3 hrs Lecture) CHEM-4204 (3) Medicinal Chemistry (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines aspects of the structure, function, This course deals with an introduction to pharmaceuticals and regulation of enzymes. Topics include the from natural sources and their biosynthetic origin. This also inter-relationship of enzyme structure and function, current includes various methods of synthesis, and studies on theories of the chemical basis of enzyme catalysis, structure-activity relationships of anti-inflammatory, enzyme kinetics, and the regulation of enzyme activity. anti-cancer and anti-microbial chemotherapeutic agents. Applications of our current understanding of enzyme Requisite Courses: CHEM-2202 and CHEM 2203 biochemistry are discussed. [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: CHEM-3503 [prerequisite(s)].

CHEM-4302 (3) Instrumentation for Quantitative CHEM-4506 (3) Methods in Biochemistry (3 hrs Analysis (3 hrs Lecture) This course discusses the basic Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course examines the application electronic principles and design of instrumentation for of physical methods to problems of biochemical interest. molecular and atomic spectroscopy as well as quantitative Topics to be covered include the isolation and stabilization mass spectrometry. Students taking this course gain an of proteins; sub-cellular fractionation; methods for the appreciation of a variety of topics including basic assay of protein activity; the determination of enzyme electronics, signal acquisition, noise and signal kinetic parameters; purification and analysis of enhancement. Apart from the classroom, students also biomolecules (especially proteins) by selective precipitation participate in practical demonstrations in the laboratory. (varying pH, salt concentration, and solvent), liquid Theory and applications for a variety of techniques chromatography (ion exchange, gel filtration, and affinity available in this course include the following: atomic chromatography) and electrophoresis (slab gel and absorption and atomic emission spectroscopy, atomic mass capillary); ultracentrifugation; and biochemical applications spectrometry and x-ray fluorescence. of the use of radioisotopes. Although emphasis is placed Requisite Courses: CHEM-2302 and CHEM-3302 on the application of these techniques to proteins, [prerequisite(s)]. application to other classes of biomolecules are examined as appropriate. CHEM-4303 (3) Analytical Separations (3 hrs Lecture | 3 Requisite Courses: CHEM-3503 [prerequisite(s)]; hrs Lab) The crucial role of analytical separations in CHEM-4506L (lab) (must be taken concurrently); chemistry and biochemistry, both qualitative and CHEM-4502 (recommended prerequisite). quantitative, is discussed in detail. Theoretical background, principles of instrumentation, and applications are detailed CHEM-4701 (6) Research Projects in Chemistry (3 hrs for important chromatographic and mass spectrometric Project / Thesis) This course is designed to allow students techniques for chemical isolation and identification. The to investigate a specific research problem. Students work laboratory exercises provide a unique opportunity to gain with a faculty member in a particular area of research practical experience with modern techniques, including gas while learning the techniques and methodology related to and liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. chemical research. Requisite Courses: CHEM-2202 and CHEM-2203 (or the Note: Students are strongly urged to consult with the former CHEM-2201) and CHEM-3302 (or the former department at least two in advance of any CHEM-2301) [prerequisite(s)]; CHEM-4303L (lab) (must be anticipated registration in this course, as approval for any taken concurrently). planned project must be obtained from a specific faculty member as well as from the Department Chair. CHEM-4401 (3) Organometallic d-Block Chemistry (3 Requisite Courses: 30 credit hours of coursework in hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course focuses on Chemistry and permission from the Chair of Chemistry [prerequisite(s)].

CHEM-4703 (3) Topics in Chemistry (3 hrs Lecture) Special topics in an area of analytical, environmental, inorganic, organic, physical, or biochemistry are addressed. Please consult the Chemistry Department for the current topic. Note: Permission from the Chair of Chemistry is required. CLASSICS

CLAS-1011 (3) Greek Society (3 hrs Lecture) Students hrs Lab) This course proceeds to a more advanced study are introduced to the fundamental social concepts, cultural of the forms, syntax, and vocabulary designed to enable characteristics, and political institutions of ancient Greek students to proceed with advanced studies in Greek. society. Examples of topics that may be covered are the Note: Students with credit in the former CLAS-1200(6) family, religion, slavery, social relations, cultural ideals as may not receive credit for this course. reflected in ancient literature and art, and political Requisite Courses: CLAS-1200 [prerequisite(s)]; institutions such as Athenian democracy. Major sources of CLAS-1201L (Lab) (must be taken concurrently). information are presented, and the problems involved in the interpretation of ancient evidence are addressed CLAS-2000 (3) The Heroic Age of Greece (3 hrs throughout. Lecture) This course will examine the Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations as revealed through their art and CLAS-1012 (3) Roman Society (3 hrs Lecture) Students architecture. Emphasis will be laid on archaeological are introduced to the fundamental social concepts, cultural discoveries as evidence for the earliest history of the characteristics, and political institutions of ancient Roman Aegean area, and as background to many Greek myths. society. Examples of topics that may be covered are the Arts surveyed will include architecture, pottery, painting, family, religion, slavery, social relations, cultural ideals as jewellery, and the minor arts. reflected in ancient literature and art, and political organization of the Republic and the Empire. Major sources CLAS-2002 (3) Greek Art and Architecture (3 hrs of information are presented, and the problems involved in Lecture) This course examines Greek art and architecture the interpretation of ancient evidence are addressed with emphasis upon their development, and their throughout. contribution to subsequent art and architecture in and America. Areas studied include architecture, sculpture, CLAS-1015 (3) Everyday Life in the Greek and Roman painting, pottery, jewellery, and the minor arts. World (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines the daily lives Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course of ordinary people in and Ancient Rome. and CLAS-2001. Topics covered include town planning, building, housing, food, clothing, shopping, travel, education, entertainment, CLAS-2003 (3) Roman Art and Architecture (3 hrs writing, bathing, participation in government, family life and Lecture) This course examines Etruscan and Roman art childrearing, serving in the army, acting and the , and architecture with emphasis upon their development, athletics, living in the countryside, farming, worship and and their contribution to subsequent art and architecture in simple technology. Europe and America. Areas studied include architecture, sculpture, painting, pottery, jewellery, and the minor arts. CLAS-1100 (3) Introductory Latin I (3 hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Lab) The course is designed for students who have no and CLAS-2001. previous knowledge of the Latin language. Its aim is to introduce the concept of an inflected language and to teach CLAS-2004 (3) Rise of the Old World Civilization (3 hrs the basic elements of Latin grammar and vocabulary. Lecture) This course covers the origins and development Requisite Courses: CLAS-1100L (Lab) (must be taken of civilization in the Old World with emphasis on the concurrently). prehistoric archaeological record. Topics discussed include the forces behind an increase in population density, the CLAS-1101 (3) Introductory Latin II (3 hrs Lecture | 1 role of civilization and urbanism in state formation, and the hrs Lab) This course is designed to expand students' problem of collapse of Old World civilizations, such as knowledge of Latin vocabulary, to introduce more complex ancient Egypt, the Near East, China, and the Indus Valley. grammatical concepts, and to provide an introduction to the Regional and chronological coverage may vary from year reading of continuous passages from Latin authors. to year. Note: Students with credit in Latin 40S or the former Cross-listed: ANTH- 2211(3). CLAS-1101(6) may not receive credit for this course. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: CLAS-1100 [prerequisite(s)]; and ANTH-2211. CLAS-1101L (lab) (must be taken concurrently). CLAS-2010 (3) Topics in Classical Studies (3 hrs CLAS-1200 (3) Introductory Greek I (3 hrs Lecture | 1 Lecture) This course explores a specific area in the field of hrs Lab) This course is designed for students with no Classical scholarship. The focus of study varies from year previous knowledge of Classical Greek and includes a to year. Possible topics include ancient medicine, study of the basic forms, syntax, and vocabulary of the technology, economics, warfare, and the popular reception language. of the Classical tradition. Information concerning these Note: Students with credit in the former CLAS-1200(6) course offerings is provided by the department. may not receive credit for this course. Note: This course may be repeated for credit when the Requisite Courses: CLAS-1200L (lab) (must be taken topic varies. concurrently). Cross-listed: HIST-2090(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course CLAS-1201 (3) Introductory Greek II (3 hrs Lecture | 1 and HIST-2090. sites to be visited, and relevant readings of ancient CLAS-2050 (3) Education in the Ancient World (3 hrs sources in translation. Among other requirements, students Lecture) This course discusses the upbringing, are expected to undertake preliminary work for a site socialization, and education of children and young adults in presentation to be mounted on location. the Greek and Roman . Stressing the evidence of Restrictions: Department Permission Required. the ancient sources, it will deal with rituals of admission Requisite Courses: 3 credits in Classics and permission into the family and community, methods of socialization of the Department Chair [prerequisite(s)]. (naming practices, modelling, myth), and the development and nature of schools. The course pays particular attention CLAS-2082 (3) Sites of the Ancient Greek and Roman to ideas and practices concerned with the development of World II (3 hrs Lecture) This course follows up on Sites of children into adults. the Ancient Greek and Roman World I, and consists of Note: This is a Support Course for the Education Program. first-hand examination of museum collections and sites of the ancient world, normally in Greece and Italy. The CLAS-2061 (3) Sport in the Ancient Greek World (3 destination and content of the course varies from year to hrs Lecture) The course examines the origin and historical year. As part of the requirements of the course, each development of sport in ancient Greece, its religious and student is expected to make a site presentation on location. political implications, and the nature of events and contests. Sites are chosen prior to leaving Winnipeg in consultation Particular attention is given to intellectual and popular with the instructor. attitudes toward sport and the contribution made by ancient Restrictions: Department Permission Required. Greece in this area to Western civilization. Requisite Courses: CLAS-2081 [prerequisite(s)]. Cross-listed: KIN-2061(3). Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial CLAS-2100 (6) Intermediate Latin Texts (3 hrs basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who Lecture) This course includes various selections from the successfully complete this course receive credit as field of Latin literature. Students are given assigned indicated. readings and may also do exercises in translation at sight. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: CLAS-1101 with a minimum grade of and CLAS-2060 | KIN-2060 | KIN-2061. B or Latin 40S [prerequisite(s)].

CLAS-2062 (3) Sport in Ancient Roman World (3 hrs CLAS-2200 (6) Intermediate Greek Texts (3 hrs Lecture) The course examines the origin and historical Lecture) This course includes various selections from the development of sport in ancient Rome, its religious and field of ancient Greek literature. Students study the more political implications, and the nature of events and contests. advanced forms, syntax and vocabulary as used by Particular attention is given to intellectual and popular ancient authors. They may also do exercises in translation attitudes toward sport and the contribution made by ancient at sight. Rome in this area to Western civilization. Requisite Courses: CLAS-1201 with a minimum grade of Cross-listed: KIN-2062(3). B [prerequisite(s)]. Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who CLAS-2301 (3) The History of Archaic Greece (3 hrs successfully complete this course receive credit as Lecture) This course traces the history of Greece during indicated. the Archaic period from the beginning of the eighth century Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course BCE through to the beginning of the fifth century BCE. and CLAS-2060 | KIN-2060 | KIN-2062. Special emphasis is placed on the social, political and economic evolution of the Greek City-states (in particular CLAS-2071 (3) Woman and the Family in Greece and Athens and Sparta), the failure of the Greeks to achieve Rome (3 hrs Lecture) This course is an introduction to the political unity, cultural transformations, periods of warfare, study of woman and the family in the ancient Greek and and the Greeks' consequent vulnerability to external Roman world. It is organized chronologically; Athens and threats. Rome in the late Republic and early Empire draw special Note: Students with credit in CLAS-2091(6) or attention. Topics to be treated include women and the HIST-2104(6) may not receive credit for this course. family in myth, kinship institutions, marriage, the family as Cross-listed: HIST-2080. an economic unit, relations within the family, women in law, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course politics, religion, sport, and literature. and HIST-2080. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-2070. CLAS-2302 (3) The History of Classical Greece (3 hrs Lecture) This course traces the history of Greece during CLAS-2081 (3) Sites of the Ancient Greek and Roman the Classical period from the beginning of the fifth century World I (3 hrs Lecture) This course consists of one term BCE until the rise of Macedon in the mid-fourth century of academic study in Winnipeg in preparation for its BCE. Special emphasis is placed on social, political and companion course, Sites of the Ancient Greek and Roman economic evolution of the Greek city-states (in particular World II, to be undertaken normally in Greece or Italy. Athens and Sparta), the failure of the Greeks to achieve Specific content and focus of this course vary with the political unity, cultural transformations, periods of warfare, destination, but generally include instruction in the ancient and the Greeks' consequent vulnerability to external history of the specific destination, the topography of the threats. Cross-listed: HIST-2089(3). Cross-listed: THFM-2405(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-2091 | HIST-2089 | HIST-2104. and THFM-2405.

CLAS-2303 (3) The History of the Roman Republic (3 CLAS-2500 (3) The Ancient World Through Film (3 hrs hrs Lecture) This course considers the history of the Lecture) This course explores Greek and Roman epic, Roman Republic from the legendary foundations of the city history, and drama through an examination of ancient of Rome through to the beginning of the Roman Empire. sources in conjunction with film adaptations. Topics in the Lectures trace the major cultural, military, and societal course range from how and why films differ from their events of the Republic. Particular emphasis is placed upon sources, how literary and cinematic techniques converge, the expansion of Rome's power throughout Italy and the how the past is used to talk about the present, and lastly Mediterranean, the forces that brought about the how modern theoretical approaches can make sense of transformation of the Roman style of government from myth and film. Monarchy to Republic, and later to Empire, and the problems which attended these changes. CLAS-2701 (3) Classical Mythology (3 hrs Lecture) This Cross-listed: HIST-2081(3). course is designed to acquaint the student with myths Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course found in Greek and Latin literature. Origins, functions, and and CLAS-2096 | HIST-2081 | HIST-2096. interpretations of myths are examined. We also study myths as story-plots. Selections in translation from Greek CLAS-2304 (3) The History of the Roman Empire (3 and Roman writers are used to illustrate myths about the hrs Lecture) This course considers the history of the origin of the universe; gods and heroes; sagas involving Roman Empire from the end of the Roman Republic through Thebes, Mycenae and Troy, and the national myths of to the reign of Constantine. Lectures trace the major Rome. cultural, military, and societal events of the first three Note: Students may not receive credit in both the former centuries of the Empire. Particular emphasis is placed upon CLAS-2701(6) and CLAS-2701(3). the expansion of Rome's power throughout the Mediterranean, Europe, and the Near East, the forces, CLAS-2702 (3) Religion in Greece and Rome (3 hrs individuals, and events that affect the Empire during the Lecture) This course will survey the religious beliefs and period 30 BCE-c.312 CE, and the problems that attended practices of the Greeks and Romans. Topics to be these changes. discussed will include the following: the worship of Cross-listed: HIST-2097. Olympian and Chthonic deities, oracles, orgiastic and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course mystery religions, Roman cults and rituals, Near Eastern and CLAS-2096 | HIST-2096 | HIST-2097. religions, and the beginnings of Christianity. Cross-listed: REL-2237(3). CLAS-2305 (3) Europe in the Early Middle Ages (c. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course 300 -c. 1000) (3 hrs Lecture) This survey examines the and REL-2237. history of Europe from the gradual collapse of the Western Roman Empire up to the emergence of states in Western CLAS-2703 (3) Magic and Divination in the Greek and Europe. The course focuses on various aspects of social, Roman World (3 hrs Lecture) Students are introduced to religious, political, cultural and intellectual life. Topics may the issues surrounding unofficial, and sometimes include the "barbarian" invasions of the Roman Empire, the unsanctioned, religious practices in ancient Greece and birth of Christianity and Islam, the rule of Justinian, the Rome. The modern problem of defining the term magic in establishment of medieval kingdoms, the rise and fall of the contrast to religion, science, and philosophy in antiquity is Carolingian Empire, as well as Magyar and Viking considered as ancient examples of purportedly magical invasions. Medieval documents are analyzed in class to activity are discussed. Particular attention is given to social offer a direct insight into the period. Restrictions: Students and political contexts in which such activity is identified. with credits in the former HIST-2211(3) and HIST-2214(6) The history of legislation against such acts is also may not take this course. addressed. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and HIST-2216. CLAS-2704 (3) Early Judaism: From Formative to Normative (3 hrs Lecture) This course surveys the CLAS-2405 (3) Staging Greek and Roman Drama (3 historical events, documents, modes of interpretation, major hrs Lecture) This course focuses on the staging of Greek figures and diverse communities and beliefs and practices and Roman tragedy and comedy. Examination of the that preceded and informed the emergence of rabbinic surviving texts of selected plays, the remains of ancient Judaism. The course unpacks the influence of momentous theatres, contemporary accounts of dramatic performance events such as Greek and Roman conquests in the Middle and relevant artwork leads to a recreation of an ancient East, the nascent Jesus movement, and the destruction of theatrical experience with information on stage the Jerusalem Temple in 70 C.E.. It explores how configuration, scenery, masks, costumes, properties, documents such as the Dead Sea scrolls, the Apocrypha gestures, dance, song, mechanical devices and stage and the Pseudepigrapha and authors such as Philo of convention. In addition to their written work, students are Alexandria and Josephus provide insight into the formative expected to participate in demonstrations and period of Early Judaism. It introduces students to the major performances in class. genres of early biblical interpretation, such as typology, allegory, and midrash and oral Torah. roots combine, introducing students to the concept of Cross-listed: REL-2121 building language using root words, prefixes and suffixes. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Students learn to define new compounds and phrases by and REL-2121. analysis of their parts. Cross-listed: KIN-2850(3). CLAS-2750 (3) Laughter, Love, and Death: Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Introduction to Classical Literature I (3 hrs Lecture) and KIN-2850. Homer's Odyssey is a story of greetings and farewells, homecomings and departures, laughter and tears. Starting CLAS-2901 (3) Introduction to Ancient Art and Art from a study of the Odyssey, this course traces emotions, History (3 hrs Lecture) This course provides an gender relations, and human mortality across an introduction to ancient Greek and Roman material culture assortment of works from the Ancient Mediterranean from an art historical perspective. Focusing on world. Students read texts in English translation from iconographic analysis, students examine ancient art in a Archaic Greece to the Roman Empire, in verse and prose, variety of media, including marble and bronze statuary, across the genres of epic poetry, history, tragedy and architectural and relief sculpture, vase painting, wall comedy, oratory and more. painting, and mosaics. Students learn to understand the Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial vocabulary of ancient imagery through a variety of basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who methodological and theoretical models; for example, successfully complete this course receive credit as contextual analysis, semiotics and structuralism, repetition indicated. and information theory, ritual analysis and cultural poetics, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Marxism, feminism, and post-colonialism and cultural and ENGL-2750. diffusion.

CLAS-2751 (3) War, History, and Memory: CLAS-2910 (3) Introductory Classical Archaeology: Introduction to Classical Literature II (3 hrs Lecture) Principles and Practices (3 hrs Lecture) This course Homer's Iliad is a doom-filled beginning for the literature of provides an introduction to the development, principles, and war, a literary monument to fate, fear, memory, and loss. practices associated with archaeological analysis and Starting from a study of the Iliad , this course traces study of Classical civilizations (primarily Greece and conflict, politics, and remembrance across an assortment Rome). A wide range of material categories (such as of works from the Ancient Mediterranean world. Students buildings, coins, pottery, sculpture, geological deposits, and read texts in English translation from Archaic Greece to the plant and animal remains) are considered along with the Roman Empire, in verse and prose, across the genres of techniques devised by Classical archaeologists for epic poetry, history, tragedy, and comedy, oratory, and understanding them and their significance as evidence for more. Classical societies. Dating and chronology, geography, Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial function, typology and the interface between material basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who remains and written evidence are considered. Curriculum successfully complete this course receive credit as includes special attention to case studies and to hands-on indicated. experience where possible.

CLAS-2800 (3) Greek and Latin in Today's English (3 CLAS-2920 (3) Food, Diet and Dining in Antiquity (3 hrs Lecture) Of the 20,000 words in common use in hrs Lecture) This course explores the techniques, issues, English, about half have come from Latin, directly or and controversies involved in reconstructing the role of through French. Greek, too, has made its contribution and food, diet and dining in Greek and Roman antiquity. Topics continues to do so as the language of science expands. In addressed include examination of lines of evidence addition to a thorough study of the formation of nouns, (broadly encompassing ancient literary and textual verbs, and adjectives from their Greek and Latin evidence, depictions from art, and material remains from component parts, we will examine the Greek script, archaeological excavation); the economic basis for principles of transliteration, medical and scientific Greek, production, trade, transport and consumption of foodstuffs words from Greek mythology and society, Roman in antiquity; practicalities and limitations involved in cooking, numerals, legal Latin, abbreviations of Latin words in preserving and preparing food stuffs; the social and common use, Latin mottoes and proverbs, and unusual philosophical context of eating and dining; the role of food plural forms in English. No knowledge of Latin or Greek is in ancient religious and cult practices; medical approaches required. to food, diet and health in antiquity. Cross-listed: LING-2208(3). Cross-listed: ANTH-2229(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and LING-2208. and ANTH-2229.

CLAS-2850 (3) The Classical Roots of Medical CLAS-2950 (3) The Roman Army (3 hrs Lecture) This Terminology (3 hrs Lecture) Knowledge of medical course considers the Roman army, from its origins and terminology equips students for a variety of fields. This increasing professionalization during the Monarchy and course lays out the most important Greek and Latin roots of Republic, to its role as emperor-maker during the third the vocabulary of contemporary medicine and century CE. Topics may include the evidence for the army, demonstrates the predictable patterns by which these recruitment, organization, strategy, unit tactics, troop disposition on the frontiers, and veterans. More broadly, contexts. this course examines the army's wider impact on culture Cross-listed: HIST-3903(3). and society with regard to religion, Romanization, and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course political life. and HIST-3211 | HIST-3903. Cross-listed: HIST-2099(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course CLAS-3101 (3) Drama of the Republic (3 hrs and HIST-2099. Seminar/Discussion) Students read in the original Latin works selected from the most famous dramatists of the CLAS-3006 (3) Topics in Ancient History (3 hrs Republic. These may include selections from Terence and Lecture) This course explores fundamental issues, specific Plautus. Attention is given both to the content and form of social institutions, key historical figures, vital events, the works under study, and to the improvement of important periods, and current directions in the study of students' skills and speed in translation. ancient Greek and Roman history in greater detail than the Cross-listed: CLAS-4101(3). history survey classes allow. The focus of study varies Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course from year to year. Examples include Greek and Roman and CLAS-3100 | CLAS-4100 | CLAS-4101. slavery, Perikles and the Athenian Empire, the myth of Requisite Courses: CLAS-2100, Intermediate Latin Texts Alexander the Great, and comparative Greek and Roman [prerequisite(s)]. historiography and biography. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary source material (in translation). Information CLAS-3102 (3) Poetry of the Republic (3 hrs concerning these course offerings is provided by the Seminar/Discussion) Students read in the original Latin Department. works selected from the most famous poets of the Note: This course may be repeated when the topic varies. Republic. These may include selections from Catullus and Cross-listed: HIST-3006. Lucretius. Attention is given both to the content and form of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course the works under study, and to the improvement of and HIST-3006. students' skills and speed in translation. Requisite Courses: 3 credits of course work in any Cross-listed: CLAS-4102(3). Classics course or permission of the Department Chair Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course [prerequisite(s)]. and CLAS-3100 | CLAS-4100 | CLAS-4102. Requisite Courses: CLAS-2100, Intermediate Latin Texts CLAS-3010 (3) Directed Readings in Classical [prerequisite(s)]. Studies (3 hrs Directed Reading) Students undertake directed readings under the supervision of a faculty CLAS-3111 (3) Prose Literature of the Republic (3 hrs member. Topic, focus, and readings are arranged on an Seminar/Discussion) Students read in the original Latin individual basis, in consultation with the instructor. Written works selected from the most famous prose of the assignments, including a cumulative final project, are the Republic. These may include selections from Cicero, Julius basis of evaluation. Caesar, and Sallust. Attention is given both to the content Restrictions: Department Permission Required. and form of the works under study, and to the improvement of students' skills and speed in translation. CLAS-3060 (3) Health in Antiquity (3 hrs Lecture) This Cross-listed: CLAS-4111(3). course explores health, disease, and medicine in the Greek Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and Roman world. It draws upon evidence from the ancient and CLAS-3110 | CLAS-4110 | CLAS-4111. textual sources (especially Galen and Hippocrates), social Requisite Courses: CLAS-2100, Intermediate Latin Texts history, and archaeology (the latter including all manner of [prerequisite(s)]. finds - architecture, art, artifacts, environmental materials, and skeletal remains) to examine how residents of the CLAS-3112 (3) Prose Literature of the Augustan Age Greek and Roman world perceived and experienced health (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) Students read in the original and disease, and how they sought to combat illness and to Latin works selected from the most famous prose authors promote healing. of the Augustan Age. These may include selections from Cross-listed: ANTH-3262(3) and KIN-3060(3). Livy. Attention is given both to the content and form of the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course works under study, and to the improvement of students' and ANTH-3262 | KIN-3060. skills and speed in translation. Requisite Courses: 3 credits in any Classics, Cross-listed: CLAS-4112(3). Anthropology, or Kinesiology course [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3110 | CLAS-4110 | CLAS-4112. CLAS-3090 (3) Classical and Medieval Science (3 hrs Requisite Courses: CLAS-2100, Intermediate Latin Texts Lecture) This lecture/seminar course examines the [prerequisite(s)]. theories, experiments, and calculations of Greek, Roman, and European scientists before the Scientific Revolution of CLAS-3122 (3) Lyric Poetry of the Augustan Age (3 the seventeenth century. As well as considering the work hrs Seminar/Discussion) Students read in the original Latin of the major contributors to , physics, and works selected from the most famous lyric poets of the mathematics in this period, the course places their ideas Augustan Age. These may include selections from Horace, and the work of the schools of Greece, Rome, and Tibullus, Propertius, Ovid, and Sulpicia. Attention is given medieval Europe within their social, cultural, and intellectual both to the content and form of the works under study, and to the improvement of students' skills and speed in period. These may include selections from Homer and translation. Hesiod. Attention is given both to the content and form of Cross-listed: CLAS-4122(3). the works under study, and to the improvement of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course students' skills and speed in translation. and CLAS-3120 | CLAS-4120 | CLAS-4122. Cross-listed: CLAS-4213(3). Requisite Courses: CLAS-2100, Intermediate Latin Texts Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course [prerequisite(s)]. and CLAS-3210 | CLAS-4210 | CLAS-4213. Requisite Courses: CLAS-2200, Intermediate Greek CLAS-3123 (3) Epic Poetry of the Augustan Age (3 hrs Texts [prerequisite(s)]. Seminar/Discussion) Students read in the original Latin works selected from the most famous epic poets of the CLAS-3221 (3) Ancient Greek Tragedy (3 hrs Augustan Age. These may include selections from Virgil Seminar/Discussion) Students read in ancient Greek works and Ovid. Attention is given both to the content and form of selections from the most famous tragic poets of the the works under study, and to the improvement of Classical period. These may include selections from students' skills and speed in translation. Aeschylus, Euripides, and Sophocles. Attention is given Cross-listed: CLAS-4123(3). both to the content and form of the works under study, and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course to the improvement of students' skills and speed in and CLAS-3120 | CLAS-4120 | CLAS-4123. translation. Requisite Courses: CLAS-2100, Intermediate Latin Texts Cross-listed: CLAS-4221(3). [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3220 | CLAS-4220 | CLAS-4221. CLAS-3131 (3) Poetry of the Empire (3 hrs Requisite Courses: CLAS-2200, Intermediate Greek Seminar/Discussion) Students read in the original Latin Texts [prerequisite(s)]. works selected from the most famous poets of the Empire. These may include selections from Juvenal and Martial. CLAS-3222 (3) Ancient Greek Comedy (3 hrs Attention is given both to the content and form of the works Seminar/Discussion) Students read in ancient Greek works under study, and to the improvement of students' skills and selections from the most famous comic poets of the speed in translation. Classical period. These may include selections from Cross-listed: CLAS-4131(3). Aristophanes and Menander. Attention is given both to the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course content and form of the works under study, and to the and CLAS-3130 | CLAS-4130 | CLAS-4131. improvement of students' skills and speed in translation. Requisite Courses: CLAS-2100, Intermediate Latin Texts Cross-listed: CLAS-4222(3). [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3220 | CLAS-4220 | CLAS-4222. CLAS-3141 (3) Prose Literature of the Empire (3 hrs Requisite Courses: CLAS-2200, Intermediate Greek Seminar/Discussion) Students read in the original Latin Texts [prerequisite(s)]. works selected from the most famous prose authors of the Empire. These may include selections from Seneca and CLAS-3231 (3) Ancient Greek History (3 hrs Tacitus. Attention is given both to the content and form of Seminar/Discussion) Students read in ancient Greek works the works under study, and to the improvement of selections from the most famous Greek historians of the students' skills and speed in translation. ancient world. These may include selections from Cross-listed: CLAS-4141(3). Herodotus, Thucydides, and Procopius. Attention is given Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course both to the content and form of the works under study, and and CLAS-3140 | CLAS-4140 | CLAS-4141. to the improvement of students' skills and speed in Requisite Courses: CLAS-2100, Intermediate Latin Texts translation. [prerequisite(s)]. Cross-listed: CLAS-4231(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course CLAS-3212 (3) Archaic Greek Lyric Poetry (3 hrs and CLAS-3230 | CLAS-4230 | CLAS-4231. Seminar/Discussion) Students read in ancient Greek works Requisite Courses: CLAS-2200, Intermediate Greek selections from the most famous lyric poets of ancient Texts [prerequisite(s)]. Greece. These may include selections from Alcaeus, Pindar, and Sappho. Attention is given both to the content CLAS-3232 (3) Ancient Greek Philosophy (3 hrs and form of the works under study, and to the improvement Seminar/Discussion) Students read in ancient Greek works of students' skills and speed in translation. selections from the most famous Greek philosophers of the Cross-listed: CLAS-4212(3). ancient world. These may include selections from Plato and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Aristotle. Attention is given both to the content and form of and CLAS-3210 | CLAS-4210 | CLAS-4212. the works under study, and to the improvement of Requisite Courses: CLAS-2200, Intermediate Greek students' skills and speed in translation. Texts [prerequisite(s)]. Cross-listed: CLAS-4232(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course CLAS-3213 (3) Archaic Greek Epic Poetry (3 hrs and CLAS-3230 | CLAS-4230 | CLAS-4232. Seminar/Discussion) Students read in ancient Greek works Requisite Courses: CLAS-2200, Intermediate Greek selections from the most famous epic poets of the Archaic Texts [prerequisite(s)]. repeated when the works under study vary. Additional CLAS-3241 (3) Ancient Greek Oratory (3 hrs in-depth work is required to receive credit at the 4000 level. Seminar/Discussion) Students read in ancient Greek works Cross-listed: CLAS-4256(3). selections from the most famous Greek orators of the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course ancient world. These may include selections from and CLAS-4256. Demosthenes and Lysias. Attention is given both to the Requisite Courses: CLAS-2100 or CLAS-2200, and content and form of the works under study, and to the permission of the Department Chair [prerequisite(s)]. improvement of students' skills and speed in translation. Cross-listed: CLAS-4241(3). CLAS-3260 (3) Advanced Classical Archaeology: Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Issues and Controversies (3 hrs Lecture | and CLAS-3240 | CLAS-4240 | CLAS-4241. Seminar/Discussion) This course examines methodological, Requisite Courses: CLAS-2200, Intermediate Greek theoretical, and topical issues in Classical Archaeology Texts [prerequisite(s)]. (broadly, the archaeology of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations). Topics discussed include the integration of CLAS-3251 (3) Hellenistic and Imperial Prose (3 hrs archaeological, scientific, artistic, and textual evidence in Seminar/Discussion) Students read in ancient Greek works the reconstruction of classical cultures; controversies in selections from the most famous prose authors of the theoretical perspectives of interpretation in Classical Hellenistic and Imperial periods. These may include Archaeology; the assessment of ancient Greco-Roman selections from Arrian, Longus, Lucian, Polybius, and ecological, social, ritual, and economic life on the basis of Plutarch. Attention is given both to the content and form of recovered artifacts and ecofacts; the use of the works under study, and to the improvement of archaeological survey data to examine ancient settlement students' skills and speed in translation. patterns; and ethical issues associated with curation and Cross-listed: CLAS-4251(3). collection of material from Greek and Roman sites. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Cross-listed: CLAS-4260(3). and CLAS-3250 | CLAS-4250 | CLAS-4251. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: CLAS-2200, Intermediate Greek and CLAS-4260. Texts [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: CLAS-2910 or permission of instructor [prerequisite(s)]. CLAS-3252 (3) Hellenistic Poetry (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) Students read in ancient Greek works CLAS-3310 (3) Alexander the Great (3 hrs Lecture) This selections from the most famous poets of the Hellenistic course looks at the life and conquests of Alexander the period. These may include selections from Apollonius and Great. It begins with a chronological examination of the rise Theocritus. Attention is given both to the content and form of Macedon under Alexander's father, Philip II, Alexander's of the works under study, and to the improvement of early life, his conquest of the Persian Empire, and students' skills and speed in translation. ultimately, his death. Four major themes are then explored: Cross-listed: CLAS-4252(3). Alexander's military and its evolution, his relationship to Restrictions: Department Chair Perm Required. Students mainland Greece, his empire, and his divinity. may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3250 | Cross-listed: HIST-3140(3). CLAS-4250 | CLAS-4252. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: CLAS-2200, Intermediate Greek and HIST-2105 | HIST-3140. Texts [prerequisite(s)]. CLAS-3320 (3) Death in Antiquity (3 hrs Lecture) This CLAS-3255 (3) Topics in Greek and Latin (3 hrs course approaches various aspects relating to death in Lecture) This course provides students who have prior antiquity (emphasizing Roman antiquity) from the experience in Latin and Greek the opportunity to explore perspective of two disciplines, Anthropology and Classics. fields of study related to philology. Examples of topics of Topics include beliefs and philosophies about the afterlife; study include papyrology, epigraphy, prose composition, causes of death, with emphasis on diseases and and comparison of Greek and Latin literary genres. The demographics; the practicalities of planning for death and focus of study varies from year to year. Information disposing of the dead; the methods and significance of concerning these course offerings is provided by the commemoration; rituals of grief and mourning; spatial Department. distribution of cemeteries in antiquity; methods and theories Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course in mortuary archaeology from classical sites; and analysis and CLAS-4255. of osteological, artifactual, and architectural data from such Requisite Courses: CLAS-2100 and CLAS-2200 and sites. Contemplation of cross-cultural comparisons on permission of the Department Chair [prerequisite(s)]. these and other topics under study is encouraged. Cross-listed: ANTH-3261(3). CLAS-3256 (3) Tutorial in Ancient Language and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Literature (3 hrs Lecture) Under the supervision of a and ANTH-3261. faculty member from the Department of Classics, students Requisite Courses: 3 credits in any Anthropology or read selections from Greek or Roman works in the original Classics course [prerequisite(s)]. Greek or Latin. Attention is given to the content and form of the words under study and to the improvement of the CLAS-3500 (6) Experiential Learning in Classics and students' translational skills and speed. This course may be Classical Archaeology (3 hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course provides Cross-listed: CLAS-4820(3). practical experience through experiential learning for Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course students in environments outside the classroom. This takes and CLAS-4820. the form of practical experience in museums, laboratories, Requisite Courses: 3 credit hours in any Classics archaeological and historical sites, and active participation course [prerequisite(s)]. in excavations. The intensive instructions employs lectures, seminars, fieldwork, and on occasion laboratory CLAS-3830 (3) Kingdoms and City-States in the components, in order to teach analytical, interpretive, and Greek and Roman Worlds (3 hrs Lecture) This course practical techniques in Classics and Classical Archaeology. focuses on a particular kingdom or city-state of the ancient Additional in-depth work is required to receive credit at the world. The topic draws upon evidence from the ancient 4000 level. Interested students should consult the textual evidence, archaeology, and cultural and social Department Chair or designate. history in the light of modern theory and scholarship. The Cross-listed: CLAS-4500(6). instructor and the focus of study vary from year to year. Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. Students Information concerning these course offerings is provided may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-4500. by the Department. Additional in-depth work is required to receive credit at the 4000 level. CLAS-3754 (3) Ancient Epic in Translation (3 hrs Note: This course may be repeated when the topic varies. Lecture) By reading works of ancient epic in translation by Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course important ancient authors (e.g., Homer, Apollonius, Vergil, and HIST-3011. Ovid, Lucan, Statius), students are introduced to the Requisite Courses: 3 credit hours in any Classics literary characteristics of the genre and their strategic course [prerequisite(s)]. deployment. The literary and historical contexts of specific epics are discussed in order to make their cultural CLAS-3840 (3) Provinces and Subjects (3 hrs Lecture) significance clear. This course focuses on a particular Roman province or Cross-listed: ENGL-3754(3). subject population of the Roman Empire. The topic draws Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course upon evidence from the ancient textual evidence, and ENGL-3754. archaeology, and cultural and social history in the light of modern theory and scholarship. The instructor and the CLAS-3755 (3) Ancient Drama in Translation (3 hrs focus of study vary from year to year. Information Lecture) Students read the works of ancient tragic poets concerning these course offerings is provided by the (e.g., Aeschylus, Sophocies, Euripides, Seneca) and of Department. Additional in-depth work is required to receive ancient comic poets (e.g., Aristophanes, Menander, credit at the 4000 level. Plautus, Terence) in translation. Literary conventions of Note: This course may be repeated when the topic varies. both ancient tragedy and comedy are addressed. The Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course plays are situated within their broader historical and and HIST-3010. festival contexts to make clear their cultural significance. Requisite Courses: At least 3 credit hours in any Cross-listed: ENGL-3755(3). Classics course [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and ENGL-3755. CLAS-3850 (3) (3 hrs Lecture) This course focuses on a specific era, or time period, in ancient and/or classical CLAS-3756 (3) Topics in Ancient Literature (3 hrs history. The topic draws upon evidence from the ancient Lecture) This course deals with the interpretation and textual evidence, archaeology, and cultural and social appreciation of literary genres, authors, or works from the history in the light of modern theory and scholarship. The canon of Greek and Latin literature. The focus of study focus of study varies from year to year. Information varies from year to year. Examples include love poetry, concerning these course offerings is provided by the satire, the ancient novel, and letter-writing as a literary Department. Additional in-depth work is required to receive form. Information concerning these course offerings is credit at the 4000 level. provided by the department. Note: This course may be repeated for credit when the Note: This course may be repeated when the topic varies. topic varies. Cross-listed: ENGL-3756(3). Cross-listed: HIST-3009(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and ENGL-3756. and HIST-3009. Requisite Courses: At least 3 credit hours in any CLAS-3820 (3) Spectacle and Ritual (3 hrs Lecture) This Classics course [prerequisite(s)]. course explores the nature and function of ritual behaviour, display, and pageantry in the Greek and Roman worlds. CLAS-3870 (3) Sexuality, Sex and Gender in the Theoretical approaches illuminate the various categories of Greek and Roman Worlds (3 hrs Lecture) This course ancient evidence. Particular topics for consideration vary, focuses on issues relating to sexuality, sex, and gender in but include military triumphs and commemorations, theatrical the Greek and Roman worlds. Theoretical approaches and sporting events within a religious context, or rites of illuminate the various categories of ancient evidence. passage such as coming-of-age ceremonies weddings, Particular topics for consideration vary, but include the and funerals. This course may be repeated for credit when social and philosophical location of homosexuality in the topic varies. Classical Greece, constructions of gender in ancient social and political discourse, representations of women in art concerning these course offerings is provided by the and literature, and the history of classical scholarship on Department. these subjects in response to contemporary social Restrictions: Honours Form Required. movements. Additional in-depth work is required for creditat the 4000-level. CLAS-4020 (3) Tutorial in Classics and Classical Note: This course may be repeated for credit when the Archaeology (3 hrs Tutorial) Students arrange subject, topic varies. focus, and readings on an individual basis, in consultation Cross-listed: CLAS-4870(3). with an instructor. Assignments, including a cumulative Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course final project, form the basis of evaluation. and CLAS-4870. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Requisite Courses: At least 3 credit hours in any Classics course [prerequisite(s)]. CLAS-4101 (3) Drama of the Republic (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) Students read in the original Latin CLAS-3901 (3) Advanced Ancient Art and Art History works selected from the most famous dramatists of the (3 hrs Lecture) Through a detailed approach, building on Republic. These may include selections from Terence and the methodologies and theories introduced in CLAS-2901, Plautus. Attention is given both to the content and form of students examine the idiosyncratic approaches to and the the works under study, and to the improvement of characteristic nature of one particular medium of ancient students' skills and speed in translation. art used in the study of the Greco-Roman worlds. Cross-listed: CLAS-3101(3). Approaches may include developments in technology, the Restrictions: Department Chair Perm Required. Students practice of connoisseurship, the role of the 'artist', the may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3100 | history of modern collecting and its role in shaping art CLAS-3101 | CLAS-4100. historical scholarship, the means of reproduction and the Requisite Courses: CLAS-2100, Intermediate Latin Texts differing views of 'copies' in ancient and modern art [prerequisite(s)]. appreciation, and the changing reception of an object in different times and locations. CLAS-4102 (3) Poetry of the Republic (3 hrs Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Seminar/Discussion) Students read in the original Latin and CLAS-4901. works selected from the most famous poets of the Requisite Courses: CLAS-2901 or permission of the Republic. These may include selections from Catullus and instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Lucretius. Attention is given both to the content and form of the works under study, and to the improvement of CLAS-3910 (3) Ancient Environments and Ecology (3 students' skills and speed in translation. hrs Lecture) This course explores approaches, Cross-listed: CLAS-3102(3). techniques, issues, and applications involved in the Restrictions: Department Chair Perm Required. Students reconstruction of ancient environmental and ecological may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3100 | conditions and settings (predominantly for Greco-Roman CLAS-3102 | CLAS-4100. antiquity). Topics addressed include the use of Requisite Courses: CLAS-2100, Intermediate Latin Texts environmental archaeology (e.g., geoarchaeology, [prerequisite(s)]. archaeobotany, , zooarchaeology) in assessing paleoenvironments and paleoecology; natural resource and CLAS-4111 (3) Prose Literature of the Republic (3 hrs landscape exploitation in antiquity as determined from Seminar/Discussion) Students read in the original Latin synthesis of literary, artistic, and archaeological datasets; works selected from the most famous prose of the and environmental change in antiquity; human Republic. These may include selections from Cicero, Julius management and mismanagement of environmental and Caesar, and Sallust. Attention is given both to the content ecological conditions in the past, including aspects of and form of the works under study, and to the improvement overhunting, deforestation, pollution and natural disasters. of students' skills and speed in translation. Additional in-depth work is required to receive credit at the Cross-listed: CLAS-3111(3). 4000 level. Restrictions: Department Chair Perm Required. Students Cross-listed: CLAS-4910(3). may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3110 | Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course CLAS-3111 | CLAS-4110. and CLAS-4910. Requisite Courses: CLAS-2100, Intermediate Latin Texts [prerequisite(s)]. CLAS-4000 (3) Advanced Studies in Classics and Classical Archaeology (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This CLAS-4112 (3) Prose Literature of the Augustan Age course explores specific issues, instututions, aspects, (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) Students read in the original historical figures, events, or themes of central importance Latin works selected from the most famous prose authors to ancient Greek or Roman society, history, or culture. The of the Augustan Age. These may include selections from topic is approached from the combined standpoints of Livy. Attention is given both to the content and form of the ancient textual and material evidence in the light of modern works under study, and to the improvement of students' theory and scholarship. Students in both the language skills and speed in translation. stream and the civilization stream may take this course for Cross-listed: CLAS-3112(3). credit towards their Honours requirements. The instructor Restrictions: Department Chair Perm Required. Students and the focus of study vary from year to year. Information may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3110 | CLAS-3112 | CLAS-4110. selections from the most famous lyric poets of ancient Requisite Courses: CLAS-2100, Intermediate Latin Texts Greece. These may include selections from Alcaeus, [prerequisite(s)]. Pindar, and Sappho. Attention is given both to the content and form of the works under study, and to the improvement CLAS-4122 (3) Lyric Poetry of the Augustan Age (3 of students' skills and speed in translation. hrs Seminar/Discussion) Students read in the original Latin Cross-listed: CLAS-3212(3). works selected from the most famous lyric poets of the Restrictions: Department Chair Perm Required. Students Augustan Age. These may include selections from Horace, may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3210 | Tibullus, Propertius, Ovid, and Sulpicia. Attention is given CLAS-3212 | CLAS-4210. both to the content and form of the works under study, and Requisite Courses: CLAS-2200, Intermediate Greek to the improvement of students' skills and speed in Texts [prerequisite(s)]. translation. Cross-listed: CLAS-3122(3). CLAS-4213 (3) Archaic Greek Epic Poetry (3 hrs Restrictions: Department Chair Perm Required. Students Seminar/Discussion) Students read in ancient Greek works may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3120 | selections from the most famous epic poets of the Archaic CLAS-3122 | CLAS-4120. period. These may include selections from Homer and Requisite Courses: CLAS-2100, Intermediate Latin Texts Hesiod. Attention is given both to the content and form of [prerequisite(s)]. the works under study, and to the improvement of students' skills and speed in translation. CLAS-4123 (3) Epic Poetry of the Augustan Age (3 hrs Cross-listed: CLAS-3213(3). Seminar/Discussion) Students read in the original Latin Restrictions: Department Chair Perm Required. Students works selected from the most famous epic poets of the may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3210 | Augustan Age. These may include selections from Virgil CLAS-3213 | CLAS-4210. and Ovid. Attention is given both to the content and form of Requisite Courses: CLAS-2200, Intermediate Greek the works under study, and to the improvement of Texts [prerequisite(s)]. students' skills and speed in translation. Cross-listed: CLAS-3123(3). CLAS-4221 (3) Ancient Greek Tragedy (3 hrs Restrictions: Department Chair Perm Required. Students Seminar/Discussion) Students read in ancient Greek works may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3120 | selections from the most famous tragic poets of the CLAS-3123 | CLAS-4120. Classical period. These may include selections from Requisite Courses: CLAS-2100, Intermediate Latin Texts Aeschylus, Euripides, and Sophocles. Attention is given [prerequisite(s)]. both to the content and form of the works under study, and to the improvement of students' skills and speed in CLAS-4131 (3) Poetry of the Empire (3 hrs translation. Seminar/Discussion) Students read in the original Latin Cross-listed: CLAS-3221(3). works selected from the most famous poets of the Empire. Restrictions: Department Chair Perm Required. Students These may include selections from Juvenal and Martial. may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3220 | Attention is given both to the content and form of the works CLAS-3221 | CLAS-4220. under study, and to the improvement of students' skills and Requisite Courses: CLAS-2200, Intermediate Greek speed in translation. Texts [prerequisite(s)]. Cross-listed: CLAS-3131(3). Restrictions: Department Chair Perm Required. Students CLAS-4222 (3) Ancient Greek Comedy (3 hrs may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3130 | Seminar/Discussion) Students read in ancient Greek works CLAS-3131 | CLAS-4130. selections from the most famous comic poets of the Requisite Courses: CLAS-2100, Intermediate Latin Texts Classical period. These may include selections from [prerequisite(s)]. Aristophanes and Menander. Attention is given both to the content and form of the works under study, and to the CLAS-4141 (3) Prose Literature of the Empire (3 hrs improvement of students' skills and speed in translation. Seminar/Discussion) Students read in the original Latin Cross-listed: CLAS-3222(3). works selected from the most famous prose authors of the Restrictions: Department Chair Perm Required. Students Empire. These may include selections from Seneca and may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3220 | Tacitus. Attention is given both to the content and form of CLAS-3222 | CLAS-4220. the works under study, and to the improvement of Requisite Courses: CLAS-2200, Intermediate Greek students' skills and speed in translation. Texts [prerequisite(s)]. Cross-listed: CLAS-3141(3). Restrictions: Department Chair Perm Required. Students CLAS-4231 (3) Ancient Greek History (3 hrs may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3140 | Seminar/Discussion) Students read in ancient Greek works CLAS-3141 | CLAS-4140. selections from the most famous Greek historians of the Requisite Courses: CLAS-2100, Intermediate Latin Texts ancient world. These may include selections from [prerequisite(s)]. Herodotus, Thucydides, and Procopius. Attention is given both to the content and form of the works under study, and CLAS-4212 (3) Archaic Greek Lyric Poetry (3 hrs to the improvement of students' skills and speed in Seminar/Discussion) Students read in ancient Greek works translation. Cross-listed: CLAS-3231(3). Restrictions: Department Chair Perm Required. Students CLAS-4255 (3) Topics in Greek and Latin (3 hrs may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3230 | Lecture) This course provides students who have prior CLAS-3231 | CLAS-4230. experience in Latin and Greek the opportunity to explore Requisite Courses: CLAS-2200, Intermediate Greek fields of study related to philology. Examples of topics of Texts [prerequisite(s)]. study include papyrology, epigraphy, prose composition, and comparison of Greek and Latin literary genres. The CLAS-4232 (3) Ancient Greek Philosophy (3 hrs focus of study varies from year to year. Information Seminar/Discussion) Students read in ancient Greek works concerning these course offerings is provided by the selections from the most famous Greek philosophers of the Department. ancient world. These may include selections from Plato and Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not Aristotle. Attention is given both to the content and form of hold credit for this course and CLAS-3255. the works under study, and to the improvement of students' skills and speed in translation. CLAS-4256 (3) Tutorial Ancient Language & Cross-listed: CLAS-3232(3). Literature (3 hrs Lecture) Under the supervision of a Restrictions: Department Chair Perm Required. Students faculty member from the Department of Classics, students may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3230 | read selections from Greek or Roman works in the original CLAS-3232 | CLAS-4230. Greek or Latin. Attention is given to the content and form of Requisite Courses: CLAS-2200, Intermediate Greek the words under study, and to the improvement of the Texts [prerequisite(s)]. students' translational skills and speed. This course may be repeated when the works under study vary. CLAS-4241 (3) Ancient Greek Oratory (3 hrs Cross-listed: CLAS-3256(3). Seminar/Discussion) Students read in ancient Greek works Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not selections from the most famous Greek orators of the hold credit for this course and CLAS-3256. ancient world. These may include selections from Requisite Courses: CLAS-2100 or CLAS-2200, and Demosthenes and Lysias. Attention is given both to the permission of the Department Chair [prerequisite(s)]. content and form of the works under study, and to the improvement of students' skills and speed in translation. CLAS-4260 (3) Advanced Classical Archaeology: Cross-listed: CLAS-3241(3). Issues and Controversies (3 hrs Lecture | Restrictions: Department Chair Perm Required. Students Seminar/Discussion) This course examines methodological, may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3240 | theoretical, and topical issues in Classical Archaeology CLAS-3241 | CLAS-4240. (broadly, the archaeology of ancient Greek and Roman Requisite Courses: CLAS-2200, Intermediate Greek civilizations). Topics discussed include the integration of Texts [prerequisite(s)]. archaeological, scientific, artistic, and textual evidence in the reconstruction of classical cultures; controversies in CLAS-4251 (3) Hellenistic and Imperial Prose (3 hrs theoretical perspectives of interpretation in Classical Seminar/Discussion) Students read in ancient Greek works Archaeology; the assessment of ancient Greco-Roman selections from the most famous prose authors of the ecological, social, ritual, and economic life on the basis of Hellenistic and Imperial periods. These may include recovered artifacts and ecofacts; the use of selections from Arrian, Longus, Lucian, Polybius, and archaeological survey data to examine ancient settlement Plutarch. Attention is given both to the content and form of patterns; and ethical issues associated with curation and the works under study, and to the improvement of collection of material from Greek and Roman sites. students' skills and speed in translation. Cross-listed: CLAS-3260(3). Cross-listed: CLAS-3251(3). Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not Restrictions: Department Chair Perm Required. Students hold credit for this course and CLAS-3260. may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3250 | Requisite Courses: CLAS-2910 or permisison of CLAS-3251 | CLAS-4250. instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: CLAS-2200, Intermediate Greek Texts [prerequisite(s)]. CLAS-4400 (3) Thesis (3 hrs Project / Thesis) All Classics Honours students must complete the thesis as CLAS-4252 (3) Hellenistic Poetry (3 hrs part of their degree requirements. This is normally Seminar/Discussion) Students read in ancient Greek works undertaken in the final year of the degree. Students selections from the most famous poets of the Hellenistic wishing to enrol in this course must consult the Chair of the period. These may include selections from Apollonius and Department of Classics well in advance of registration to Theocritus. Attention is given both to the content and form determine the thesis topic. The Chair, in consultation with of the works under study, and to the improvement of the faculty, assigns each thesis candidate a supervisor, students' skills and speed in translation. under whose guidance the thesis is completed. Students Cross-listed: CLAS-3252(3). are expected to meet regularly with their supervisors. At Restrictions: Department Chair Perm Required. Students each meeting, progress towards completion must be may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3250 | demonstrated. CLAS-3252 | CLAS-4250. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Requisite Courses: CLAS-2200, Intermediate Greek Texts [prerequisite(s)]. CLAS-4500 (6) Experiential Learning in Classics and Classical Archaeology (3 hrs Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course provides Requisite Courses: At least 3 credit hours in any practical experience through experiential learning for Classics course [prerequisite(s)]. students in environments outside the classroom at a more intensive and more advanced level than CLAS-3500. This CLAS-4850 (3) Eras (3 hrs Lecture) This course focuses takes the form of practical experience in museums, on a specific era, or time period, in ancient and/or classical laboratories, archaeological and historical sites, and active history. The topic draws upon evidence from the ancient participation in excavations. The intensive instruction textual evidence, archaeology, and cultural and social employs lectures, seminars, fieldwork, and on occasion history in the light of modern theory and scholarship. The laboratory components, in order to teach analytical, focus of study varies from year to year. Information interpretive, and practical techniques in Classics and concerning these course offerings is provided by the Classical Archaeology. Notes: This course is open only to Department. This course may be repeated for credit when students in the Honours BA in Classics (Classical the topic varies. Civilization) and the Honours BA in Classics (Classical Note: Students taking this course at the 4000 level must be Languages). registered as Classics Honours Students. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not Restrictions: Honours Form Required. hold credit for this course and CLAS-3500. Requisite Courses: At least 3 credit hours in any Classics course [prerequisite(s)]. CLAS-4820 (3) Spectacle and Ritual (3 hrs Lecture) This course explores the nature and function of ritual behaviour, CLAS-4870 (3) Sexuality, Sex, and Gender in the display, and pageantry in the Greek and Roman worlds. Greek and Roman Worlds (3 hrs Lecture) This course Theoretical approaches illuminate the various categories of focuses on issues relating to sexuality, sex, and gender in ancient evidence. Particular topics for consideration vary, the Greek and Roman worlds. Theoretical approaches but include military triumphs and commemorations, theatrical illuminate the various categories of ancient evidence. and sporting events within a religious context, or rites of Particular topics for consideration vary, but include the passage such as coming-of-age ceremonies weddings, social and philosophical location of homosexuality in and funerals. This course may be repeated for credit when Classical Greece, constructions of gender in ancient social the topic varies. Additional Requirements: students taking and political discourse, representations of women in art this course at the 4000 level must be registered as and literature, and the history of classical scholarship on Classics Honours students. these subjects in response to contemporary social Cross-listed: CLAS-3820(3). movements. This course may be repeated for credit when Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not the topic varies. hold credit for this course and CLAS-3820. Note: Students taking this course at the 4000 level must be Requisite Courses: 3 credit hours in any Classics registered as Classics Honours Students. course [prerequisite(s)]. Cross-listed: CLAS-3870(3). Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not CLAS-4830 (3) Kingdoms and City-States in the hold credit for this course and CLAS-3870. Greek and Roman Worlds (3 hrs Lecture) This course Requisite Courses: At least 3 credit hours in any focuses on a particular kingdom or city-state of the ancient Classics course [prerequisite(s)]. world. The topic draws upon evidence from the ancient textual evidence, archaeology, and cultural and social CLAS-4901 (3) Advanced Ancient Art and Art History history in the light of modern theory and scholarship. The (3 hrs Lecture) Through a detailed approach, building on instructor and the focus of study vary from year to year. the methodologies and theories introduced in CLAS-2901, Information concerning these course offerings is provided students examine the idiosyncratic approaches to and the by the Department. characteristic nature of one particular medium of ancient Note: Students taking this course at the 4000 level must be art used in the study of the Greco-Roman worlds. registered as Classics Honours Students. Approaches may include developments in technology, the Restrictions: Honours Form Required. practice of connoisseurship, the role of the 'artist', the Requisite Courses: at least 3 credit hours in any history of modern collecting and its role in shaping art Classics course [prerequisite(s)]. historical scholarship, the means of reproduction and the differing views of 'copies' in ancient and modern art CLAS-4840 (3) Provinces and Subjects (3 hrs Lecture) appreciation, and the changing reception of an object in This course focuses on a particular Roman province or different times and locations. subject population of the Roman Empire. The topic draws Note: Students taking this course at the 4000 level must be upon evidence from the ancient textual evidence, registered as Classics Honours Students. archaeology, and cultural and social history in the light of Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not modern theory and scholarship. The instructor and the hold credit for this course and CLAS-3901. focus of study vary from year to year. Information Requisite Courses: CLAS-2901 or permission of concerning these course offerings is provided by the instructor and Classics Chair (or designate) for 4000 level Department. This course may be repeated when the topic students [prerequisite(s)]. varies. Note: Students taking this course at the 4000 level must be CLAS-4910 (3) Ancient Environments and Ecology (3 registered as Classics Honours Students. hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course explores approaches, techniques, issues, and applications involved in the reconstruction of ancient environmental and ecological conditions and settings (predominantly for Greco-Roman antiquity). Topics addressed include the use of environmental archaeology (e.g., geoarchaeology, archaeobotany, palynology, zooarchaeology) in assessing paleoenvironments and paleoecology; natural resource and landscape exploitation in antiquity as determined from synthesis of literary, artistic, and archaeological datasets; climate and environmental change in antiquity; human management and mismanagement of environmental and ecological conditions in the past, including aspects of overhunting, deforestation, pollution and natural disasters. Note: Students taking this course at the 4000 level must be registered as Classics Honours Students. Cross-listed: CLAS-3910(3). Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3910. CONFLICT RESOLUTION STUDIES

CRS-1200 (6) Introduction to Conflict Resolution the ground work for effective conflict resolution. Students Studies (3 hrs Lecture) Disagreements, hurtful encounter and critique various theoretical perspectives relationships, bullying, verbal aggression, physical assault, such as individual characteristics, social process, and genocide, and war-human conflict is widespread in social structural theories. Students evaluate the usefulness personal, community, and global settings, and all of these theories by applying them to different conflict experience conflict in some way. This course prepares situations, and develop their abilities to identify conflict students to deal constructively with conflict through resolution strategies appropriate to the conflict analysis. creative problem solving, effective communication, This course is closely integrated with and must be taken productive use of power, skills for peaceful justice-making, concurrently with CRS-2211(1.5) Coaching Skills and understanding gender dynamics. To deal with personal Workshop. and others' conflicts, students explore approaches such Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course as negotiation, mediation, nonviolent action, cross-cultural and MSC-2102. sensitivity, legal alternative dispute resolution, and Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of the restorative justice. instructor [prerequisite(s)]; CRS-2211 (must be taken Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course previously or at the same time as this course). and MSC-1200. CRS-2211 (1.5) Coaching Skills Workshop (1.5 hrs CRS-2111 (1.5) Special Topics Workshop (1.5 hrs Workshop) In this workshop students learn and practice Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This workshop offers informal models of third party participation in conflict students the opportunity to learn and practice various resolution. Under the supervision of an experienced conflict resolution skills used within a wide variety of practitioner, students learn how to coach and prepare settings. Areas of study may include topics such as disputants effectively, and how to facilitate informal conflict compassionate listening, faith-based community resolution intervention. This workshop is integrated with peacebuilding, identity conflict resolution skills, and and must be taken concurrently with CRS-2210(3) Conflict diversity awareness training. This course may be repeated Theory and Analysis. for credit when topic varies. Note: Students may not hold credit in both this course and Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of the the former CRS-2211(1.5) Conciliation Skills Workshop. instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]; CRS-2210 (must be taken CRS-2131 (3) History of Peace and Nonviolence I (3 concurrently). hrs Lecture) This course examines the history of pacifism, peace movements, and nonviolence from ancient times to CRS-2221 (3) Restorative Justice (3 hrs Lecture) This the 1700s. It focuses in particular on Europe, with special course identifies the principles of restorative justice and emphasis on the period from ancient Greece and Rome, to explore the application of these principles in various Early Modern times in Western Europe. The course also contexts. This will include a critical assessment of various addresses history of peace in other parts of the world. forms of victim offender mediation, as well as the Thus, it contrasts Christian traditions of nonviolence with application of restorative principles at various levels within those of Hindu, Buddhist and other eastern traditions. For the criminal justice system, as they affect victims, case studies, the course examines Mennonite communities offenders, and the community. Alternative models of justice in 16th and 17th century Switzerland and the Netherlands. as a whole will also be considered. Cross-listed: MENN-2131(3) and HIST-2131(3). Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course instructor [prerequisite(s)]. and HIST-2131 | MENN-2131. CRS-2231 (3) Nonviolent Social Change (3 hrs Lecture) CRS-2132 (3) History of Peace and Nonviolence II (3 This course explores the imperative of social change from hrs Lecture) This course examines the history of pacifism, a social justice perspective. After studying the meanings of peace movements, and nonviolence from the 1700s to the power and its exercise as well as theories of present. It focuses in particular on North America, but also non-violence, students are taken through the modalities of covers selected events in other parts of the world. The non-violent social action. The practicalities of planning, course, thus, contrasts Christian traditions of nonviolence strategizing, and implementing non-violent struggle are with those of aboriginal, secular, and eastern cultures. For covered through case study methodology. Students cover case studies, the course examines Mennonite communities such topics as the formation of coalitions, getting media in 19th and 20th century Canada and the United States attention, framing messages, and mobilizing constituents. where have embraced pacifism as a The course is designed to help students understand and fundamential principle of social organization. participate more effectively in initiatives for non-violent Cross-listed: MENN-2132(3) and HIST-2132(3). social action. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of the and HIST-2132 | MENN-2132. instructor [prerequisite(s)].

CRS-2210 (3) Conflict Theory and Analysis (3 hrs CRS-2232 (3) Introduction to Conflict Resolution in Lecture) Analyzing social and interpersonal conflict lays Educational Settings (4 hrs Lecture) This course will present an introduction to the theory and methods of interpersonal and small group conflict. Issues surrounding conflict resolution, with special emphasis on conflict in diversity are examined in depth, specifically with respect to educational settings. The course will help students to individual and cultural differences. Direct instruction is understand the nature of human conflict, responses to provided in the analysis, development, and implementation conflict, and models for constructive ways to deal with of self-management and interpersonal communication skills conflict between and among individuals and groups. Topics to enhance healthy relationships and prevent dysfunctional will include anger, power, creative dimensions of conflict, conflict in daily life. and mediation. These will be examined from an Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of the interdisciplinary perspective. instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Cross-listed: EDUC-2232(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course CRS-2261 (3) Conflict in the Family II (3 hrs Lecture) and EDUC-2232. Building upon the systemic family theory and the life cycle processes studied in Conflict in the Family I, this course CRS-2241 (3) Conflict and Culture (3 hrs Lecture) In this closely examines specific family conflicts in marital course students explore the relationship between culture relations, parents with younger children, parents with and conflict from an interdisciplinary perspective. Students adolescents, single parents, step and blended families, and examine their own cultural perspectives and worldviews same-sex couples. Drawing from class discussion, the as well as cultural differences in response to conflict. The academic literature, and personal anecdotes, family course examines the origins and nature of conflict relational conflict is explored for both its deepening between and among cultures, with special reference to the potential and its inhibiting power. relationships between cultural values and conflict Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 and CRS-2251 or resolution processes. Special attention is given to popular permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. culture, religion, cultural models of conflict resolution, rituals of reconciliation, and inter-ethnic conflict in the modern CRS-2262 (3) Conflict, Faith and Community (3 hrs world. Lecture) This course explores how conflict and conflict Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of the resolution are linked to personal faith and life in community. instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Students first have the opportunity to investigate what is meant by "faith" and "community." Students then explore CRS-2242 (3) Methods of Conflict Resolution in how faith and community can shape their understanding of Educational Settings (4 hrs Lecture) This course will conflict and the practice of conflict resolution. Diverse provide practical applications of conflict resolution skills, for views of conflict and faith developed by secular as well as teaching conflict resolution and for the implementation of various religious communities is examined. conflict management programs from elementary to Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of the secondary levels. Practical skills for conflict resolution in instructor [prerequisite(s)]. the classroom, in the home, in the peer group, and in staff relations will be developed. Areas of skill learning will CRS-2271 (3) Conflict Within Groups (3 hrs Lecture) include conflict mediation, listening skills, responding to The dynamics of group conflict include both interpersonal anger and violence, and classroom management. A interactions and collective processes. In this course practicum component will be included to provide the students develop analytical tools and practical facilitation opportunity to link theory to practice. skills to deal with group conflict in a variety of settings: Cross-listed: EDUC-2242(3). study groups, sports teams, work teams, and social Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course change efforts. Students learn hands-on approaches for and EDUC-2242. assessing complex social processes and the diverse Requisite Courses: CRS-2232 or EDUC 1001 or EDUC factors in group conflict including concepts of group 1801, and CRS-1200 [prerequisite(s)]. formation, collective decision-making, and effective facilitation. Students also study leadership and issues of CRS-2251 (3) Conflict in the Family I (3 hrs Lecture) power and diversity affecting groups. The This course is designed to help students understand how teaching/learning format for this course includes lectures, conflict develops and manifests itself within familial small and large group work, as well as written reflections relationships. Students study the nature of the family and skill development exercises. through the lens of a systemic perspective by examining Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of the family structure, communication patterns, and gender instructor [prerequisite(s)]. issues in relation to the family life cycle. Students learn to differentiate between destructive and constructive conflict CRS-2281 (3) Selected Topics in Conflict Resolution processes in the family. They then progress to an Studies (3 hrs Lecture) The course is designed to understanding of how to transform antagonistic conflict introduce students to the reality and complexity of conflict into problem solving. situations within a number of settings, such as small and Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of the large communities, organizations, and families. The course instructor [prerequisite(s)]. has a strong applied component, presenting specific mediation problems through a case study approach. CRS-2252 (3) Conflict and Communication (3 hrs Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of CRS Lecture) This course provides some theoretical Coordinator [prerequisite(s)]. underpinnings of the dynamics of communication in CRS-2310 (3) Conflict Resolution, Social Change and CRS-3220 (3) Models for Conflict Transformation (3 The Arts (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) Conflict Resolution, hrs Lecture) This course examines historical and Social Change and the Arts explores how different arts contemporary models for nonviolent conflict transformation. have been used to affect social change. The course looks It defines processes such as conflict management, conflict at ways that cultural productions play a positive role in resolution, and conflict transformation. Students explore building peaceful societies. The expressive arts and other ways to prevent destructive conflict, the roles of action methods can provide a bridge between personal and forgiveness and reconciliation in divided societies, and collective experience to help people master complex tools to build sustainable peace. Models used to address feelings in their healing process while also inspiring, conflicts include sustainable peacebuilding, human needs motivating, and uniting social movements. The course theory, transformative mediation, forgiveness, nonviolent covers theory and practice from around the world social change, public apologies, truth and reconciliation highlighting community-based arts. Students learn how to commissions, Indigenous circles, and multi-track diplomacy. implement arts within community projects and the This course is closely integrated with and must be taken assessment of outcomes and, as such, make connections concurrently with CRS-3221(1.5) Mediation Skills between artistic disciplines and community well-being. Workshop. Cross-listed: THFM-2806 Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and CRS-2220 | MSC-2103. and THFM-2806. Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of instructor [prerequisite(s)]; CRS-3221 (must be taken CRS-2421 (3) Legal Systems and Alternative Dispute previously or at the same time as this course). Resolution (ADR) (3 hrs Lecture) Students study the basics of the Canadian Legal System, including the CRS-3221 (1.5) Mediation Skills Workshop (1.5 hrs Constitution, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the Workshop) This hands-on workshop offers students the role of Parliament and Provincial legislatures in creating opportunity to learn and practice third-party mediation in laws, as a context for legal conflict resolution and various conflict resolution. Through interaction in small groups and alternative dispute resolution processes. This course various mediation simulations, students learn a model of emphasizes the use of law to resolve conflicts. Topics mediation to deal with interpersonal conflicts, and skills to include rule makers, rule enforcers, civil litigation, criminal facilitate a mediation session whose aim is a constructive proceedings, class actions, administrative law, and resolution between two people in conflict. This workshop alternative dispute resolution processes such as the Indian is closely integrated with and must to taken concurrently Residential School Resolution process. with CRS-3220(3) Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of the Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. instructor [prerequisite(s)]; CRS-3220 (must be taken concurrently). CRS-2431 (3) Negotiation Theory and Practice (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines the theory and practice of CRS-3231 (3) Ethics in Conflict Resolution (3 hrs negotiation, including topics such as negotiating skills, Lecture) This course examines the ethical dimensions of contextual factors, agreement implementation and conflict resolution. The first part of the course focuses on follow-up, multilateral negotiation, and third party four ethical theories: Kantian, Consequentialism, Virtue and intervention. Principlism. The second part of the course draws on Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of the specific issues in conflict resolution, especially with instructor [prerequisite(s)]. reference to the mediation process, such as neutrality, justice and confidentiality. This part of the course includes CRS-2443 (3) Conflict and Development Issues in the analysis of case studies and codes of professional Indigenous Communities (3 hrs Lecture) Within the conduct. broad frameworks of international development and conflict Requisite Courses: CRS-1200(6) plus a minimum of 6 resolution studies, this course explores the dynamics of additional credit hours in CRS courses (i.e. CRS-XXXX), or indigenous people globally, with special reference to the permission of instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Canadian context. The course describes key elements of indigenous cultures and world views. It examines inter- CRS-3240 (3) Workplace Conflict Resolution (3 hrs and intra-group conflict and conflict resolution processes Lecture) This course examines contemporary workplace involving indigenous communities. Processes of issues, causes of workplace conflict and a variety of marginalization and underdevelopment are presented in dispute and conflict resolution responses such as order to understand the indigenous communities' social, negotiation, conciliation, mediation, grievance procedures, economic, and political situations. Strategies for community and arbitration as well as tribunals such as labor relations development and conflict resolution will be highlighted as boards and human rights commissions. Examination of means to achieve transformation. approaches to conflict resolution in the workplace includes Cross-listed: IDS-2443(3). reference to such issues as violence, bullying, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course harassment, organizational culture, "constructive and IDS-2443. dismissal," and other workplace concerns. Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or IDS-1100 or permission Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of the of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. instructor [prerequisite(s)]. CRS-3242 (3) Women and Peacemaking (3 hrs field. Lecture) This course addresses, from an interdisciplinary Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. Students perspective, both theoretical and practical contributions may not hold credit for this course and CRS-3292. that women have made to peacemaking in the modern Requisite Courses: CRS-1200, CRS-2210, CRS-3220 world. It includes analysis of women's involvement in and permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. peace action, research, and education. Attention is given to the challenges that activists face in organizing around their CRS-3294 (3) Practicum in Conflict Resolution identity as women, such as the challenge of building Studies (3 hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This common ground among women with varied experiences program is designed for students to integrate their and concerns. academic learning in settings of supervised 'field' Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or WGS-1232 or experiences. The practicum involves voluntary work with a permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. relevant agency, exposing students to actual work settings where they can apply their insights about conflict and its CRS-3262 (3) Critical Issues in Conflict Resolution (3 resolution. Students integrate theory with practice through hrs Lecture) Using the perspectives of conflict resolution seminar participation, and academic assignments. studies, this course examines issues of current social Restrictions: Perm - MSC Pract Dir Required. controversy as instances of social conflict, including the Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 and CRS-2210 and analysis of characteristics of conflict and directions for the CRS-3220, permission of the field of conflict resolution. Specific issues examined vary Practicum Director, and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 from year to year, but may include such topics as [prerequisite(s)]. native/aboriginal issues, alternative healing models, and issues of conflict and spirituality. CRS-3295 (3) Practicum in Conflict Resolution Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of the Studies (3 hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This instructor [prerequisite(s)]. program is designed for students to integrate their academic learning in settings of supervised 'field' CRS-3272 (3) Refugees and Forced Migration (3 hrs experiences. The practicum involves voluntary work with a Lecture) Global trends continue to show unprecedented relevant agency, exposing students to actual work settings numbers of forcibly displaced people worldwide. Countries where they can apply their insights about conflict and its have struggled with how to assist refugees and internally resolution. Students integrate theory with practice through displaced people. Less than one percent of refugees under seminar participation, and academic assignments. UNHCR mandate are resettled in other countries. This Restrictions: Perm - MSC Pract Dir Required. course explores the root causes of forcibly displaced Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 and CRS-2210 and people; the costs associated with such movements, CRS-3220, permission of Menno Simons College Practicum including economic, physical, and mental health; the Director, and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 responses of world governments; and the work of [prerequisite(s)]. resettlement agencies in assisting refugees. The issues and lessons learned from the experience of resettling and CRS-3296 (1.5) Practicum in Conflict Resolution integrating refugees around the world are studied, Studies (1.5 hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This including in Canada. program is designed for students to integrate their Cross-listed: HR-3272(3). academic learning in settings of supervised 'field' Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course experiences. The practicum involves voluntary work with a and HR-3272. relevant agency, exposing students to actual work settings Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or HR-1200, or permission where they can apply their insights about conflict and its of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. resolution. Students integrate theory with practice through seminar participation, and academic assignments. CRS-3292 (6) Directed Readings in Conflict Restrictions: Perm - MSC Pract Dir Required. Resolution Studies (3 hrs Directed Reading) In this Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 and CRS-2210 and course, readings and assignments in the area of Conflict CRS-3220, permission of Menno Simons College Practicum Resolution Studies will be arranged between an individual Director, and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 student and the instructor. [prerequisite(s)]. Note: This course is only available to students in their final year of classes and with a declared major in CRS. CRS-3297 (1.5) Practicum in Conflict Resolution Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. Students Studies (1.5 hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This may not hold credit for this course and CRS-3293 | program is designed for students to integrate their MSC-3101. academic learning in settings of supervised 'field' Requisite Courses: CRS-1200, CRS-2210, CRS-3220 experiences. The practicum involves voluntary work with a and permissions of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. relevant agency, exposing students to actual work settings where they can apply their insights about conflict and its CRS-3293 (3) Directed Readings in Conflict resolution. Students integrate theory with practice through Resolution Studies (3 hrs Directed Reading) This course seminar participation, and academic assignments. is designed for senior students with exceptional potential in Restrictions: Perm - MSC Pract Dir Required. the field of Conflict Resolution. All reading requirements in Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 and CRS-2210 and the course are selected and directed by a specialist in this CRS-3220, permission of Menno Simons College Practicum Director, and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 transition to a just and stable society. The course [prerequisite(s)]. investigates a variety of transitional justice mechanisms, such as reparations, truth commissions, reconciliation CRS-3298 (6) Practicum in Conflict Resolution activities and criminal tribunals. Studies (6 hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This Cross-listed: HR-3410(3). program is designed for students to integrate their Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course academic learning in settings of supervised 'field' and HR-3410 | HRGS-3410. experiences. The practicum involves voluntary work with a Requisite Courses: HR-2100 and HR-2200,or the former relevant agency, exposing students to actual work settings HRGS-2101, or the former POL-2101 or permission of the where they can apply their insights about conflict and its instructor [prerequisite(s)]. resolution. Students integrate theory with practice through seminar participation, and academic assignments. CRS-3901 (3) Humanitarian Aid and Conflict: Do No Restrictions: Perm - MSC Pract Dir Required. Harm (3 hrs Lecture) This course focuses on the Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 and CRS-2210 and problems of providing assistance in complex emergencies, CRS-3220, permission of Menno Simons College Practicum where armed conflict has generated crises requiring a Director, and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 humanitarian response. It covers the nature of [prerequisite(s)]. contemporary armed conflict, the actors involved in responding to complex emergencies, and the many CRS-3299 (3) Practicum in Conflict Resolution dimensions of humanitarian aid and intervention. Through Studies (3 hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This analysis of aid's impacts on the conflict and its program is designed for students to integrate their effectiveness at meeting human needs, the course academic learning in settings of supervised 'field' explores models of humanitarian assistance that minimize experiences. The practicum involves voluntary work with a negative impacts. relevant agency, exposing students to actual work settings Cross-listed: IDS-3901(3). where they can apply their insights about conflict and its Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course resolution. Students integrate theory with practice through and IDS-3901. seminar participation, and academic assignments. Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or IDS-1100 and 45 credit Restrictions: Perm - MSC Pract Dir Required. hours of university credit, or permission of the instructor Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 and CRS-2210 and [prerequisite(s)]. CRS-3220, permission of Menno Simons College Practicum Director, and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 CRS-3910 (3) Peace Theory and Practice (3 hrs [prerequisite(s)]. Lecture) This course investigates theories of peace. Theories of war and the practice of warfare have been CRS-3331 (3) Genocide, War, and Violent Conflict (3 studied a great deal; theories of peace and the practice of hrs Lecture) Genocide, war, and violent conflict are among peace have been studied less. The course begins with the most pressing problems investigated by conflict attempts to define peace - a task as difficult as that of analysts. This course helps students interpret and defining war and conflict - by drawing on key studies by understand unfolding situations of large-scale violence in peace research scholars like Galtung, Reardon, and the world. To aid that process we examine a variety of Elshtain. The course is conducted in a modified seminar theoretical approaches, case studies, and core debates in format (half the course in large group format, the remainder the area from an interdisciplinary perspective. utilizing small group problem-based learning). Contemporary efforts to ameliorate selected cases of Cross-listed: IDS-3910(3). violent conflict, war, and genocide are also examined. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of the and IDS-3910. instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or IDS 1100 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. CRS-3332 (3) Trauma and Violence (3 hrs Lecture) This course explores serious, violent conflict, with attention to CRS-3920 (3) Action Research Methods (3 hrs the multifaceted causes, dynamics, and traumatic Lecture) This course investigates the contemporary consequences of violence. It considers these issues at all research and field work methods commonly used by relevant levels, including intrapersonal, interpersonal, researchers and practitioners in the fields of international familial, community, and national. Students are exposed to development and conflict resolution studies. The course the existing knowledge base in research and crisis theory, emphasizes attitudes and skills necessary to conduct and also observe and study practical skills for crisis first participatory action research. Topics and techniques aid and community longer-term intervention. covered in the course include planning for research, Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of the proposal writing, sampling strategies, interviewing and instructor [prerequisite(s)]. focus group techniques, life history, photovoice and participatory video, integrating qualitative and quantitative CRS-3410 (3) Models of Transitional Justice (3 hrs methods, and post-field work activities. Lecture) This course examines transitional justice, the Cross-listed: IDS-3920(3). processes by which societies deal with the legacy of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course widespread human rights abuses after a period of and IDS-3920. oppression or violent conflict in order to achieve the Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or IDS 1100 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)].

CRS-3931 (3) Human Rights and Conflict Resolution CRS-4252 (3) Advanced Studies in Mediation Practice (3 hrs Lecture) Human rights advocates and conflict (3 hrs Lecture) The course provides an in-depth resolution practitioners both aim to build peaceable examination of contemporary developments and issues in societies based on mutual respect and the rule of law. the theory and practice of mediation as a method for Rights advocates typically push the justice agenda while conflict resolution. These are examined in several different conflict resolution practitioners strive for transformation contexts where mediation is practiced, including areas often without utilizing human rights norms and institutions such as victim-offender conflict, family and divorce, as a basis for stability. This course systematically labour-management relations, environmental issues, evaluates the tensions and parallels between the two conflict in schools, and international relations. In each case fields, examining some of the ways in which human rights the examination emphasizes the social-structural and conflict resolution scholars and practitioners can circumstances that influence the nature of mediation interact in their approaches. Basic human rights concepts practice. The course draws extensively on research are introduced and case studies are used in an exploration findings and case-study materials relating to the of the issues. contemporary practice of mediation. Cross-listed: HRGS-3931(3). Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 and CRS-2210 and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course CRS-3220, or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. and HR-3931. Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of the CRS-4293 (3) Directed Readings in Conflict instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Resolution Studies (3 hrs Directed Reading) This course is offered to senior CRS students. Readings, assignments, CRS-4200 (3) Senior Seminar in Conflict Resolution and course of study are selected and agreed upon in Studies (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course provides consultation between the individual student and the a broad overview of the field of Conflict Resolution Studies, instructor. and highlights the unity in the field at all scales from the Restrictions: Department Permission Required. personal to the global. It emphasizes major theories and Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 and CRS-2210 and practical approaches with which to analyze and address CRS-3220, and permission of the Department Chair different types of social conflict at [prerequisite(s)]. interpersonal/organizational and community/global levels. As a major component of the course requirement students CRS-4350 (3) Post-Conflict Truth, Memory, and research and present a mini-thesis on a topic of their Reconciliation (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) The suffering choice. from atrocities during war-time is often seen as producing Requisite Courses: CRS-1200, CRS-2210, CRS-2241, lingering individual and collective trauma, contributing to and CRS-3220 or permission of the instructor either personal dysfunction or successive cycles of [prerequisite(s)]. violence where oppressed groups become the perpetrators in future regimes or conflicts. This course CRS-4224 (3) Inner Peace and Conflict probes the role of memory in transitional societies, with Transformation (3 hrs Lecture) The course explores the particular emphasis on using memory to strengthen nature of inner conflict, based on knowledge and skills mechanisms for justice and human rights. Reconciliation developed through the study of interpersonal, inter-group, projects, ranging from community-based initiatives to formal and other levels of conflict. Inner conflict is viewed not as legislated undertakings such as truth and reconciliation a problem or failure but as a normal and natural aspect of commissions are examined in depth. human experience. Inner peace is defined as a state of Cross-listed: HR-4350(3). balance or equilibrium between the present and the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course emergent self. Inner conflict transformation is seen to be an and HR-4350 | HRGS-4350. ongoing process of growth and change. Requisite Courses: HR-3410, CRS-3410, or the former Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of the HRGS-3410 or permission of the instructor instructor [prerequisite(s)]. [prerequisite(s)].

CRS-4240 (3) Workplace Dispute Resolution System CRS-4910 (3) Conflict and the Construction of the Design (3 hrs Lecture) The course is designed to develop Other (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This seminar addresses an understanding of the nature and causes of conflict in a central question raised in post-colonial theory about the the workplace, and the implementation of conflict resolution way humans construct and maintain an understanding of systems within the organization. Areas of study include the Other. We ask the question, "Have scholars found the systems design related to the organizational culture, idea of the Other useful as a synthesizing concept?" This context, and structure. It examines past and current problem-based, interdisciplinary seminar considers conflict resolution systems, structures that are necessary particular sites of struggle in cultural, social, and individual to support conflict management systems, and emerging contexts. Finally, we ask about the implications of this trends in workplace dispute systems design. The course inquiry for our cultural, social, and individual then studies organizational advantages and disadvantages circumstances. of investing in dispute systems design. Cross-listed: IDS-4910(3). Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 and CRS-3240 or Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and IDS-4910. Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 and CRS-2210, and CRS-3220 or IDS-1100, and IDS-2110 and IDS-3111 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)].

CRS-4920 (3) Program Planning in Development and Conflict Resolution (3 hrs Lecture) Program planning is a critical first step in most interventions by development and conflict resolution organizations. This course covers blueprint planning required for preparation of funding proposals and various forms of strategic and participatory planning required for the application of results-based management and learning approaches during program implementation. Current debates regarding approaches to planning are also reviewed. Students acquire skills necessary for conceptualizing and implementing international or domestic projects undertaken by non-governmental organizations: needs assessment, goal and purpose identification, formulation of logframe, workplan and budget, and preparation of a funding proposal. Cross-listed: IDS-4920(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and IDS-4920. Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or IDS-1100 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)].

CRS-4922 (3) Program Evaluation in Development and Conflict Resolution (3 hrs Lecture) Evaluating programs is a means of systematically assessing interventions designed to promote development and conflict resolution. This course covers formative evaluations required for program decision-making and summation evaluations applicable for analyzing outcomes and impacts to determine relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, sustainability and potential for replication of programs normally implemented by non-governmental organizations. Current debates in approaches to evaluation are also reviewed. Students acquire skills in: selecting relevant quantitative and qualitative indicators, various approaches to obtain measures for the indicatos selected, approaches to analyzing collected data, and effective presentation of evaluation conclusions and recommendations. Cost-benefit analysis is covered in ECON-3316(3). Cross-listed: IDS-4922(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and IDS-4922. Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or IDS-1100 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (COOP)

COOP-2999 (0 or 3) Co-op Work Term I (Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course offers a cooperative work placement or other experiential learning opportunity adaptable to a wide variety of contexts and disciplines. Students register for this course when beginning their first work term placement. Performance is evaluated by the employer and the departmental cooperative supervisor, and may include a work-term performance report by the student; grading may be pass/fail or by letter grade. The credit version normally includes an academic assignment. The course may be completed more than once for recognition on the student record. Formal co-op designation requires the completion of three work terms, i.e. 2999, 3999 and 4999. Restrictions: Department Permission Required.

COOP-3999 (0 or 3) Co-op Work Term II (Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course offers a cooperative work placement or other experiential learning opportunity adaptable to a wide variety of contexts and disciplines. Students register for this course when beginning their second or subsequent work term placement. Performance is evaluated by the employer and the departmental cooperative supervisor, and may include a work-term performance report by the student; grading may be pass/fail or by letter grade. The credit version normally includes an academic assignment. The course may be completed more than once for recognition on the student record. Formal co-op designation requires the completion of three work terms, i.e. 2999, 3999 and 4999. Cross-listed: ACS-3700(3). Restrictions: Department Permission Required. Students may not hold credit for this course and ACS-3700. Requisite Courses: COOP-2999 [prerequisite(s)].

COOP-4999 (0 or 3) Co-op Work Term III (Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course offers a cooperative work placement or other experiential learning opportunity adaptable to a wide variety of contexts and disciplines. Students register for this course when beginning their third or subsequent work term placement. Performance is evaluated by the employer and the departmnetal cooperative supervisor, and may include a work-term performance report by the student; grading may be pass/fail or by letter grade. The credit version normally includes an academic assignment. The course may be completed more than once for recognition on the student record. Formal co-op designation requires the completion of three work terms, i.e. 2999, 3999 and 4999. Restrictions: Department Permission Required. Requisite Courses: In order to take this course you need to complete COOP-3999 [prerequisite(s)]. CRIMINAL JUSTICE

CJ-1002 (3) Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 hrs Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Lecture) This course surveys the contemporary criminal and CJ-3125 | SOC-3125. justice system from the initial contact with the offender Requisite Courses: CJ-1002, or the former CJ-1101, or through prosecution, disposition, incarceration, and release SOC-1101 [prerequisite(s)]. to the community. Emphasis is on the role of the police, prosecution, courts and corrections, as well as their CJ-2130 (3) Criminal Law (3 hrs Lecture) Introduces policies and practices relative to the offender. Legal, students to the nature, purpose, scope, sources and basic empirical, and theoretical materials are covered. principles of the criminal law. The course covers certain Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course fundamental legal concepts such as mens rea, negligence and CJ-1101. and strict liability, and the analysis of the concept of criminal responsibility in Canada. Students engage in a CJ-2100 (3) Foundations of Justice (3 hrs Lecture) This critical examination of the legislative policies expressed in course examines the academic foundations of the the Criminal Code, as well as an examination of the legal interdisciplinary study of criminal justice. It explores principles relating to certain specific crimes and to certain political, philosophical, legal, social, and methodological major defences. The course also considers the impact of foundations of the field. The course provides a base for the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms on the more advanced third year work. criminal law. Note: Students must have a declared major in Criminal Note: Students must have a declared major in Criminal Justice, or permission from the Instructor Justice, or permission from the Instructor Requisite Courses: CJ-1002 or the former CJ-1101 Requisite Courses: CJ-1002 or the former CJ-1101 [prerequisite(s)]. [prerequisite(s)].

CJ-2101 (3) Criminal Justice Research Methods (3 CJ-2203 (3) Institutional Corrections (3 hrs Lecture) hrs Lecture | 2 hrs Lab) A study of the principles, data Offers an introduction to the theories of punishment and sources and research methods appropriate for criminal the rise of incarceration in the Western world during the justice research. Topics include research design, sampling 19th and 20th century. Specific attention is given to the use scaling, questionnaire construction, survey research and of correctional institutions in Canada, and current programs qualitative methodology. and practices. Note: Students must have a declared major in Criminal Note: Students must have a declared major in Criminal Justice, or permission from the Instructor Justice, or permission from the Instructor Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: CJ-1002 or the former CJ-1101 and CJ-3101. [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: CJ-1002 or the former CJ-1101 [prerequisite(s)]; CJ-2101L (lab) (must be taken CJ-2204 (3) Community Corrections (3 hrs Lecture) concurrently). Focuses on theories of community and the use of community based interventions in the Western world. CJ-2120 (3) Policing in Canada (3 hrs Lecture) Examines Specific attention is given to community based correctional the organization and operation of contemporary Canadian programs in Canada and current practices in probation, policing. The police occupation is assessed, including parole and conditional sentencing. socialization of recruits. Key areas of focus include the Note: Students must have a declared major in Criminal Charter of Rights and Freedoms and police powers, the Justice, or permission from the Instructor use of force, corruption, accountability, police Requisite Courses: CJ-1002 or the former CJ-1101 administration and the political dimension of police work. [prerequisite(s)]. Note: Students must have a declared major in Criminal Justice, or permission from the Instructor CJ-2222 (3) Criminal Justice Field School (3 hrs Requisite Courses: CJ-1002 or the former CJ-1101 Lecture | Lab) This course deepens students [prerequisite(s)]. understanding of the criminal justice system and its applications across Canada through experiential learning. CJ-2125 (3) Victimology (3 hrs Lecture) This course Although all provinces and territories are under one Federal focuses on the dynamics of victimization in society and its Criminal Code, systems vary greatly between southern consequences. Major theoretical perspectives on provinces and northern territories. In this course students victimization patterns are examined, addressing issues of visit numerous agencies operating in Winnipeg and travel to gender, race, and class, and social institutions such as the a location in the North (e.g. Rankin Inlet) to visit a variety of family, school, and the criminal justice system. Students agencies operating there. Note that the Northern location become familiar with socio-demographic profiles of crime visited may vary from year-to-year. Reflections on and victims. Victims' rights, effect of victimization (including comparisons of these experiences will province students revictimization in the media) and victim attitudes towards with deeper understandings of the Canadian Criminal the justice system are discussed. This course was Justice System. formerly called Crime Victims. Note: Students must be able to pay for flights and room Note: Students must have a declared major in Criminal and board. Justice, or permission from the Instructor Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. Requisite Courses: CJ-1002(3), CJ-2130(3), CJ-2100(3) seizure, electronic surveillance, charging, arrest and [prerequisite(s)]; CJ-2222L (lab) (must be taken detention, interrogation, and an accused's right to counsel concurrently). and silence. The course analyzes what constitutional, common law and statutory remedies an accused can seek CJ-3107 (3) Criminal Justice and the Media (3 hrs when evidence is obtained improperly or there has been Lecture) Critically examines the depiction of the criminal abuse of police or prosecutorial powers. Students are justice system in the media, including television, film, print introduced to the fundamentals of other pre-trial and the Internet. Key research findings and theoretical phenomena including bail. approaches to studying criminal justice in the media are Requisite Courses: CJ-1002 or the former CJ-1101, and discussed. Implications for policy, public opinion and the CJ-2130 [prerequisite(s)]. operation of the agencies of the criminal justice system are examined. CJ-3184 (3) Surveillance, Information, and Criminal Requisite Courses: CJ-1002 or the former CJ-1101, and Justice (3 hrs Lecture) This course provides students CJ-2100 [prerequisite(s)]. with a critically informed understanding of surveillance in Canada. A main goal is to explore concepts and develop CJ-3117 (3) Crime Careers (3 hrs Lecture) Examines a skills to engage with claims about surveillance and related selection of criminal careers, focusing on a variety of topics such as policing. Students learn to define dimensions. Criminal careers will be examined with respect surveillance, information, and the relationship of to degree, frequency and progression of criminal surveillance to the nation-state as well as policing. With involvement; seriousness of the offence, public reaction to focus on empirical examples from the realm of criminal the offence; legal responses and criminal processing. The justice, students critically assess recent theoretical types of crimes to be examined include conventional crime statements made concerning surveillance: (a) Foucault's (such as theft or vandalism), violent crime, political crime, panopticism, (b) Mathiesen's synopticism, (c) Deleuze's organized crime, occupational crime and professional control societies, and (d) Haggerty/Ericson's surveillant crime. assemblages. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. and CJ-2102. Requisite Courses: CJ-1101 or CJ-1002 and CJ-2100 Requisite Courses: CJ-1002 or the former CJ-1101, and [prerequisite(s)]. CJ-2100 [prerequisite(s)]. CJ-3201 (3) Comparative Crime and Criminal Justice CJ-3121 (3) Race and the Criminal Justice System (3 (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines crime and criminal hrs Lecture) This course examines definitions of "race" justice in cross cultural and cross national perspective. and racism, and explores different ways of theorizing their Specific attention is given to the history, development and relationship to law, criminal justice, and criminological current operation of criminal justice systems within knowledge. The course uses empirical cases in policing, socialist, civil, common and Islamic legal traditions. Specific sentencing, corrections, border control, and policy-making topics for comparative examination include criminal law, in order to explore the particular dynamics of race, the law, policing, courts, corrections and youth justice. Current and criminal justice in Canada. It includes a focus on issues in transnational crime are examined. relationships between ongoing colonialism, immigration Requisite Courses: CJ-1002 or the former CJ-1101, and policy, the criminal justice system, and the large scale CJ-2100 [prerequisite(s)]. imprisonment of indigenous people and people of colour in Canada. It also considers policy and social movement CJ-3204 (3) Crime Prevention (3 hrs Lecture) Explores responses to racism in the criminal justice system. the history and development of perspectives on crime and Requisite Courses: CJ-1002 or the former CJ-1101, and crime prevention and critically examines the theoretical CJ-2100 [prerequisite(s)]. approaches within the field. The course will also focus on contemporary spatial perspectives on crime prevention. A CJ-3122 (3) Criminal Intelligence Analysis (3 hrs variety of disciplinary perspectives analyze the relationship Lecture) This course examines criminal intelligence between crime, fear and including geography, analysis in Canadian law enforcement. Skills, techniques, criminology, city planning and architecture. Specific and challenges in the field of intelligence analysis are situational and physical environmental strategies of crime addressed. Specific topics include intelligence-led policing, prevention are discussed. tactical and strategic intelligence, and ethical issues. Requisite Courses: CJ-1002 or the former CJ-1101, and Investigations and case studies are used to facilitate CJ-2100 [prerequisite(s)]. comprehension of course concepts and their practical application. CJ-3205 (3) Professional Ethics in Criminal Justice (3 Requisite Courses: CJ-2120 [prerequisite(s)]. hrs Lecture) Focuses on understanding and dealing with ethical issues that arise in the criminal justice system. CJ-3130 (3) Criminal Procedure (3 hrs Lecture) Different theoretical perspectives will be used to explore Surveys critical legal issues in the Canadian criminal the social and organizational process that lead to procedure with an emphasis placed on investigation. The corruption and abuse of power, systemic discrimination, course considers the relevant Criminal Code sections, and illegal behaviour by criminal justice practitioners. The constitutional provisions, common law rules and recent use of case studies will provide a realistic picture not only case law as they relate to the powers of search and of what ethical questions arise in the criminal justice system, but also of how sound moral decisions are made in structures and is structured by social contexts and social response to them. inequalities, including race, class, and sexuality. Requisite Courses: CJ-1002 or the former CJ-1101, and Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. CJ-2100 [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: CJ-1101 or CJ-1002 and CJ-2100 [prerequisite(s)]. CJ-3223 (3) Green Criminology (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines the history and contemporary nature of CJ-3470 (3) Forensic Psychology (3 hrs Lecture) This 'green' (environmental) criminology harms as well as the course examines ways that psychological principles can diverse strategies developed to protect the environment. It inform understand of and practices in the criminal justice explores the way in which governments, transnational system (i.e., law enforcement, courts, corrections). Topics corporations, military apparatuses, and ordinary people to be covered include: detection of deception, eyewitness going about their everyday activities routinely harm the testimony, legal decision-making, juries, mental illness in environment, ecology and animals. Topics include the social court, risk assessment, psychopathology, and corrections. construction of environmental problems, pollution, illegal Research on psychological factors in the criminal justice disposal of waste, animal rights, the prosecution of system and field practices are emphasized. specific environmental offences, the regulation of Cross-listed: PSYC-3470(3). environmental activities, environmental risk, and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course transnational offences. Students may also be interested in and PSYC-3470. CJ/SOC-3233, which covers different material. Requisite Courses: CJ-1002 or the former CJ-1101 and Cross-listed: SOC-3223(3). CJ-2101, or PSYC-1000, PSYC-2101 and PSYC-2102, or Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course SOC-2125 and SOC-2126 [prerequisite(s)]. and SOC-3223. Requisite Courses: CJ-1002(3) or the former CJ-3500 (3) Interpersonal Violence (3 hrs Lecture) CJ-1101(6), or SOC-1101 or permission of the instructor Utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to examining [prerequisite(s)]. interpersonal violence as a critical and complex social issue. Specific types of interpersonal violence covered CJ-3233 (3) Green Justice (3 hrs Lecture) This course include child abuse and neglect, child sexual violence, examines inequalities across race, gender, class and spousal abuse, elder abuse, rape and other forms of locality in relation to environmental problems such as toxic intimate sexual and physical violence. The course includes waste disposal, air pollution, , deforestation, a comprehensive examination of theoretical perspectives and environmental disasters. It also examines the response regarding the nature and origins of interpersonal violence to these inequalities in the form of local and global as well as a critical examination of the effectiveness of the movements, protests, and politics. Topics include: the mental health, child welfare, and criminal justice systems history of green justice; how green justices are created; approach to interpersonal violence prevention, intervention, differential exposure to environmental risks; the impact of and policy. green inequalities and the various responses to green Requisite Courses: CJ-1002 or the former CJ-1101, and injustices. Students may also be interested in CJ-2100 [prerequisite(s)]. CJ/SOC-3223, which covers different material. Cross-listed: SOC-3233(3). CJ-3800 (6) Criminal Justice Field Placement (3 hrs Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) Places students in a and SOC-3233. criminal justice or human services agency. Students Requisite Courses: CJ-1002 or the former CJ-1101, or provide service to the community while gaining the benefit SOC-1101 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. of practitioner experience. The course instructor will assist students in applying lessons learned in the class room to CJ-3400 (3) Selected Topics in Criminal Justice (3 hrs their respective placements through structured class Lecture) Examines specific topics in Criminal Justice at the discussion, reflective journals and a library paper third year level. Students should consult the department assignment. regarding potential offerings in a given year. Note: Students must have a declared major in Criminal Requisite Courses: CJ-1002 or the former CJ-1101, and Justice, or permission from the Instructor CJ-2100 [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Department Permission Required. Requisite Courses: CJ-2100 and CJ-2130 and CJ-3444 (3) Gender and the Criminal Justice System permission of the Department Chair [prerequisite(s)]. (3 hrs Lecture) This course explores Canadian criminal justice practices through a gendered lens. Students CJ-4105 (3) Seminar in Youth and the Criminal examine how gender contours our understanding of crime, Justice System (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) Provides a its construction, and representation. Students examine the critical examination of systemic problems and policy issues link between gender and surveillance, correction, legality, in youth justice. The course evaluates the effectiveness of punishment, criminalization, and discipline found in criminal current criminal justice legal reforms, interventions, justice practices. The course utilizes feminist legal treatment programs, and policies aimed at youth. Specific frameworks, historical and contemporary criminological, topics include public discourse on youth crime and justice, sociological, and political perspectives on gender and the the social construction of adolescents involved with the system of justice. The primary focus is an examination of youth justice system, the interface of corollary systems of an intersectional approach to assess how the law child welfare and mental health, the administration of youth justice systems and a comparative analysis of the policy CJ-4300 (3) Critical Criminal Justice Theory (3 hrs choices made in developing frameworks for responding to Lecture) Examines some of the major critical theoretical youth justice. perspectives of the social sciences. The course is Restrictions: Honours Form Required. intended to offer an advanced discussion of Marxist, Requisite Courses: CJ-1002 or the former CJ-1101 Foucaultian, and newly emerging critical realist [prerequisite(s)]. perspectives as they are used to make sense of criminal justice. CJ-4116 (3) Program and Policy Evaluation (3 hrs Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Lecture | 2 hrs Lab) Examines methodologies for the formal Requisite Courses: CJ-2100 [prerequisite(s)]. assessment of social programs using quantitative and qualitative methods of inquiry including survey, interview, CJ-4400 (3) Selected Topics in Criminal Justice (3 hrs observation and case study techniques. The political and Lecture) Explores specific topics in Criminal Justice at an social processes framing evaluation research are also advanced level. Students should consult the department discussed. The course requires a student project to apply regarding potential offerings in a given year. lessons learned. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Requisite Courses: CJ-2101 or permission of the CJ-4401 (3) Criminal Justice Directed Readings (3 hrs instructor [prerequisite(s)]; CJ-4116L (lab) (must be taken Directed Reading) In this course, criminal justice readings concurrently). and assignments are arranged between an individual student and department faculty member. Topics may not CJ-4122 (3) Capstone Seminar in Criminal Justice (3 duplicate regular course offerings in criminal justice or hrs Seminar/Discussion) The course traces the intellectual other departments. A course outline with assignments, history of the discipline and evaluates key issues and meeting schedule between the instructor and student, debates in its theoretical and philosophical development written assignments and course weights must be broader questions about the nature and scope of justice approved in advance, with written permission of the and criminal justice are also explored. The course orients instructor and Honours Program Chair. Additional students to the major areas of advanced criminal justice requirements: A minimum of 3.0 GPA in Criminal Justice inquiry including criminal justice theory; law and the courts courses, and completion of at least one 3000-level Criminal process; policing; and punishment and corrections. Justice course. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Requisite Courses: CJ-1002 or the former CJ-1101 [prerequisite(s)]. CJ-4500 (3) Colonialism and Criminal Justice in Canada (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This seminar explores CJ-4123 (3) Honours Thesis in Criminal Justice the relationship between settler colonialism and the Criminal (Project / Thesis with variable meeting hours) The Honours Justice system in Canada. The criminal justice system is thesis provides students the opportunity to complete an considered as one among many interlocking systems that extensive research paper or conduct a research project on shape the life chances of Indigenous peoples in the a subject of interest relevant to the discipline. In addition to present, and continues to be shaped by Indigenous completing the project, students in this course are peoples' resistance to attempted domination. Topics may expected to meet with a faculty supervisor on a regular include: Indigenous legal systems; deaths in custody; schedule throughout the academic year. Presentation of policing; murdered and missing Indigenous women and their research results verbally and in thesis form to the girls; social work; resistance and resurgence movements; Criminal Justice Department are integral to the course. and restorative justice. Emphasis is placed on reading Permission of the Department Chair is required. Indigenous scholars from across Turtle Island and Restrictions: Honours Form Required. cultivating tools to critically engage with hegemonic Requisite Courses: CJ-4122 [prerequisite(s)]. narratives about Indigenous criminalization. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. CJ-4130 (3) Advanced Criminal Law (3 hrs Lecture) Requisite Courses: CJ-1002(3) or the former Examines Canadian criminal law in depth with a particular CJ-1101(6), or permisison of the instructor emphasis on the constitutional issues affecting the [prerequisite(s)]. disposition of the criminal trial. In addition, complex substantive areas are also surveyed. The course focuses CJ-4654 (3) Interdisciplinary Perspectives on on conceptually advanced criminal law areas including Preventing Wrongful Convictions (3 hrs inchoate offences, advanced issues in defences, sexual Seminar/Discussion) This course uses an interdisciplinary offences, public order offences, offences against the state lens to examine the issue of wrongful convictions in and against the administration of justice, and offences Canada. A combination of legal and social-science pertaining to group responsibility. Students are introduced perspectives and readings will be used to identify how and to the fundamentals of legal research and reasoning why wrongful convictions take place and to discuss through course assignments. evidence-based remedies to reduce their likelihood. Topics Restrictions: Honours Form Required. may include the roles of: eyewitness memory; false Requisite Courses: CJ-2130 and CJ-3130 or permission confessions; plea bargaining; forensic biases; prosecutors of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. and defense counsel; misleading scientific evidence; and unsavoury Crown witnesses. This course may be co-taught between the UW Criminal Justice Department and UM Faculty of Law. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Requisite Courses: CJ-2130(3) and CJ-3130(3) [prerequisite(s)].

CJ-4800 (6) Research Field Practicum (3 hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This applied course will give students the opportunity for service based learning. Students will spend eight hours per week at a previously arranged field site and engage in service. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not hold credit for this course and SOC-4800. Requisite Courses: CJ-2101 [prerequisite(s)]. DANCE PROGRAM

DANC-1901 (3) Survey of Dance I (3 hrs Lecture) This be taken concurrently). course introduces students to composition, paedagogy, and performance through the use of lectures, DANC-3903 (6) Performance II (3 hrs Lecture) This is a demonstrations, and practical application. Composition: second performance project course focusing on works by fundamental concepts of choreography; improvisation as a faculty members and/or guest choreographers. basis for choreographic development. Paedagogy: Requisite Courses: DANC-3901 and DANC-3902 (must introduction to kinesiological principles and technical and be taken concurrently). artistic analysis. Performance: analysis of the rehearsal and performance experience. The classes for this course DANC-3904 (6) Spring Dance Intensive III (3 hrs are scheduled over two terms. Lecture) This is a further development of DANC-2904(6) Requisite Courses: DANC-2901 (must be taken Spring Dance Intensive II. It is a practical and intensive concurrently). studio course in dance and includes technique performance and special topics relevant to the technical DANC-1902 (3) Survey of Dance II (3 hrs Lecture) This is and artistic development of the modern dancer. a continuation of DANC-1901(3). Requisite Courses: DANC-2902 or equivalent or Requisite Courses: DANC-1901 or permission of the permission of the Program Co-Director [prerequisite(s)]. Program Co-Director [prerequisite(s)]; DANC-2902 (must be taken concurrently). DANC-3910 (6) Dance Composition I (3 hrs Lecture) This course explores methods of choreography and DANC-1904 (6) Spring Dance Intensive I (3 hrs Lecture) includes choreographic assignments culminating in public This is a practical and intensive studio course in dance. It performances. It is normally taken in the third year. includes technique, performance, and special topics Restrictions: Department Permission Required. relevant to the technical and artistic development of the modern dancer. Admission to the course is by audition. DANC-3911 (6) Dance Paedagogy I (3 hrs Lecture) This course explores methods of teaching in creative dance, DANC-2901 (6) Dance Technique I (3 hrs Lecture) This ballet and modern at the elementary level and offers studio course is comprised of daily studio classes in the experience in teaching and/or assistant teaching. It is techniques of modern dance and ballet. The course normally taken during the second or third year. focuses on the refinement of technique and artistic Restrictions: Department Permission Required. development. Requisite Courses: DANC-1901 (must be taken DANC-3912 (6) Special Studies in Dance I (3 hrs concurrently). Lecture)

DANC-2902 (6) Dance Technique II (3 hrs Lecture) This DANC-4901 (6) Dance Technique IV (3 hrs Lecture) This is a further development of DANC-2901(6) Dance course is a further development of DANC-3901(6) Dance Technique I. Technique III. Requisite Courses: DANC-2901 or permission of the Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Program Co-Director [prerequisite(s)]; DANC-1902 (must be Requisite Courses: DANC-3901 or permission of the taken concurrently). Program Co-Director [prerequisite(s)]; DANC-4902 and DANC-4903 (must be taken concurrently). DANC-2904 (6) Spring Dance Intensive II (3 hrs Lecture) This is a further development of DANC-1904(6) DANC-4902 (6) Performance III (3 hrs Lecture) This Spring Dance Intensive I. It is a practical and intensive course represents a progression from the 3000-level studio course in dance and includes technique, performance courses with emphasis on the student's performance, and special topics relevant to the technical individual development. It involves a practicum with a and artistic development of the modern dancer. professional choreographer. Requisite Courses: DANC-2901 or equivalent or Restrictions: Honours Form Required. permission of the Program Co-Director [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: DANC-3901, DANC-3902, and DANC-3903 or permission of the Program Co-Director DANC-3901 (6) Dance Technique III (3 hrs Lecture) This [prerequisite(s)]; DANC-4901 and DANC-4903 (must be is a further development of DANC-2902(6) Dance taken concurrently). Technique II. Requisite Courses: DANC-2902 or permission of the DANC-4903 (6) Performance IV (3 hrs Lecture) This Program Co-Director [prerequisite(s)]; DANC-3902 and course represents a further progression from the DANC-3903 (must be taken concurrently). 3000-level courses with emphasis on the student's individual development. It involves a practicum with a DANC-3902 (6) Performance I (3 hrs Lecture) This professional choreographer. course is a performance project focusing on works by Restrictions: Honours Form Required. faculty members and/or guest choreographers. It includes Requisite Courses: DANC-3901, DANC-3902, and rehearsals and performances. DANC-3903 or permission of the Program Co-Director Requisite Courses: DANC-3901 and DANC-3903 (must [prerequisite(s)]; DANC-4901 and DANC-4902 (must be taken concurrently).

DANC-4904 (6) Spring Dance Intensive IV (3 hrs Lecture) This is a further development of DANC-3904(6) Spring Dance Intensive III. It is a practical and intensive studio course in dance and includes technique, performance, and special topics relevant to the technical and artistic development of the modern dancer. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Requisite Courses: DANC-3901 or equivalent or permission of the Program Co-Director [prerequisite(s)].

DANC-4910 (6) Dance Composition II (3 hrs Lecture) This course represents a further development of DANC-3910(6) Dance Composition I. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Requisite Courses: DANC-3910 and permission of the Program Co-Director [prerequisite(s)].

DANC-4911 (6) Dance Paedagogy II (3 hrs Lecture) This course places emphasis on the teaching of ballet and modern at the intermediate level and offers studio experience in teaching and/or assistant teaching. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Requisite Courses: DANC-3911 and permission of the Program Co-Director [prerequisite(s)].

DANC-4912 (6) Special Studies in Dance II (3 hrs Lecture) DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES

DEV-2004 (3) Observation and Evaluation Techniques relationships with parents, families, and professionals in in Child-Care Settings (3 hrs Lecture) This course the child care setting. Topics include methods of effective provides a theoretical and practical examination of the communication; responsibilities to parents, families, and principles of systematic observation and evaluation in professionals; and the relationship between child-care child-care settings. The focus is on studying and settings and community resources. implementing different observational strategies ranging from anecdotal reports to sampling methods. DEV-3500 (3) Independent Study (3 hrs Directed Practical activities and projects will provide opportunities to Reading) Readings in a particular topic in child care will be acquire new techniques for observing, recording, and arranged between an individual student and an instructor. analyzing children's behaviours, and to make valid Where appropriate, a practicum may also be included as inferences. Based on observations in selected child care part of this course. settings, students will complete assignments designed to Note: Written permission of the Instructor and the Director help them build skills as reflective practitioners, program of Developmental Studies are required to take this course. evaluators, facilitators of children's learning, and providers Restrictions: Department Permission Required. of a healthy and safe environment. Requisite Courses: PSYC-2200 or permission of the DEV-3600 (3) Special Topics in Developmental Director of Developmental Studies [prerequisite(s)]. Studies (3 hrs Lecture) The course examines relevant issues and developments in Developmental Studies. Course DEV-3001 (3) Applied Child Development (3 hrs content varies from year to year. The topic of each course Lecture) This course focuses on the application of theory is available to students prior to registration. Students are and research in child development. The course covers allowed to repeat the course if topics vary. primarily theories and research relating to developmental Note: Written permission of the Instructor and the Director periods before adolescence and discusses implications of of Developmental Studies are required to take this course. these for the practitioner, parent, and professional working with both normally developing and special needs children. DEV-3610 (3) Topics in Leadership in Early Childhood Requisite Courses: PSYC-2200 or permission of the Care and Education (ECCE) (3 hrs Lecture) The course Director of Developmental Studies [prerequisite(s)]. provides an opportunity for currently enrolled interning students to understand and to integrate core concepts DEV-3100 (3) The Child, Family, and Social Policy (3 such as mentoring, team building, strategic planning, hrs Lecture) This course is designed to sensitize students advocacy, communication, and inclusion of children with to the social policy and legal dimensions of child diverse needs, as they explore management and development. It addresses the current political climate leadership issues in childcare systems. Students acquire surrounding the adequacy of child care, as well as information and skills through in-class discussions and selected issues concerning the law and the rights of presentations, reporting on experiences gained through children. Possible topics include current social policy and their concurrent internship placement, and individual provision of child-care services; law, divorce, and the research and reading. rights of children with diverse needs; and issues related to Note: Written permission of the Director of Developmental adoption and foster parenting. Knowledge of effective Studies is required to take this course. Students are advocacy and children's rights enables students to expected to take this course in the final term of their participate in the policy process and explore issues in the Developmental Studies program. current child-care policy agenda. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: PSYC-2200 or permission of the and DEV-3310 | DEV-3410. Director of Developmental Studies [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: DEV-3630 (must be taken previously or at the same time as this course). DEV-3300 (3) Speech and Language Disorders in Children (3 hrs Lecture) This course is designed to DEV-3630 (3) Advanced Internship introduce students to the field of communication disorders (Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum | 1 hrs in children. It provides an overview of professional issues. Seminar/Discussion) The course provides advanced field Possible topics include the identification of different types experience in the administration of childcare centres and of communication disorders, procedures in the evaluation leadership in the early childhood community. Students learn and treatment of these disorders, and child-care program skills within such topics as childcare licensing planning techniques. requirements, programs and policy planning, personnel Cross-listed: LING-3105(3). management, budgeting, the inclusion of children with Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course special needs, and developing and implementing and LING-3105. individualized programs. Students develop a major project Requisite Courses: PSYC-2200 or permission of the in their selected area of specialization that provides a Director of Developmental Studies [prerequisite(s)]. focused learning experience in their placement. Note: Written permission of the Director of Developmental DEV-3400 (3) Parents, Families, and Professionals in Studies is required to take this course. Students are Child Care (3 hrs Lecture) This course considers theory expected to take this course in the final term of their and practice in establishing and maintaining productive Developmental Studies program. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and DEV-3330 | DEV-3430. Requisite Courses: DEV-3610 (must be taken previously or at the same time as this course). DISABILITY STUDIES

DIS-1003 (3) Introduction to Disability Studies I (3 hrs challenging bio-medical views of sexualities and disabilities, Lecture) This course addresses definitions of and focusing on how people with disabilities embrace their approaches to disability, and the differences as a result of sexualities and/or are prevented from doing so. Students history and cultures. In addition, the course examines the explore these topics from critical disability, feminist, and ways in which disability is constructed in societies - queer perspectives. Recognizing and balancing complex including the media, workplaces service provision, families, and sometimes apparently competing self-identities and and environmental barriers. This course is designed to be needs are integral from a human rights perspective. of particular interest to people with disabilities, people with Cross-listed: WGS-2264(3). interest in providing disability services, educators, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course caregivers, therapists, and all people with an interest in and WGS-2264. disability issues. Requisite Courses: DIS-1003 and DIS-1004 or Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course WGS-1232 or 30 credit hours [prerequisite(s)]. and SOC-1003. DIS-3001 (3) Disability Studies Seminar I (3 hrs DIS-1004 (3) Introduction to Disability Studies II (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This upper-level seminar course, Lecture) This course examines social change in terms of which builds on DIS-2100(3) Theorizing Disability, allows disability rights movements. It looks at innovative, students to deepen their study of disability-related topics, contemporary as well as historic approaches of social social models of disability, and the works of key disability change in the community and within wide-ranging studies theorists. The focus of the course may vary from institutions within the disability rights movement in a year to year, but a common theme is the consideration of Canadian context. A specific focus is on daily and the socio-political meanings of non-conformist bodies. Key institutional sites where disability is visible including questions include: "What is disability?" and "Do particular federal and provincial policies, social service intersections of difference (e.g., gender, race, sexuality, provision and programming, and regulated local and class) matter?" With the aim of debating new ideas, community-based responses. Regional variations of social students are expected to explore relevant scholarship on change within a Canadian context are fully explored. This their own and with the class. online course is of particular interest to people with Requisite Courses: DIS-2100 or permission of the disabilities, people with interest in providing disability Program Coordinator [prerequisite(s)]. services, educators, caregivers, therapists, and all people with an interest in disability issues. DIS-3002 (3) Disability Studies Research Placement Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course (3 hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum with variable and SOC-1004. meeting hours) This field placement is designed to provide Disability Studies students with the opportunity to apply DIS-2100 (3) Theorizing Disability (3 hrs Lecture) Prior their research skills to a position in a disability organization. to the 1970s, the concept of disability was centred on Students learn new research methodologies, work in individual impairments and people with disabilities were teams and on their own, and make contacts outside "othered" because of their difference from ableist norms. academe. Placements are negotiated between students, Over the last three decades, disability activists and instructors, and hosting agencies. Students are matched theorists have sought to shift the focus from a medical with agencies based on their research skills, interests, model to a social model. Within the social model, external academic background, and the needs of the host. A good obstacles are regarded as disabling, rather than knowledge of research methods is required. non-conformist bodies. This move has had a powerful Requisite Courses: SOC-2125 or SOC-2126 or impact on a disability theorization and political action. The PSYC-2102 or any introductory social science qualitative or social model of disability has much in common with critical quantitative research methods course [prerequisite(s)]. analyses that deconstruct and denaturalize race and gender. In this course, we will consider the implications of DIS-3003 (3) Disability Studies Directed Readings (3 the social model of theorizing disability, examine the hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course provides a student at critiques, and explore the alternatives. the third year level with the opportunity, in close Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course consultation with a professor, to pursue in depth a and SOC-2100. selected area of Disability Studies. Requisite Courses: SOC-1101 or DIS-1003 or DIS-1004 Requisite Courses: DIS-2100 or permission of the [prerequisite(s)]. Program Coordinator [prerequisite(s)].

DIS-2200 (3) Disabilities, Sexualities, and Rights (1.5 DIS-3006 (3) Embodied Subjects (3 hrs hrs Lecture | 1.5 hrs Seminar/Discussion) Links between Seminar/Discussion) This course uses an intersectional living with disabilities and risk of disadvantage or approach to embodiment that attends to how constructions discrimination are clear, yet focus on equity, employment of class, debility, disability, frailty, gender, race, sexuality, access, services, and physical health needs may render and other social differences come to figure in experiences invisible issues of sexual health, identity, and expression of and understandings of the body. We think about bodies as people with disabilities. This course embraces social sites not only of social inscription but also of agency and models and explores human rights implications of possibility and highlight feminist and crip activism. What is embodiment? What is a subject? How are subjects embodied? What are the implications of embodied subjectivity? Why are some humans perceived as more embodied than others and how do the above constructions affect those perceptions? Cross-listed: WGS-3006(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and WGS-3006. Requisite Courses: WGS-2333 OR DIS-2100 or permission of the WGS Chair or DS Coordinator or instructor [prerequisite(s)].

DIS-4001 (3) Disability Studies Seminar II (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This seminar course focuses on a specific theme, author, movement, approach or theory in Disability Studies, allowing students to study, discuss, and exchange ideas about disability-related topics in some depth. Course themes may include such areas as ageism, disabled women and violence, chronic illness and gender, accommodation in the workplace, and representations of disability in fairy-tales, media and other cultural discourses. Students should consult the Disability Studies Coordinator for details. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Restrictions: Department Permission Required. Requisite Courses: Any 3000-level DIS course and permission of the Chair (or designate), or Coordinator [prerequisite(s)].

DIS-4002 (3) Disability Studies Field Placement II (Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum with variable meeting hours) This placement course provides students with a further opportunity to work in a disability-related setting and reflect upon the experience. Students apply their research skills and previous experience to a position in a disability organization. Students may work in teams and/or on their own, and make further contacts outside of academe. Students are matched with agencies based on their research skills, interests, academic background, and the needs of the host. Tasks may include literature updates, developing research and evaluation protocols, and co-writing, editing, and publishing reports. Restrictions: Department Permission Required. Requisite Courses: DIS-3002, and permission of the Chair (or designate), or Coordinator [prerequisite(s)].

DIS-4900 (3) Honours Research Paper (Directed Reading with variable meeting hours) The Honours Research Paper allows a student, in consultation with a faculty member, to pursue an area of interest that has emerged in their program of study. The course is taught on an individual arrangement between Supervisor and student. A Reader, with relevant expertise, also evaluates the final version. When scheduling permits, the student presents results at the annual WGS/DIS Colloquium. Topics may include an exploration of a film, novel, television or online show in its representations of ability and disability or evaluations of particular practical strategies and tactics like separation and mainstreaming for persons living with disabilities. Restrictions: Department Permission Required. Requisite Courses: DIS-2100 and permission of the Chair (or designate), or the Coordinator [prerequisite(s)]. EAST ASIAN LANGUAGES & CULTURE

EALC-1004 (3) East Asian Cultural Foundations (3 hrs standing in Korean 40S are not eligible to take this course. Lecture) This course introduces students to the cultural Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course traditions and belief systems of (primarily China, and REL-2040. Japan, and Korea). Traditions examined include Requisite Courses: EALC-1300L (lab) (must be taken Confucianism, Daoism (Taoism), and Buddhism. Special concurrently). attention is given to the examination of ideas stemming from primary source documents (in translation) within their EALC-2031 (3) Chinese-English Translation (3 hrs historical and cultural contexts. Emphasis is given to the Lecture) This course seeks to improve students' language central role played by developments in China for the skills and deepen their ability to communicate meanings in formation of East Asian cultural values. written texts between the two languages and two cultures. Students translate original scripts drawn from EALC-1100 (6) Introduction to Japanese Language (3 various genres of literature, including scientific materials hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course introduces students to and documents. Basic approaches include guided class the modern Japanese language. The aim of this course is to discussion, a minimum of lecture time and a maximum of provide a solid base in vocabulary, grammar, and translation practice time. This course is an introduction to pronunciation through speaking, listening, writing, and the principles and techniques of translation, but requires reading exercises. Students are introduced to Japanese proficiency in the Chinese and English languages. syllabary (hiragana and katakana) and basic Japanese Requisite Courses: At least 3 credit hours at the 1000 characters (kanji). In addition to providing the basis for level in Rhetoric, Writing and Communication further research for EALC students interested in Japanese [prerequisite(s)]. studies, the course is of interest to a variety of students from various disciplines interested in acquiring basic EALC-2100 (6) Intermediate Japanese Language (3 Japanese language skills. hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) In this course, students extend Note: Native spekaers of Japanese or students who have their knowledge of Japanese grammar and vocabulary in standing in Japanese 40S or equivalent are not eligible to communicative and academic contexts through take this course. assignments, group work, and exercises in speaking, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course listening, writing, and reading. Students are expected to be and REL-2020. able to read and write hiragana, katakana, and some kanji, Requisite Courses: EALC-1100L (lab) (must be taken and to have mastered pronunciation and basic Japanese concurrently). grammar. In addition to providing the basis for further research for students in EALC who are interested in EALC-1200 (6) Introduction to Chinese Language (3 Japanese studies, this course is of interest to elementary hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course introduces students to students of Japanese who wish to improve their language the modern standard Chinese language (Mandarin). The aim skills. of the course is to provide a solid base in vocabulary, Note: Native speakers of Japanese are not eligible to take grammar, and pronunciation through speaking, listening, this course. writing, and reading exercises. In addition to providing the Requisite Courses: EALC-1100 [prerequisite(s)]; basis for further research for EALC students interested in EALC-2100L (lab) (must be taken concurrently). Chinese studies, the course is of interest to a variety of students from various disciplines interested in acquiring EALC-2200 (6) Intermediate Chinese Language (3 hrs basic Chinese language skills. Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course is a continuation of Note: This course is not intended for Chinese native Introduction to Chinese Language (Mandarin), and is a speakers, including speakers of dialects other than study of Chinese in its spoken and written forms with more Mandarin. vocabulary, more advanced grammatical structures and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course written characters. Equal emphasis is given to speaking, and REL-2030. listening, reading, and writing. Chinese dictionary usage is Requisite Courses: EALC-1200L (lab) (must be taken also addressed. In addition to providing the basis for concurrently). further research for EALC students interested in Chinese studies, this course is of interest to a variety of students EALC-1300 (6) Introduction to Korean Language (3 who wish to improve their Chinese language skills. hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course introduces students to Note: Speakers of dialects other than Mandarin must the modern Korean language. The aim of this course is to receive permission from the instructor to take this course. provide a solid base in vocabulary, grammar, and Requisite Courses: EALC-1200 or permission of the pronunciation through speaking, listening, writing and instructor [prerequisite(s)]; EALC-2200L (lab) (must be reading exercises. Students are introduced to the Korean taken concurrently). characters known as Hangul. In addition to providing the basis for further research in East Asian Languages and EALC-2301 (3) Intermediate Korean I (3 hrs Lecture | 1 Cultures, the course is of interest to a variety of students hrs Lab) Intermediate Korean I is the first term of from various disciplines interested in acquiring basic intermediate Korean language. The course is designed for Korean language skills. students who have completed Introduction to Korean or the Note: Native speakers of Korean or students who have equivalent. To complete Korean language at the intermediate level, students must continue on to Cross-listed: REL-2708(3). Intermediate Korean II. Building on their knowledge of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Korean, students learn more advanced vocabulary, and REL-2708. grammar, and idiomatic expressions. Students also learn about Korean culture through the textbook and audiovisual EALC-2709 (3) Women in Asian Religions and media. Students are encouraged to speak as much Korean Cultures (3 hrs Lecture) The course examines the as possible to improve their oral communication skills. experience of women in several Asian cultures (e.g., India, Overall, the course aims to develop intermediate-level China, Japan), in different religious traditions (e.g., proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism). The course is Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial intended as a comprehensive introduction to women's basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who experience in both pre-modern and modern contexts, with successfully complete this course receive credit as attention to how women are perceived and perceive indicated. themselves in religious and cultural roles. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Cross-listed: REL-2709(3). and EALC-2300. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: EALC-1300, or equivalent and REL-2709. [prerequisite(s)]; EALC-2301L (lab) (must be taken concurrently). EALC-2718 (3) Buddhist Traditions in East Asia (3 hrs Lecture) This course traces the historical development of EALC-2302 (3) Intermediate Korean II (3 hrs Lecture | 1 Mahayana (Great Vehicle) Buddhism in East Asia, focusing hrs Lab) Intermediate Korean II is the second term of on the founding of East Asian Buddhist traditions in China, intermediate Korean language. The course is designed for and their transmission to Korea and Japan. The course students who have already completed Intermediate Korean introduces the major beliefs and practices associated with I in addition to Introductory Korean or the equivalent. East Asian Buddhism, the schools, figures, and texts that Building on their knowledge of Korean, students learn more form the traditions that have flourished in East Asian advanced vocabulary, grammar, and idiomatic expressions countries. In addition to Chinese Buddhist developments, used in traditional and modern Korean. Students also learn the course examines the adaptation of Chinese Buddhist about Korean culture through the textbook and audiovisual traditions in Korea and Japan. media. Students are encouraged to speak as much Korean Cross-listed: REL-2718(3). as possible to improve their oral communication skills. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Overall, the course aims to develop intermediate-level and REL-2718. proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial EALC-2720 (6) Japanese Civilization (3 hrs Lecture) basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who This course familiarizes students with major components of successfully complete this course receive credit as Japanese civilization such as religion, the arts, and politics indicated. with a specific focus on their importance in shaping Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Japanese history and culture. It is taught in Japan as an and EALC-2300. intensive summer course. Students reside and attend Requisite Courses: EALC-2301, or equivalent classes on the campus of Doshisha University in the city of [prerequisite(s)]; EALC-2302L (lab) (must be taken Kyoto. The course features field trips and guest lectures. concurrently). EALC-2721 (3) Traditional Japanese Culture (3 hrs EALC-2707 (3) Chinese Religions (3 hrs Lecture) This Lecture) This course surveys traditional Japanese culture course is a study of the basic beliefs and practices of the through an exploration of visual and dramatic arts, Chinese as informed by the three major Chinese traditions: literature, philosophy, and religion. Special emphasis is Confucian, Taoist (Daoist), and Buddhist. The course will placed on cross-cultural roots that bridged Japan with its examine the development of each of these traditions, as neighboring countries in East Asia. The historical well as their blending into a comprehensive set of beliefs foundations of popular Japanese contemporary culture - and practices that shaped the common understanding and Manga, Anime, and high technology to name a few - are practice of Chinese religion. The effect of Communism on also discussed. Chinese religious life and the resurgence of religion in Cross-listed: REL-2721(3)& ANTH-2121(3). contemporary China will also be examined. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Cross-listed: REL-2707(3). and ANTH-2121 | REL-2721. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and REL-2707. EALC-2723 (3) Japanese Cinema (3 hrs Lecture) This course surveys Japanese cinema from the 1960s to the EALC-2708 (3) Religion in Japanese Life (3 hrs present day. To understand the context of the films, Lecture) This course examines the religious life of the relevant literature (short stories, novels, and traditional Japanese people, as informed by traditions deriving from Japanese theater on which the films are based) is the native Shinto religion of Japan, the adapted traditions of discussed. In the process, the focus is on transitions from Buddhism and Confucianism, and the impact of modern to postmodernism, alterity, and subjectivity in film. Westernization and modernization on traditional beliefs and Directors examined include, among others, Ozu, Mishima, practices. Kurosawa, Teshigahara, Miyazaki, and Kitano. context of contemporary Korea. The various Korean EALC-2724 (3) Popular Culture in Japan (3 hrs Lecture) religious traditions are critically examined in terms of their Japanese culture is not just an integral component of cumulative, participatory process in world religious history. today's Japanese society, but it is also embedded in Cross-listed: REL-2733(3). today's globalized culture. In the decades following World Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course War II, toys, animation, comics, video games and even an and REL-2733. aesthetic of kawaii (cuteness) spread from Japan around the globe. This course begins with the birth and EALC-2734 (3) The Making of Modern East Asian dissemination of Japanese pop culture in the late Culture (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students seventeenth century. It then focuses on the relationships to East Asian culture in modern times. It surveys the between religion, print media, and popular culture of the transformation of traditional cultural values as a result of late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Finally, it intense political and cultural influence from the West since explores Japan's pop culture boom of the late twentieth the late 19th century, and explores the roots of and early twenty-first centuries. contemporary culture in China, Japan, and Korea. Particular Cross-listed: REL-2724 attention is given to the impact of literature (primarily short Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial stories and novels by early 20th-century intellectuals) and basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who Western thought on the East Asian region (e.g., social successfully complete this course receive credit as Darwinism, liberalism, science, and democracy, introduced indicated. to East Asia during the late 19th century), and on the way Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course in which traditional values are being critically re-evaluated and REL-2724. as China, Japan, and Korea have endeavored to modernize their societies. EALC-2725 (3) Food in Japanese Culture (3 hrs Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Lecture) This course explores the culture and history of and REL-2734. Japanese cuisine. Designated in 2013 by UNESCO as part of the world's "Intangible Cultural Heritage." Japanese food EALC-2740 (3) The Supernatural in East Asian is no longer restricted to Japan itself, but is now an integral Culture (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students component of global culinary culture. In the class, students to East Asian culture through depictions of supernatural follow the evolution of Japanese food from its origins in phenomena. By transgressing the boundaries of life and prehistoric hunting-gathering and rice cultivation to its death, human and animal, real and unreal, supernatural globalization in fusion cuisine of the twenty-first century. beings shed light on socio-culturally constructed The course ultimately aims to demonstrate how Japanese boundaries, such as status and gender. Through the lens food today is not necessarily Japanese in origin, but the of traditional supernatural literature, a framework of social product of intra and later intercontinental cultural, political, structures in traditional East Asia emerges to show how and religious networks. characters confront and transgress the bounds of Cross-listed: REL-2725(3). normative behaviour. Topics may include gender, purity and Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial contamination, Five Elements Theory, Buddhism, Daoism, basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who Neo-Confucianism, popular religion, cultural taboos, and successfully complete this course receive credit as changing views toward the supernatural in the age of indicated. scientific inquiry. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Cross-listed: REL-2740(3). and REL-2725. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and REL-2740. EALC-2731 (3) Chinese Culture and Beliefs (3 hrs Lecture) This course focuses on Chinese traditions and EALC-2770 (6) Introduction to Chinese Culture: Past values that have influenced modern Chinese society. This and Present (3 hrs Lecture) This course familiarizes course is introductory and requires no prior knowledge of students with major Chinese cultural traditions such a Chinese language and history. All the texts in this course Confucianism, Daoism (Taoism), and Buddhism, examining are in English. Students discover ways in which cultural specifically their roles in shaping Chinese culture in areas representations in social life, customs, business practice, such as religion and philosophy, language and literature, art literature, and art have affected and are being affected by and architecture, economics and business. This course beliefs. Through lecture and guided discussion students may be taught on campus, or as an intensive Summer better understand how traditions and beliefs continue to course taught in China. When taught in China, students will inform about Chinese culture today. reside and attend classes on the campus of Shanghai Cross-listed: REL-2731(3). Normal University. It will feature field trips and guest lectures by Shanghai Normal University faculty. EALC-2733 (3) Religious Traditions of Korea (3 hrs Lecture) This course provides an historical overview of EALC-2772 (3) Modern Chinese Literature in Korean religious traditions. We examine the historical Translation (3 hrs Lecture) This course focuses on processes that world religious traditions--Buddhism, Chinese literary texts that reflect the stylistic conventions Confucianism, and Christianity--have undergone in Korea. and cultural issues of China between 1911 and the 21st Then we consider the Korean folk religious tradition, century. This course is introductory and requires no prior Shamanism, and new religions in relation to the social knowledge of Chinese language, history, or culture. All texts in this course are in English. Students not only examine the forms and contents of the literary texts from EALC-3100 (6) Advanced Japanese Language (3 hrs various theoretical points of view, but also explore the Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) In this course, students complete their social, political, and historical contexts in which these texts undergraduate studies in the Japanese language through are written. Through lecture and guided discussion, advanced communicative and written exercises. Special students discover the ways in which Modern Chinese emphasis is placed on social science readings, allowing Literature continues to inform about Chinese culture today. students to read and comprehend a Japanese language newspaper article by the end of the course. Students are EALC-2773 (3) Chinese Cinema (3 hrs Lecture) This also encouraged to participate in the advanced level of the course focuses on films produced by Chinese filmmakers Manitoba Japanese Speech Contest. between the 1930s and the present in appropriate Requisite Courses: EALC-2100 or permission of the historical and cultural contexts. The course is introductory instructor [prerequisite(s)]; EALC-3100L (lab) (must be and requires no prior knowledge of Chinese language, taken concurrently). history, culture, or literature. All the films studied in the course have English subtitles. Students in the course EALC-3150 (3) Translating Japanese to English (3 hrs generally view one film per week, preceded by preparatory Seminar/Discussion) This course focuses on the practice lecture and followed by guided class discussion. of translating Japanese to English. Translation theory is introduced for students to familiarize themselves with the EALC-2774 (3) Big Ideas and Great Debates in various techniques and tools Japanese language Chinese Intellectual History (3 hrs Lecture) This course translators and interpreters tend to apply in their studies, explores the intellectual history of pre-modern China. By professions, or travels. The course focuses especially on taking a thematic approach to leading intellectual currents retaining the voice of the original Japanese source and on within Chinese thought, the course critically examines producing clean and accurate English translations of the debated and contested ideas between and among a material. Students have a choice of articles or short stories diversity of schools of Chinese thought, including, but not to translate for their final projects. The class is open to limited to, Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism. The students who completed EALC-3100 and to native or fluent course is based on close reading of primary text materials Japanese speakers. in translation and students are required to engage in debate Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial during class hours. basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who Cross-listed: REL-2774(3). successfully complete this course receive credit as Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course indicated. and REL-2774. Requisite Courses: EALC-3100 or permission of the Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. EALC-2780 (3) The Martial Arts of East Asia (3 hrs Lecture) In this course, students challenge the portrayal of EALC-3708 (3) Topics in Buddhist Culture and East Asian martial arts as an ancient, mystical practice by Society (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course explores examining the history of martial arts. Students explore how topics of contemporary interest regarding the study of military techniques once intended for war, policing, and Buddhism and society, examining major issues facing control of banditry came to be practiced as methods of Buddhism in the Asian context, focusing on aspects of the moral and physical self-cultivation. The course examines institutional, social, and political role played by Buddhism. the historical origins of martial arts in China, Japan, and May be taken for credit more than once, with permission of Korea, their evolution, and how they both subverted and instructor. Topics may include: Buddhism and Tibetan served state agendas in the modern era. Lastly, it covers identity in the struggle for Tibetan autonomy in China, the the role of martial arts in contemporary popular culture. This Buddhist monastic institution and its role in society, and class is an online course requiring a high speed internet debates over the interpretation of Buddhism in modern connection. Asian countries. Cross-listed: REL-2780 Cross-listed: EALC-4708(3) & REL-3708(3)/4708(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and REL-2780. and EALC-4708 | REL-3708 | REL-4708. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in East Asian Cultures EALC-3007 (6) Introduction to Classical Chinese (3 courses (or equivalent) or permission of the instructor hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course introduces students to [prerequisite(s)]. Classical Chinese language grammar, style, and the use of traditional characters, through the reading of excerpts from EALC-3713 (3) Gender and Sexuality in Chinese traditional Chinese literature, the basis from which all forms Culture (3 hrs Lecture) This course focuses on Chinese of the Classical Chinese writing system, in Japan and society, culture and conceptions of identity through the Korea as well as China, developed. Special attention is prisms of gender and sexuality. Topics include normative given to texts from ancient China's intellectual and religious social roles as defined by Confucian values, power and traditions, Confucianism and Daoism (Taoism). The course sexual dynamics within polygamous households, the social assumes no prior knowledge of Chinese. body vs. the biological body and the diversity of atypical Note: This course is not available to students with prior bodies in traditional China. Further we will see how gender training in Classical Chinese. inequality was appropriated to reflect China's Cross-listed: REL-3007(6). backwardness vis à vis the West and Japan in the modern period, and how contemporary culture and society has China, paying specific attention to how they were shaped sought to free gender expression from the confines of by a variety of social, political, economic, and religious national discourse. factors. Possible topics may include correlative cosmology Cross-listed: EALC-4713(3), REL-3713(3), REL-4713(3) in Han Confucianism, individualism in medieval China, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Tang-Song intellectual transitions, Buddhist-Confucian and EALC-3709 | EALC-4709 | EALC-4713 | REL-3713 | interactions in the Middle Period of China, REL-4713. Neo-Confucianism and its social impacts in Lat-Imperial China, the rise of Evidential Studies in Qing China, and the EALC-3720 (3) Topics in Japanese Culture and May Fourth Movement. This course may be repeated for Society (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course examines credit when the topic varies. Additional work is required at a variety of topics in Japanese Culture and Society. Topics the 4000 level. selected change from year to year according to instructor Cross-listed: EALC-4732(3). and student interests. Possible topics may include the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course development of intellectual culture in Tokugawa Japan and REL-3732. (1600-1858), the role of women in Japanese culture, Shinto Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in East Asian Cultures ("the way of the gods") thought and practice, and the courses (or equivalent), or permission of the instructor search for identity in modern Japan. This course may be [prerequisite(s)]. taken for credit more than once, with permission of the instructor. EALC-3733 (3) The Chinese Cultural Revolution in Cross-listed: EALC-4720(3) & REL-3720/4720(3). Fiction and Film (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course China's Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (1966-76), a and REL-3720. period of social and political upheaval, through depictions Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in East Asian Cultures of the era in fiction and film. Engaging multiple perspectives, courses (or equivalent), or permission of the instructor we analyse the events of the period and how their retelling [prerequisite(s)]. serves divergent purposes depending on their intended audience. Does collective memory-making allow survivors EALC-3721 (3) The Age of the Samurai (3 hrs to process trauma, or relegate this repressive period to the Seminar/Discussion) "Samurai" often evokes an image of a past? What differences can we observe between warrior entranced in the Bushido code, ready to commit depictions intended for international versus domestic harakiri upon command. This course demystifies such an audiences? Topics include: student protests, gender aura surrounding Japan's warrior class by exploring their expression, attacks on "traditional culture," the deification rise from Heian temple servants to Sengoku warlords and of Mao, and the rustication movement. then their fall from Edo Japan's intellectuals and Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial bureaucrats to the realms of the destitute. Sources include basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who samurai autobiographies, their intellectual scholarship, and successfully complete this course receive credit as representations of samurai in contemporary popular indicated. culture. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in East Asian Cultures Cross-listed: EALC-4721(3) & REL-3721(3)/4721(3). courses (or equivalent), or permission of the instructor Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course [prerequisite(s)]. and EALC-4721 | REL-3721 | REL-4721. Requisite Courses: REL-2721 or EALC-2721 or EALC-3970 (3) Topics in Asian Religions and permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Cultures (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course explores specific topics in the Asian Religions and Cultures area of EALC-3731 (3) Topics in Chinese Culture and Society study at an advanced level. This course may be repeated (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course explores specific for credit when the topic varies. Students enrolled at the topics in the Asian Religions and Cultures area of study at 4000 level are typically assigned a heavier workload in an advanced level. This course may be repeated for credit terms of assignements and are expected to perform at a when the topic varies. Students enrolled at the 4000 level more advanced level. Students should consult the are typically assigned a heavier workload in terms of department regarding potential offerings in a given year. assignments and are expected to perform at a more Cross-listed: EALC-4970(3) and REL-3970(3)/4970(3). advanced level. Students should consult the department Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course regarding potential offerings in a given year. and EALC-4970 | REL-3970. Cross-listed: EALC-4731(3) and REL-3731(3)/4731(3). Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in East Asian Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Languages and Culture or 6 credit hours in Religion & and REL-3731. Culture, 3 of which must be in the Asian Religions and Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in East Asian Cultures Cultures area of study, or permission of the instructor courses (or equivalent) or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. [prerequisite(s)]. EALC-3991 (3) Readings in East Asian Language and EALC-3732 (3) Topics in Chinese Intellectual and Culture (3 hrs Directed Reading) This course provides Cultural History (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course individual study of a specialized subject at an advanced explores a variety of topics in Chinese intellectual history. It level in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean languages and examines specific cultural, literary, and intellectual trends in cultures. Students plan a directed readings list with their instructor and meet on a regular basis to discuss the topics EALC-4721 (3) The Age of the Samurai (3 hrs covered therein. Seminar/Discussion) "Samurai" often evokes an image of a Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial warrior entranced in the Bushido code, ready to commit basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who harakiri upon command. This course demystifies such an successfully complete this course receive credit as aura surrounding Japan's warrior class by exploring their indicated. rise from Heian temple servants to Sengoku warlords and Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. then their fall from Edo Japan's intellectuals and bureaucrats to the realms of the destitute. Sources include EALC-4708 (3) Topics in Buddhist Culture and samurai autobiographies, their intellectual scholarship, and Society (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course explores representations of samurai in contemporary popular topics of contemporary interest regarding the study of culture. Buddhism and society, examining major issues facing Cross-listed: EALC-3721(3) and REL-3721(3)/4721(3). Buddhism in the Asian context, focusing on aspects of the Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not institutional, social, and political role played by Buddhism. hold credit for this course and EALC-3721 | REL-3721 | May be taken for credit more than once, with permission of REL-4721. instructor. Topics may include: Buddhism and Tibetan Requisite Courses: EALC/REL-2721 and permission of identity in the struggle for Tibetan autonomy in China, the the Department Chair [prerequisite(s)]. Buddhist monastic institution and its role in society, and debates over the interpretation of Buddhism in modern EALC-4731 (3) Topics in Chinese Culture and Society Asian countries. (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course explores specific Cross-listed: EALC-3708(3) and REL-3708(3)/4708(3). topics in the Asian Religions and Cultures area of study at Restrictions: Department Permission Required. Students an advanced level. This course may be repeated for credit may not hold credit for this course and EALC-3708 | when the topic varies. Students enrolled at the 4000 level REL-3708 | REL-4708. are typically assigned a heavier workload in terms of Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in East Asian Cultures assignments and are expected to perform at a more courses (or equivalent) or permission of the instructor advanced level. Students should consult the department [prerequisite(s)]. regarding potential offerings in a given year. Cross-listed: EALC-3731(3) and REL-3731(3)/4731(3). EALC-4713 (3) Gender and Sexuality in Chinese Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not Culture (3 hrs Lecture) This course focuses on Chinese hold credit for this course and REL-4731. society, culture and conceptions of identity through the Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in East Asian Cultures prisms of gender and sexuality. Topics include normative courses (or equivalent) or permission of the instructor social roles as defined by Confucian values, power and [prerequisite(s)]. sexual dynamics within polygamous households, the social body vs. the biological body and the diversity of atypical EALC-4732 (3) Topics in Chinese Intellectual and bodies in traditional China. Further we will see how gender Cultural History (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course inequality was appropriated to reflect China's explores a variety of topics in Chinese intellectual history. It backwardness vis à vis the West and Japan in the modern examines specific cultural, literary, and intellectual trends in period, and how contemporary culture and society has China, paying specific attention to how they were shaped sought to free gender expression from the confines of by a variety of social, political, economic, and religious national discourse. factors. Possible topics may include correlative cosmology Cross-listed: EALC-4713(3), REL-3713(3), REL-4713(3) in Han Confucianism, individualism in medieval China, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Tang-Song intellectual transitions, Buddhist-Confucian and EALC-3709 | EALC-3713 | EALC-4709 | REL-3713 | interactions in the Middle Period of China, REL-4713. Neo-Confucianism and its social impacts in Lat-Imperial China, the rise of Evidential Studies in Qing China, and the EALC-4720 (3) Topics in Japanese Culture and May Fourth Movement. This course may be repeated for Society (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course examines credit when the topic varies. Additional work is required at a variety of topics in Japanese Culture and Society. Topics the 4000 level. selected change from year to year according to instructor Cross-listed: EALC-3732(3). and student interests. Possible topics may include the Restrictions: Department Permission Required. Students development of intellectual culture in Tokugawa Japan may not hold credit for this course and REL-4732. (1600-1858), the role of women in Japanese culture, Shinto Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in East Asian Cultures ("the way of the gods") thought and practice, and the courses (or equivalent), or permission of the instructor search for identity in modern Japan. This course may be [prerequisite(s)]. taken for credit more than once, with permission of the instructor. EALC-4970 (3) Topics in Asian Religions and Cross-listed: EALC-3720(3) & REL-3720/4720(3). Cultures (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course explores Restrictions: Honours Form Required. specific topics in the Asian Religions and Cultures area of Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in East Asian Cultures study at an advanced level. This course may be repeated courses (or equivalent), or permission of the instructor for credit when the topic varies. Students enrolled at the [prerequisite(s)]. 4000 level are typically assigned a heavier workload in terms of assignements and are expected to perform at a more advanced level. Students should consult the department regarding potential offerings in a given year. Cross-listed: EALC-3970(3) and REL-3970(3)/4970(3). Restrictions: Department Permission Required. Students may not hold credit for this course and EALC-3970 | REL-3970 | REL-4970. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in East Asian Languages and Culture or 6 credit hours in Religion & Culture, 3 of which must be in the Asian Religions and Cultures area of study, or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)].

EALC-4991 (3) Readings in East Asian Languages and Culture (3 hrs Directed Reading) This course provides individual study of a specialized subject at an advanced level in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean languages and cultures. Students plan a directed readings list with their instructor and meet on a regular basis to discuss the topics covered therein. Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who successfully complete this course receive credit as indicated. Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. ECONOMICS

ECON-1102 (3) Introduction to Economics: Micro (3 pursuing a BA (Hons) degree in Economics. Restriction: hrs Lecture) This is an introductory analysis of May not be taken for credit if students have completed a contemporary economic institutions and the application of 2000-level course in Mathematics or ECON-2201(3). micro-economic theory to current Canadian economic Requisite Courses: Pre-Calculus Math 40S or Applied problems. The course will consider economic theories of Math 40S or an equivalent course [prerequisite(s)]; production, consumption and exchange, price determination ECON-1201L (lab) (must be taken concurrently). and the role of competition. Note: Students may not hold credit for this course and ECON-2101 (3) Intermediate Economics: Micro (3 hrs ECON-1104(3) or ECON-1106(3). Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course provides a more advanced Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course analysis of microeconomic concepts developed in first and ECON-1104 | ECON-1106. year. It examines the price system, allocation of resources, and the impact of alternative market structures on ECON-1103 (3) Introduction to Economics: Macro (3 consumer and producer behaviour. hrs Lecture) This is an introductory analysis of Requisite Courses: ECON-1102 with a minimum grade of contemporary economic institutions and the application of C, or ECON-1104 or ECON-1106 with a minimum grade of B macro-economic theory to current Canadian economic [prerequisite(s)]; ECON-2101L (lab) (must be taken problems. The course will consider economic theories of concurrently). the determination of national income, governmental monetary and fiscal policy, the role of money and the ECON-2102 (3) Intermediate Economics: Macro (3 hrs banking system, international trade and the determination of Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course introduces students to a foreign exchange rates. more advanced analysis of macroeconomic concepts Note: Students may not hold credit for this course and developed in first year. It examines subjects such as ECON-1104(3) or ECON-1106(3). national income determination, theories of consumption, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course employment, interest, and money. Business cycles, and ECON-1104 | ECON-1106. inflation, and economic growth will be discussed in a Canadian context. ECON-1104 (3) Introduction to Economic Theory (3 Requisite Courses: ECON-1103 with a minimum grade of hrs Lecture) This course provides an introduction to the C, or ECON-1104 or ECON-1106 with a minimum grade of B principles of micro- and macro-economic theory. It is [prerequisite(s)]; ECON-2102L (lab) (must be taken designed for students in the Environmental/Urban Studies concurrently). programs. It may also be of interest to students majoring in other programs seeking an overview of economic theory. ECON-2201 (3) Mathematics for Economics and Note: This course is not intended for Economics majors. Finance (3 hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course introduces Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and applies basic mathematical tools used in the analysis of and ECON-1102 | ECON-1103 | ECON-1106. economic and financial problems. It is designed as a technical bridge between intermediate and honours level ECON-1106 (3) Introduction to Economic theory courses. Topics such as derivatives, comparative Development (3 hrs Lecture) This course provides an statistics, economic models, and mathematical concepts introduction to economic theory, while simultaneously used in finance will be presented within the context of emphasizing how such theory improves the understanding economic and financial analysis. of issues facing developing countries. Both branches of Requisite Courses: MATH-1102 or MATH-1103 or economics (microeconomics and macroeconomics) are ECON-1201, and a minimum grade of C in ECON-1102 and covered. Issues typically discussed include economic ECON-1103, or ECON-1104 or ECON-1106 [prerequisite(s)]; inequality, environmental economics, economic growth, ECON-2201L (lab) (must be taken concurrently). financial crisis and international trade. Note: This course is not intended for Economics majors. ECON-2203 (3) Game Theory and Strategy (3 hrs Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Lecture) This is an introductory course in game theory. and ECON-1102 | ECON-1103 | ECON-1104. Game theory is a modern area of study that examines decisions and outcomes in strategic settings. It provides an ECON-1201 (3) Quantitative Methods for Economics analytical tool that is used for analyzing conflict and and Business (3 hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course cooperation that arise in various social settings involving presents a number of models from economics and finance interactions between individuals and/or organizations. The using elementary quantitative techniques. It is designed to focus of the course is on non-cooperative game theory, be a methods course that allows students from a variety of although some concepts from cooperative game theory backgrounds to work with economic and finance models. may be covered as well. Ideas such as Nash equilibrium, The course also provides an overview of the quantitative dominance, backward induction, evolutionary stability, background required for selected second and third year commitment, credibility, asymmetric information and courses in Economics. It may be taken as a co-requisite for uncertainty are discussed and applied to examples drawn ECON-1102(3) and ECON-1103(3) for students interested from economics, business, politics and elsewhere. in a mathematical review. Requisite Courses: Precalculus Mathematics 40S or Note: This course is not recommended for students Applied Mathematics 40S or ECON-1201; OR permission of the Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. ECON-2311 (3) Economics of Natural Resource ECON-2301 (3) Financial Markets and Financial Extraction (3 hrs Lecture) The course examines economic Systems (3 hrs Lecture) This course will focus on the models of resource extraction and harvesting through time. role of money and financial institutions in the operations of Renewable and non-renewable natural resources such as a market economy. It will involve an analysis of the forestry, fisheries, and fossil fuels are considered. An payments system, types of financial instruments, and economic perspective of sustainability is introduced. differences in financial intermediaries. Requisite Courses: A minimum grade of C in ECON-1102 Requisite Courses: A minimum grade of C in ECON-1102 and ECON-1103 or in ECON-1104 or in ECON-1106 and ECON-1103, or in ECON-1104 or ECON-1106 [prerequisite(s)]. [prerequisite(s)]. ECON-2315 (3) Indigenous Economic Development (3 ECON-2302 (3) Money and Banking (3 hrs Lecture) This hrs Lecture) This course provides an overview of course begins with a discussion of the quantity theory of economic development issues as they relate to Indigenous money and the mechanics of monetary control. It is communities in Canada. The course begins with an followed by an analysis of the determinants of money overview of economic concepts to enable students to think demand and the role of monetary policy within the about the economic issues in Indigenous communities. A framework of the Canadian financial system. historical overview and discussion of development Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course strategies of the Federal government in Canada is and ECON-2310. provided. Students are then exposed to ways that land, Requisite Courses: A minimum grade of C in ECON-1102 labour and capital can stimulate economic development on and ECON-1103, or in ECON-1104 or ECON-1106 and off reserves. Issues of natural resource development [prerequisite(s)]. and urban reserves are discussed. The course concludes with case studies of economic development in Indigenous ECON-2303 (3) Labour Economics (3 hrs Lecture) This communities, highlighting the diversity of these initiatives course examines competing theories of wage and across Canada. employment determination. The simple neo-classical model, Requisite Courses: ECON-1102 or ECON-1103 or human capital theory, institutional and post-Keynesian ECON-1106; OR permission of the Instructor approaches are considered with respect to Canada [prerequisite(s)]. including the organization of the trade union movement, the role of collective bargaining, and the current issues such ECON-2317 (3) Environmental Economics (3 hrs as technological change and industrial health and safety. Lecture) This course examines the role of economics in Requisite Courses: A minimum grade of C in ECON-1103 decision-making about the environment. Topics covered or ECON-1104 or ECON-1106 [prerequisite(s)]. include the theory of externalities and public goods; market and non-market valuation of environmental amenities; and ECON-2304 (3) Income Distribution and Industrial the regulation of polluting activities using instruments such Relations (3 hrs Lecture) This course studies theoretical as pollution taxes, tradable permits (cap and trade), and models of income distribution. It also examines the structure eco-labels. of capital-labour relations in Canada including the Requisite Courses: A minimum grade of C in ECON-1102 organization of the trade union movement, the role of and ECON-1103, or ECON-1104 or ECON-1106 collective bargaining, and current issues such as [prerequisite(s)]. technological change and industrial health and safety. Requisite Courses: A minimum grade of C in ECON-1102 ECON-2318 (3) Energy Economics (3 hrs Lecture) This and ECON-1103, or ECON-1104 or ECON-1106 course introduces the student to the issues and policies [prerequisite(s)]. pertaining to energy markets from an economic perspective. Environmental, technical, social, and financial ECON-2305 (3) Canadian Economic History (3 hrs issues are considered. A case study for the demand for Lecture) This course surveys the development of the transportation energy is used as a unifying theme Canadian economy prior to 1867. Main topics will include throughout the course. early staple exports, agriculture, and industrialization. Requisite Courses: A minimum grade of C in ECON-1102 Requisite Courses: A minimum grade of C in ECON-1102 and ECON-1103, or ECON-1104 or ECON-1106 and ECON-1103, or ECON-1104 or ECON-1106 [prerequisite(s)]. [prerequisite(s)]. ECON-2819 (3) Corporate Finance I (3 hrs Lecture) This ECON-2306 (3) Canadian Economic Development (3 course introduces students to the fundamentals of finance hrs Lecture) This course examines the growth of the and presents theories and tools to be used in addressing Canadian economy since 1867. The "National Policy" of the corporate finance problems and issues. The course 19th Century, the development of the Prairie economy, the examines the theories and principles of financial Great Depression, and the growing influence of the United management that relate to the practices used by States are considered. corporations in the procurement, management and Requisite Courses: A minimum grade of C in ECON-1102 disbursement of capital funds. Topics include methods of and ECON-1103, or ECON-1104 or ECON-1106 capital acquisition and valuation of capital and financial [prerequisite(s)]. assets. Cross-listed: BUS-2819(3). practitioners and academics, it examines the strengths and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course limitations of microfinance as an approach to poverty and BUS-2819. reduction. Students are introduced to a number of Requisite Courses: BUS-2002(3) with a minimum grade sub-disciplines of Economics, including development of C+ or ECON-1102(3) and ECON-1103(3), both with a economics, financial economics, feminist economics, and minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must institutional economics. have met their university writing requirement wiht a Requisite Courses: ECON-1102 and ECON-1103, or minimum grade of C+ (or exemption) [prerequisite(s)]; AND ECON-1104 with a minimum grade of C or ECON-1106 with ONE of STAT-1301(3), STAT-1401(3), or STAT-1501(3) or a minimum grade of C [prerequisite(s)]. the former STAT-1201(6) with a minimum grade C+; OR permission of the Instructor (must be taken previously or at ECON-3201 (3) Econometrics for Economics and the same time as this course). Finance (3 hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course is an introduction to the specification and estimation of ECON-2820 (3) Corporate Finance II (3 hrs Lecture) This econometric models as applied to empirical questions in course builds on the fundamentals introduced in economics and finance. It covers statistical inference in BUS-2819(3)/ECON-2819(3) and discusses theories and economics and finance, hypothesis testing, regression tools used for evaluating risks and returns associated with analysis, and multivariate regression models with emphasis financial assets. There is an intensive study of economic on structural estimation using standard computer theories and principles of financial management. Topics packages. include Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), market Requisite Courses: ECON-2101, ECON-2102, one of efficiency, the cost of capital, optimal capital structure, and STAT-1301 or STAT-1401 or STAT-1501, and one of risk management. STAT-1302 or STAT-2001; OR permission of the Instructor Cross-listed: BUS-2820(3). [prerequisite(s)]; ECON-3201L (lab) (must be taken Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course concurrently). and BUS-2820. Requisite Courses: BUS-2819(3) or ECON-2819(3), ECON-3301 (3) International Trade: Theory and Policy either with a minimum grade of C+; OR permission of the (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines theories of Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. international trade. It deals with approaches to the benefits of trade, the effects of tariffs and quotas, customs unions ECON-3104 (3) Modern Microeconomics for and imperfect competition on trade. It pays particular Economics and Business (3 hrs Lecture) This course attention to Canadian trade policies. presents the concepts and theories that form the basis of Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 or permission of the modern microeconomic analysis. Market imperfections Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. arising due to issues such as uncertainty, informational asymmetry and imperfect competition are analyzed, and ECON-3302 (3) International Finance: Theory and their welfare implications are studied. Game theory is Policy (3 hrs Lecture) This course is an introduction to introduced as an analytical tool. Applications may include international finance and open-economy macroeconomics. auctions and markets for insurance and used goods. It examines exchange rate policy, the fiscal and monetary Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 [prerequisite(s)]. effects of trade, investment flows, and the development of the international monetary system. ECON-3115 (3) Gender and the Economy (3 hrs Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 and ECON-2102; OR Lecture) This course explores the gender dimensions of permission of the Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. economic life from both neoclassical and feminist economics perspectives. Topics explored include gendered ECON-3303 (3) Economics of Public Expenditures: divisions of labour within the family; gender inequality in the Theory and Policy (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines labour market; unpaid domestic.labor and work-family the rationale of the public sector and its development and balance; the intersection of ability, class, race and growth in Canada. It deals with the theoretical and practical sexuality in social reproduction; gender differences in aspects of public decision-making. The budgeting process management; and the gender impact of technological relating to allocation, redistribution, and stabilization will be change and globalization. Examples are drawn from both examined. developed and developing countries. Particular attention is Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 [prerequisite(s)]. paid to policy remedies for gender inequality in the economy. ECON-3304 (3) Economics of Taxation: Theory and Requisite Courses: ECON-1102 or ECON-1104 or Policy (3 hrs Lecture) This course will analyze the theory ECON-1106; OR permission of the Instructor of taxation and the Canadian tax structure. It also deals [prerequisite(s)]. with the role of alternative tax policies in attaining various economic and social goals including allocation, ECON-3120 (3) Microfinance in Theory and Practice (3 redistribution, and stabilization. hrs Lecture) This course provides an overview of the Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 [prerequisite(s)]. economics of microfinance, a development strategy that provides credit, savings and insurance for individuals and ECON-3305 (3) Economic Development (3 hrs Lecture) families that are unable to access funds from formal This course will examine problems and theories of internal financial institutions. Drawing on readings from development, as well as policies to accelerate change. It will deal with such topics as poverty, income distribution, positive analysis of each particular public policy area are human capital, employment, growth, rural-urban migration, discussed. population growth, and rural development. Requisite Courses: ECON-1102 and ECON-1103, or Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 or permission of the ECON-1104 with a minimum grade C, or ECON-1106 with a Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. minimum grade C [prerequisite(s)].

ECON-3306 (3) International Aspects of Economic ECON-3315 (3) Urban Economics and Real Estate Development (3 hrs Lecture) This course will examine Markets (3 hrs Lecture) This course uses economic problems and theories of international development, as well analysis in order to understand the problem of urban as policies to accelerate change. It will deal with such growth and decay. Among the issues addressed are the topics as international trade and investment, foreign aid, location decisions of firms, the location patterns of third world debt, the role of the international financial households and firms within cities, suburbanization, institutions and multinational corporations, and the new agglomeration economies and the origin and economic international division of labour. functions of cities. An in-depth analysis of housing and real Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 [prerequisite(s)]. estate markets is also presented. Relevant Canadian case studies are used to illustrate the issues. ECON-3307 (3) Industrial Organization and Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 [prerequisite(s)]. Competition Policy (3 hrs Lecture) Industrial Organization is the field in economics that examines models ECON-3316 (3) Cost-Benefit Analysis and Project of monopolies and oligopolies with particular emphasis on Evaluation (3 hrs Lecture) The techniques of benefit-cost the strategic issues related to imperfectly competitive analysis and program evaluation will be developed from the markets. In addition, a number of business practices are perspectives of economics with reference to natural examined in relation to their contribution to overall welfare resource economics and public expenditure analysis. Case in the economy. This course also involves a presentation studies will be used to examine the techniques. and analysis of how current industrial organization theory Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 or permission of the and policy is reflected in Canada's Competition Act. Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and ECON-3309. ECON-3317 (3) Economic Development in the Asia Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 [prerequisite(s)]. Pacific Region (3 hrs Lecture) This course is an introduction to the economic development of selected Asian ECON-3308 (3) Regulation and Public Enterprises (3 Pacific countries, such as Japan, China, South Korea, and hrs Lecture) This course examines the theory and policy Philippines. related to the regulation of markets. It examines how Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 or permission of the regulations might be set to improve the allocation and Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. distribution of resources in the economy. In the course, the effectiveness of a number of regulations is examined. The ECON-3319 (3) Managerial Economics (3 hrs Lecture) A course also examines the role and operation of public study of the application of economic theory to the enterprises in the economy as an alternative to regulation. decision-making problems of managers in private and public In addition, a brief introduction to the economics of Private institutions; the objectives of business organizations; Public Partnerships is presented. economic and non-economic concepts of competition; Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 [prerequisite(s)]. costs and profits; demand and product pricing; capital budgeting. ECON-3310 (3) Economics of Health Care in Canada (3 Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 [prerequisite(s)]. hrs Lecture) This course will apply economic analysis to current issues in the delivery system for health care ECON-3320 (3) Managerial Finance (3 hrs Lecture) This services in Canada. It will deal with such topics as the course presents an intensive study of the economic structure of the health care industry; economic costs of theories and principles of financial management essential diseases, disability and premature death; pricing problems for the growth of business firms and hence the growth of and social returns from public investment; incomes of the Canadian economy. It relates financial theory to health care practitioners; economic efficiency in the health financial management within a Canadian context. care industry; benefit-cost analysis of various health care Cross-listed: BUS-3320(3). programs. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 [prerequisite(s)]. and BUS-3320. Requisite Courses: ECON-2101(3) with a minimum grade ECON-3311 (3) Government Policy Towards of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their Business (3 hrs Lecture) This is a survey course that university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ examines the way in which major areas of government (or exemption); OR permission of the Instructor economic policy can affect business. Policy areas outlines [prerequisite(s)]. are international trade policy, competition policy, environmental management policies, public enterprises, and ECON-3321 (3) History of Economic Thought I (3 hrs economic regulation. The emphasis is on the economic and Lecture) This course examines the development of political social arguments underlying these major areas of economy from ancient times until 1870 with emphasis on government economic policy, but both normative and Classical Political Economy. Adam Smith, David Ricardo, Karl Marx, and John Stuart Mill will be read in the context of Requisite Courses: ECON-4103 and permission of the the criticism of their contemporaries. Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 and ECON-2102; OR permission of the Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. ECON-4106 (3) Advanced Macroeconomics (3 hrs Lecture) This course entails advanced analysis of ECON-3322 (3) History of Economic Thought II (3 hrs macroeconomic theories of aggregate consumption, Lecture) This course examines the first and second investment demand, economic growth, and employment generations of neoclassical writers (1870-1936) in the behaviour. A study of empirical works related to Canadian context of the criticism of their contemporaries. The focus experience will be emphasized. will be on Walras, Jevons, Marshall, Edgeworth, Pigou, and Restrictions: Honours Form Required. J.B. and J.M. Clark. The emphasis is on the historical and Requisite Courses: ECON-4104 [prerequisite(s)]. philosophical dimensions of their work. Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 and ECON-2102; OR ECON-4201 (3) Econometrics (3 hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) permission of the Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. This course considers standard econometric problems including multicollinearity, serial correlation, and ECON-3819 (3) Advanced Corporate Finance (3 hrs heteroscedasticity. Autoregression and simultaneous Lecture) This advanced finance course adds to the equations models will also be introduced. One hour lab technical skill and conceptual understanding of accounting instruction is included. and corporate finance developed in previous courses. It Restrictions: Honours Form Required. provides an in-depth study of issues and tools that Requisite Courses: ECON-3201 [prerequisite(s)]; financial managers use in making decisions. Topics include ECON-4201L (lab) (must be taken concurrently). capital budgeting under uncertainty, valuation and financial modelling, leasing, and options. ECON-4203 (3) Topics in Mathematical Economics (3 Cross-listed: BUS-3819(3). hrs Lecture) The course introduces advanced Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course mathematical methods for formulating and analyzing and BUS-3819. economics theories and problems. Topics such as Requisite Courses: ECON-2820(3) or BUS-2820(3) with difference and differential equations, dynamic optimization, a minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; Students must and game theory are presented with economics have met their university writing requirement with a applications. minimum grade of C+ (or exemption); OR permission of the Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: ECON-2101, ECON-2102, and ECON-2201 all with a minimum grade of C+ ECON-4103 (3) Microeconomics (3 hrs Lecture) This [prerequisite(s)]. course provides students with an intensive review of the major principles and techniques of microeconomic analysis. ECON-4303 (3) Topics in Applied Economics (3 hrs It also deals with the determination of prices and the role of Lecture) This course examines issues in a selected area of the pricing system as the mechanism by which individual economics. Possible areas include labour, health and and social decisions are made. development economics. The choice of topic depends on Restrictions: Honours Form Required. the instructor. The emphasis is on using empirical methods. Requisite Courses: A minimum grade of C+ in Appropriate econometric techniques for addressing issues ECON-2101 and ECON-2201 [prerequisite(s)]. of endogeneity, selection bias, and unobserved heterogeneity may be covered. Students may repeat this ECON-4104 (3) Macroeconomics (3 hrs Lecture) This course for credit, provided the topic varies. course emphasizes macroeconomic concepts concerning Restrictions: Honours Form Required. the measurement and determination of national income, and Requisite Courses: ECON-3201 and permission of the the application of macroeconomic policy tools to the Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Canadian economy. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. ECON-4306 (3) Topics in Economic Development (3 Requisite Courses: A minimum grade of C+ in hrs Lecture) Interest in the topic of economic development ECON-2102 and ECON-2201 [prerequisite(s)]. has enjoyed resurgence in academic circles given the emergence of "new growth theory" and endogenous ECON-4105 (3) Advanced Microeconomics (3 hrs models of economic growth. These models place greater Lecture) This course introduces a number of topics in emphasis upon human capital accumulation, innovation, and modern microeconomic theory. Modern microeconomic growth. Concurrently, the rise of Southeast Asian theory stresses the influence of asymmetric information, economies has challenged conventional views about how uncertainty, and strategic behaviour on the operation and the West grew rich or, more recently, why Latin America performance of markets. Topics may include choice under did not. This course is designed to examine the new uncertainty, expected utility theory, the insurance decision growth theory literature in the context of recent historical (including moral hazard and adverse selection), signaling changes in the . models, and game theory. The course is primarily designed Restrictions: Honours Form Required. for students wishing to pursue graduate work in Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 and ECON-2102 with a Economics or Finance. minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. ECON-4307 (3) Topics in Macroeconomic Theory and analysis and fiscal federalism. The economic analysis of Policy (3 hrs Lecture) This course provides students with collective decision-making in a non-market context is an opportunity to build on the macroeconomics background examined. developed in Honours Macroeconomics (ECON-4104 (3)). Restrictions: Honours Form Required. The course considers macroeconomic problems and Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 and ECON-2201 with a techniques for solving them, highlighting the use of dynamic minimum grade C+ [prerequisite(s)]. models and their implications for policy. An emphasis is placed on the importance of political economy ECON-4316 (3) Topics in Regulation and Public considerations in macroeconomics. Issues covered in any Enterprises (3 hrs Lecture) Regulation and public given year may include the interplay between enterprises are two instruments used by governments to demographics and fiscal policy, the determinants of policy govern the allocation of resources in certain markets. related to technology adoption, and therefore economic Among the regulatory topics addressed are theories of growth, income redistribution, or the determination of regulation, cost of service regulation, rate of return monetary policy. regulation and price cap regulation. Reference is made to Restrictions: Honours Form Required. regulations in a number of industries, such as the energy, Requisite Courses: ECON-4104 [prerequisite(s)]. telecommunications and transportation industry. In addition, the role of Public Enterprises as an alternative approach to ECON-4310 (3) Topics in International Economics (3 the allocation and distribution of resources is discussed. hrs Lecture) This course examines theoretical and applied Restrictions: Honours Form Required. topics related to international trade or international finance. Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 and ECON-2201 with a Topics related to international trade may include a minimum grade C+ [prerequisite(s)]. discussion of the benefits of trade, the effects of tariffs and quotas, customs unions and imperfect competition on ECON-4317 (3) Topics in Environmental and Natural trade. Topics related to international finance may include an Resource Economics (3 hrs Lecture) This course examination of exchange rate policy, the fiscal and presents selected issues in environmental and resource monetary effects of trade investment flows, and the economics at an advanced level. Topics such as the theory development of the international monetary system. of environmental policy, international aspects of Restrictions: Honours Form Required. environmental problems, monitoring and enforcement of Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 and ECON-2102; OR environmental regulations, and efficient versus sustainable permission of the Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. utilization of natural resources are examined. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. ECON-4311 (3) Topics in the History of Thought: Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 and ECON-2201 with a Keynes (3 hrs Lecture) The economic and philosophical minimum grade C+ [prerequisite(s)]. writings of Keynes and the "Cambridge Circus" is examined in the historical and social context of the times. ECON-4318 (3) Topics in Labour Economics (3 hrs Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Lecture) Several new economic approaches have led to Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 and ECON-2102 with a important insights into the nature of the labour market. minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]. Becker=s new household economics provides a provocative interpretation of the family; principal-agent ECON-4313 (3) Topics in Industrial Organization and theory offers novel explanations of the organization of Competition Policy (3 hrs Lecture) This course labour within the firm; and implicit contract theory examines areas of research in modern industrial challenges conventional views of employer/employee organization theory and competition policy. Industrial relationships. This course examines in depth one or two Organization is the field in economics that examines the selected topics in labour economics. effectiveness of competition in markets that are less than Restrictions: Honours Form Required. perfectly competitive. Among the topics addressed are Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 and ECON-2201 with a models of imperfect competition, game theory and minimum grade C+ [prerequisite(s)]. competition in a spatial framework. Business practices such as resale price maintenance, exclusive dealing, and ECON-4411 (3) Advanced Reading Course in tied selling are examined in the context of industrial Economics (3 hrs Directed Reading) A program of organization theory and policy. In addition, the course reading, research, and consultation for senior students, to examines how current research in industrial organization is be arranged by the instructor and the student. reflected in Canada's Competition Act. Restrictions: Department Permission Required. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Requisite Courses: ECON-2101 and ECON-2201 with a ECON-4412 (3) Advanced Reading Course in minimum grade C+ [prerequisite(s)]. Economics (3 hrs Directed Reading) A program of reading, research, and consultation for senior students, to ECON-4314 (3) Topics in Public Economics (3 hrs be arranged by the instructor and the student. Lecture) The course deals with the theory of taxation and Restrictions: Department Permission Required. public expenditures within the context of first-best and second-best analysis. The theories of production, ECON-4800 (3) Investments (3 hrs Lecture) This course consumption, and other externalities are discussed. Other introduces students to the main financial instruments that topics include the theory and practice of cost-benefit are used in the investment industry, including a detailed description of financial instruments and how they are (or exemption); OR permission of the instructor traded in financial markets. A brief review of portfolio [prerequisite(s)]. theory is presented including a discussion of a number of key models of modern finance, including the Capital Asset ECON-4803 (3) Topics in Finance II (3 hrs Lecture) This Pricing Model and the Arbitrage Pricing Theory. The course course provides an opportunity to study a particular also includes a detailed examination of the role and finance research topic in depth. The course content covers operation of fixed-income securities and equities. The primarily empirical aspects in finance. Possible topics course concludes with a discussion of the role and addressed include financial risk and management, valuation techniques of passive versus active portfolio management. and financial statement analysis, and valuation and Note: This course is intended for students in the EFIN financial modeling. This course may be repeated for credit program. when the topic varies. Cross-listed: BUS-4800(3). Cross-listed: BUS-4803(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not and BUS-4800. hold credit for this course and BUS-4803. Requisite Courses: BUS-2820(3) or ECON-2820(3) (or Requisite Courses: ECON/BUS-2820 and ECON-2201 the former ECON-2319(6) or BUS-2319(6)); and and ECON-3201, ALL with a minimum grade C+; OR STAT-1302(3) or STAT-2001(3); and ONE of permission of the Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. MATH-1101(6) or MATH-1102(3) or MATH-1103(3) or ECON-1201(3); ALL with a minimum grade C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ (or exemption); OR permission of the Instructor [prerequisite(s)].

ECON-4801 (3) Options, Futures, and Derivatives (3 hrs Lecture) This course is designed to provide an in-depth analysis of a number of topics in modern finance theory and applications. The main areas that are examined include Futures Markets, Option Markets and Derivatives. These financial instruments play a key role in the management of risk by firms, and have attracted increasing interest from private sector firms and the larger community. The role of these instruments in the financial markets and their effect on the financial system are examined in detail. Note: This course is intended for students in the EFIN program. Cross-listed: BUS-4801(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and BUS-4801. Requisite Courses: ECON-2820(3) or BUS-2820(3) (or the former ECON-2319(6) or BUS-2319(6)); and STAT-1302(3) or STAT-2001(3); and ONE of MATH-1101(6) or MATH-1102(3) or MATH-1103(3) or ECON-1201(3); ALL with a minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ (or exemption); OR permission of the Instructor [prerequisite(s)].

ECON-4802 (3) Topics in Finance I (3 hrs Lecture) This course provides an opportunity to study a particular finance research topic in depth. The course covers primarily theoretical aspects in finance. Possible topics addressed include entrepreneurial finance, fixed income analysis and behavioral finance. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Cross-listed: BUS-4802(3). Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not hold credit for this course and BUS-4802. Requisite Courses: BUS-2820(3) or ECON-2820(3), and ECON-2201(3) and ECON-3201(3), all with a minimum grade of C+ [prerequisite(s)]; and students must have met their university writing requirement with a minimum grade of C+ EDUCATION

EDUC-1801 (3) Education Today: An Introduction to include conflict mediation, listening skills, responding to Teaching (3 hrs Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course offers a anger and violence, and classroom management. A survey for those interested in the Manitoba K-S4 education practicum component will be included to provide the system. Its major objective is to further students' opportunity to link theory to practice. understanding of the relevant social, legal, and political Cross-listed: CRS-2242(3). factors that provide the context for life in the classroom Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and for the teacher-student relationship. and CRS-2242. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: CRS-2232 or EDUC-2232, and and EDUC-1001 | EDUC-1002 | EDUC-1802. CRS-1200 [prerequisite(s)].

EDUC-1802 (3) Education Today (WEC): An EDUC-2410 (3) The School System: Structure and (3 hrs Lecture) This course Dynamics (4 hrs Lecture) This course is an introductory offers a survey for those interested in the Manitoba K-S4 study of the structure, functions, and policies of the public education system. Its major objective is to further students' school system at the local and provincial levels. Emphasis understanding of the relevant social, legal, and political is placed on the professional, legal, political, administrative, factors that provide the context for life in the classroom and organizational aspects of the educational system as and for the teacher-student relationship. This course is they relate to the classroom teacher in Manitoba schools. intended for students admitted to the Winnipeg Education Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Centre program. and EDUC-2411 | EDUC-4404. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: EDUC-1801 or EDUC-1802 or and EDUC-1001 | EDUC-1002 | EDUC-1801. EDUC-1810 or EDUC-4002 and a minimum of 18 completed credit hours of course work [prerequisite(s)] or permission EDUC-1810 (3) Educational Leadership Within a of an advisor in the Faculty of Education [prerequisite(s)]. Service-Learning Framework (3 hrs Lecture) Service-learning is an educational approach that integrates EDUC-2411 (3) The School System: Structure and service in the community with intentional learning Dynamics for After-Degree Students (4 hrs Lecture) outcomes. By providing students with the opportunity to This course is an introductory study of the structure, frame theoretical learning in real-life situations, functions, and policies of the public school system at the service-learning leads students to broaden their horizons local and provincial levels. Emphasis is placed on the and to change their perspectives on their participation as professional, legal, political, administrative, and citizens of a diverse democracy. This course utilizes a organizational aspects of the educational system as they methodology that combines academic instruction, relate to the classroom teacher in Manitoba schools. This meaningful service and critical reflective thinking to promote course is for students registered in the After-Degree student learning and civic responsibility. Students should program. have flexibility in their schedule as they must complete 40 Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course hours of community service at a designated site as part of and EDUC-2410 | EDUC-4404. the course requirements. EDUC-2511 (3) Learning Theory (3 hrs Lecture) This EDUC-2232 (3) Introduction to Conflict Resolution in course is an introduction to psychological principles as Educational Settings (4 hrs Lecture) This course will they apply to the practice of teaching and learning within present an introduction to the theory and methods of educational contexts. This course provides an overview of conflict resolution, with special emphasis on conflict in various learning theories and the implications each has for educational settings. The course will help students to variables such as classroom interaction, motivation, understand the nature of human conflict, responses to instruction, assessment, and evaluation. conflict, and models for constructive ways to deal with Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course conflict between and among individuals and groups. Topics and EDUC-2501. will include anger, power, creative dimensions of conflict, Requisite Courses: EDUC-2512 or EDUC-2514 (must be and mediation. These will be examined from an taken concurrently); EDUC-1801 or EDUC-1802 or interdisciplinary perspective. EDUC-1810 and a minimum 18 completed credit hours of Cross-listed: CRS-2232(3). course work [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and CRS-2232. EDUC-2512 (1) Learning Theory Practicum (3.5 hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum | 3 hrs Lab) This EDUC-2242 (3) Methods of Conflict Resolution in course offers practical teaching experience in the schools Educational Settings (4 hrs Lecture) This course will under the guidance and supervision of practicum host provide practical applications of conflict resolution skills, for teachers. Students complete 10 days of practicum over the teaching conflict resolution and for the implementation of fall or winter term. This course must be taken concurrently conflict management programs from elementary to with EDUC-2511(3) and will be closely integrated with that secondary levels. Practical skills for conflict resolution in course's assignments. the classroom, in the home, in the peer group, and in staff Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course relations will be developed. Areas of skill learning will and EDUC-2514. Requisite Courses: EDUC-2511 (must be taken delivery systems, assessment, adaptive programming, concurrently); Two EDUC-2512Px (practicums) (must be family and community involvement and education services taken concurrently). for children with mild to moderate cognitive, emotional, and behavioural special needs. Attention is paid to the EDUC-2513 (3) Learning Theory (RRC) (4 hrs Lecture) mandated provincial curriculum and policies, as well as to This course is an introduction to psychological principles as professional, legal, ethical and societal considerations. they apply to the practice of teaching and learning within Students are expected to begin to link a theoretical educational contexts. The course will provide an overview perspective to a practical understanding of the of various learning theories and the implications each has wide-ranging issues of inclusive education in Manitoba for variables such as classroom interaction, motivation, schools. Additional Requirements: Students must be instruction, assessment, and evaluation. admitted into the After-Degree program. Note: This course may be taken by Education students in Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course the joint UW/ program only. and EDUC-2530 | EDUC-3510 | EDUC-4501.

EDUC-2514 (1) Learning Theory Practicum (WEC) (3 EDUC-3810 (6) Teaching/Learning and the K-8 hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course Curriculum (3 hrs Lecture) This course will introduce offers practical teaching experience in the schools under students to the theory which underlies the teaching and the guidance and supervision of practicum host teachers. learning process. Students will examine age appropriate This course must be taken concurrently with EDUC-2511(3) teaching and learning strategies, methods of differentiated and will be closely integrated with that course's ins truction and classroom management. The fundamentals assignments. Students in this course will have a practicum of instructional design and assessment in lesson and unit experience consisting of one day per week for 10 weeks, planning will also be addressed. Students registering for plus an eight day block. this course must also register for the co-requisite Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course practicum course which provides the experiential link from and EDUC-2512. theory to practice. Requisite Courses: EDUC-2511 (must be taken Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course concurrently). and EDUC-3801 | EDUC-3803. Requisite Courses: EDUC-2511 with a minimum grade of EDUC-3400 (3) Educational Settings and the Sociology C, and EDUC-2512 or EDUC-2514 [prerequisite(s)]; of Learning (3 hrs Lecture) This course is an introduction EDUC-3811 or EDUC-3814 (must be taken concurrently); a to the study of learning utilizing sociological principles. minimum of 48 credit hours of course work; and Elementary Social factors affecting teaching and learning will be students must have completed 6 credit hours in examined. It will consider educational settings as learning Mathematics to satisfy the Distribution Requirement environments, examining such features as the social [prerequisite(s)]. characteristics of students, schools, and their surroundings, that have an impact on school performance. EDUC-3811 (2) Teaching/Learning and the K-8 Some attention is given to a consideration of the Curriculum Practicum (2 hrs relationship between school learning environments and Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum | 3 hrs Lab) This educational reform. course offers practical teaching experience in the schools under the guidance and supervision of practicum host EDUC-3510 (3) Inclusive Approaches to Teaching teachers. Students complete 10 days of practicum in the Exceptional Students I (4 hrs Lecture) This course fall term and 10 days of practicum in the winter term for a addresses the relevant theories, delivery systems, total of 20 days. This course must be taken concurrently assessment, adaptive programming, family and community with EDUC-3810(6) and will be closely integrated with that involvement and education services for children with mild course's assignments. to moderate cognitive, emotional, and behavioral special Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course needs. Attention is paid to the mandated provincial and EDUC-3814. curriculum and policies, as well as to professional, legal, Requisite Courses: EDUC-2511 and EDUC-2512 or ethical and societal considerations. Students are expected EDUC-2514 [prerequisite(s)]; EDUC-3811P1, EDUC-3811P2, to begin to link a theoretical perspective to a practical EDUC-3811P3 and EDUC-3811P4 (must be taken understanding of the wide-ranging issues of inclusive concurrently). education in Manitoba schools. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course EDUC-3814 (2) Teaching/Learning and the K-8 and EDUC-2530 | EDUC-3511 | EDUC-4501. Curriculum Practicum (WEC) (3 hrs Lecture) This Requisite Courses: EDUC-2511, with a minimum grade C, course offers practical teaching experience in the schools and EDUC-2512 or EDUC-2514 [prerequisite(s)]; Including under the guidance and supervision of practicum host the prerequisite courses, students must have completed a teachers. Students complete 20 days of practicum over minimum of 48 credits hours of coursework, or permission two terms (fall and winter) and an eight day block over two of an advisor in the Faculty of Education [prerequisite(s)]. terms (fall and winter). This course must be taken concurrently with EDUC-3810(6) and will be closely EDUC-3511 (3) Inclusive Approaches to Teaching integrated with that course's assignments. Exceptional Students I for After-Degree Students (4 Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course hrs Lecture) This course addresses the relevant theories, and EDUC-3811. Requisite Courses: EDUC-2511 and EDUC-2514 [prerequisite(s)]. [prerequisite(s)]; EDUC-3810 (must be taken concurrently). EDUC-4400 (3) Critical Pedagogy and Student EDUC-4000 (3) Special Topics in Education (4 hrs Diversity (4 hrs Lecture) Critical pedagogy is a theoretical Lecture) This course will examine relevant issues and approach to understanding the classroom as a sphere of developments in education. Course content will vary from social action where it is possible to empower students by year to year. The topic of each course will be available to transforming the conditions that interfere with learning. This students prior to registration. course applies principles of critical pedagogy to issues of Note: Prerequisites for this course will be determined on classroom diversity, understood as a complex of ethnicity, an individual course basis. economic class, gender, and other social differences that Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course are often mobilized as axes of power in educational and EDUC-5001. settings. Particular attention will be paid to the implications of critical pedagogy for teaching in inner city schools in EDUC-4001 (3) Independent Study (3 hrs Directed Winnipeg, where there is a high incidence of poverty, Reading) In this course readings in a particular topic will be marginalization and cultural diversity. arranged between an individual student and an Instructor. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Where appropriate, a practicum may also be included as and EDUC-3401. part of the course. Requisite Courses: EDUC-2513 or EDUC-3810 Note: Written permission of the instructor and the Chair of [prerequisite(s)]. the Departmental Review Committee is required. Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. EDUC-4401 (3) Just and Effective Schooling (4 hrs Lecture) In this course students study conceptions of 'just' EDUC-4002 (6) Foundations of Teaching and Learning and 'effective' schooling, and the ways these priorities (4 hrs Lecture) This course will consist of philosophical, might be practically addressed. Through studying and psychological and pedagogical foundations in Education. mapping diverse ideological perspectives that prioritize 'just' The course will introduce psychological principles as they and 'effective' schooling, students are provided with relate to the practice of teaching and learning within the concepts to analyze educational contexts and programs educational context. Students will examine the philosophy committed to social equity. Engaging an inquiry-based and goals of education in Manitoba and in other cultures approach, students make personal meaning in relation to and will be encouraged to develop their philosophical and these educational priorities to inform their teaching practice. pedagogical perspectives by examining current theory and In this course, schooling is understood as an ethical practice. Teaching and learning will be examined within the educational enterprise that is entangled with inequalities model of teacher decision-making that includes knowledge related to race, ethnicity, language, economics, gender, of the learner (learner characteristics), knowledge of the ability, knowledge systems and settler-colonial relations. relationship of content, strategies, lessons and planning, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and knowledge of methods (classroom organization, and EDUC-3402. motivation, instruction, assessment). Requisite Courses: EDUC-2513, EDUC-3810, or Note: This course may be taken by students in the After EDUC-4002 [prerequisite(s)]. Degree Program only. EDUC-4403 (3) Education for Multicultural Settings (4 EDUC-4003 (3) Pedagogy and Professional Practice (4 hrs Lecture) This course will explore multiculturalism and hrs Lecture) This course introduces Elementary (K to 8) multicultural . Topics will include After-Degree students to the theory which underlies the current issues that relate to identity, gender, race, human teaching and learning process. Students examine rights and special needs. Emphasis will be on relating age-appropriate teaching and learning strategies, methods theoretical discussions to practical classroom situations. of differentiated instruction, positive classroom-learning Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course environments, and the fundamentals of instructional design and EDUC-2402. and assessment in lesson and unit planning. Teaching and learning is further examined within the context of Manitoba EDUC-4405 (3) Contemporary Issues in Inner-City and Canadian educational issues and philosophies of Education (4 hrs Lecture) This course examines the inner education. city, its issues and its characteristics, with a balanced and contextualized approach, including the issue of equality EDUC-4102 (3) Introduction to Teaching English as an versus equity. The role of education and educators in Additional Language (4 hrs Lecture) This course regards to meeting the specific needs and challenges of provides an introduction to the field of Teaching English as learners in the inner-city context are studied, particularly in an Additional Language (TEAL). It examines the scope of respect to constructive community building and helpful TEAL; communicative competence; theories of English approaches that create positive results. language teac hing in relation to their linguistic, pedagogical, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and socio-cultural presuppositions; and EAL instructional and UIC-2515. techniques. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course EDUC-4407 (3) Enrichment and Talent Development and EDUC-3201. (4 hrs Lecture) This introductory course to gifted education Requisite Courses: EDUC-2513 or EDUC-3810 considers philosophy, theoretical models, and issues such as acceleration, segregation versus integration, and appropriate teaching techniques. The course emphasizes EDUC-4412 (3) Teaching and Supporting Youth From practical strategies such as curriculum compacting, Immigrant and Refugee Backgrounds (4 hrs Lecture) mentorship, creative problem solving, self-directed learning, This course is designed to provide teachers with an and the development of theme units. Throughout, the awareness and understanding of issues concerning general focus is on enrichment programming for talent children and youth from refugee and immigrant development. A portion of the course may involve a backgrounds. The global concern for peace education, practicum/mentoring placement, where students guide conflict resolution, and basic human entitlements are children or adolescents from a partnering school division addressed. Teachers who work in multi-ethnic cities must (or divisions) through a higher order enrichment activity or learn how to meet the unique needs of newcomer students project. and their families. Students examine the state of the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course world's children and learn how to effectively address the and EDUC-3502. psychosocial and emotional needs of these children in Requisite Courses: EDUC-2513 or EDUC-3810 or today's classrooms. Students also learn how to foster EDUC-4002 [prerequisite(s)]. resilience by developing the talents, skills, and gifts of children who have refugee and immigrant backgrounds. EDUC-4408 (3) Issues with At-Risk Children and Youth (4 hrs Lecture) This course is designed to EDUC-4502 (3) Critical Analysis of Mental Health familiarize students with many key issues and concepts in Practices in Schools (4 hrs Lecture) In this course, the domain of at-risk children and youth. Topics covered student teachers develop ways to support student include reclaiming children and youth at risk, identifying and well-being in schools and engage knowledgably with nurturing the talents of troubled young people, celebrating mental health curriculum and mental health awareness survivors and resilience, developmental assets, cultural campaigns promoted in Manitoba schools. This course variables, learning disabilities/Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity exposes student teachers to the conventional Disorder, and mentoring. Attention will be paid to areas psychiatry-based mental health approach as well as the such as conflict resolution and anger management; social inter-disciplinary scholarly critique of conventional mental skills training; and exploring issues such as bullying, gangs health premises and practices. This course provides and gang prevention, and strength-building prevention and students with tools for a practical analysis of mental health treatment programs. curriculum, as well as the opportunity to consider a range Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course of approaches to student distress and well-being that and EDUC-3503. emphasize ethics, compassion, social justice, and Requisite Courses: EDUC-2513 or EDUC-3810 community building. [prerequisite(s)]. Note: It is expected that students have prior experience in another course with writing an academic paper using APA EDUC-4409 (3) Mentoring At-Risk Youth (4 hrs Lecture) style. Students may not hold credit for this course and the This pass/fail course is designed to provide the experiential special topics course EDUC-4000 Mental Health Premises link between theory and practice in the at-risk domain. and Practices. Students mentor youth with a variety of social/emotional and educational needs. Mentoring experiences may involve EDUC-4600 (3) Critical Literacy for Empowerment (4 high-school students at-risk of dropping out of school, hrs Lecture) This course focuses on using critical reading elementary and middle years gifted students, high school and writing in early, middle, and senior school years to war affected youth, or students exhibiting needs in the decrease student alienation and promote stronger area of literacy. performance through an empowering approach to studying texts and language conventions. In particular, the focus is EDUC-4410 (3) Introduction to Indigenous Education on written texts such as literary works, school textbooks, (4 hrs Lecture) This course explores First Nations, Métis, and curriculum documents; and on language conventions and Inuit perspectives of Indigenous education and such as Standard English and social discourses that affect pedagogies supporting meaningful inclusion of Indigenous students' perceptions of themselves and others and the cultures, languages, and worldviews in contemporary possibilities open to them in the future. The approach is education. Students develop and demonstrate their ability to most obviously relevant to teaching in content areas such contribute to Indigenous education and reconciliation within as the Language Arts, History, and Social Studies, but it is a Manitoba context. Topics may vary but include traditional also relevant to teaching in the sciences. philosophies, education, and life skills; colonization and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course decolonization in education; Treaties in Canada; federal and and EDUC-3602. provincial policies concerning Indigenous education; Requisite Courses: EDUC-3810 or EDUC-2513 stereotypes and racism; Residential Schools; Indigenous [prerequisite(s)]. resilience and self-determination; pathways to reconciliation; Indigenous education in Manitoba curricula; EDUC-4601 (3) Computer Assisted Multi-Media and creating effective learning environments that support Learning (4 hrs Lecture) This course explores technology Indigenous cultures, identities, languages, and student and its role in education. The practical component focuses success. on developing skills such as using/designing web-based Requisite Courses: EDUC-2513, EDUC-3810 or learning, authorware, multimedia web components (image, EDUC-4002 [prerequisite(s)]. audio, video), and presentation software. The theoretical component deals with the critical analysis of technology Lecture) This course introduces students to the theory and and its role in education. Students are expected to be practice relative to creating and managing an effective proficient in Windows and MS Office. learning environment. Students examine relevant Note: Depending on their proficiency and background, developments in classroom management, conflict students should plan to spend an additional 20-30% resolution, and community building in the classroom. This laboratory time in order to complete assignments. course focuses on factors that influence student and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course teacher behaviors and those that can produce an optimal and EDUC-3604. learning environment for all. Additionally, this course Requisite Courses: EDUC-2601 or EDUC-2611 examines teacher identity and presence and the impact of [prerequisite(s)]. these on learning and behaviors in the classroom.

EDUC-4602 (3) Senior Years Curriculum, Instruction EDUC-4710 (3) Elementary (K-8) Curriculum, and Assessment: Integrating Technology into Instruction & Assessment: English Language Arts 1 Senior Years Teaching (4 hrs Lecture) This course will (4 hrs Lecture) The purpose of this course is to introduce focus on the innovative use of technology in the classroom pre-service teachers to the current trends, issues, to promote critical thinking in students. Senior years materials, and methods in developing an effective students in ALL curriculum areas will be introduced to the early-years balanced literacy program, spanning skills needed to develop integrated lesson plans in which Kindergarten to Grade 4, as supported by research. It they weave subject area outcomes with technology provides them with foundational knowledge, theory, outcomes. Topics will include learning theory in relation to experience, and continuous assessment practices of critical thinking, essentials of curriculum development, students' learning in early-years literacy instruction. Manitoba technology frameworks, lesson planning for technology integration, and educational applications of EDUC-4711 (3) Elementary (K-8) Curriculum, information technology. Continuing parallel themes will be Instruction & Assessment: English Language Arts 2 the rationale and development of Technology as a (4 hrs Lecture) This course introduces pre-service Foundation Skill, and the development of Literacy with ICT teachers to the theoretical foundations, instructional Across the Curriculum in Manitoba schools. approaches, and assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of the English Language Arts at the middle-year EDUC-4603 (3) Teaching for Sustainability (4 hrs level within the context of the Manitoba Education Lecture) Teaching for Sustainability explores the various Curriculum Framework. The nature and development of the definitions of sustainability used in educational settings. It middle-years learner is emphasized, especially in its examines models that provide frameworks for and a series implications for learning and for planning for instruction. of approaches that together create a sustainability- The course explores the six language arts, the basic focused classroom. content knowledge required to teach the middle-years program, meaningful pedagogy and instructional design, EDUC-4604 (3) Classroom-Based Assessment (4 hrs and text types, including extended texts. Lecture) This course provides senior stream students with an overview of the current assessment techniques used in EDUC-4712 (3) Elementary (K-8) Curriculum, senior- and middle-years educational settings today. Instruction and Assessment: Mathematics Students learn about the principles of fair assessment, Foundational (4 hrs Lecture) This course introduces ethical protocol in conducting classroom-based students to the instructional, assessment, and assessments and assessment of inquiry, types of differentiation approaches relevant to the teaching of assessment materials available, research properties of Mathematics within the context of the Manitoba Education assessment, and relative advantages and disadvantages Curriculum Framework for Kindergarten to Grade 8 of various assessment techniques. This course Mathematics. emphasizes the theory and research available for conducting fair assessments and reporting information that EDUC-4713 (3) Elementary (K-8) Curriculum, is useful for enhancing students' educational experiences. Instruction and Assessment: Mathematics - Advanced (4 hrs Lecture) This course builds on the K-8 EDUC-4700 (3) The Adult Learner: An Introduction to instructional, assessment, and differentiation approaches Adult Education (3 hrs Lecture) This course will critically introduced in the Elementary Mathematics - Foundational examine models, perspectives, and research related to course. Particular attention is given to designing and adult learning in both formal and informal settings. It will implementing mathematical learning environments that emphasize the role of the adult educator in program foster various mathematical processes and goals planning, implementation, and evaluation within the context highlighted in the Manitoba Education Curriculum of an examination of current adult education issues and Framework for the elementary grades. questions. Requisite Courses: EDUC-4712 [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and EDUC-2701. EDUC-4714 (3) Elementary (K-8) Curriculum, Requisite Courses: EDUC-3810 or EDUC-2513 Instruction and Assessment: Science - Foundational [prerequisite(s)]. (4 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to the topics, concepts, issues, instructional approaches, and EDUC-4701 (3) Classroom Management (4 hrs assessment techniques relevant and essential to teaching science at the Kindergarten to Grade 8 levels within the have a teaching major or minor in Kinesiology. context of the Manitoba Education Science curricula. EDUC-4720 (3) Elementary (K-8) Advanced Curricular EDUC-4715 (3) Elementary (K-8) Curriculum, Inquiry: Humanities (4 hrs Lecture) This course Instruction and Assessment: Science - Advanced (4 introduces students to pedagogical theories and the hrs Lecture) This course builds on the instructional, implementation of these theories in practice. Teacher assessment, and differentiation approaches and candidates investigate intensively one or more curricular techniques introduced in the Elementary Science - topics of their choice in a selected humanities area, Foundational course, fostering of the development of referencing applicable pedagogical theories. The advanced skills in elementary-years science within the investigation is located in a specific implementation setting context of the Manitoba Curriculum for Kindergarten to and result in the development of curriculum materials for Grade 8 Science. teaching and learning for the specified setting. This course Requisite Courses: EDUC-4714 [prerequisite(s)]. is required for students in the Elementary stream with one or more teaching areas in subjects other than Mathematics EDUC-4716 (3) Elementary (K-8) Curriculum, or the Sciences. Restriction: Complettion of one or more Instruction and Assessment: Social Studies - teaching areas in subjects other than Mathematics or the Foundational (4 hrs Lecture) This course introduces Sciences. students to the instructional, assessment, and differentiation approaches relevant to the teaching of EDUC-4721 (3) Elementary (K-8) Advanced Inquiry: Social Studies within the context of the Manitoba Education Mathematics Curricular -Science (4 hrs Lecture) This Curriculum Framework documents for Kindergarten to course introduces students to advanced pedagogical Grade 8 Social Studies. Students engage in planning that theories and the implementation of these pedagogies in integrates the teaching and learning processes and the practice. The core of this course is the development and social context within which teaching and learning occurs. implementation of a project based on teaching-as-research principles, where each student focuses on a particular EDUC-4717 (3) Elementary (K-8) Curriculum, pedagogical theory and implementation setting. The course Instruction and Assessment: Social Studies - content includes an introduction to teacher-as-researcher Advanced (4 hrs Lecture) This course builds on the principles and surveys of advanced pedagogies, instructional, assessment, and differentiation approaches culminating with presentations of the products that are introduced in the Elementary Social Studies - Foundational generated from each student's production of a project. This course. Students inquire into curriculum and design course is required for students in the Elementary stream curriculum experiences within the context of the Manitoba who have a teaching area in Biology, Chemistry, Education Curriculum Framework documents for Mathematics, or Physics. Kindergarten to Grade 8 Social Studies. Students engage in Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course planning that integrates the teaching and learning process and EDUC-4839. and the social context within which teaching and learning occurs. EDUC-4730 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, Requisite Courses: EDUC-4716 [prerequisite(s)]. Instructions and Assessment: Middle- Years English Language Arts for Senior-Years Teachers (4 EDUC-4718 (3) Elementary (K-8) Curriculum, hrs Lecture) This course provides pre-service teachers Instruction and Assessment: Integrating the enrolled in the Senior Years program with an introduction to Expressive Arts (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces teaching literacy in the Middle Years (Grades 5 to 8). students to the theory and instructional and assessment Students explore creative ways to teach short stories, approaches relevant to the integration of the arts-dance, novels, drama, poetry, non-fiction, and visual texts suitable drama, music, visual arts, video, and creative for middle-years learners. Inquiry circles, self-directed writing-across the curricula within the context of the literacy projects, and novel-study groups are a part of this Manitoba Education Curriculum Frameworks for course. Interdisciplinary themes and emerging literacy Kindergarten to Grade 8. genres are explored. Assessment for literacy learning and practical applications of Manitoba Education ELA curriculum EDUC-4719 (3) Elementary (K-8) Curriculum, documents are analyzed. A focus on teaching both literary Instruction and Assessment: Physical Education - and non-fiction upper-level MY works is highlighted. Health Education (4 hrs Lecture) In this course, students develop an understanding of the Manitoba Education EDUC-4731 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, Kindergarten to Grade 4 and Grades 5 to 8 curricula for Instruction and Assessment: Middle- Years French Physical Education and Health Education. The course for Senior-Years Teachers (4 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to the instructional approaches and is a curriculum-based course for students in the assessment techniques relevant to the effective delivery of Senior-Years stream. Students develop an in-depth health and physical education at the Kindergarten to Grade understanding of specific curricular topics in the French: 8 levels within the context of the Manitoba Education Communication and Culture Curriculum. This course curriculum. Restrictions (ineligible students): Admission to focuses on theoretical foundations, instructional the certification portion of the Education Program. Additional approaches, and resources for teaching French in the Requirements: This is a required course only for students middle years within the context of the Manitoba Education in the Elementary stream (Integrated or After-Degree) who curriculum framework for French. Emphasis is placed on an oral proficiency, a balanced literacy approach, and EDUC-4736 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, critical reflection in connecting theory and practice. Instruction and Assessment: Biology I (4 hrs Lecture) Restriction: Students admitted to the certificate portion of This course introduces students to curriculum, instruction, the Education Program. and assessment for teaching Biology at the Grade 9, 10, and 11 levels. It presents a wide variety of teaching EDUC-4732 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, strategies and resources that assist learners in their Instruction and Assessment: Middle- Years conceptual development and understanding of biology, Mathematics for Senior- Years Teachers (4 hrs placing an emphasis on practical laboratory work and Lecture) This course introduces Senior-Years students to student activities. The course examines the discrete the curriculum, instructional approaches, and assessment Biology curriculum modules at each of the respective techniques relevant to the teaching of Mathematics at the levels: Reproduction, Grade 9; Dynamics of Ecosystems, middle-years level within the context of the Manitoba Grade 10; and Wellness and Homeostasis, Digestion and Education Curriculum Framework for Mathematics. Nutrition, Transportation and Respiration, Excretion and Waste Management, and Protection and Control, Grade 11. EDUC-4733 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment: Middle- Years EDUC-4737 (3) Senior Years (9-12) Curriculum, Physical-Health Education for Senior-Years Instruction and Assessment: Biology II (4 hrs Teachers (4 hrs Lecture) This course introduces Lecture) This course introduces students to curriculum, Senior-Years students to the general theories and instruction, and assessment for teaching Biology at the practices in teaching Physical Education and Health Grade 12 and Advanced Placement levels. It presents a Education at all levels. Specifically, this course familiarizes wide variety of teaching strategies and resources that students with the Manitoba Middle Years (Grades 5 to 8) assist learners in their conceptual development and Physical Education and Health Education Curriculum understanding of biology, placing an emphasis on practical Framework. Students learn key curricular concepts, laboratory work and student activities. Curriculum modules methods, and approaches for delivery to middle-years for Grade 12 Biology are examined, and curriculum design students while developing an understanding of how the for AP Biology is addressed. Topics studied include Middle-Years Curriculum acts as the foundation for that of biological inheritance, evolutionary theory, and biodiversity. the senior years. Key topics, such as effective teaching Requisite Courses: Completion of EDUC-4734, principles, assessment of fitness, ongoing professional EDUC-4736 and EDUC-4869 [prerequisite(s)]. development, hygiene, and puberty are covered. Practical teaching experiences and teacher development are EDUC-4738 (3) Senior-Years (9-12): Curriculum, essential to this course. Instruction and Assessment: Chemistry I (4 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to the curriculum, EDUC-4734 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, instruction, and assessment for teaching Chemistry at the Instruction and Assessment: Middle- Years Science secondary level. It presents a wide variety of teaching for Senior-Years Teachers (4 hrs Lecture) This course strategies and resources that assist learners in their introduces Senior-Years students to the curriculum, conceptual development and understanding of chemistry instruction, and assessment for teaching Middle- Years and places an emphasis on practical lab work and student Science within the context of the Manitoba Education activities. It includes an examination of the Chemistry Grades 5 to 8 Science Curriculum. The course presents a Curriculum modules in Grade 9 Science (Atoms and wide variety of teaching strategies and resources that Elements) and Grade 10 Science (Chemistry in Action) and assist middle-years learners in their conceptual the Grade 11 Chemistry Curriculum. development and understanding of science, placing an emphasis on inquiry and the design process. EDUC-4739 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum Instruction and Assessment: Chemistry II (4 hrs EDUC-4735 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, Lecture) This course introduces students to the curriculum, Instruction and Assessment: Middle- Years Social instruction, and assessment for teaching Chemistry at the Studies for Senior Years Teachers (4 hrs Lecture) Grade 12 level. It presents a wide variety of teaching This course engages participants with the Manitoba Social strategies and resources that assist learners in their Studies Curriculum documents for the Middle Years and conceptual development and understanding of chemistry associated resources. The Curriculum identifies its goals and places an emphasis on practical lab work and student as helping students to acquire the skills, knowledge, and activities. Curriculum modules for Grade 12 Chemistry and values necessary to understand the world in which they models for AP Chemistry are examined. live, to engage in active democratic citizenship, and to Requisite Courses: Completion of EDUC-4734, contribute to the betterment of society. The course EDUC-4738 and EDUC-4869 [prerequisite(s)]. prepares teacher candidates to utilize the curriculum documents for meaningful and effective planning. It inquires EDUC-4740 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, into how a reflective teacher makes decisions about what Instruction and Assessment: Curriculum Design I (4 and how to teach in relation to the teaching and learning hrs Lecture) This course focuses on inquiry into teaching context and the formal, social, and hidden curricula. and learning in the senior-years curricular areas for which Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course there are no mandated provincial curricula. Emphasis is and EDUC-4842 | EDUC-4850. placed on the process of curriculum design, curriculum theory, and contemporary issues related to content, instruction, and assessment at the senior-years level. reflection in connecting theory and practice. Requisite Courses: Completion of EDUC-4730 or Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course EDUC-4735 [prerequisite(s)]. and EDUC-4856. Requisite Courses: Completion of EDUC-4731 EDUC-4741 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, [prerequisite(s)]. Instruction and Assessment: Curriculum Design II (4 hrs Lecture) This inquiry-based course explores EDUC-4745 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, senior-years curriculum with an emphasis on the practical Instruction and Assessment: French II (4 hrs Lecture) aspects of instructional design and curriculum This course is the second of two curriculum-based implementation. Using "the good school" as a guiding theme, courses for students in the Senior-Years stream. It students design curriculum frameworks projects provides students with the opportunity to extend individually and collaboratively. There is a focus on knowledge and skills acquired in SY CIA: French I for the interactive classroom teaching and learning for the real teaching of French: Communication and Culture. The world. Students develop practical, personal knowledge by focus in this course is on research and innovations in engaging in classroom activities, reading assignments, and second-language teaching, detailed planning for instruction project-based learning. and assessment, integrating culture, teaching literature, Requisite Courses: Completion of EDUC-4740 and using technology within the context of the Manitoba [prerequisite(s)]. Education Curriculum Framework for French at the high-school level. EDUC-4742 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, Requisite Courses: Completion of EDUC-4744 Instruction and Assessment: English Language [prerequisite(s)]. Arts I (4 hrs Lecture) With an emphasis on recent adolescent literacy research and critical inquiry into EDUC-4746 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, teaching secondary English Language Arts, this course Instruction and Assessment: Mathematics I (4 hrs provides students with opportunities to examine critically, Lecture) This course introduces students to the curriculum, interpret, and explore relevant Manitoba curriculum instructional approaches, and assessment techniques documents and their implications for literacy learning. The relevant to the teaching of Mathematics at the senior-years course emphasizes teaching literary and non-fiction works level within the context of the Manitoba Education (e.g., novels, poetry, short stories, articles, songs, Curriculum Framework for Mathematics. The focus is on biographies, internet postings, and film,) appropriate for the Grades 9 and 10 Mathematics and the Grades 9 to 12 Grades 9 and 10 English Language Arts. Strategies that Essential Mathematics programs for the province of highlight self-directed and collaborative ways of knowing, Manitoba. as well as assessment approaches, are analyzed. Requisite Courses: Completion of EDUC-4732 Requisite Courses: Completion of EDUC-4730 [prerequisite(s)]. [prerequisite(s)]. EDUC-4747 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, EDUC-4743 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment: Mathematics II (4 hrs Instruction and Assessment: English Language Lecture) This course introduces students to the curriculum, Arts II (4 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to instructional approaches, and assessment techniques the instructional approaches and assessment strategies relevant to the teaching of Mathematics at the senior-years relevant to the teaching of English Language Arts in Grade level within the context of the Manitoba Education 11 and 12 within the context of the Manitoba Education Curriculum Framework for Mathematics. The focus in CIA Curriculum Frameworks for English. Emphasis is placed on Mathematics II is on the Grade 11 and Grade 12 Applied effective ways to teach literature and non-fiction and Pre-Calculus courses for the province of Manitoba. appropriate for the upper levels of senior high and on Requisite Courses: Completion of EDUC-4746 recent adolescent literary research and critical inquiry. [prerequisite(s)]. Students explore instructional strategies that include reflective writing, collaborative inquiry, novel-study groups, EDUC-4748 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, and interactive media presentations. Instruction and Assessment: Physical Requisite Courses: Completion of EDUC-4742 Education-Health Education I (4 hrs Lecture) This [prerequisite(s)]. course provides students with an introduction to the overall Senior-Years Physical Education and Health Education EDUC-4744 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, Curriculum Framework in Manitoba. Students develop an Instruction and Assessment: French I (4 hrs Lecture) understanding of key curricular concepts, methods, and This course is the first of two curriculum-based courses strategies for delivery to senior-years students. Developing for students in the Senior-Years stream. Students develop skills and knowledge related to assessment of Physical an in-depth understanding of specific curricular topics in Education and Health Education teaching resources, French: Communication and Culture. This course focuses movement and motor-skill theory in relation to teaching the on theoretical foundations, instructional approaches, and discipline, behaviour management, and personal and social resources for teaching French at the senior-years level management is instrumental to this course. within the context of the Manitoba Education Curriculum Research-based findings and the foundations of the Framework for French. This course emphasizes an curriculum are used as the building blocks for learning. oral-proficiency and balanced-literacy approach and critical Requisite Courses: Completion of EDUC-4733 [prerequisite(s)]. EDUC-4753 (3) Senior Years (9-12) Curriculum EDUC-4749 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment: Social Studies II (4 hrs Instruction and Assessment: Physical Lecture) This course builds on Senior Years (9-12) Education-Health Education II (4 hrs Lecture) This Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Social Studies I. course develops students' knowledge and skills related to This course introduces students to several major topics, the teaching of the Senior-Years Physical Education and events, and issues in Geography or History and provides Health Education Curriculum Framework in Manitoba. for each the background content knowledge, teaching Students broaden their understanding of key curricular resource materials, and relevant pedagogical approaches. concepts, methods, and approaches for delivery to Furthermore, the course examines common concepts, Senior-Years students. This course introduces students to themes, and concerns in Senior Years Geography and the teaching of pivotal health-related concepts, such as History Social Studies and curricula. This course may be sexual education, nutrition, substance abuse, and repeated for credit when the topic varies (a maximum of addiction. In addition, theory and practical application two times). strategies associated with assessment, evaluation, safety, Requisite Courses: EDUC-4752 [prerequisite(s)]. and adaptation for students of all levels are instrumental to this course. Research-based findings and the foundations EDUC-4754 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, of the curriculum are used as the building blocks for Instruction and Assessment: Theatre Arts I (4 hrs learning. Lecture) This course prepares teacher candidates for Requisite Courses: Completion of EDUC-4748 drama instruction at the secondary-school level. It focuses [prerequisite(s)]. on the general approach to teaching a drama program, with an overview of each level and a study of progressions EDUC-4750 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, from one level to the next. Practical in nature, the students Instruction and Assessment: Physics I (4 hrs experience the drama exercises for themselves, centering Lecture) This course introduces student teachers to the on how to present the material effectively to their future curriculum, instruction, and assessment for teaching students. Specific units that could be incorporated into a Physics at the Grades 9, 10, and 11 levels. The course complete drama program are explored. Experiencing the introduces a wide variety of teaching strategies and projects first hand, students present a finished product, resources to assist student teachers in their conceptual with a discussion of evaluation techniques following each development and understanding of physics and places an presentation. emphasis on practical laboratory work and student Requisite Courses: EDUC-4730 [prerequisite(s)]. activities. The course examines the Physics Curriculum modules of Electricity and Astronomy in Grade 9, Motion in EDUC-4755 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, Grade 10, and the Physics units of Waves, Nature of Light, Instruction and Assessment: Theatre II (4 hrs Mechanics, and Fields in Grade 11. Lecture) This course prepares teacher candidates to direct productions at the secondary-school level. It focuses on EDUC-4751 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Curriculum, the specific skills utilized in productions, as well as the Instruction and Assessment: Physics II (4 hrs logistics of producing a musical. The course is practical Lecture) This course introduces students to the curriculum, and participatory with an exploration of the various facets instruction, and assessment for teaching Grade 12 and of the production process and examines performance as Advanced Placement Physics. The course introduces a part of the classroom experience. wide variety of teaching strategies and resources to assist Requisite Courses: EDUC-4754 [prerequisite(s)]. student teachers in their conceptual development and understanding of physics with an emphasis on practical EDUC-4756 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Advanced laboratory work and student activities. Advanced Curricular Inquiry: Group A (4 hrs Lecture) In this Placement (AP) courses go beyond the curriculum course, students develop a broad understanding of expectations of the secondary program and include topics significant curricular topics at the senior-high level in the typically found in first-year university-level courses. broad domain of English Language Arts, Theatre, Requisite Courses: EDUC-4734, EDUC-4750 and Psychology, or Sociology. The exploration of the theoretical EDUC-4869 [prerequisite(s)]. foundations and relevant pedagogies is undertaken in the context of essential content. Emphasis is placed on an EDUC-4752 (3) Senior Years (9-12) Curriculum, inquiry-based approach and critical reflection in connecting Instruction and Assessment: Social Studies I (4 hrs theory and practice. Pre-service teachers explore the Lecture) This course introduces students to Geography or effectiveness of instructional methods and strategies and History Social Studies curricula at the secondary level. It the process of reflective decision making in relation to the explores several foundational instructional strategies and teaching and learning context, in particular through action examines approaches to planning for instruction and research. assessment. A critical question underlying these Requisite Courses: EDUC-4741, EDUC-4743 or explorations is: What are the purposes of Geography or EDUC-4755 [prerequisite(s)]. History education? Note: This course may be repeated for credit when the EDUC-4757 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Advanced topic varies (a maximum of two times). Curricular Inquiry: Group B (4 hrs Lecture) In this Requisite Courses: EDUC-4735 [prerequisite(s)]. course, students develop a broad understanding of significant curricular topics in the field of Social Studies and Faculty-appointed supervisor. This practicum consists of a History and in the domains of Anthropology, Classics, five-week block and a one-day-a-week experience for a Economics, Geography, Philosophy, and Political Science. total of nine days and includes a four-day, start-of-school The exploration of the theoretical foundations and relevant experience. pedagogies is undertaken in the context of essential content. Emphasis is placed on an inquiry-based approach EDUC-4771 (3) Practicum Block II: Elementary (3 hrs and critical reflection in connecting theory and practice. Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course offers Pre-service teachers explore the effectiveness of teaching experience in Grades K-8 settings under the instructional methods and strategies and the process of guidance and supervision of practicum host teachers and a reflective decision making in relation to the teaching and Faculty-appointed supervisor. This practicum consists of a learning context. five-week block and a one-day-a-week experience for a Requisite Courses: EDUC-4741 or EDUC-4753 total of nine days and, if appropriate, may include a [prerequisite(s)]. four-day, start-of-school experience. Requisite Courses: EDUC-4770 [prerequisite(s)]. EDUC-4758 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Advanced Curricular Inquiry: French (4 hrs Lecture) This course EDUC-4772 (3) Practicum Block III: Elementary (3 hrs introduces students to action research as a Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course offers problem-solving methodology to improve teaching and teaching experience in Grades K-8 settings under the learning in the French language classroom. Through this guidance and supervision of practicum host teachers and a course, pre-service teachers apply the knowledge and Faculty-appointed supervisor. This practicum consists of a theory acquired from coursework in Senior-Years French I five-week block and a one-day-a-week experience for a and II and, particularly, through their experience of teacher total of nine days and includes a four-day, start-of-school as researcher in the implementation of an action-research experience. project. Requisite Courses: EDUC-4770 and EDUC-4771 Requisite Courses: EDUC-4745 [prerequisite(s)]. [prerequisite(s)].

EDUC-4759 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Advanced EDUC-4773 (3) Practicum Block IV: Elementary (3 hrs Curricular Inquiry: Mathematics (4 hrs Lecture) This Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course offers course introduces students in the Senior-Years stream to teaching experience in Grades K-8 settings under the advanced pedagogical theories and the implementation of guidance and supervision of practicum host teachers and a these pedagogies in practice in provincial Mathematics Faculty-appointed supervisor. This practicum consists of a curricula. The core of this course is the development and five-week block and a one-day-a-week experience for a implementation of a project based on teaching-as-research total of nine days and, if appropriate, may include a principles, where each student focuses on a self-selected four-day, start-of-school experience. topic of research, along with a particular pedagogical Requisite Courses: EDUC-4772 [prerequisite(s)]. theory and implementation setting. The course content includes an introduction to teacher-as-researcher EDUC-4774 (3) Practicum Block I: Senior Years (3 hrs principles and surveys of advanced pedagogies, Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course offers culminating with presentations of the products that are teaching experience in Middle-Years settings under the generated from each student's production of a project. guidance and supervision of practicum host teachers and a Requisite Courses: EDUC-4747 [prerequisite(s)]. Faculty-appointed supervisor. This practicum consists of a five-week block and a one-day-a- week experience for a EDUC-4760 (3) Senior-Years (9-12) Advanced total of nine days and includes a four-day, start-of-school Curricular Inquiry: Physical Education-Health experience. Education (4 hrs Lecture) In this course, students develop inquiry-based research skills while continuing to expand EDUC-4775 (3) Practicum Block II: Senior Years (3 hrs their knowledge and skills related to the teaching of the Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course offers Senior-Years Physical Education and Health Education. teaching experience in Middle-Years settings under the Students will learn about the role of theory and research guidance and supervision of practicum host teachers and a within the realm of the discipline and will develop an Faculty-appointed supervisor. This practicum consists of a understanding of how this research is implemented. five-week block and a one-day-a-week experience for a Contemporary issues in the areas of physical and health total of nine days and, if appropriate, may include a education and how these issues affect teaching and the four-day, start-of-school experience. school environment will be explored. Students apply Requisite Courses: EDUC-4774 [prerequisite(s)]. theoretical knowledge and research-based ideas, providing the communities in which they engage with physical health EDUC-4776 (3) Practicum Block III: Senior Years (3 hrs benefits. Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course offers Requisite Courses: EDUC-4749 [prerequisite(s)]. teaching experience in Senior-Years settings under the guidance and supervision of practicum host teachers and a EDUC-4770 (3) Practicum Block I: Elementary (3 hrs Faculty-appointed supervisor. This practicum consists of a Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course offers five-week block and a one-day-a-week experience for a teaching experience in Grades K-8 settings under the total of nine days and includes a four-day, start-of-school guidance and supervision of practicum host teachers and a experience. Requisite Courses: EDUC-4775 [prerequisite(s)]. curriculum framework for the early years. Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification EDUC-4777 (3) Practicum Block IV: Senior Years (3 hrs portion of the program. Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course offers teaching experience in Senior-Years settings under the EDUC-4837 (1) Early Years Curriculum, Instruction guidance and supervision of practicum host teachers and a and Assessment: Physical Education/Health Faculty-appointed supervisor. This practicum consists of a Education (4 hrs Lecture) This course introduces five-week block and a one-day-a-week experience for a students to the instructional approaches and assessment total of nine days and, if appropriate, may include a techniques relevant to the teaching of Physical and Health four-day, start-of-school experience. Education within the context of the Manitoba Education and Requisite Courses: EDUC-4776 [prerequisite(s)]. Training curriculum framework for the early years. Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification EDUC-4778 (3) Practicum Block Red River College: portion of the program. Senior Years (3 hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course offers teaching experience in Senior-Years EDUC-4838 (3) Early Years Curriculum, Instruction, settings under the guidance and supervision of practicum and Assessment: Reading and the English host teachers and a Faculty-appointed supervisor. This Language Arts (4 hrs Lecture) This course introduces practicum consists of a five-week block and a students to the instructional approaches and assessment one-day-a-week experience for a total of nine days and, if techniques relevant to the teaching of Language Arts appropriate, may include a four-day, start-of-school within the context of the Manitoba Education and Training experience. curriculum framework for the early years. Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification EDUC-4779 (3) Practicum Block Supplementary: portion of the program. Senior Years (3 hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course offers supplemental teaching experience EDUC-4839 (3) Early Years Curriculum, Instruction, under the guidance and supervision of practicum host and Assessment: Mathematics (4 hrs Lecture) This teachers. This practicum is typically taken in conjunction course introduces students to the instructional approaches with one or more Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment and assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of courses. The student must have standing in this course Mathematics within the context of the Manitoba Education and in the corresponding Curriculum, Instruction and and Training curriculum framework for the early years. Assessment courses in order to fulfill degree requirements. Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification Prerequisites: Recommendation of the Performance Review portion of the program. Committee and written permission of the Chair of the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Performance Review Committee or Director of Student and EDUC-4721. Teaching. EDUC-4840 (1) Early Years Curriculum, Instruction EDUC-4820 (3) Early Years Education (4 hrs Lecture) and Assessment: Music (4 hrs Lecture) This course This course examines the premises and objectives of Early introduces students to the instructional approaches and Years Education. Students are introduced to the assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of Music instructional approaches effective in achieving these goals. within the context of the Manitoba Education and Training curriculum framework for the early years. EDUC-4821 (3) Middle Years Education (4 hrs Lecture) Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification This course examines the premises and objectives of portion of the program. Middle Years Education. Students are introduced to the instructional approaches effective in achieving these goals. EDUC-4841 (3) Early Years Curriculum, Instruction, Requisite Courses: EDUC-3810 and admission to the and Assessment: Science (4 hrs Lecture) This course certification portion of the degree and the Middle Years introduces students to the instructional approaches and Stream [prerequisite(s)]. assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of Science within the context of the Manitoba Education and Training EDUC-4835 (1) Early Years Curriculum, Instruction, curriculum framework for the early years. and Assessment: Art (4 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to the instructional approaches and EDUC-4842 (3) Early Years Curriculum, Instruction, assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of Art and Assessment: Social Studies (4 hrs Lecture) This within the context of the Manitoba Education and Training course introduces students to the instructional approaches curriculum framework for the early years. and assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification Social Studies within the context of the Manitoba Education portion of the program. and Training curriculum framework for the early years. Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification EDUC-4836 (1) Early Years Curriculum, Instruction, portion of the program. and Assessment: Drama (4 hrs Lecture) This course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course introduces students to the instructional approaches and and EDUC-4735 | EDUC-4850. assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of Drama within the context of the Manitoba Education and Training EDUC-4843 (1) Middle Years Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Art (4 hrs Lecture) This course will and Assessment: Alternative (4 hrs Lecture) This introduce students to the instructional approaches and course will introduce students to instructional approaches assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of Art and assessment techniques relative to senior years within the context of the Manitoba Education and Training students in alternative programs or settings. For example, curriculum framework for the middle years. topics will include student initiated projects (SIPS), school initiated courses (SICS), distance learning, storefront EDUC-4844 (1) Middle Years Curriculum, Instruction learning centres, adult learning, special needs programs and Assessment: Drama (4 hrs Lecture) This course and other alternative programs. will introduce students to the instructional approaches and assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of Drama EDUC-4853 (3) Senior Years Curriculum, Instruction within the context of the Manitoba Education and Training and Assessment: Biology (4 hrs Lecture) This course curriculum framework for the middle years. introduces students to the instructional approaches and assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of Biology EDUC-4845 (1) Middle Years Curriculum, Instruction at the senior years level within the context of the Manitoba and Assessment: Physical Education/Health Education and Training curriculum framework for Biology. Education (4 hrs Lecture) This course will introduce Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification students to the instructional approaches and assessment portion of the program. techniques relevant to the teaching of Physical and Health Requisite Courses: EDUC-4869 and associated Education within the context of the Manitoba Education and practicum courses (must be taken previously or at the Training curriculum framework for the middle years. same time as this course).

EDUC-4846 (3) Middle Years Curriculum, Instruction EDUC-4854 (3) Senior Years Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment: Reading and the English and Assessment: Chemistry (4 hrs Lecture) This Language Arts (4 hrs Lecture) This course will introduce course introduces students to the instructional approaches students to the instructional approaches and assessment and assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of techniques relevant to the teaching of Reading and the Chemistry at the senior years level within the context of the English Language Arts within the context of the Manitoba Manitoba Education and Training curriculum framework for Education and Training curriculum framework for the middle Chemistry. years. Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification portion of the program. EDUC-4847 (3) Middle Years Curriculum, Instruction Requisite Courses: EDUC-4869 and associated and Assessment: Mathematics (4 hrs Lecture) This practicum courses (must be taken previously or at the course will introduce students to the instructional same time as this course). approaches and assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of Mathematics within the context of the Manitoba EDUC-4855 (6) Senior Years Curriculum, Instruction Education and Training curriculum framework for the middle and Assessment: English (4 hrs Lecture) This course years. introduces students to the instructional approaches and assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of English EDUC-4848 (1) Middle Years Curriculum, Instruction at the senior years level within the context of the Manitoba and Assessment: Music (4 hrs Lecture) This course Education and Training curriculum framework for English. will introduce students to the instructional approaches and Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of Music portion of the program. within the context of the Manitoba Education and Training curriculum framework for the middle years. EDUC-4856 (6) Senior Years Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment: French (4 hrs Lecture) This course EDUC-4849 (3) Middle Years Curriculum, Instruction introduces students to the instructional approaches and and Assessment: Science (4 hrs Lecture) This course assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of French will introduce students to the instructional approaches and at the senior years level within the context of the Manitoba assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of Science Education and Training curriculum framework for French. within the context of the Manitoba Education and Training Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification curriculum framework for the middle years. portion of the program. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course EDUC-4850 (3) Middle Years Curriculum, Instruction and EDUC-4744. and Assessment: Social Studies (4 hrs Lecture) This course will introduce students to the instructional EDUC-4857 (3) Senior Years Curriculum, Instruction approaches and assessment techniques relevant to the and Assessment: Geography (4 hrs Lecture) This teaching of Social Studies within the context of the course introduces students to the instructional approaches Manitoba Education and Training curriculum framework for and assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of the middle years. Geography at the senior years level within the context of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course the Manitoba Education and Training curriculum framework and EDUC-4735 | EDUC-4842. for Geography. Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification EDUC-4852 (5) Senior Years Curriculum, Instruction portion of the program. within the context of the Manitoba Education and Training EDUC-4859 (3) Senior Years Curriculum, Instruction curriculum framework for Theatre and Drama. and Assessment: Health (4 hrs Lecture) This course Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification introduces students to the instructional approaches and portion of the program. assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of Health Requisite Courses: EDUC-4867 and associated Education at the senior years level within the context of the practicum courses (must be taken concurrently). Manitoba Education and Training curriculum framework for Health Education. EDUC-4866 (3) Senior Years (9-12) Curriculum, Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification Instruction, and Assessment: History and portion of the program. Philosophy of Science and Science Teaching (4 hrs Requisite Courses: For Senior Years students with a Lecture) This course examines the historical development major or minor in Physical Activity, EDUC-4863 and of science in terms of major themes (like the atomic model) associated practicum courses (must be taken and how this development relates to science teaching. It is concurrently). intended to foster a more complete view of the nature and philosophy of science to provide the science educator with EDUC-4860 (6) Senior Years Curriculum, Instruction a context for the content of the Manitoba curriculum and and Assessment: History (4 hrs Lecture) This course associated textbooks. This is not a formal course in the introduces students to the instructional approaches and history of science; but rather, the course emphasizes the assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of History role of history and philosophy of science in science at the senior years level within the context of the Manitoba instruction. This course may also be of interest to Education and Training curriculum framework for History. elementary and middle years teachers who wish to gain a Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification broader insight into science and can be used as portion of the program. certification elective. Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification EDUC-4861 (6) Senior Years Curriculum, Instruction portion of the program. and Assessment: Mathematics (4 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to the instructional approaches EDUC-4867 (3) Senior Years Curriculum, Instruction and assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of and Assessment: Performance Production (4 hrs Mathematics at the senior years level within the context of Lecture) This course provides music and theatre major the Manitoba Education and Training curriculum framework students with skills required to produce school for Mathematics. performances such as concerts, variety shows, dramas, Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification musicals and fashion shows. Building on the skills they portion of the program. have acquired in their major teachable area, students will focus on the planning and managing of productions within EDUC-4863 (3) Senior Years Curriculum, Instruction a senior years school setting. and Assessment: Kinesiology (4 hrs Lecture) This Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification course introduces students to the instructional approaches portion of the program. and assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of Requisite Courses: EDUC-4865 and associated Physical Activity at the senior years level within the context practicum courses (must be taken concurrently). of the Manitoba Education and Training curriculum framework for Physical Activity. EDUC-4868 (3) Curriculum, Instruction and Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification Assessment: Principles of Learning French as a portion of the program. Second Language (4 hrs Lecture) This course presents Requisite Courses: EDUC-4859 and associated the theories and principles of learning French as a second practicum courses (must be taken concurrently). language with particular emphasis on the Communicative Approach in Core French and Immersion. A study of EDUC-4864 (3) Senior Years Curriculum, Instruction current didactic materials, teaching methods and lesson and Assessment: Physics (4 hrs Lecture) This course implementation at the K to 8 levels, based on the Manitoba introduces students to the instructional approaches and context, will be undertaken. This course will be taught in assessment techniques relevant to the teaching of Physics French. at the senior years level within the context of the Manitoba Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification Education and Training curriculum framework for Physics. portion of the program. Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification Requisite Courses: EDUC-4856 or admission into an portion of the program. Elementary French Immersion certification school placement Requisite Courses: EDUC-4869 and associated (must be taken previously or at the same time as this practicum courses (must be taken previously or at the course). same time as this course). EDUC-4869 (3) Senior Years (9-12) Curriculum, EDUC-4865 (3) Senior Years Curriculum, Instruction Instruction and Assessment: Theory of Science and Assessment: Theatre and Drama (4 hrs Lecture) Teaching (4 hrs Lecture) This course addresses effective This course introduces students to the instructional science teaching strategies and current issues in science approaches and assessment techniques relevant to the education. The focus is on methodology to promote student teaching of Theatre and Drama at the senior years level learning understanding of science concepts and processes. Practical methods for demonstrating, planning offers teaching experience in Senior Years settings under laboratory experiences, managing science equipment, and the guidance and supervision of practicum host teachers. safety concerns are also developed and discussed. This practicum includes a 5 week block plus 1 day a week Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification experience for a total of 9 days and may include a start of portion of the program. school experience if appropriate. Requisite Courses: EDUC-4734 SY C,I&A Middle Years Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification Science for Senior Years Teachers (must be taken portion of the program. concurrently). EDUC-4875 (2.5) Practicum Block II - Early Years (3 hrs EDUC-4870 (3) Senior Year (9-12) Curriculum, Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course offers Instruction and Assessment: Literacy Across the teaching experience in Early Years settings under the Curriculum (4 hrs Lecture) This course explores guidance and supervision of practicum host teachers. This expanding notions of text and literacy across the practicum includes a 5 week block plus 1 day a week curriculum. Prospective teachers are asked to consider experience for a total of 9 days and may include a start of how to bring learners and texts together to explore and school experience if appropriate. construct meaning within their particular content areas. To Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification this end, students are introduced to dominant theories and portion of the program. current approaches in the engagement of subject area texts through reading, viewing, listening, writing, speaking, EDUC-4876 (2.5) Practicum Block II - Middle Years (3 and representing. hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification offers teaching experience in Middle Years settings under portion of the program. the guidance and supervision of practicum host teachers. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course This practicum includes a 5 week block plus 1 day a week and EDUC-3102. experience for a total of 9 days and may include a start of school experience if appropriate. EDUC-4871 (6) Senior Years Curriculum, Instruction Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification and Assessment: Curriculum Design (4 hrs Lecture) portion of the program. The first part of this course focuses on developing curriculum in areas where no mandated provincial EDUC-4877 (2.5) Practicum Block II - Senior Years (3 curriculum documents exist. The second part of the course hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course focuses on instructional design techniques and the offers teaching experience in Senior Years settings under implementation of the curriculum. Students are expected to the guidance and supervision of practicum host teachers. design units and may have an option of a practicum This practicum includes a 5 week block plus 1 day a week component (self-arranged). experience for a total of 9 days and may include a start of Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification school experience if appropriate. portion of the program. Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification Requisite Courses: A minimum of 18 credit hours in portion of the program. Anthropology, Classics, Economics, Law, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, or Sociology [prerequisite(s)]; EDUC-4878 (2.5) Practicum Block III - Early Years (3 EDUC-4873 and EDUC-4877 (must be taken concurrently). hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course offers teaching experience in Early Years settings under EDUC-4872 (2.5) Practicum Block I - Early Years (3 hrs the guidance and supervision of practicum host teachers. Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course offers This practicum includes a 5 week block plus 1 day a week teaching experience in Early Years settings under the experience for a total of 9 days and may include a start of guidance and supervision of practicum host teachers. This school experience if appropriate. practicum includes a 5 week block plus 1 day a week Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification experience for a total of 9 days and may include a start of portion of the program. school experience if appropriate. Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification EDUC-4879 (2.5) Practicum Block III - Middle Years (3 portion of the program. hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum | 3 hrs Lab) This course offers teaching experience in Middle Years settings EDUC-4873 (2.5) Practicum Block I - Middle Years (3 under the guidance and supervision of practicum host hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course teachers. This practicum includes a 5 week block plus 1 offers teaching experience in Middle Years settings under day a week experience for a total of 9 days and may the guidance and supervision of practicum host teachers. include a start of school experience if appropriate. This practicum includes a 5 week block plus 1 day a week Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification experience for a total of 9 days and may include a start of portion of the program. school experience if appropriate. Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification EDUC-4880 (2.5) Practicum Block III - Senior Years (3 portion of the program. hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course offers teaching experience in Senior Years settings under EDUC-4874 (2.5) Practicum Block I - Senior Years (3 the guidance and supervision of practicum host teachers. hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course This practicum includes a 5 week block plus 1 day a week experience for a total of 9 days and may include a start of school experience if appropriate. EDUC-4890 (3) Senior Years Curriculum, Instruction Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification and Assessment: General Methods (3 hrs Lecture) portion of the program. This course introduces students to the instructional approaches and assessment techniques relevant to EDUC-4881 (2.5) Practicum Block IV - Early Years (3 teaching at the Senior Years level within the context of the hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course Manitoba Education and Training curriculum framework. offers teaching experience in Early Years settings under Note: Students must be in the Joint UW/RRC Vocational the guidance and supervision of practicum host teachers. Education Teacher Program and employed full-time as This practicum includes a 5 week block plus 1 day a week teachers. They must also have completed the 18 credit experience for a total of 9 days and may include a start of hours Arts or Science Minor. school experience if appropriate. Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification EDUC-4891 (3) Practicum Block - Vocational Education portion of the program. (3 hrs Lecture) This course offers teaching experience in Senior Years settings under the guidance and supervision EDUC-4882 (2.5) Practicum Block IV - Middle Years (3 of practicum host teachers. A minimum of 110 hours of hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course actual teaching must be completed. offers teaching experience in Middle Years settings under Note: Students must be in the Joint UW/RRC Vocational the guidance and supervision of practicum host teachers. Education Teacher Program and employed full-time as This practicum includes a 5 week block plus 1 day a week teachers. experience for a total of 9 days and may include a start of Requisite Courses: EDUC-4890 [prerequisite(s)]. school experience if appropriate. Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification EDUC-5001 (3) Special Topics in Education (3 hrs portion of the program. Lecture) This course examines relevant issues and developments in education. Course content varies from EDUC-4883 (2.5) Practicum Block IV - Senior Years (3 year to year. The topic of each course will be available to hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course students prior to registration. offers teaching experience in Senior Years settings under Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course the guidance and supervision of practicum host teachers. and EDUC-4000. This practicum includes a 5 week block plus 1 day a week experience for a total of 9 days and may include a start of EDUC-5401 (3) Creative Problem Solving (3 hrs school experience if appropriate. Lecture) This course examines misconceptions that often Note: Available only to students admitted to the certification inhibit creativity, distinguishes between creative and critical portion of the program. thinking, identifies problem-solving styles, and explores ways of developing creative environments in schools and EDUC-4884 (3) Practicum Block - Red River College (3 other settings. After being introduced to various models for hrs Lecture) This course offers teaching experience in learning and applying Creative Problem Solving, students Senior Years settings under the guidance and supervision build a personal 'tool box' of pragmatic techniques and of practicum host teachers. This practicum includes a 5 have the opportunity to practice them. week block plus 1 day a week of experience for a total of 9 days and may include a start of school experience if EDUC-5402 (3) Expanding Gifted Education (3 hrs appropriate. Lecture) Gifted education in most school districts has Note: Available only to students in the Joint UW/RRC traditionally been reserved for high-achieving, Business, Industrial, Aboriginal Language or the full-time teacher-pleasing students. This course explores the Vocational Teacher Education Programs who have been expansion of enrichment programming to include hitherto admitted to the certification portion of the program. marginalized students: nonconformists, dropouts, the "tough bright," children and youth from minority groups, and EDUC-4887 (2.5) Supplemental Practicum (3 hrs young people whose talents surface in domains other than Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course offers reading, writing, and arithmetic. Specific topics such as supplemental teaching experience under the guidance and inclusive philosophies and models, segregation versus supervision of practicum host teachers. This practicum integration, real-world problem solving, mentoring, includes a 5 week block and may include 1 day a week self-directed learning, and strategies for developing the experience for a total of 9 days and/or a start of school talents of all students in the regular classroom are experience if appropriate. This practicum is typically taken examined. in conjuction with one or more Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment courses. This course, in conjuction with the EDUC-5403 (3) Meeting the Needs of FAS/FAE Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment course, must be Students (3 hrs Lecture) FASD (Fetal Alcohol Spectrum passed in order to fulfill degree requirements. Disorder) poses challenges for educators. This course Note: Recommendation of the Performance Review considers methods of helping students with this condition Committee and written permission of the Chair of the function as effectively as possible in our schools. After Performance Review Committee or Director of Student examining diagnostic procedures and behavioural Teaching is required. characteristics, the focus moves to classroom strategies Restrictions: Department Permission Required. for helping students to develop life skills, enhance their academic performance, and behave in socially acceptable EDUC-5410 (3) Understanding and Responding to ways. Prerequisites: A Bachelor of Education degree and 2 Learning Disabilities (3 hrs Lecture) Learning Disabilities years of appropriate teaching/work experience OR (LD), often termed invisible or hidden handicaps, can take permission of instructor. many different forms and affect a wide range of students to varying degrees. Issues emphasized in this course EDUC-5404 (3) Reaching ADHD Child (3 hrs Lecture) include definition, types of disability, characteristics, This course focuses on specific issues surrounding self-concept, diagnosis, assessment, and remedial, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), including compensatory, and classroom strategies. definition, incidence, identification, diagnosis, etiology, medication, behaviour management, self-management skills EDUC-5411 (3) Youth Violence in Schools (3 hrs training, and prognosis. The intent is to present a balanced Lecture) Youth violence in schools is a symptom of multiple approach to help educators, parents, and other caregivers and pervasive societal problems. Child abuse, poverty, understand and cope more effectively with hyperactive unemployment, intolerance, alcohol and substance abuse, children in the classroom, home, and community. lack of sufficient support services for youths and families, and exposure to media violence contribute to a culture of EDUC-5405 (3) Reclaiming Troubled Children and violence. The complex nature of youth violence demands Youth (3 hrs Lecture) This course is designed to prepare multifaceted solutions. Reducing violence in schools educators to meet the needs of emotionally fragile and requires early and systematic intervention in classrooms behaviourally disruptive children and youth. Emphasis is on from early childhood to secondary levels. Schools, as Life Space Crisis Intervention (LSCI), an advanced, influential socializing institutions, can play a central role in interactive, therapeutic set of strategies that help teachers prevention and intervention. and other caregivers understand the cycle of conflict and its long-term effects. Students learn to reframe problems EDUC-5412 (3) Gifted Education in the Inner-City (3 from crisis management to crisis teaching, treat hrs Lecture) Specific facets of gifted education are disrespectful students respectfully, de-escalate explored in this course: practical and logistical concerns in aggression and counter-aggression, recover after a crisis, inner city enrichment programming, theoretical models to and turn crisis situations into learning opportunities. guide practice, developing self-awareness in teachers and students, and strategies for the promotion of social capital EDUC-5406 (3) Achieving Real-Life Skills (3 hrs across socioeconomic strata. Emphasis is placed on Lecture) This course is designed to prepare educators to identifying and nurturing the talents of marginalized work more effectively with at-risk youth. Using a variety of students. practical resources, students learn how to help adolescents develop transferable, personal skills in a EDUC-5420 (3) Introduction to School Guidance and variety of domains. Students are introduced to the Counselling (3 hrs Lecture) This course provides a (Steps to Achieving Real-life Skills) Program, a middle years comprehensive overview of the profession of school guidance curriculum for at-risk young people that can be counselling. It provides students with an overview and implemented on an individual, small group, or total general understanding of (1) historical perspectives and classroom basis. Components of the program include current activiites of counsellors, (2) the role and function of self-reflection, relationship-building, anger management, counsellors in a variety of settings, (3) techniques utilized values clarification, drug and alcohol awareness, family by counsellors, (4) multiculutral considerations in dynamics, and listening and communication skills. counselling, (5) organizataion of counselling programs, and (6) legal and ethical guidelines. EDUC-5407 (3) Teaching At-Risk Readers (3 hrs Lecture) Some children have great difficulty acquiring EDUC-5421 (3) Theories and Issues in School language arts skills. Helping these at-risk readers and Counselling (3 hrs Lecture) This course provides an writers achieve greater proficiency is an educational overview of the fundamental theories of school counselling priority. The purpose of this course is to provide includng: the contexts of effective treatment systems, experienced, practicing teachers with the opportunity to person-centered therapy, existential and gestalt therapy, develop a thorough understanding of reading and writing emerging counselling approaches, rational emotive disability within a practical and a theoretical framework. behavioural therapy, action-foucsed therapy, reality and The focus is on mastering the essential components of behavioural therapy. Also considered are values, assessment and remedial strategies. objectives, ethical issues, and the counsellor-student relationship. Throughout, emphaisis is placed on practical EDUC-5408 (3) Teaching At-Risk Students in the couselling strategies for early, middle, and sentior years Inner City School (3 hrs Lecture) This course analyzes levels. Through lectures, readings, class activities, educational responses to the changes faced by children in discussions and video clips, students learn about the Canadian inner-city schools. It examines the historical, fundamental components of the major theories, examine cultural, political, and educational issues surrounding differences and similarities amongst the various academically and socially at-risk students within an approaches, and consider practical issues that school inner-city setting. Identity, race, culture, gender, and human counsellors face. rights are analyzed in relation to culturally appropriate pedagogy and learning styles. EDUC-5422 (3) Early and Middle Years School Counselling (3 hrs Lecture) This course provides a thorough study of counselling as it relates to the early and and a field experience under the joint supervision of a U of middle years' student. Emphasis is placed on the role and W supervisor and a site supervisor. The school counselling function of the school counsellor within the framework of a practicum is designed to assist students in learning the comprehensive developmental guidance program model. function and procedures that accompany the role of a Contemporary issues related to early years and middle school counselor through observation, shadowing, and years students are explored and strategies for assisting reviewing relevant documentation. Students are required to students are examined. complete a minimum of 100 hours in a supervised school setting. Paid working hours in a school division shall not EDUC-5423 (3) Senior Years School Counselling (3 count towards these practicum hours. Please see website hrs Lecture) This course offers a study of school on current application procedures. Field placements are counselling as it relates to students at the senior years limited and placements will only be arranged by the Faculty level. Emphasis is placed on the role and function of the of Education Placement Coordinator. school counsellor within the framework of a Requisite Courses: EDUC-5426 with a minimum grade B comprehensive developmental guidance progam model. and have a B. Ed. degree with at least two years of Contemporary issues related to students at the secondary appropriate teaching/work experience [prerequisite(s)]. level are explored and techniques for counselling are investigated. EDUC-5428 (3) Teaching Newcomers in Canada (3 hrs Lecture) This course provides teachers with an EDUC-5424 (3) Group Guidance and Counselling in awareness of the issues concerning newcomer children School Settings (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines and youth. Teachers who work in multi-ethic cities must the many facets of group dynamics, including learn how to meet the unique needs of newcomer students characteristics, formation and dissolution, stages of and how to work effectively in partnership with families change, and the role of the counsellor in facilitating and the community. The course content examines the state collaboration, cooperataion, and group processes. of the world's children, global citizenship, and newcomer Stategies for facilitating productive and therapeutic children's connections to Canadian classrooms. Providing guidance groups are investigated and the development of psychosocial and emotional support to children and youth leadership skills in group counselling are conducted under who come from diverse backgrounds is one of the supervision. concerns addressed.

EDUC-5425 (3) Counselling Ethics for Canadian EDUC-5429 (3) Education for Peace and Sustainable School Settings (3 hrs Lecture) This course is designed Development (3 hrs Lecture | 27 hrs Seminar/Discussion) to provide a comprehensive overview of legal and ethical Peace and security are fundamental to human dignity and issues as they relate to the profession of school development. The sustainable development of any culture counselling. The objectives are to provide students with an is always endangered by insecurity and conflict. Human overview and general understanding of: (1) standards of tragedies result in overwhelmed health-care systems; the practice for counsellors; (2) professional responsibilities of destruction of homes, schools, and communities; and counsellors in a variety of settings; (3) ethical counselling increased numbers of displaced people and refugees. relationships; (4) ethical consulting and referral in Education for sustainable development plays a key role in counselling, and (5) legal and ethical guidelines in school promoting values for peace. Theories and practical settings. Topics include: informed consent, confidentiality, examples of global education, peace education, record-keeping, boundary issues, training and competence, capacity-building education, and social justice are explored, clinical supervision, working with minors and diversity and literature linking peace education and sustainability is issues. examined.

EDUC-5426 (3) School Counselling Practicum Skills (3 EDUC-5430 (3) Sex and Health Education (3 hrs Lecture hrs Lecture) The practice skills course provides students | Seminar/Discussion) This course provides a with the opportunity to practice counselling skills and comprehensive overview of the potentially sensitive techniques in a supervised lab setting. Students analyze outcomes of the Physical Education and Health Curriculum case studies and use digital recordings to practice and how this pertains to the school counselor. The course counselling, consulting and coordinating skills. Students are provides an overview of the importance of personal and required to conduct 10 individual counselling sessions with social management, health lifestyle practices, and personal a client. Students are expected to demonstrate a safety for all students. In addition, students learn how mind progression of skills that allow gradual progress into direct and body are connected to promote lifelong healthy living. service with students in a school setting (under guidance of a site supervisor). EDUC-5431 (3) Mental Health Promotion in Schools (3 hrs Lecture) Teachers are often the first people who EDUC-5427 (3) Supervised School Counselling suspect mental illness in children. They work with children Program (3 hrs Lecture) The practicum in school living with mental illness on a day-to-day basis. counselling provides an opportunity for students to School-wide mental-health promotion requires an synthesize the theoretical information on individual understanding of a whole-school-based response for counselling and group counselling from their coursework nurturing mental health and resiliency for students and the and apply it in an early, middle, or senior years school school community. Issues related to physical and mental setting. The course provides both a laboratory experience well-being, emotional literacy, and resilience are examined from a developmental perspective (early years, middle knowledge from Exceptional Children 1. It emphasizes an years, and senior years). This course promotes mental inclusive philosophy with consideration of how to meet the health, reduces the stigma associated with mental illness, needs of all students. It focuses on teaming, planning, and and incorporates prevention and early intervention intervention for more significant special needs, including strategies in child and adolescent mental health. cognitive, behavioral, and physical and sensory disabilities and disorders. Students concentrate on strategies that EDUC-5432 (3) Crisis and Trauma in Learning apply directly to their own school situations while learning Environments (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces from the varied experiences of their colleagues. students to approaches and assessment techniques Requisite Courses: EDUC-5442 and EDUC-5001 relevant to effective crisis and trauma work with early-, [prerequisite(s)]. middle-, and senior-years students. Topics include strategies for prevention, intervention, and postvention; EDUC-5444 (3) Engaging Reluctant Learners (3 hrs Western-based trauma discourse and counter-discourse; Lecture | Seminar/Discussion) Designed primarily for gender, colonization, and trauma; suicidal crisis; crisis in-the-trenches teachers of unengaged students, the related to body image, fat prejudice, and eating difficulty; purpose of this course is to help educators move from anti-violence resistance and community building; inflexible, deficit-based, linear approaches so often used "belonging" students; and self-care. with disenfranchised children and youth toward more adaptive, malleable, strength-based programming. The EDUC-5440 (3) Inclusive Education 1 (3 hrs Lecture | emphasis throughout is on using the Seminar/Discussion) This course presents as overview of connect-clarify-restore approach for relationship building educational theories, assessment procedures, delivery as a basis for developing practical alternative programs for systems, and adaptive programming practices designed to troubled and troubling young people. An example of some serve students with special needs. Topics to be addressed made-in-Manitoba initiatives (e.g. The Infinity Program, Lost include foundation definitions, history of inclusive Prizes) shows that one size definitely does not fit all. education, neuro-developmental disorders, etiologies, Requisite Courses: EDUC-5440 and EDUC-5441 learning disability, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, [prerequisite(s)]. enrichment, individualized programming, and classroom strategies to promote student success. The intent is to EDUC-5445 (3) Educational Assessment (3 hrs Lecture make the learning of the principles of inclusion meaningful | Seminar/Discussion) This course reviews current theories by relating them to their application. and applications of both formative and summative assessment practices for students in the inclusive EDUC-5441 (3) Inclusive Education 2 (3 hrs Lecture) classroom. Students explore standardized, normed, and This course provides a more in-depth look at some of the criterion-referenced assessments and the interpretation of topics covered in Inclusive Education 1. Specifically, specific programming for identified students. This course assessment, service delivery, adaptations, and gives students the opportunity to work with strategies and individualized educational and behavioral programming are provides direction in working collaboratively with explored. As well, emphasis is placed on examining administrators, classroom teachers, students, parents and practical strategies for meeting the needs of at-risk children auxiliary professional personnel. and youth, establishing mentorship programs, and Requisite Courses: EDUC-5440 and EDUC-5441 introducing enrichment activities in the regular classroom. [prerequisite(s)]. Models, history, current issues and strategies in providing supports, accommodations, and differentiated curriculum in EDUC-5446 (3) Poverty and Potential (3 hrs Lecture | inclusive environments are explored. Seminar/Discussion) This course introduces students to Requisite Courses: EDUC-5440 [prerequisite(s)]. issues in low-socioeconomics communities. Issues include student transitions, summer learning loss, tiered pedagogy, EDUC-5442 (3) Working With Exceptional Children 1 teacher effect, cultural disconnect, and the impact of family (Lecture with variable meeting hours) This course offers and environmental factors. Frameworks to conceptualize an overview of exceptional children within the school ways that support high-risk students are introduced in setting. The intent is to focus on the extensive field of addition to practical, effective, and research-based special education in Manitoba, to examine programming for strategies for supporting students. The course uses students with special needs, and to consider the causes, hands-on and interactive learning methods. characteristics, and implications of specific Requisite Courses: EDUC-5440 and EDUC-5441 exceptionalities. School issues are examined through [prerequisite(s)]. multiple lenses. Specifically, this course reviews recent scholarship and research into students with EDUC-5447 (3) Sex, Gender and Diversity (3 hrs exceptionalities, drawn from the fields of psychology, Lecture | Seminar/Discussion) This course covers the sociology and education. Additionally, the course focuses spectrum of concerns facing educators in the effort to on constantly changing demographics in the schools and make their schools, classrooms and counseling services the requirement for educators to reflect upon the meaning inclusive of sexual and gender minority students and of global citizenship. others who are affected by a homophobic school climate: lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, Two Spirit, and EDUC-5443 (3) Working With Exceptional Children 2 (3 questioning (LGBTQ) students; students with LGBTQ hrs Lecture | Seminar/Discussion) This course builds on the parents; and others who are targeted or distressed by homophobia. Educators are introduced to a large range of leadership on the collaborative and creative process within print, web, and video resources from scholarly, the school is examined. In addition, the concept of professional, and community sources, including research creativity, as it applies to inclusive teaching and learning in reports, curriculum materials, Gay Straight Alliance the K-12 Canadian classroom, is explored with an materials, and community services. introductory focus on educators' beliefs and knowledge that foster creativity in the classroom. EDUC-5448 (3) Programming for Aboriginal Students (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines Aboriginal Education in Manitoba public schools, with a particular focus on incorporating Aboriginal perspectives in curriculum as mandated by the Manitoba Department of Education. This course begins with an examination of historical experiences and contemporary realities of Aboriginal peoples in Canada and builds upon that understanding in the exploration of practical strategies, programs, and a curriculum appropriate for Aboriginal students.

EDUC-5449 (3) Bullying and School Violence (3 hrs Lecture | Seminar/Discussion) This course is organized around the social-ecological framework that looks at violence as existing within both a personal and an ecological context. The latter term, introduced by Bronfenbrenner, refers to the interaction of persons and social structures existing at several levels: family and primary social networks and intermediate social , such as schools and communities, as well as cultural and community contexts.

EDUC-5450 (3) Risk and Resilience (3 hrs Lecture | Seminar/Discussion) This course examines the characteristics and issues facing vulnerable children and youth, particularly those children called "at risk". This course seeks to emphasize strengths that might compensate for weaknesses, health instead of illness, normality instead of pathology, and hopefulness instead of professional cynicism. This population of youth is particularly threatening to untrained adults who are regularly lured in counter-aggressive or avoidant behavior. It is important that adults who work with these youth with unmet needs are able to provide corrective responses.

EDUC-5451 (3) Teachers and the Law (3 hrs Lecture | Seminar/Discussion) Legislation is examined with a special emphasis on inclusion and the provision of education to students with exceptional leaning needs: (1) federal law; the constitution Act, Charter of Rights and Freedoms, (2) Manitoba Law; the Public Schools Act, Education Administration ACt, Personal Health Information Act, Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, Child and Family Services Act, Human Rights and (3) Manitoba regulations and standards for appropriate educational programming. Manitoba Education and Advanced Learning, interdepartmental protocols, school division policy, and case law are included to provide participants with a current and comprehensive overview of the legal requirements for teachers.

EDUC-5452 (3) Leadership in Inclusive Education (3 hrs Lecture | Seminar/Discussion) This course presents an overview of the theories and practices regarding the development and maintenance of positive school climate and how positive climate can support the inclusive teaching and learning process. The impact of principal and teacher ENGLISH

ENGL-1000 (3) English 1A (3 hrs Lecture) This course students who plan on pursuing further work in Cultural offers an introduction to university-level literary study, Studies. including the reading of creative literature (poetry, fiction, Note: To meet the prerequisite for Upper-Year English, or drama); the theory and practice of literary criticism; the students taking this course should also take ENGL-1000(3). role of historical and cultural factors influencing literary texts; and research skills. Students' writing also receives ENGL-1005 (3) Introduction to English: Reading to significant attention. Because each section is different, Write (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to students should consult the current section descriptions on university-level literary study. Students read a variety of the English Department website. creative literature (poetry, drama, fiction, and creative Note: Students taking this course plus 3 other credit hours non-fiction) from a writerly perspective, to explore and of First-Year (1000-level) English will meet the prerequisite analyse writers' techniques, and to gain a broader for most Upper-Year English courses. No more than 6 understanding of the art and craft of writing. Topics may credit hours of First-Year English may count toward a include poetic structure, dramatic action, narrative major in English. strategies, organizational principles, imagery, setting, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course characterization, and voice. This course may be of special and ENGL-1001 | ENGL-1111 | ENGL-1201_6. interest to students who plan to take Creative Writing courses at the 2000 level. ENGL-1001 (6) English 1 (3 hrs Lecture) This course offers a full introduction to university-level literary study, ENGL-2002 (3) The Creative Process (3 hrs Lecture) including the reading of creative literature (poetry, fiction, This course addresses the complex processes involved in or drama); the theory and practice of literary criticism; the the creation of a literary text from initial inspiration to role of historical and cultural factors influencing literary publication. Students' reading of fiction and poetry is texts; and research skills. Students' writing also receives supplemented with lectures based on documented significant attention. Because each section is different, evidence of the authors' own approaches to the craft of students should consult the current descriptions of writing (including literary essays, interviews, drafts, individual sections available on the English Department letters, and/or occasional live appearances, when website. possible). The course examines the habits, beliefs, Note: This course satisfies the prerequisite for most influences, and intellectual reasoning behind the decisions Upper-Year English courses. No more than 6 credit hours writers make while composing and revising their drafts. We of First-Year English may count toward a major in English. also study the effects of those decisions. The reading list Students may not hold credit for this course and may vary from year to year, while maintaining the goals of ENGL-1000 | ENGL-1003 | ENGL-1111 | ENGL-1201 | gender balance and an emphasis on literature of the ENGL-1202 | ENGL-1203 twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, and ENGL-1000 | ENGL-1111 | ENGL-1201_6. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)].

ENGL-1003 (3) Introduction to English: Topics in ENGL-2003 (6) The Field of Children's Literature (3 Literature (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces hrs Lecture) An introduction to the study of children's students to a variety of creative literature (poetry, drama, literature, this course explores the characteristics of this and/or fiction) through the lens of a particular theme, genre, form of literature, unusually named for its readers rather nationality or period. Each section is a uniquely designed than its producers. We study various strategies for reading introduction to university-level literary study. Because each young people's texts; cultural assumptions about children section is different, students should consult the current and childhood; trends in educational theory and practice; descriptions of individual sections available on the English the economic and political contexts of the production, Department website. consumption, and marketing of texts for young people; and Note: To meet the prerequisite for Upper-Year English, popular culture and media for young people. Texts from a students taking this course should also take ENGL-1000(3). range of genres, such as poetry, picture books, novels, Students may not hold credit for this course and blogs, and films, are considered. ENGL-1001 | ENGL-1111 | ENGL-1201 | ENGL1202 | Note: Students may not hold credit for this course and the ENGL-1203 | LING-1200 former ENGL-2003(3) Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, and LING-1200. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)].

ENGL-1004 (3) Introduction to English: Reading ENGL-2004 (6) A History of Children's Literature (3 Culture (3 hrs Lecture) This course explores the role that hrs Lecture) This course covers the history of children's culture, as a set of practices encompassing a range of literature from Sumerian clay 'readers' to the present day, texts, events, experiences, and social institutions, plays in with a focus on texts published before the mid-twentieth everyday lives. Students interpret cultural forms and century. Topics include the shift of myths, fairy tales, and practices such as written texts, film, television, visual and fables from oral to literary tradition; literary forms performance art, music, and electronic media - and the associated specifically with children, such as nursery institutions that shape them. May be of special interest to rhymes and fantasy; the development of early picture books featuring woodcuts; and increased commodification textual studies. Students explore the histories of literary of picture books that came with the advent of lithography. and textual studies, including literary criticism and critical Students study the nineteenth- and twentieth-century rise theories. They practice the skills of close reading and of children as consumers, and changing notions of textual analysis, reading through the lenses of critical childhood such as the development of the concept of theories, researching, assembling bibliographies, and childhood innocence. analyzing literary and cultural scholarship. Formats include Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, oral presentation, seminar discussion, and formal, written, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. textual analysis. Note: Written permission of the Honours Chair or designate ENGL-2102 (3) Introduction to Creative Writing: is required. This course is compulsory for students Developing a Portfolio (3 hrs Lecture) In this course, entering the Honours program, open to students in the students concentrate on developing a portfolio of creative 4-year BA, and best taken soon after first-year English. writing, including both poetry and short fiction. The course Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, introduces students to strategies for writing in both genres including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) and permission and to the discipline involved in seeing a project through of the Honours Chair or designate [prerequisite(s)]. several drafts to its final stages. Emphasis is placed on the skills involved in self-editing and the professional ENGL-2145 (6) Field of Cultural Studies (3 hrs Lecture) preparation and submission of manuscripts suitable for a This course introduces students to the key concepts that portfolio. underpin the field of cultural studies. The course includes Note: This course is recommended for students who plan readings in theory and criticism and the study of cultural to enroll in further creative writing courses at the forms and practices, such as written texts, film, television, undergraduate level. visual and performance art, music, print and electronic Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, media, as well as the institutions that shape them. Since including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. cultural studies is overwhelmingly interdisciplinary, the course also offers instruction in research methods, ENGL-2113 (6) Picture Books for Children (3 hrs interpretive strategies, and writing. Issues covered may Lecture) This course explores picture book elements, include subcultures, urbanism, nationalism, ethnicity, industries, and modes of reception and interpretation, postcolonialism, globalization, sexuality, and gender. involving strategies such as small-group discussions, Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, presentations, oral and written forms of analysis, and the including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. making of picture books. Of particular interest is our exploration of experimental and innovative picture book ENGL-2146 (6) Screen Studies (3 hrs Lecture) This forms and their contribution to changing concepts of the course offers an in-depth introduction to screen studies, a child, childhood and children's culture. This course may field that encompasses not simply cinema and television, incorporate experiential, community-based and but also considers other forms of moving image production service-learning components. and distribution: from artists' video and the expanded Note: Students may not hold credit for this course and the screens of the art gallery to apps, videogames and other former ENGL-2113 (3) contemporary online audio- visual formats. The course Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, draws on concepts from cultural studies, film theory, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. television studies, media archaeology, and technology studies in order to examine the aesthetic, social, cultural, ENGL-2114 (6) Fairy Tales, Fantasy, and Culture (3 hrs industrial, and political dimensions of the screen image. Lecture) This course examines fairy tales from their origins Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, in myth and folklore to their uses in contemporary culture. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. Students explore the major themes and characteristics of traditional tales, such as those collected by Charles ENGL-2180 (6) Popular Literature and Film (3 hrs Perrault and the Grimms and written by Hans Christian Lecture) This course focuses on popular cultural forms Andersen and Oscar Wilde. They then consider the and genres, and also the very idea of "the popular" itself, in function of fairy tales in contemporary society (in, for literature, film, and other media (tv, web). Depending on the example, the social texts of weddings and proms) and year, the course may introduce students to types of study narratives influenced by fairy tales, particularly popular literature and film from different historical periods narratives directed to audiences of young people. Topics and locations, or it may focus on one particular area, might include second-world fantasy; narrative revisions of nation, theme, or genre (romance; horror, detection; fairy tales; Disney's animations of fairy tales; or fantasy; the western). Students explore central contemporary narrative films using fairy-tale motifs. terminologies, concepts, and theories in the study of Note: Students may not hold credit for this course and the popular literature and film and develop their understandings former ENGL-2114(3). of cultural studies and film studies in relation to literary Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, studies. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-Year English, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. ENGL-2142 (6) Field of Literary and Textual Studies (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course offers an in-depth ENGL-2185 (3) Literary Communities (3 hrs Lecture) introduction to, and practice in the skills of, literary and Literary communities provide significant contexts for the writing and study of literature. This course explores the Restoration, Eighteenth-Century, Romantic, and Victorian literary works, interrelated biographies, and periods to the beginning of the 20th century. The course historical/cultural contexts of communities of writers. This may comprise an overall survey and/or exploration of approach provides an alternative framework of study to significant literary and cultural moments, movements or those focusing on individual authors, literary periods, or topics across the time frame. While British literature is the genres. Possible literary communities for study in different focus, there may also be consideration of transnational and offerings of this course might include the Bloomsbury transcultural issues such as trans- literatures. Group, the Lake Poets, the Inklings, the expatriate American Readings in poetry, drama, fiction, and other prose from in Paris, the Beat Poets, and the Kootenay School of each literary period demonstrate changing views about the Writing. production, reception, and role of literature in society. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)].

ENGL-2202 (3) Literature of the Sixteenth Century (3 ENGL-2311 (6) Shakespeare (3 hrs Lecture) By hrs Lecture) This course is a study of representative examining critically a number of plays, this course traces writers of the sixteenth century with emphasis upon the Shakespeare's career as a dramatist. Students will read major poets, dramatists, and prose writers of the period. representative histories, comedies, tragedies and Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, romances. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and ENGL-2231 | ENGL-4311. ENGL-2203 (3) Literature of the Seventeenth Century Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, (3 hrs Lecture) This course is a study of representative including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. writers (to 1660), with emphasis upon the major poets, dramatists, and prose writers of the period. ENGL-2401 (6) Tragedy and Comedy in Drama (3 hrs Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, Lecture) This course investigates some of the changing including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. concepts of tragedy and comedy in British and other European drama from the Greek playwrights to Ibsen. The ENGL-2220 (3) English Literatures and Cultures major emphasis of the course will be on the study of plays. 700-1660 (3 hrs Lecture) This course addresses the Attention will also be given to classical and modern critical history of literature of England from the 8th century until the theorists. Restoration in 1660. The course may comprise an overall Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, survey and/or an exploration of significant literary and including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. cultural moments, movements or topics across this time frame. Reading in the poetry, drama, and prose of the Old ENGL-2601 (6) The Novel (3 hrs Lecture) This course will and Middle English, Tudor, Elizabethan, and Jacobean vary in emphasis from year to year. It may consist of an periods may be combined with selected theoretical and historical overview of the national or international critical texts from each literary period, to demonstrate development of prose fiction over several centuries, or it changing views about the production, reception, and role may focus on a major fictional mode (such as 'realism,' for of literature in society. example), or it may concentrate on the formal aspects of Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, the genre. The particular focus will be announced prior to including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. registration. For further details, consult the Department of English website. ENGL-2221 (3) Medieval Literature: Chaucer and His Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, Contemporaries (3 hrs Lecture) The later Middle Ages, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. the age of Chaucer, was a period of devastating calamities and highest creative achievements. In this course, students ENGL-2603 (3) Short Fiction (3 hrs Lecture) This course explore both, reflecting on the ways medieval life, with all considers the short story both in its nineteenth century and its contrasts and exuberance, was imaginatively captured - contemporary forms. Short fiction in different and transformed - in romances, fabliaux, fables, lyrics, English-speaking cultures, principally in England, the United and mystery plays. The focus is on Chaucer's Canterbury States, and Canada, will be discussed. Tales and other texts, such as Sir Gawain and the Green Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, Knight and The Second Shepherd's Play. Typically including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. students read these texts against the background of medieval notions about literature, art, music, folklore, ENGL-2604 (3) Poetry and Poetic Form (3 hrs Lecture) religion, and science. This course introduces students to various features and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course forms of poetic discourse. While historical context informs and ENGL-2301 | ENGL-4242 | ENGL-4302. lectures and class discussion, the course focuses on the Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, figural elements of poetry (such as rhythm and rhyme, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. diction and tone, metaphor and allegory). By engaging in thorough discussions and varied writing assignments, ENGL-2230 (3) British Literatures and Cultures students learn to become more appreciative, critical 1660-1901 (3 hrs Lecture) This course addresses the readers of poetry, and in the process expand the history of British literature from 1660 through the possibilities of their own writing. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, cultural, economic, and political relationships that have including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. existed between imperial powers and the areas they colonized. Key critical concepts in postcolonial studies ENGL-2612 (3) Science Fiction (3 hrs Lecture) This such as abrogation, hybridity, and transculturation are course explores the literature identified as 'science fiction' studied through a close reading and historical, political, and in an attempt to define its characteristics and evaluate its cultural contextualization of literary and other cultural strengths and weaknesses. While the texts include some works. Topics may include, but are not limited to, Utopian and satiric fantasies of earlier centuries, the resistance, transformation, diaspora, globalization, and course concentrates on science fiction since H.G. Wells. ecological imperialism. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)].

ENGL-2613 (3) Fantasy Fiction (3 hrs Lecture) This ENGL-2740 (3 or 6) African Literatures and Cultures course analyzes literary works within the fantasy genre in (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to light of contemporary psychoanalytic, feminist, and/or other literatures of the African , in English, and the cultural theories. While the course considers the history of cultures out of which they grew, with and extended focus the genre and the "fantastic" as a literary mode, the course on the literatures of African diasporas. Students explore concentrates on contemporary fantasy fiction from J.R.R. major debates in the history of African literatures, including Tolkien to the present. Particular emphasis is placed on the debates on how to define African literature, the language poetics and politics of "world-building" in fantasy texts, a of African literature, and the relation of African literature to term that refers to the production of a vast and complex imperialism, colonialism, post-colonialism, nationalism, and imaginary world whose historical, geographical, globalization. African literacy and cultural works are ontological, and cultural realities substantially differ from examined for their thematic concerns and aesthetics. The the world(s) inhabited by fantasy's various readerships. course may focus on specific national/regional literatures, Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-Year English, or offer a survey of specific literary and cultural including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. movements/traditions of Africa. Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial ENGL-2703 (3) Play Analysis (3 hrs Lecture) This is a basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who practical course for actors, directors, and designers in the successfully complete this course receive credit as analysis of plays in rehearsal and pre-rehearsal situations. indicated. A variety of interpretive strategies are developed in Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-Year English, approaching the problems of form, character, and theme in including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. plays of different styles and periods. The emphasis is on Stanislavsky-derived techniques. ENGL-2750 (3) Laughter, Love, and Death: Note: This course is strongly recommended for all theatre Introduction to Classical Literature I (3 hrs Lecture) students in the Honours or the General program. Homer's Odyssey is a story of greetings and farewells, Cross-listed: THFM-2703(3). homecomings and departures, laughter and tears. Starting Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course from a study of the Odyssey, this course traces emotions, and THFM-2703. gender relations, and human mortality across an Requisite Courses: THFM-1001 or THFM-1002 or 6 credit assortment of works from the Ancient Mediterranean hours in first-year English, including ENGL-1001(6) or world. Students read texts in English translation from ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. Archaic Greece to the Roman Empire, in verse and prose, across the genres of epic poetry, history, tragedy and ENGL-2710 (3) Literature in Translation (3 hrs Lecture) comedy, oratory and more. This course focuses on modern non-English literary texts in Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial English translation. Readings may be organized around a basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who genre such as the novel; a critical approach such as successfully complete this course receive credit as post-colonialism or cultural studies; a period such as indicated. Romanticism; or specific literary traditions in languages Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course such as French, German, Spanish and Italian. Students and CLAS-2750. should consult the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures for a description of the current offering. This ENGL-2751 (3) War, History, and Memory: course may be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Introduction to Classical Literature II (3 hrs Lecture) Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Homer's Iliad is a doom-filled beginning for the literature of and MOD-2710. war, a literary monument to fate, fear, memory, and loss. Requisite Courses: SPAN-2180(3) or FREN-2180(3) or Starting from a study of the Iliad , this course traces GERM-2209(3) or 6 credit hours of First-Year English conflict, politics, and remembrance across an assortment including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1003(3) [prerequisite(s)]. of works from the Ancient Mediterranean world. Students read texts in English translation from Archaic Greece to the ENGL-2722 (3 or 6) Postcolonial Literatures and Roman Empire, in verse and prose, across the genres of Cultures (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students epic poetry, history, tragedy, and comedy, oratory, and to postcolonial literatures and cultures. "Postcolonialism" is more. a critical term used to describe the various social, linguistic, Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course successfully complete this course receive credit as and ANTH-2402 | LING-2002. indicated. ENGL-2806 (3) Semantics: Philosophical Foundations ENGL-2802 (3) Syntax (3 hrs Lecture) Syntax is the study (3 hrs Lecture) Semantics is the branch of linguistics of the arrangement of words into groups, clauses and concerned with how we construct meaning using sentences. In this course students use morphological, language. It is arguably the most diverse branch, situated syntactic, semantic, and lexical criteria to define traditional between the highly formalizable "inner layers" of parts of speech, in order to understand how these phonology, morphology and syntax and the fuzzier "outer combine to form a variety of clauses and sentences types. layer" of pragmatics. Key ideas covered in the course Form, function, class and structure are introduced from the include: the difference between sense and reference, the perspective of systemic functional and communication application of basic rules in formal logic, prototype theory, linguistics. These descriptive frameworks are contrasted componential analysis, and cognitive semantics; how to with transformational generative models and others. identify thematic roles in sentences; the functions of noun Cross-listed: ANTH-2403(3) and LING-2003(3). classifiers, deictics, and adpositions in different languages; Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and, the nature of metaphors, metonyms and image and ANTH-2403 | LING-2003. schemas. Cross-listed: ANTH-2405(3) and LING-2004(3). ENGL-2803 (3) Phonetics and Phonology (3 hrs Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Lecture) This course describes all English consonant and and ANTH-2405 | LING-2004 | PHIL-2374. vowel sounds in terms of place and manner of articulation. It also identifies how sounds are organized into syllables ENGL-2922 (3) Topics in Women Writers (3 hrs and words by studying the concepts of phonemes, Lecture) This course focuses on a topic in the field of allophones and phonological rules. Although the course women writers which varies from year to year. The topic focuses on English phonology, it also draws heavily on area may be defined by genre; historical period; literary and other languages to illustrate the key concepts. Students will cultural movement; or local, national, or global communities. be required to master characters and diacritics from the Students should consult the English Department Handbook International Phonetic Alphabet. for information about specific iterations of the course. This Cross-listed: ANTH-2401(3) and LING-2001(3). course may be repeated once when the topic varies. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and ANTH-2401 | LING-2001. and WGS-2922. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, ENGL-2804 (3) Language and Culture (3 hrs Lecture) including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. The course examines how language encodes cultural dialects from different regions and time periods within ENGL-2933 (6) Survey of Women Writers (3 hrs various social and cultural contexts. Selected British, Lecture) This course offers a select survey of women American, and Canadian dialects are studied from specific writers, theorizing about women, and feminist theory from historical and contemporary periods. Social factors such the Middles Ages to the present. Lectures and discussion as age, gender, ethnicity, class, socio-economic, offer historical, aesthetic, social, theoretical, and literary educational, political, and religious factors are considered contexts in which to consider women as subjects, writers, from a sociolinguistic perspective. The course also and readers and to consider the material conditions of examines language and dialects related to various women at different points in history and in different cultural registers, such as student-teacher classroom exchange, contexts. The course also consider women in relation to job interviews, work talk, and casual conversation. To various literary, political, and cultural movements, which examine the differences in these registers, functional and may include, but not necessarily limited to, Neoclassicism, systemic perspectives of communication linguistics are Romanticism, Victorianism, Feminism, Decadence, introduced. Modernism, Postmodernism, Globalization and Cross-listed: ANTH-2406(3) and LING-2101(3). Postcolonialism. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and ANTH-2406 | LING-2101. and ENGL-2902 | ENGL-2912 | WGS-2933. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-Year English, ENGL-2805 (3) Morphology (3 hrs Lecture) This course including ENGL-1001 or ENGL-1000 [prerequisite(s)]. introduces students to the concepts and methods of word analysis. Students investigate the nature of morphemes ENGL-2981 (3) A History of Writing, Reading, and the (smallest units of meaning), their different types and Book (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to functions, and the different ways they are organized into the history of the book, the material basis of Western words. The course explores the process of word literate/literary culture, by exploring writing and reading formation through derivation and compounding as well as technologies from the papyrus scroll to the digital screen. It grammatical uses of inflectional morphemes. Based largely briefly traces the history of producing, reading, preserving, in English, both lectures and exercises also draw on and controlling material texts and covers such topics as various other languages to highlight key morphological writing as handwork, ideologies of reading, the manuscript features and constructs. codex, the invention of printing, the development of Cross-listed: ANTH-2405(3) and LING-2002(3). mise-en-page, notions of authorship, the reading public, the economics of book trade, and the digital revolution. The portfolio of their own fiction to the Department of English course offers a historical and material perspective on the well before registration. past and present manifestations of literate/literary culture. Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. Requisite Courses: 6 credits of First-year English, Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) and permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. ENGL-3101 (6) Creative Writing Comprehensive (3 hrs Lecture) This course focuses on the fundamentals of ENGL-3114 (3) Writing Poems (3 hrs Lecture) This writing poetry and short fiction. Students engage in course is designed for students who wish to concentrate workshops and discussion about the art and craft of on the craft of writing poetry. Topics include metre, rhythm, writing and the writing process. The readings and lineation, imagery and various elements of poetic language. assignments are designed to develop skills in creating and Note: Interested students should submit a five-page editing both fiction and poetry. portfolio of their own poetry to the Department of English Note: Interested students should submit a ten-page well before registration. portfolio of their writing, including at least FOUR pages of Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. prose and TWO of poetry, to the English Department well Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, before registration. Enrolment is limited. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) and permission Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-Year English, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3), and ENGL-3115 (3) Writing for Children (3 hrs Lecture) This ENGL-2102(3) and written permission of the instructor course allows students to explore and practice various [prerequisite(s)]. forms of writing for children. Students read both successful classics and unconventional works that may ENGL-3102 (1) Creative Writing Field Research question strict definitions of "children's" literature. In any (Variable Meeting Hours) This course gives students the given offering of the course, the instructor might focus on opportunity to work in groups with a professional writer for picture books, fiction for young adults, or other forms. a short period and to engage in off-campus research as Please consult the English Department website for a inspiration for creative writing projects. Each section takes current course description. a unique approach to specific aspects of writing; some Note: Interested students should submit a five-page sections may be offered entirely off campus. portfolio of their own writing (any genre) to the Department Note: Interested students should submit a portfolio (five of English well before registration. pages of their own writing in any genre) to the English Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. Department well before registration. Please note that this Requisite Courses: ENGL-2102 [prerequisite(s)]. course is one credit hour only and is graded on a Pass/Fail basis. This course may be repeated for credit when the ENGL-3116 (3) Topics in Creative Writing (3 hrs topic varies. Lecture) This course explores a particular approach to Restrictions: Department Permission Required. creative writing or a specialized topic in the field of creative Requisite Courses: 12 credit hours in English and writing. The content varies from year to year. The course permission of the Department Chair [prerequisite(s)]. may focus on a specific genre (e.g., memoir, mystery, or science fiction); an issue of identity (e.g., region, sexuality, ENGL-3112 (6) Advanced Creative Writing (3 hrs or ethnicity); or other topic (e.g., experimental writing; Lecture) This course provides further training in the writing editing; chapbook publishing; or traditions in story-telling). of fiction or poetry for students who have successfully Please consult the English Department website for a completed ENGL-3101(6) and who submit an appropriate detailed course description in any given year. This course portfolio. Student writing is discussed in workshops and may be repeated once when the topic varies. individual conferences, and a major project must be Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. completed. Enrolment is limited. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, Note: Interested students should submit a portfolio of their including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) and permission writing to the Assistant, Department of English, by May 15. of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Each portfolio must consist of TEN pages of writing, including at least FOUR pages of prose. Students missing ENGL-3117 (3) Poetry for Young People (3 hrs Lecture) the deadline should consult with the instructor as soon as This course explores poetry and poetic forms written for possible. young people. In any given offering of the course, the Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. poetry studied might have an historical dimension, or the Requisite Courses: ENGL-3101 and permission of the course may focus exclusively on contemporary poetry or instructor [prerequisite(s)]. poetic forms from one or more regions. Attention is paid to the role that ideological figurations of the child, childhood, ENGL-3113 (3) Writing Short Fiction (3 hrs Lecture) This or adolescence play in poetic constructions of youth and course is designed for students who wish to concentrate young readers. Poetic forms studied may include, but are on the craft of writing fiction, with a focus on the short not limited to, nursery rhymes, nonsense verse, slam story. Topics include characterization, dialogue, narrative poetry, hip-hop, rap, dub poetry, novels in verse, plays in structure and various elements of style. verse, and poetry written by young people. Note: Interested students should submit a five-page Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. work. Special Studies courses are offered only in exceptional circumstances, and/or only when students can ENGL-3118 (3) Topics in Fiction for Young People (3 satisfy program requirements in no other way, and only hrs Lecture) This course examines varieties of narratives where the course proposal follows departmental guidelines produced for children and adolescents from the end of the and receives approval from the Departmental Curriculum 19th century to the present. Students explore narrative Committee and the Department Chair. structures and strategies, as well as theories of children's Restrictions: Department Permission Required. literature. Topics may include regional literature; global fiction in English for young people; canonical texts and ENGL-3151 (6) Critical Theory: An Introduction (3 hrs texts that resist mainstream cultures; writing by young Lecture) This course examines current theoretical debates people; the forms, production, and reception of narrative; in the fields of literary and cultural studies. Students read a girls' books and boys' books; fantasy; and coming-of-age range of selected texts in critical theory, from among narratives. This course may be repeated once when the Marxism, semiotics, psychoanalysis, reader response, topic varies. post-structuralism, deconstruction, feminism, queer theory, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course critical race theory, postmodernism, and post colonialism. and ENGL-2115. Although we may read literary and/or other cultural texts, Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, the focus is on theory. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) and 3 credit Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course hours of study in Young People's Texts and Cultures at the and ENGL-2151. 2000 level [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. ENGL-3119 (3) Canadian Children's Literatures and Cultures (3 hrs Lecture) This course investigates ENGL-3160 (3) Topics in Young People's Cultural and children's texts in Canada in order to examine various Literary Texts (3 hrs Lecture) This course explores a ideologies of Canadian childhood(s). Topics considered group of literary, media, or cultural texts for, by and/or may include multiculturalism and its discontents; historical about young people that is different in focus from courses texts and the production of history; nationhood and border in children's literature offered at the 2000 level. Possible anxieties; the performance of gender and sexual identities; topics include girls' books, uses of myth, Indigenous and territory, the land, and dis/possession. children's texts, teen media texts, gaming and narrative Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course theory, and narratives by and about child soldiers. Consult and ENGL-2116. the English Department website for a description of the Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, course being offered in any given semester. This course including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) and 3 credit may be repeated once when the topic varies. hours in Young People's Texts and Cultures at the 2000 Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First Year English, level [prerequisite(s)]. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)].

ENGL-3120 (6) Practicum in Literature, Literacy and ENGL-3169 (3) Films for Young People (3 hrs Lecture | Language (3 hrs Lecture) Students arrange volunteer 3 hrs Lab) This course explores narrative films for young work placements with organizations that support literature, people, arguably the principal form through which literacy, and language development in Manitoba. First, contemporary North American young people encounter students identify areas of interest, explore the theory and narrative. As well as looking at the history of the implications of the proposed work, and design the terms of Hollywood system as this pertains to films for children and their commitment and accountability within their chosen adolescents, we also look at the films for and about young settings. Then they work at the placement and participate in people produced by international and independent the seminar so that they may reflect upon and represent filmmakers. Some attention is paid to developing strategies their practicum work. and a vocabulary for reading film. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in English at the 2000 Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, level or above [prerequisite(s)]. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) and 3 credit hours of study in Young People's Texts and Cultures at the ENGL-3122 (3) Special Studies I (3 hrs Lecture) 2000 level [prerequisite(s)]. Students interested in advanced study in a specific area should consult the professor with whom they propose to ENGL-3180 (3 or 6) Making Peace and War in work. Special Studies courses are offered only in Literature and Culture (3 hrs Lecture) This course exceptional circumstances, and/or only when students can examines traditional and non-traditional literary and cultural satisfy program requirements in no other way, and only representations of peace and conflict. It raises practical where the course proposal follows departmental guidelines and theoretical questions about representations of and receives approval from the Departmental Curriculum violence, death, justice, and hope in relation to gender, Committee and the Department Chair. ethnicity, nation, culture, creative identities, colonialism, Restrictions: Department Permission Required. imperialism, memory, and mythology. Throughout, the course explores the potential of the university as a site of ENGL-3131 (6) Special Studies II (3 hrs Lecture) peace making. Students interested in advanced study in a specific area Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, should consult the professor with whom they propose to including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. include Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot, Charles Dickens, ENGL-3190 (6) Literature and Film (3 hrs Lecture) This Tennyson, the Brownings, Oscar Wilde, and Thomas course examines how novels, plays, short stories and Hardy. historical narratives are associated with and/or adapted to Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, screenplays and films. Attention is given to narrative theory including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. and practices, elements and principles of story design, screenplay as literary genre, the art of adaptation, and ENGL-3222 (6) Modernism (3 hrs Lecture) This course interdisciplinary creative processes. Works to be studied studies the literature and culture of the modernist period, range from British and American classics, such as The from approximately 1910 to 1945, and examines the Scarlet Letter and Portrait of a Lady, to recent Canadian characteristics and contexts of the period itself. Students and international feature films, such as The English Patient study fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction from a variety and A History of Violence. of national contexts and international movements. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, Depending on the instructor, the course may focus on such including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. modernist movements as imagism, Futurism, Dadaism, and surrealism, and on the political, economic, social, and ENGL-3209 (3 or 6) Eighteenth-Century Studies philosophical contexts of . This course includes a Culture (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines Restoration cultural studies approach to investigate the relationships and eighteenth-century British literature, with a consistent between literature and other cultural forms, such as attempt to contextualize it within contemporary political, painting, film, architecture, and music. economic, social, and intellectual life. Relevant contexts Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, include the appearance and development of party-system including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. politics: the growth of commercial capitalism, urbanization, and sociability; ongoing debates over the status of women, ENGL-3225 (6) Contemporary British Literature and religious minorities, colonial rule, and the institution of Culture (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines the slavery; and the impact on literary culture of an emergent transformations within British literature and culture that mass reading public. In response to continuing challenges have occurred in the contemporary period, with a special to the established canon of Restoration and consideration of how the idea of 'culture' itself has become eighteenth-century literature, the course may include integral to the articulation of a post-imperial national identity. works once considered representative, as well as works Students examine literature alongside film, television, music, by lesser known writers. and the visual arts in order to comprehend the changes in Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, British culture and society that have come with the including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. transformation of Britain into a multicultural nation and with its efforts to find its geopolitical place in an era of ENGL-3210 (6) Romantic Literature and Culture (3 hrs globalization. Lecture) This course introduces students to English Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, literature and culture of the Romantic period (1789-1832). including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; The course not only considers Romanticism as a complex ENGL-2142 (must be taken previously or at the same time response to a shared set of literary and philosophical as this course). anxieties, but also focuses on the interplay between the socio-political concerns of the Romantic period and the ENGL-3401 (6) Modern Drama (3 hrs Lecture) This literature that the period produced. Touching on topics as course consists of a critical study of plays representative contentious as the French Revolution, women's rights, and of the main trends in twentieth century theatre. Playwrights the slave trade, the course examines the ways in which such as Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Pirandello and Brecht issues of nationality, race, and gender shaped the work of will be studied. many of the most influential men and women writers of the Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, day. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and ENGL-2211. ENGL-3708 (3 or 6) Canadian Literature and Culture Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. Canadian literature and culture from a variety of historical, regional, generic, and artistic contexts. Emphasis is placed ENGL-3211 (6) Victorian and Edwardian Literature (3 on different moments and movements in Canadian literary hrs Lecture) This course examines the formations and and cultural history, such as: early missionary, exploration, transformations in British culture between the 1830s and and travel writing; settler colonial literature; modernism and World War I through an exploration of literary texts, cultural postmodernism; postcolonial and diasporic writing; artifacts, and social documents. In any year, the course is Indigenous literatures; and popular literatures. Important organized around several specific themes, such as Empire, Canadian genres, such as Confederation poetry, the short the domestic ideal, detection and surveillance, the cult of story cycle, long poem, historical novel, language poetry, the child, or aestheticism; and several specific immigrant writing, and speculative fiction, may also be methodologies, such as cultural studies, gender and highlighted. Attention is paid to the roles of race, ethnicity, sexuality studies, narrative theory, or Marxist theory. class, gender, sexualities, nationalism, regionalism, settler Although this course draws on a wide range of colonialism, and globalization. non-canonical material, writers whose works we consider Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. The course emphasizes Indigenous values, knowledge, and theories. In a given year, students may focus on a ENGL-3709 (3 or 6) Topics in Canadian Literature and specific artist, nation, genre, or period. Students should Culture (3 hrs Lecture) This course focuses on a topic in consult the English Department Handbook for a description Canadian Literature and Culture which varies from year to of the course offered in a given year. This course may be year. Possible topics are: memoirs and life writing; the repeated once for credit when the topic varies. gothic; travel writing; historical fiction; Canadian comics; Cross-listed IS-3723. Black Canadian writing; trauma and memory; Mennonite Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Writing; representations of disability; dystopias; and and IS-3723. bestsellers and prize winners. Students should consult the Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, English Department website for more specific information including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. about the iterations of this course. This course may be repeated once when the topic varies. ENGL-3724 (3 or 6) Topics in Race and Ethnicity (3 hrs Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Lecture) This course focuses on a specific topic related to and ENGL-3713. critical race and ethnic studies. Possible topics include Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First Year English, narratives related to immigration, multiracialism, gender and including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. sexuality, transnationalism, or interethnic and comparative race studies: (auto) ethnographic texts; narratives of ENGL-3717 (3 or 6) Indigenous Literatures and cultural nationalism; the Harem renaissance; Asian/America Cultures (3 hrs Lecture) This course explores literary and studies; race and film. Students should consult the other cultural texts by a range of Native Canadian and department website for information about the specific topic American authors, with a focus on texts produced during offered in a given term. This course may be repeated once and after the 1960s. The course studies texts that address when the topic varies. issues about individual, communal, and cultural loss and Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First Year English, renewal through new ways of thinking, seeing, and including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. imagining. In our explorations, we employ various reading strategies and engage contemporary critical/theoretical ENGL-3725 (3 or 6) Topics in Cultural Studies (3 hrs perspectives. Each version of the course may have a Lecture) This course examines specific topics, different emphasis. methodologies, and/or theoretical concerns in cultural Cross-listed: IS-3717(3). studies and cultural theory. Possible topics include critical Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course approaches to popular culture; fandom, audiences, and and IS-3717. reception; mass culture and the mass media; intersections Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, of race, class, gender, and sexuality in cultural studies; including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. writing methods and practices at the Birmingham Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies (CCCS); Stuart Hall; cultural ENGL-3719 (3) Literature of Manitoba (3 hrs Lecture) studies and activism; popular cinema and cultural studies. This course explores the literary culture of the Canadian Students should consult the department website for Prairies through texts written by Manitoba authors. Themes information about the specific topic offered in a given term. examined may include the pioneer experience, establishing This course may be repeated once when the topic varies. new communities in unfamiliar territory while recalling a Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial cultural history from another place; the experience of basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who colonized Aboriginal peoples; different perceptions of successfully complete this course receive credit as nature and the land; small town and big city life; and the indicated. search for intellectual, social, and religious freedom amidst Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First Year English, perceived parochialism. Authors studied may include including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. , Martha Ostenso, Tomson Highway, Frederick Philip Grove, Gabrielle Roy, Kristjana Gunnars, ENGL-3730 (3 or 6) American Literature (3 hrs Lecture) Patrick Friesen, Miriam Toews, Beatrice Culleton Mosionier, This course offers an introduction to a range of American , David Arnason, Robert Kroetsch, and W.D. texts, including fiction, prose, poetry, and drama, Texts are Valgardson. studied in their cultural, historical, and regional contexts. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Emphasis is placed on different moments and movements in and ENGL-3714. American literary and cultural history, such as the Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First Year English, American Gothic, Transcendentalism, Regionalism, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. Modernism, The Harlem Renaissance, the Beatnik Generation, and Postmodernism. Specific American genres, ENGL-3723 (3 or 6) Topics in Indigenous Texts and like the Hardboiled or the Western may also be highlighted. Cultures (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines Attention is paid to the roles of race, ethnicity, class, Indigenous literary and other cultural productions, such as gender, sexualities, nationalism, settler colonialism, and music, film, and art. In an era when racism and globalization. eno-colonialism continue to challenge First People's Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course sovereignty, Indigenous artists, along with scholars, and ENGL-3720 | ENGL-3721. activists, and community members are contributing to Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-Year English, Indigenous peoples' health, healing, and self-determination. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. and media discourse. ENGL-3754 (3) Ancient Epic in Translation (3 hrs Cross-listed: LING-3101(3), ANTH-3407(3). Lecture) By reading works of ancient epic in translation by Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course important ancient authors (e.g., Homer, Apollonius, Vergil, and ANTH-3407 | LING-3101. Ovid, Lucan, Statius), students are introduced to the Requisite Courses: LING-2101 or ANTH-2406 or literary characteristics of the genre and their strategic ENGL-2804 [prerequisite(s)]. deployment. The literary and historical contexts of specific epics are discussed in order to make their cultural ENGL-3812 (3 or 6) History of the English Language (3 significance clear. hrs Lecture) This course offers a concise survey of the Cross-listed: CLAS-3754(3). English language as a medium of literature from Old to Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Modern English. It introduces students to the metalanguage and CLAS-3754. used to describe linguistic change and emphasizes the connection between such change and literary expression. ENGL-3755 (3) Ancient Drama in Translation (3 hrs Students read excerpts from Beowulf, Chaucer, and Lecture) Students read the works of ancient tragic poets Shakespeare, among others, to discover the profound (e.g., Aeschylus, Sophocies, Euripides, Seneca) and of shifts that occurred in the structure and use of English ancient comic poets (e.g., Aristophanes, Menander, over the last and half. Students also explore the Plautus, Terence) in translation. Literary conventions of consequences of those shifts for literary practices over both ancient tragedy and comedy are addressed. The the centuries. The course challenges students to enhance plays are situated within their broader historical and their awareness of the time-bound character of both festival contexts to make clear their cultural significance. language and literature. Cross-listed: CLAS-3755(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and ENGL-2811. and CLAS-3755. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) or permission of ENGL-3756 (3) Topics in Ancient Literature (3 hrs the Department Chair [prerequisite(s)]. Lecture) This course deals with the interpretation and appreciation of literary genres, authors, or works from the ENGL-3814 (3) Topics in the Englishes of the Past (3 canon of Greek and Latin literature. The focus of study hrs Lecture) This course offers an in-depth look at the varies from year to year. Examples include love poetry, English language at a single period in its fifteen hundred satire, the ancient novel, and letter-writing as a literary year old history. The specific focus of the course changes form. Information concerning these course offerings is from year to year in response to the interests of the provided by the department. students and the needs of the English Department. Thus, Cross-listed: CLAS-3756(3). depending on the demand, the course may focus on Middle Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course English, on English of the Elizabethan period, or on the and CLAS-3756. eighteenth century. Alternatively, the course may focus on the language of a particular writer, such as, for example, ENGL-3800 (3) Textual Analysis (3 hrs Lecture) This Chaucer, Shakespeare, or Joyce. Students study the course examines the principles and methods of textual structure, usage, and creative engagement with language analysis as a language-centered approach to literary and at a given period or in the repertoire of a particular writer. non-literary discourse. Various texts are analyzed using Wherever appropriate, some attention may also be given to six descriptive linguistic tools, namely sounding regional dialects and social registers. The course (phonology), seeing (graphology), wording (lexis), challenges students to enhance their awareness of the arranging (syntax), meaning (semology and semantics), time-bound character of both language and literature. and ornamenting (rhetoric). Textual analysis considers the Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial effect of writers' choices to create different reader basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who responses to literary elements such as developing successfully complete this course receive credit as characters, building suspense, creating humour, and indicated. achieving particular rhetorical purposes. Requisite Courses: English I or ENGL-3812 or permission Cross-listed: ANTH-3405(6) and LING-3001(6). of the Department [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and ANTH-3405 | LING-3001. ENGL-3901 (6) Queer Literature, Culture, and Theory Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-Year English (3 hrs Lecture) This course offers a survey of lesbian, or permission of the Department Chair [prerequisite(s)]. gay, transgender, and queer literary and cultural production. In addition to examining novels, poems, films, ENGL-3802 (3) Registers of Our Daily Life (3 hrs and plays, students read critical essays, queer theory, and Lecture) Students are introduced to issues involved in the case studies from the field of sexology. Some attention is research being done by linguists, text analysts, discourse paid to the historical development of categories such as analysts, and sociolinguists concerning various types of "gay", "lesbian," and "transgender"; the history of gay institutional discourse. They are required to carry out a liberation and AIDS activism, and the relationship between research project on a register of their choice. Experimental the gay liberation movement and other social justice investigation and contemporary research focus on medical, movements. scientific, legal, business, financial, political, classroom, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and WGS-3601. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. ENGL-4103 (3) Research Apprenticeship (3 hrs ENGL-3905 (3) Topics in Biblical Texts and Cultural Seminar/Discussion) In this apprenticeship, students reflect Studies (3 hrs Lecture) This course offers a critical on how research issues influence their study of language introduction to biblical texts and their relationships to, and and literature. Students meet with instructors who have influences on, literary and cultural production. Students similar research interests in one-to-one tutorials and read biblical texts in relation to a historical and generic seminars to discuss common research questions and range of literary and cultural texts that draw on, explore, practices. They may consider a range of issues including challenge, parody, and satirize biblical texts, themes, for example, the analysis of how key periodicals, critical images, characters, and symbols. Students examine biblical studies, and professional associations define a particular texts as they are negotiated in contemporary secular research topic. This course supports the development of society in relation to various topics such as histories of research skills for work in the field of English studies. colonization, "English studies," and transcultural Students may also be guided in the preparation of challenges. This course may be repeated once when the manuscripts for publication. topic varies. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or ENGL-3920 (3) Representations of Disability in ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same Literary and Cultural Texts (3 hrs Lecture) This course time as this course). examines social, cultural, historical, political, and aesthetic ideas about disability as they are expressed in literary and ENGL-4104 (3) Tutorial Apprenticeship in English (3 cultural texts. Students use the skills of textual and hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course provides theoretical analysis to examine a range of texts that may opportunities for experiencing and exploring learning and include novels, performance texts, poetry, short stories, teaching strategies in university language and literature children's and young people's texts, feature films, courses. Students assist in a designated lecture/seminar documentary films, visual art, graphic narratives, blogs, course in English in a variety of ways. They may be asked YouTube videos, and other texts generated by social to lead tutorial groups, to facilitate seminars, to help in the media. Students consider representations of disability in preparation of course materials, to offer support to relation to a wide range of topics including aging, creative students, and to edit and evaluate student's written work. identity, colonialism, culture, ethics, ethnicity, family, Students meet regularly with the supervising professor in gender, human rights, imperialism, memory, mythology, order to discuss and evaluate teaching strategies and nation, and sexuality. materials. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-Year English, Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not including ENGL-1001(6) ro ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. hold credit for this course and ENGL-4001. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, ENGL-3951 (3) Topics in Feminist Theory (3 hrs including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; Lecture) This course focuses on a topic in feminist theory ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or that varies from year to year. Possible topics include ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same women and language; women and nature; feminism and time as this course). Marxism; female communities; women and diaspora; and feminism and popular culture. Students should consult the ENGL-4110 (6) Critical Theory (3 hrs English Department website for information about specific Seminar/Discussion) This course explores current trends in iterations of the course. This course may be repeated once critical, cultural, and literary theory. Possible areas of when the topic varies. inquiry include Marxism, semiotics, psychoanalysis, reader Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course response, poststructuralism, deconstruction, feminism, and WGS-3951. queer theory, critical race theory, postmodernism, and Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, postcolonialism. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, ENGL-3980 (3 or 6) Topics in Comics and Graphic including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; Narratives (3 hrs Lecture) This course focuses on a ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or particular topic in the study of comics and graphic ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same narratives. Possible topics are: autobiographical comic time as this course). books; feminist comics; superhero comics; comics and film; comics and/as history; comics culture(s); individual ENGL-4122 (3) Special Studies I (3 hrs creators. Course readings may include some non-comics Seminar/Discussion) Students interested in advanced texts and theoretical material. Students should consult the study in a specific area should consult the professor with department website for information about the specific topic whom they propose to work. Special Studies courses are offered in a given term. This course may be repeated once offered only in exceptional circumstances, and/or only when the topic varies. when students can satisfy program requirements in no other way, and only where the course proposal follows including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; departmental guidelines and receives approval from the ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or Departmental Curriculum Committee and the Department ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same Chair. time as this course). Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, ENGL-4242 (3 or 6) Medieval Literature and Culture (3 including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course discusses ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or representative works in medieval literature and culture. ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same Topics vary from year to year and often include medieval time as this course). romance and visionary allegory. The texts studied may include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Malory's Morte ENGL-4131 (6) Special Studies II (3 hrs d'Arthur, Pearl, and Piers Plowman and the work of Seminar/Discussion) Students interested in advanced Chaucer. Some continental predecessors in translation study in a specific area should consult the professor with (Romance of the Rose and Chretien's romances), lays and whom they propose to work. Special Studies courses are metrical romances, lyrics, mystery plays and works by offered only in exceptional circumstances, and/or only known female authors, as well as texts from medieval when students can satisfy program requirements in no revivals in later centuries, may also receive attention. other way, and only where the course proposal follows Students may repeat this course once when the topic departmental guidelines and receives approval from the varies. Departmental Curriculum Committee and the Department Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not Chair. hold credit for this course and ENGL-2221 | ENGL-2301 | Restrictions: Honours Form Required. ENGL-4302. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same time as this course). time as this course).

ENGL-4160 (3 or 6) Young People's Texts and ENGL-4251 (3 or 6) Early Modern Literature and Cultures (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course offers a Culture (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course focuses focused study of an area of young people's texts and on literature produced by English writers between 1485 cultures, such as narrative fiction and film, digital or and 1660. Each iteration of the course focuses on a material culture. It may be organized as an exploration of particular topic in the field of early modern literature and texts and cultures of a particular period, consider a figure, culture. Topic areas vary from year to year, but may genre, or theme across a range of historical periods and/or include: specific authors, or groups of authors (e.g. contemporary moments. Possible topics include Victorian Shakespeare, Philip Sidney, the Cavalier Poets); particular children's literature, the tween and the teen, revisionist literary forms (e.g. history plays, political pamphlets, epic fairy tales, and transnational literacy. This course may be poetry); or religious, scientific, political, social, and/or repeated for credit once when the topic varies. philosophical contexts (e.g. the Reformation, natural Restrictions: Honours Form Required. philosophy, formulations of gender and/or sexuality). This Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-Year English, course may be repeated for credit when the topic varies. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; Restrictions: Honours Form Required. ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; time as this course). ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same ENGL-4211 (3 or 6) Romanticism (3 hrs time as this course). Seminar/Discussion) This course pursues in-depth analyses of literature, history, and culture of the English ENGL-4261 (6) Seventeenth-Century Literature (3 hrs Romantic period (1789-1832). The course considers how Seminar/Discussion) This course studies a selection of events and issues such as the French Revolution, poetry, drama, and prose by seventeenth century English abolitionism, and women's rights influenced Romantic writers. Attention is given to developments in literary styles writers, including Mary Wollstonecraft, Anna Barbauld, and to significant religious, scientific, political, social, and William Blake, William Wordsworth, Samuel Coleridge, philosophical contexts, such as, for example, Kingship, William Godwin, Byron, Percy Shelley,John Keats,Mary Puritanism, exploration and colonization, civil war, and Shelley, and Jane Austen. Sections of the course may also revolution. Course will no longer be offered after the consider other national Romantic movements (e.g., 2017-18 academic year. American or Transatlantic Romanticism) as well as Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not elements and discourses of Romanticism across history hold credit for this course and ENGL-4271. and in the present. This course may be repeated for credit Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, once when the topic varies. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; Restrictions: Honours Form Required. ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same time as this course). contemporary literature or cultures. The course may concentrate on a specific national context for literature and ENGL-4270 (3 or 6) Eighteenth-Century Literature culture (e.g. visual culture in Britain; Canadian heritage films and Culture (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course and historical fiction) or may examine a specific aspect of provides an opportunity for seminar study of Restoration contemporary literature and culture from an international and eighteenth-century British literature, contextualizing it perspective (e.g. representations of urban experience). within contemporary political, economic, social, and Topics vary and may include multiculturalism, race, gender, intellectual life. Relevant contexts include the development contemporary film and television, youth cultures, visual of party politics, the rise of commercial capitalism and cultures, popular music, and popular culture. This course colonialism; debates over the status of women , may be repeated for credit once when the topic varies. parliamentary reform, and abolition; the proliferation of print Restrictions: Honours Form Required. culture; the professionalization of authorship; and concepts Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, such as "Enlightenment," "Neoclassicism," and "sensibility". including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; The course equally draws upon current theoretical ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or frameworks for understanding materials, which may ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same extend beyond literary texts to other texts and media. This time as this course). course may be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not ENGL-4403 (3 or 6) Author, Genre, or Form (3 hrs hold credit for this course and ENGL-4221. Seminar/Discussion) This course offers students the Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, opportunity for intensive critical study of an author, genre, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; or form. Sections of the course may focus on a particular ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or author, or a particular genre or form of literary and/or ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same cultural production (e.g., sub genres and forms within time as this course). poetry, drama, graphic narrative, popular fiction, and visual media). Each time the course is offered the topic covered ENGL-4281 (3 or 6) Victorian Literature and Culture (3 will be listed on the English Department Website. This hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course examines the course may be repeated for credit once when the topic literature and culture of the Victorian period (1837-1901). varies. As a topics-based course the specific focus may vary Restrictions: Honours Form Required. each time it is offered. Possible topics include imperialism Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in First-Year English, and colonization, urbanization and industrialization, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; sexuality and gender, and science and technology. This ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or course may be repeated for credit once when the topic ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same varies. time as this course). Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not hold credit for this course and ENGL-4511. ENGL-4710 (3 or 6) Canadian Literature and Culture Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course offers a study of including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; an area of Canadian literature and culture at an advanced ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or level. It may, for instance, involve the study of a limited ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same number of authors, artists, or cultural producers, an time as this course). historical period, school, or movement, one or two genres, forms, or media, or critical and cultural theory in relation to ENGL-4285 (3 or 6) Modernist Literature and Culture Canadian literature and culture. This course may be (3 hrs Lecture) This course focuses on some of the literary repeated for credit once when the topic varies. and cultural texts of modernism, understood as a series of Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not contemporaneous transnational artistic and cultural hold credit for this course and ENGL-4711 | ENGL-4712. movements between approximately 1910 and 1945. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, Sections of the course may focus on a specific form, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; genre, movement, place, or politics. Sample topics include: ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or Modernist Poetry, Noir in Fiction and Film, the Harlem ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same Renaissance, Gender and Modernism, and Reading the time as this course). 1930s. This course may be repeated once when the topic varies. ENGL-4717 (3 or 6) Indigenous Literatures and Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Cultures (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, Indigenous texts and culture. The theme of the course including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; varies from year to year. It may focus on historical and/or ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or contemporary representations of Indigenous people. Or the ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same course may study Indigenous contributions on topics such time as this course). as the environment, neo-colonialism, violence against women, health, sovereignty, and reconciliation. The course ENGL-4294 (3 or 6) Contemporary Literature and may examine a specific artist, nation, genre, or period. This Culture (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course offers an course may be repeated for credit once when the topic in-depth examination of some particular aspect of varies. Cross-listed: IS-4717(3)/(6). Japanese ); literary remediations; identity and Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not representation (e.g., race, Indigeneity); youth culture (e.g., hold credit for this course and IS-4717. adolescent sexuality, Disney); video games and gaming; Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, new media platforms and technologies; screen practices. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; In addition to media materials, the course focuses on critical ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or and theoretical questions related to the topic. This course ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same may be repeated for credit once when the topic varies. time as this course). Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First Year English, ENGL-4720 (3 or 6) American Literature and Culture including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course focuses on a ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or specific area of study in American literature and culture. ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same For example, it may focus on works from the Harlem time as this course). Renaissance or the Beat Generation. Alternatively, it may draw on texts from a particular region or ones that address ENGL-4742 (3 or 6) Cultural Studies (3 hrs a specific subject. Specific focus depends on the Seminar/Discussion) This course focuses on a topic in the instructor. Students may repeat this course once when the field of cultural studies that varies from year to year. The topic varies. course may focus on a specific critical and methodological Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not approach (reception studies, Marxist cultural analysis, hold credit for this course and ENGL-4531 | ENGL-4651. etc.), on a particular school of thought or in the Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, field (the Birmingham Centre for Contemporary Cultural including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; Studies; Cultural Studies beyond Britain; the turn to Gramsci ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or in Cultural Studies), or on a particular topic in the field ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same (popular culture; digital culture; fandom; the politics of time as this course). representation; youth and subcultures; cultures of resistance; etc.) Students may repeat this course once ENGL-4730 (3 or 6) Postcolonial Literatures and when the topic varies. Cultures (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course Restrictions: Honours Form Required. investigates some of the central questions in the field of Requisite Courses: ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or postcolonial studies through an analysis of cultural and ENGL-2145(6) or ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously theoretical works from one or more of these regions: or at the same time as this course); 6 credit hours in Africa, the Caribbean, South Asia, the Middle East, and the First-Year English, including ENGL-1001(6) or Pacific Islands. This course may be repeated for credit ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. once when the topic varies. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. ENGL-4823 (3) Old English Language (3 hrs Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, Seminar/Discussion) This course provides an introduction including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; to Old English (Anglo-Saxon). The study of sounds, ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or vocabulary, and structure is followed by the translation ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same and analysis of representative Old English literature, mainly time as this course). prose. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. ENGL-4740 (3 or 6) Topics in Comparative Literature Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course focuses on a topic including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; in the field of comparative literature, the study of literatures ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or and cultures, literary history, and theory, across two or ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same more linguistic groups, cultures, or national literatures. time as this course). Texts originally written in other languages are read in translation normally. Students should consult the English ENGL-4841 (3) Old English Literature (3 hrs Department web site for information about specific Seminar/Discussion) This course provides an introduction iterations of the course. This course may be repeated once to the literature of Old English (Anglo-Saxon), by means of when the topic varies. translation and analysis of selected prose and poetry, with Restrictions: Honours Form Required. proper emphasis upon Beowulf. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, Restrictions: Honours Form Required. including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or time as this course). ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same time as this course). ENGL-4741 (3 or 6) Screen Studies (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course focuses on a topic in ENGL-4901 (3 or 6) Gender, Literature and Culture (3 screen studies that varies from year to year. Possible hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course focuses on a topic topics may include: genre (e.g., noir, melodrama, related to gender, literature, and culture that varies from documentary ); national cinemas (e.g., Canadian, Nigerian, year to year. Possible topic areas are the continued relevance of feminism and feminist theory to literary and cultural studies, queer theory and its impact on how we read texts, and the impact of critical race theory on the study of gender, literature, and culture. This course may be repeated for credit once when the topic varies. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-year English, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same time as this course).

ENGL-4903 (3 or 6) Critical Race Studies (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course focuses on topics related to Critical Race Studies, textual representations of people and communities of colour, and theoretical conversations about race and ethnicity. Students are exposed to foundational as well as newer critical perspectives. Specific focus depends on the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit once when the topic varies. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of First-Year English, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]; ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or ENGL-2146(6) (must be taken previously or at the same time as this course). ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND SCIENCES

ENV-1600 (3) Human-Environmental Interactions (3 also be emphasized. hrs Lecture) This course deals with a variety of topics Cross-listed: SOC-2502(3). which illustrate the complexity and diversity of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course environmental issues. The central theme is "understanding and SOC-2502. natural processes in the environment" as a means of Requisite Courses: ENV-1600(3) or SOC-1101(6) or measuring human impact. Topics dealt with reflect current permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. environmental concerns-for example, global warming, overexploitation, wildlife management, urban issues, health ENV-2521 (3) Voluntary Simplicity (3 hrs Lecture) issues. Development is increasingly understood as a participatory, Note: The Department recommends that students take deliberate process aimed at enhancing quality of life for RHET-1102 or RHET-1103 in their first year of studies as individuals within community. This course examines the most courses in DESS programs include multiple writing concept, theory, and practice of voluntary simplicity as a assignments. means of development for individuals seeking alternatives Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course to consumer values and culture. The course explores both and ENV-2600. the historical roots of voluntary simplicity and its modern expressions, with special emphasis on the relevance of ENV-2401 (1) Forest Field Skills Camp (3 hrs Lecture) simplicity to building emotional well-being, vibrant This intensive two-week field course is mandatory for community, sustainable environment, and social justice. students in the Forest Ecology program and is designed to Cross-listed: IDS-2521(3). give students field survival and basic forestry skills. Topics Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course include bush camp construction; safe use of boats, ATVs, and IDS-2521. and chainsaws; and basic bush survival skills. Students Requisite Courses: ENV-1600(3) or IDS-1100(6) or also learn how to correctly use topographical maps, permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. compasses, air photos, GIS maps and other forestry equipment. This course is offered at University College of ENV-2603 (3) Environmental Sustainability: A Global the North at The Pas, Manitoba. Dilemma (3 hrs Lecture) This course focuses on Cross-listed: BIOL-2401(1). environmental factors relevant to understanding and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course implementing sustainable development. Its aim is to teach and BIOL-2401. students to understand and appreciate fundamental ecological principles within the context of social values and ENV-2416 (3) Sex, Gender, Space, and Place (3 hrs technological constraints. Moreover, the course seeks to Lecture) This course examines, from interdisciplinary equip students to assess environmental problems from an perspectives including those of Women's and Gender interdisciplinary perspective, and to develop strategies that Studies, Geography, and Environmental Studies, might solve these problems. Topics or issues that may be relationships among sex, gender, space and place in addressed include: ecosystem dynamics; feedback in societies, cultures, environments, and ecosystems. environmental processes; the concepts of carrying Selected relevant topics are considered, such as capacities and population thresholds; optimum yield theory; ecofeminism, the cultural politics and political geography of loss of biodiversity; overconsumption and overpopulation; sex and sexual identities, the gendering and sexing of city deforestation, desertification and pollution; energy demand landscape and architecture, notions of public and private versus supply; urbanization trends; global warming; ozone space, and the space/place in the sociocultural layer depletion; resource management, conservation, and construction of femininity and masculinity. We consider recovery; and environmental monitoring and impact how sex, gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and assessment. other aspects of identity affect the transformation of space Cross-listed: IDS-2603(3). into place. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Cross-listed: GEOG-2416(3) and WGS-2416(3). and IDS-2603. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: ENV-1600 or IDS-1100 or permission and GEOG-2416 | WGS-2416. of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: ENV-1600(3), or GEOG-1102(3) and GEOG-1103(3), or WGS-1232 (6) or permission of the ENV-2604 (3) Environment and Health (3 hrs Lecture) instructor [prerequisite(s)]. There is growing concern amongst the scientific community, media, and general public that environmental ENV-2502 (3) Sociology of the Environment (3 hrs chemical contamination may be responsible for some Lecture) This course offers an examination of human and ecosystem health problems. This course environmental issues and concerns from a sociological provides a scientific overview of selected chemical perspective. Topics for review include environmental contamination issues, discusses relative risks of values, attitudes and behaviour; the environmental recognized and potential hazards, and assesses possible movement; the political economy of the environment, and technical and regulatory solutions. Topics may include environmental risk and risk assessment. Debates stratospheric ozone depletion, tropospheric air pollution, surrounding such concepts as sustainable development, acid rain, greenhouse gas emissions, anthropogenic deep ecology, environmental justice and global change will pollutants such as PCBs and perfluorinated chemicals, and other relevant issues. A knowledge of high school level practices of sustainable forestry in Canada. Topics include chemistry is useful, but not absolutely necessary. evolution of the forest industry including past and current Requisite Courses: ENV-1600(3) or permission of the forest policy and practices. Important aspects of instructor [prerequisite(s)]. harvesting, reforestation, forest protection, private woodlot forestry, natural products and First Nations forestry are ENV-3004 (3) Women, Health and the Environment (3 discussed. The role of the forest industry in Canada is hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course introduces students examined within the larger context of government to a number of pertinent issues and questions feminists are regulation, multi-resource management, multi-stakeholder dealing with when considering women, health and the processes, and global markets. The environmental impact environment. We investigate how women, health and the of forest management activities on natural landscapes is environment intersect and explore some of the reviewed under ever changing environmental codes and repercussions of particular environmental situations restrictions and the need to produce green products. (including, but not limited to, environmental pollution, nuclear Cross-listed: BIOL-3476(3). radiation, and synthetic hormones) on women's physical, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course emotional, spiritual and psychological health. We also study and BIOL-3476. the ways in which feminists are researching and calling attention to the injustice of environmental degradation on ENV-3602 (3) Environmental Governance for women's health and various feminist strategies developed Sustainability (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines in challenging dangerous environmental practices. current theoretical and analytical approaches useful for Cross-listed: WGS-3004(3). understanding environmental governance in today's Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course complex problem domains. Focusing on the human and WGS-3004. dimensions of environmental resources, students examine Requisite Courses: WGS-1232(6) or the former major approaches to understanding complex WGS-2300 or the former WGS-2301 or permission of the human-environmentas issues, such as conventional instructor [prerequisite(s)]. environmental problem solving, framing and discourse analysis; and social ecological systems thinking. Students ENV-3025 (3) Issues in Sustainable Cities (3 hrs develop a conceptual foundation and the analytical abilities Lecture) This course addresses issues of sustainable needed to assess environmental governance concepts, urban development. Topics may include the following: issues, and cases associated with "wicked" environmental world population growth and urbanization in developed and governance settings. developing countries; the impact of technology, trade, and Requisite Courses: ENV-1600(3) or permission of the commercial globalization on urban environments; the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. degradation of land, water, and air inside of cities and in their bio-regions; the consumption of fossil fuels and the ENV-3603 (3) Winnipeg and the Environment: A Case local and global impact of their combustion; the politics of Study Approach (3 hrs Lecture) This course focuses on sustainable urban development; the role of planning and the particular problems facing the City of Winnipeg in its urban administrative practices and policies in environmental interaction with the environment. Students are required to degradation and mitigation; and the place of local participate in an in-class strategic planning session to environmental initiatives in national environmental actions. select issues and concerns that become the case study Cross-listed: UIC-3025(3). content of the course. Municipal planning initiatives are Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course used to select the issues, to define their scope, and to and UIC-3025. propose policy and program solutions. The course format Requisite Courses: GEOG-2414(3) or the former involves small interactive group discussions led by the GEOG-2404, or UIC-1001(6) or permission of the instructor students and facilitated by the instructor. A high level of (must be taken previously or at the same time as this student participation is expected. course). Cross-listed: UIC-3603(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course ENV-3035 (3) Law and the Environment (3 hrs Lecture) and UIC-3603. This course provides an introduction to Canadian Requisite Courses: ENV-1600 or the former ENV-2600 environmental law, including constitutional, common law, or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. and statutory regimes. Topics include endangered species, air, water and waste management, toxic pollutants, ENV-3606 (3) The Environment and Business (3 hrs contaminated land, resource development, the division of Lecture) This course examines practical examples of ways constitutional powers, regulatory approaches, in which business operations have responded to environmental assessment, monitoring and enforcement, environmental and sustainability challenges and and environmental torts. Students consider the opportunities. The course provides an historical socio--economic, political, and scientific backgrounds of perspective on corporate environmentalism and covers environmental problems. Current Manitoba examples current topics such as self-regulation and voluntary illustrate these concepts, problems and solutions. initiatives, environmental management systems, product Requisite Courses: ENV-1600 [prerequisite(s)]. stewardship, life-cycle analysis, industrial ecology, toxics use reduction, strict liability and due diligence, and ENV-3476 (3) Forest Policy and Management (3 hrs sustainable performance management. The course uses Lecture) This course addresses the principles and case studies from Canada and elsewhere, including developing nations, to illustrate the issues, problems, and ENV-3609(3). Presentation of results, both orally and in solutions discussed. written form, is required. Students work closely with the Requisite Courses: ENV-1600 or permission of the instructor or another member of the faculty and an external instructor [prerequisite(s)]. advisor from the community during completion of the project. Research projects are designed to assist ENV-3607 (3) Forests and the Environment (3 hrs community groups, government departments, private sector Lecture) This course is intended to provide students with firms or other organizations. the fundamental knowledge of the interactions between Requisite Courses: ENV-3609(3) and a minimum of 60 human and forest ecosystems. It examines current forestry credit hours towards their degree or permission of the practices and studies new alternatives in forest resources Department Chair [prerequisite(s)]. management based on our growing knowledge of the natural dynamics of these ecosystems. The concepts ENV-3611 (3) Environmental Toxicology (3 hrs Lecture) underlying forest sustainability and forest conservation in a This course provides an understanding of how and why changing world are discussed. Using the boreal forest as chemicals may damage humans and other organisms. an example, students will acquire an understanding of Basic principles of toxicology and environmental chemical natural ecosystem dynamics and of proposed alternatives exposure are covered, and detailed analysis is presented in forestry practices. The effects of global climate change of the body's defences against toxicants and the and increasing human pressure on our forests are also physiological and/or biochemical mechanisms by which examined. toxicants cause effects. Toxicological modeling and Requisite Courses: BIOL-2403(3) or the former environmental risk assessment are introduced. Students BIOL-3403 [prerequisite(s)]. apply these principles to explore emerging topics of interest in their own disciplines. ENV-3608 (3) Forest Wildlife Management (3 hrs Cross-listed: CHEM-3611(3). Lecture) This course focuses on the management of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course wildlife populations in forested environments in Canada. and CHEM-3611. Students participate in an examination of forest biodiversity Requisite Courses: CHEM-2202(3) and CHEM-2203(3) or including discussion of terrestrial and aquatic species, the former CHEM-2201 [prerequisite(s)]. ecosystems, conservation strategies, coarse and fine filter approaches, forest fragmentation, core habitat ranges, ENV-3612 (3) Environmental Impacts of Agriculture (3 management at forest stand and landscape levels and how hrs Lecture) The course provides a comprehensive animals use forest habitats. Topics include habitat supply knowledge on impacts of agriculture on the environment. It and modelling, population monitoring methods, the focuses on the global food production trends in meeting the cumulative effects of forest management activities, growing population needs and the positive and negative legislation and guidelines, role of endangered species, impacts of agriculture on the environment, emphasizing the adaptive forest management and the importance of impacts on (a) the atmosphere and stratosphere resulting terrestrial and wetland classification. in global climate change and air pollution, (b) the Requisite Courses: ENV-3607(3) [prerequisite(s)]. hydrosphere resulting in water deficits and pollution, (c) the lithosphere soil degradation and (d) the ENV-3609 (3) Research Methods and Design (3 hrs through habitat degradation, overharvesting, and genetic Lecture | 3 hrs Lab) This course is a prerequisite for the pollution, causing biodiversity loss. The course also Research Projects course (ENV-3610(3)) and teaches provides the conceptual knowledge required to produce students the steps and methods required to produce a food in an ecologically sustainable manner. successful research project. Students learn to develop a Requisite Courses: ENV-1600 or GEOG-2401 clear research question, form hypotheses and predictions [prerequisite(s)]. and formulate a study with the appropriate measurements and design structure. Students are shown examples of ENV-4450 (3) Geographic Perspectives on experimental and other designs and methods used in the Environment and Sustainability (3 hrs natural and social sciences. Finally, students develop a Seminar/Discussion) This course considers geographic research design for their own project used in the Research and environmental appproaches to sustainable Projects course. staples-based development, particularly as they apply to Note: ENV-3609L must be taken concurrently. water, energy, and mining. Discussion begins by outlining Requisite Courses: GEOG-2309(3) or STAT-1201(6) or change, complexity, uncertainty, and conflicts associated STAT-1501(3) or permission of the Department Chair with primary and derived resources, including those [prerequisite(s)]; ENV-3609L (lab) (must be taken contributing to climate change. Important technological concurrently). innovations and policy developments designed to address these challenges are contemplated. Topics include ENV-3610 (3) Research Projects (3 hrs Lecture) This corporate social responsibility policies, public-private course teaches students to understand, develop, and initiatives, community-based resource management, complete research projects with relevance to real world adaptive management, and social learning through public situations. The primary objective is to help students develop participation. research skills for the workplace. Students are required to Cross-listed: GEOG-4450(3). undertake a reasearch project in an area of environmental Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course interest, typically using proposals developed in and GEOG-4450. Requisite Courses: Two of GEOG-2204(3), diversion, water quality and management, and well-being. GEOG-2212(3), GEOG-3408(3), GEOG-3508(3), Students work in a collaborative team setting and are ENV-2603(3), or permission of the instructor required to submit a written project plan and present their [prerequisite(s)]. project outcomes orally and in writing. Restrictions: Students may not receive credit for this course and ENV-4611 (3) Environmental Impact Assessment (3 ENV-4614 when the topic was Critical Environmental hrs Lecture) This course explores the methodology of Issues: Campus Sustainability. environmental impact assessment (EIA). Students learn Requisite Courses: ENV-1600 or permission of the about various types of EIA, the components of EIA review, Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. the regulatory aspects of EIA and how to complete their own EIA. Students undertake EIA examples in both written ENV-4617 (3) Ecology and Management of Species at and oral form. Risk (3 hrs Lecture) This course focuses on management Requisite Courses: Completion of at least 60 credit and policy related to species at risk. Students learn what hours towards degree or permission of the Department constitutes a species at risk and review the factors, both Chair [prerequisite(s)]. natural and human induced, that can cause a species to become at risk. Students gain a thorough understanding of ENV-4613 (3) Directed Research in Environmental the assessment criteria used to determine listing under Studies and Sciences (3 hrs Project / Thesis) Students provincial and federal endangered species legislation and undertake research in their areas of interest. The research of the legislation and policy framework that governs may take the form of a literature review, an experiment, or management of species at risk. Students examine involve analysis of existing data. Evaluation is based on a management principles and practices for the recovery of written submission summarizing student findings. species at risk and the prevention of species Requisite Courses: ENV-1600 [prerequisite(s)]. endangerment. Restrictions: Students may not receive credit for this course and ENV-4614 when the topic (or ENV-4614 (3) Critical Environmental Issues (3 hrs subject) was Critical Environmental Issues: Ecology and Lecture) This course examines current issues of Management of Species at Risk. controversy and public concern in environmental studies Requisite Courses: ENV-1600 or permission of the and environmental science. The content varies from year to instructor [prerequisite(s)]. year and students should consult the Environmental Studies and Sciences Department for a more detailed ENV-4701 (6) Honours Environmental Studies and description of topic areas in terms in which the course is Sciences Thesis (3 hrs Project / Thesis) This course offered. provides an opportunity for students to undertake a project Requisite Courses: ENV-1600(3) or permission of the of personal interest under the guidance of a faculty Department Chair [prerequisite(s)]. member or equivalent and the Course Coordinator. Practical experience is provided in research design and ENV-4615 (3) Environmental Soil Science (3 hrs methodology, data analysis, in the oral and written Lecture) The course provides students with a presentation of the findings, and participation in academic comprehensive knowledge of environmental issues related conferences. This course is intended to provide students to soil science emphasizing the significant role soil plays in with a solid background for entry into graduate programs sustaining environmental quality. It focuses on soil or research-oriented careers. functions, soil quality, environmental significance of soil Note: Enrolment in this course is limited by the availability of properties and processes, ecological implications of faculty to serve as supervisors. Students must obtain soil-water-nutrient interactions, fate and transport of written permission from the Department Chair to register for contaminants in soils, and environmental impact of soil this course. A written agreement between the student and , all of which are interconnected to current the faculty supervisor is required before permission is environmental issues such as global warming, water granted. pollution, soil degradation, atmospheric pollution etc. The Restrictions: Department Permission Required. course also aims to provide the conceptual knowledge Requisite Courses: GEOG-2309(3) and ENV-4611(3), required to manage soil on a scientifically-based, and 30 credit hours in Environmental Studies with a environmentally friendly, and ecologically sustainable minimum 3.0 GPA (B) in honours subject courses manner. [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: GEOG-2213(3) and CHEM-1112(3) or the former CHEM-1101(6) or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)].

ENV-4616 (3) Campus Sustainability (3 hrs Project / Thesis) Students complete a project designed to assist with improving the university's sustainability performance. Project topics stem from the university's sustainability plan and are developed in consultation with the Campus Sustainability Office and other stakeholders. Topic areas include air quality, climate change, education, finance and procurement, governance, land use, transportation, waste FRENCH STUDIES

FREN-1100 (3) Elementary French 1 (3 hrs Lecture | 1 FREN-1104 (3) Intermediate French 1 (3 hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course is designed for students with no prior hrs Lab) This course is intended for students with a training in French. It focuses on basic grammatical and working knowledge of basic French. The focus is on the lexical skills, such as common verbs in simple tenses, review of previously acquired grammatical and syntactical interrogative and negative sentences, daily life greetings skills, and on the acquisition of new skills (e.g. past and and conversation. Students focus on basic skills in oral and compound tenses, conjunctions and expression of cause written comprehension and expression in class. In the and effect). Lexical skills are targeted through reading weekly one-hour lab (travaux pratiques) students practice activities (e.g. newspaper articles, poems, short stories). grammar aiming at vocabulary acquisition, and greater ease Writing tasks include compositions. The weekly one- hour with morphology and syntax. Students complete short lab (travaux pratiques)) is dedicated to developing greater reading and writing tasks designed to develop a good ease with using vocabulary, morphology, and syntax. foundation for future courses. This course does not count Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course towards the major. and FREN-1111 | FREN-1112. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: Placement test or FREN-1103(3) and the former FREN-1001(6). [prerequisite(s)]; FREN-1104L (lab) (must be taken Prerequisite: Placement test or permission of the concurrently). department. Requisite Courses: FREN-1100L (lab) (must be taken FREN-2105 (3) Intermediate French 2 (3 hrs Lecture | 1 concurrently). hrs Lab) This course is intended for students with a working knowledge of intermediate French wishing to FREN-1102 (3) Elementary French 2 (3 hrs Lecture | 1 undertake a program in French Studies (literature or hrs Lab) This course is designed for students with a basic linguistics), or to improve their written French for other knowledge of French. Students learn grammatical and disciplines. The focus is on perfecting grammatical and lexical foundations, such as past and future tenses, the syntactical skills (e.g. direct and indirect speech, the subjunctive mood (for expressing emotions), the conditional passive, and complex sentences) through short writing present (to discuss hypothetical situations), pronouns (to activities. The weekly one-hour lab (travaux pratiques)) is avoid redundancy). Vocabulary used to discuss abstract dedicated to developing greater ease with using concepts is introduced. Language comprehension and vocabulary, morphology, and syntax. expression skills are practiced in class (e.g. short texts, Requisite Courses: Placement test, or FREN-1104, or the songs, or poems are presented and discussed). The former FREN-1111, or the former FREN-1112 weekly one-hour lab (travaux pratiques)) is dedicated to [prerequisite(s)]; FREN-2105L (lab) (must be taken developing greater ease with using vocabulary, concurrently). morphology, and syntax. Writing tasks include composing sentences and paragraphs. FREN-2110 (3) Composition and Grammar (3 hrs Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course is designed to improve and FREN-1001. students' written and grammatical command of French. Requisite Courses: Placement test or FREN-1100(3) Major modes are introduced (descriptive, narrative, and [prerequisite(s)]; FREN-1102L (lab) (must be taken argumentative), with the grammatical tools required in the concurrently). writing and editing process (e. g. complex sentences, conjunctions, adverbs, spelling). Model texts are presented FREN-1103 (3) Elementary French 3 (3 hrs Lecture | 1 and assignments focus on writing in a variety of genres hrs Lab) This course is intended for students with some (e.g. descriptions, narratives, summaries, reviews). knowledge of French wishing to bring their proficiency up Activities consist of writing sentences, paragraphs and to the entrance level for a Major or Minor in French. The essays, while practicing French syntax. The weekly focus is on the review of basic grammatical skills (e.g. one-hour lab (travaux pratiques)) is dedicated to language pronouns, past tenses, simple sentences), and on the practice through games, debates, and thematic gradual acquisition of complex structures (e.g. subordinate presentations aiming at vocabulary acquisition, and greater clauses, tenses of the conditional and the subjunctive). ease with morphology and syntax. Lexical skills are targeted through reading activities (e.g. Requisite Courses: FREN-2105(3), or Placement test, or magazine articles, short poems or narratives) and by the former FREN-1111(6), or the former FREN-1112(6) or listening to audio documents (e.g. songs, video clips). The permission of the department [prerequisite(s)]; FREN-2110L weekly one-hour lab (travaux pratiques)) is dedicated to (lab) (must be taken concurrently). developing greater ease with using vocabulary, morphology, and syntax. Writing tasks evolve from shorter FREN-2114 (3) English-French Translation (3 hrs to longer sentences and to compositions. Lecture) This course in translation from English to French Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course serves a dual purpose: to give students an opportunity to and FREN-1111 | FREN-1112. expand their French vocabulary and grammatical skills and Requisite Courses: Placement test, or FREN-1102(3), or to initiate them to specific written styles in the target the former FREN-1001(6) [prerequisite(s)]; FREN-1103L language (French). To this end, a number of recurring (lab) (must be taken concurrently). semantic, grammatical and syntactic features of French will be studied through shorter translation exercises and through the translation of longer documents, e.g., Roy. Novels, drama and poetry are analyzed using literary newspaper articles, business letters or scientific theories drawn from social realism/sociocritique and abstracts. narratology. Periodic class discussions will take a table Requisite Courses: FREN-2110; or placement test, or the ronde format. former FREN-2109 or permission of the instructor Requisite Courses: FREN-2105, or placement test, or the [prerequisite(s)]. former FREN-1111, or the former FREN-1112, or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. FREN-2115 (3) French-English Translation (3 hrs Lecture) In this course the principles of translation from FREN-2183 (3) Francophone Canadian Literature French into English will be introduced. The lexicon and After 1960 (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines the stylistics of the target language (English) will be discussed francophone literature of Canada from the mid-twentieth in relation to different styles and registers. Students will century to the present day. Students examine works by translate authentic texts from a variety of contexts such as authors from Acadia, Manitoba and , as well as by literary, commercial, journalistic and scientific. Literary writers known as les écrivains migrants, with emphasis translation will focus on descriptive and narrative on the central role played by the novel and by the components; practical texts will include advertisements, Révolution tranquille in the development of contemporary newspaper articles and scientific magazine articles. Canadian francophone literature. The course may include Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course works of Blais, Miron, Ducharme, Tremblay, Hébert, Maillet, and FREN-2112. Chen, Chiasson and Léveillé. Novels, drama and poetry are Requisite Courses: FREN-2110(3), or placement test, or analyzed using literary theories drawn from narratology the former FREN-2109(3) or permission of the instructor and narrative/ semiotics discursive. Periodic class [prerequisite(s)]. discussions will take a table ronde format. Requisite Courses: FREN-2105(3), or placement test, or FREN-2116 (3) French for Business (3 hrs Lecture) This the former FREN-1111(6), or the former FREN-1112(6) or practical course is intended primarily to teach students to permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. communicate effectively in business situations with an emphasis on the Canadian context. To this end, course FREN-2202 (3) Phonetics (3 hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This materials include situational texts reflecting business course presents the theory and practice of French activities and covering a range of topics (e.g., office and phonetics and phonology. Theory covers the acoustics and computer, financial institutions, marketing and advertising). physiology of speech, the International Phonetic Alphabet, The course is designed to expand language skills already the description of French vowels, consonants, articulation acquired as well as to present the specialized vocabulary features (assimilation, liaison, etc.), and prosodic patterns and idioms used in the business environment. Extensive (syllabation, rhythm, intonation, etc.). Practical applications exercises in vocabulary, comprehension, business writing include phonetic transcription, orthoepy (the relationship and correspondence are included. between pronunciation and orthography) and a lab Requisite Courses: FREN-2110, or placement test, or the program aiming at oral performance. former FREN-2109, or permission of the instructor Cross-listed: LING-2301(3). [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and LING-2301. FREN-2180 (3) Introduction to French Literature (3 hrs Requisite Courses: FREN-2105, or placement test, or the Lecture) This course gives students the foundational skills former FREN-1112, or permission of the instructor required to read and write in French about literature. [prerequisite(s)]; FREN-2202L (lab) (must be taken Students are introduced to the terms and tools of analysis concurrently). necessary for a critical reading of modern literary texts which are drawn from different genres and a variety of FREN-2205 (3) Culture and Society in Contemporary areas of the francophone world, such as Canada, France, France (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines major Africa and the Caribbean. Some class time is devoted to cultural and historical aspects of contemporary French the development of writing skills. society (e.g. the social system, the Fifth Republic, feminism, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course the role of Paris). The theoretical approach is comparative and FREN-1381. (e.g. Roland Barthes, Richard Hoggart, and E.T. Hall). Requisite Courses: FREN-2105(3), or placement test, or Course material is presented through several media (e.g. the former FREN-1111(6), or the former FREN-1112(6) or songs, comics, film, political speeches). As they learn permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. about diverse and iconic elements of French culture, students are given opportunities to develop their reading, FREN-2182 (3) Francophone Canadian Literature speaking and writing skills. Before the 1960s (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines Requisite Courses: FREN-2105, or placement test, or the the francophone literature of Canada from its modern former FREN-1111, or the former FREN-1112, or permission origins at the end of the 19th century to the mid-20th of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. century. Works by women and men from Acadia, Manitoba and Quebec are examined with an emphasis on the central FREN-2207 (3) Society and Cultures in Quebec and in role played by Quebec in the creation of modern Canadian Francophone Manitoba after 1960 (3 hrs Lecture) This francophone literature. Authors studied may include Riel, course offers an introduction to the cultures of Nelligan, Grandbois, Melanson, Savard, Guèvremont and Francophone Canada, with emphasis on the cultural expression of the Francophone communities in Manitoba, Requisite Courses: FREN-2105, or placement test, or the as well as on that of Quebec. Students study cultural former FREN-1111(6), or the former FREN-1112(6), or material such as journalistic articles, festivals, film, permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. television, music, comics and advertising in historical, social and political context. The development of Francophone FREN-2482 (3) Nineteenth-Century French Poetry and cultures in minority contexts is central to the course. Drama (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines the Students examine changing representations of women, the development of nineteenth-century poetry and drama. The formation and evolution of national consciousness in evolution of theatre from the drame romantique to the Quebec and questions about what it means to be théâtre fin-de-siècle will be studied through selected Francophone or Quebecois in a diverse society. works of such authors as Hugo, Musset, and Rostand. Requisite Courses: FREN-2105 or the former Poetry will include a selection from the romantic, FREN-1111(6) or the former FREN-1112(6) or placement parnassian, and symbolist schools (e.g. test or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Desbordes-Valmore, Gautier, Baudelaire). Students will be introduced to basic techniques of textual appreciation and FREN-2383 (3) The Art of Close Reading (3 hrs Lecture) commentary. This course is designed to acquaint students with close Requisite Courses: FREN-2105, or placement test, or the reading, a method to analyze and comment on literary texts former FREN-1111(6), or the former FREN-1112(6), or of different genres and periods. Students will learn to permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. recognize, study and appreciate the elements of style and content. Students will acquire practical skills through the FREN-2609 (3) Decolonizing Voice: Francophone presentation of exposés in oral and written forms. Indigenous Literature (3 hrs Lecture) This course Requisite Courses: FREN-2105, or placement test, or the examines the responses of Indigenous writers and artists former FREN-1111(6), or the former FREN-1112(6), or (through novels, poems, plays and movies) to colonial permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. structures and colonial discourse in Canada. All works are read in French. Indigenous guests are invited to the class FREN-2384 (3) Literary Avant-Garde in French and the students are asked to attend events in the (1900-1950) (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines the Indigenous community as part of their course requirement. concept of "avant-garde" in early twentieth century French Students finish the course with a good understanding of literatures in Europe, the Antilles and Canada. We analyze Canada's historic relationship with Indigenous Canadians texts from the Manifeste Dada (1918) through André and how Canadians and how colonialism still affects Breton's Manifeste du surréalisme (1924) and Aimé present relationships. Césaire's poetry to the Refus Global (1948) in Quebec. The Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course course focuses on literary and cultural comparisons. It and FREN-3609. investigates various aspects of Modernism, such as Requisite Courses: FREN-2105, or placement test, or the aesthetic autonomy and the relationship between art and former FREN-1111, or the former FREN-1112, or permission politics. The course works across genres and national of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. literatures. Students learn about modernist mouvements and contexts: dada, futurism, surrealism, expressionism, FREN-3111 (6) Comparative Stylistics and Translation theatre of the absurd and the négritude mouvement. (3 hrs Lecture) In this course, French is studied by being Requisite Courses: FREN-2105, or placement test, or the contrasted with English in a comparative lexicology and former FREN-1111(6), or the former FREN-1112(6), or comparative grammar approach. Linguistic divergence is permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. examined at the lexical level (e.g. semantic values, stylistic variants, linguistic interference), the grammatical and FREN-2385 (3) Twentieth Century French Writers and syntactic levels (e.g. gender, modifiers, modal auxiliaries, Thinkers (3 hrs Lecture) French works from the '50s to word order), and the pragmatic level, with a focus on the present day are studied in this course. Major literary cultural strategies (e.g. sentence segmentation into trends and movements - existentialism, le nouveau roman translation units, modulation, grammatical transposition). and postmodernism - are analysed in fiction, poetry and Translation strategies are explored so as to address the essay by writers such as Sartre, Camus, Ponge and distinctive lexical, grammatical, syntactic, and pragmatic Yourcenar. features of each language. Requisite Courses: FREN-2105, or placement test, or the Cross-listed: LING-3311(6) former FREN-1111(6), or the former FREN-1112(6), or Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. and LING-3311. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in 2000-level French FREN-2481 (3) Nineteenth-Century French Prose (3 Studies courses, including 3 credit hours in 2000-level hrs Lecture) This course examines the development of language or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. prose in nineteenth-century France. Works representing the main literary movements (Romanticism, Realism, and FREN-3202 (3) Géolinguistique francaise (French Naturalism) will be selected, as much as possible, from Geolinguistics) (3 hrs Lecture) This course presents both male and female authors. These may include Stendhal, contemporary varieties of French in Canada and other Balzac, Sand, Flaubert, Maupassant, and Zola. Students parts of the Francophone World. After a brief introduction will be introduced to basic techniques of textual to linguistic change from early dialects to today's appreciation and commentary. international norm, the course focuses on regional variation particularly in Canada and North America, major our contemporary age. geolinguistic concepts (e.g. regionalism, isogloss), and Cross-listed: FREN-4283(3). fieldwork methods. Sound documents are explored for their Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course vocabulary and grammar, to help students expand their and FREN-4283. communication skills in different environments, as they Requisite Courses: 6 credit-hours of 2000-level French become more familiar with different varieties of French. Studies literature courses or permission of the instructor The Honours level concentrates on methodology and [prerequisite(s)]. linguistic data analysis (e.g. lexicometry, linguistic atlases). Cross-listed: LING-3303(3). FREN-3301 (3) History of the French Language (3 hrs Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Lecture) This course traces the development of the French and FREN-4202 | LING-3303 | LING-4303. language through the centuries, examining historical, Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in 2000-level French political and social events that have a significant impact on language/linguistics or permission of the instructor linguistic change. Four periods are considered: the High [prerequisite(s)]. Middle Ages and the first written texts; the Old French era with its dialects; Renaissance French, influenced by Italy FREN-3204 (3) French Morphology and Syntax (3 hrs and the Humanist movement; and the birth of modern Lecture) Based on the analysis of modern French, this French and la francophonie. Various linguistic documents course presents fundamental linguistic concepts, including are studied to illustrate the status and distinct features of nature and types of monemes, distributional and syntactic French in different eras. properties of morphemes, and the French verbal system Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in 2000-level French (mood, tense and aspect). The syntax of simple, compound Studies courses or permission of the instructor and complex sentences is studied in a [prerequisite(s)]. transformational-generative perspective, as it applies to French. At the Honours level, in FREN-4206/LING-4304, FREN-3481 (3) Nineteenth-Century Literature and additional approaches (mainly the functional and the Philosophy (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) The course invites cognitive) are used to examine complex utterances in students to reflect upon the contributions of French various oral and written styles. literature to ethics and metaphysics and to the circulation of Cross-listed: LING-3302(3). ideas. Nineteenth-century writers openly tackling Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course philosophical and scientific issues lead us to better and LING-3302. understand the narrative construction of ideas and Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in 2000-level French concepts in relation to forms of thought in the human language/linguistics, or permission of the instructor experience. Thus, fiction and poetic speculation stand [prerequisite(s)]. beside prolific nineteenth-century European philosophers (Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche), prompting students to reflect on FREN-3205 (3) Studies in Bilingualism (3 hrs Lecture) the cultures and knowledge of our times through various This course explores three major aspects of bilingualism: theoretical lenses. The FREN-4481 students are assigned the context, the learner, and the writer. The context section additional theoretical articles compared to the FREN-3481 introduces historical and geographical aspects of students. bilingualism (e.g. official/unofficial bilingualism in the Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial Francophone world), and resulting sociolinguistic situations basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who (e.g. diglossia/bilingualism). The main section of the course successfully complete this course receive credit as focuses on the bilingual learner (e.g. multilingual acquisition, indicated. compound bilingualism, the active lexicon in Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of 2000-level French Franco-Manitoban and immersion school children). The Studies literature courses [prerequisite(s)]. concluding section examines examples of bilingual writing (e.g. Beckett, Green, Léveillé). FREN-3580 (3) Littérature du XVIIIe siècle: Le siècle Cross-listed: FREN-4205(3), LING-3305(3) and des Lumières (3 hrs Lecture) This course is intended to LING-4305(3). develop in the student an understanding and appreciation Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course of the nature of literature and society in the eighteenth and FREN-4205 | LING-3305 | LING-4305. century. While emphasis vary from year to year, this Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in 2000-level French course may include works by major authors such as Studies courses; including 3 credit hours in 2000-level Montesquieu, Prévost, Madame de Tencin, Francoise de language/linguistics, or permission of the instructor Graffigny and Voltaire. Students also investigate trends [prerequisite(s)]. such as la crise de conscience européenne, le mythe du Sauvage,"Lumières" et Raison, and l'Encyclopédie. FREN-3283 (3) Life-Narratives in French Literature (3 Attention is given to relationships between literature and hrs Lecture) In 20th and 21st century literature from Proust the arts. and Colette to Annie Ernaux and Le Clézio, the Cross-listed: FREN-4580(3). representation of the self has undergone several Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course transformations in form, content and generic boundaries. and FREN-4580. The course studies different genres: autobiography, Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in 2000-level French autofiction and memoir. Students explore the meanings of Studies literature courses or permission of the instructor these texts and what they conceal about Modernity and [prerequisite(s)]. family, Réjean Ducharme's imagining of children's FREN-3581 (3) Littérature du XVIIIe siècle: Lumières experiences, the dark worlds created by Gaétan Soucy, et Révolution (3 hrs Lecture) This course is intended to the feminist thought of Nancy Huston, and Ying Chen's take study the relationships between literature and society in on the experience of immigration. Frequent discussions the eighteenth century. While emphasis will vary from year take a table ronde format. to year, this course may include works by major authors Cross-listed: FREN-4953(3). such as Diderot, Rousseau, Beaumarchais, and Isabelle de Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Charrière. Emphasis will be placed upon the development and FREN-4953. of literary styles and the history of ideas in scientific, Requisite Courses: 6 credit-hours in 2000-level French philosophical, and political contexts. Students will also Studies literature courses or permission of the instructor investigate some trends such as philosophie et [prerequisite(s)]. engagement au Siècle des "Lumières", le libertinage, la condition de la femme et l'Ancien Régime, le droit des FREN-3954 (3) Littérature du «je» au Canada (3 hrs gens, la Révolution and le préromantisme. Lecture) This course offers a critical study of first-person Cross-listed: FREN-4581(3). literature in Canada, including Manitoba. Texts may include Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course autobiographies, autofiction, memoirs, diaries, and letters. and FREN-4581. Students study the works of authors such as Gabrielle Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in 2000-level French Roy, France Theoret, Nelly Arcan, Denise Bombardier, Studies literature courses or permission of the instructor Claire Martin, and Gerald Leblanc from a literary [prerequisite(s)]. perspective, with a focus on how their texts communicate a personal point of view. Students analyze the ways FREN-3680 (3) Littérature du XVIIe siècle: Le Baroque authors present their experiences with a concentration on (3 hrs Lecture) This course offers a critical study of the different forms personal writing can take, and what literary works representative of the seventeenth century. these forms suggest about the social and historical While emphasis will vary from year to year, this course contexts in which first-person literature is produced in may include works by major authors such as Corneille, Canada. Scarron, Cyrano de Bergerac and Molière. The course will Cross-listed: FREN-4954(3). investigate such trends as baroque, grotesque, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course romanesque and libertinage. and FREN-4954. Cross-listed: FREN-4680(3). Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in 2000-level French Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Studies literature courses or permission of the instructor and FREN-4680. [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in 2000-level French Studies literature courses or permission of the instructor FREN-4021 (3) Tutorial (3 hrs Tutorial | 3 hrs Lab) The [prerequisite(s)]. specialized study of a single author, or of a genre, period or theme, or of a specific language or linguistics topic, FREN-3681 (3) Littérature du XVIIe siècle: Le under the direction of a professor. Classicisme (3 hrs Lecture) This course offers a critical Note: Permission of the instructor is required to register. study of works representative of the rich literary Restrictions: Honours Form Required. production of the seventeenth century, dominated by Louis XIV and the Court of Versailles. While emphasis will vary FREN-4115 (3) Literary and Intersemiotic Translation from year to year, this course may include works by major (3 hrs Lecture) This Honours course examines theoretical authors such as Molière, Racine, La Fontaine, Madame de and practical issues in literary translation. It deals mainly Sévigné and Madame de La Fayette. The course will with aspects of literary translation relating to genres (e.g., investigate some of the changing concepts of tragedy and novel, drama), style (e.g., metaphors), metalinguistics (e.g., comedy, and trends such as préciosité, classicisme, cultural elucidation) and theoretical issues (e.g. honnêteté and absolutisme. interpretation). The principal focus is on interlingual Cross-listed: FREN-4681(3). translation (from French to English and English to French). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Secondarily, intersemiotic translation is discussed, and and FREN-4681. examples of intermedial transpositions are analyzed (e.g. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in 2000-level French novel to film; play to opera; poem to painting), Coursework Studies literature courses or permission of the instructor includes comparisons of translations and intermedial [prerequisite(s)]. transpositions, reviews of theoretical works (e.g. A. Berman, U. Eco), and translation assignments in the FREN-3953 (3) The Contemporary Francophone Novel student's preferred language(s). The course is taught in of Canada (3 hrs Lecture) In this course, students study a French. selection of contemporary Canadian francophone novels. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. The chosen texts represent major literary trends since Requisite Courses: 3 credit hours in French literature 1960, and they vary in structure as well as the social, [prerequisite(s)]; and 3 credit hours in 3000-level French cultural and political questions they raise. Topics may language/linguistics, or permission of the instructor include the uniquely Canadian narrative of Gabrielle Roy, [prerequisite(s)]. Antonine Maillet's Acadian perspective, Marie-Claire Blais' revolutionary examination of the traditional Quebecois FREN-4200 (3) Language and Style (3 hrs Lecture) The first focus of this course is on French Lexicology (e.g. FREN-4206 (3) French Morphology and Syntax (3 hrs word formation, neologisms), and the interaction between Lecture) Based on the analysis of modern French, this lexis, semantics (e.g. semantic fields) and syntax (e.g. course presents fundamental linguistic concepts, including idioms). The second focus is on the relation between nature and types of monemes, distributional and syntactic language and style in various French texts (e.g. essays, properties of morphemes, and the French verbal system speeches), explored for their stylistic variation and (mood, tense and aspect). The syntax of simple, compound discursive features (e.g. foregrounding, rhythm). Class and complex sentences is studied in a work investigates French vocabulary and dictionary transformational-generative perspective, as it applies to presentations of linguistic variation (usage labels of time, French. At the Honours level, in FREN-4206/LING-4304, place and style). Course work includes compositions that additional approaches (mainly the functional and the develop lexical and rhetorical cohesion when writing in cognitive) are used to examine complex utterances in French, and a research paper on an individual linguistic various oral and written styles. topic. Cross-listed: LING-4304(3). Cross-listed: LING-4300(3). Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not Restrictions: Honours Form Required. hold credit for this course and FREN-4112 | LING-4302 | Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in 2000-level French LING-4304. language/linguistics or permission of the instructor Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in 2000-level French [prerequisite(s)]. language/linguistics or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. FREN-4202 (3) Géolinguistique Française (french Geolinguistics) (3 hrs Lecture) This course presents FREN-4283 (3) Life-Narratives in French Literature (3 contemporary varieties of French in Canada and other hrs Lecture) In twentieth and twenty-first century literature parts of the Francophone World. After a brief introduction from Proust and Colette to Annie Ernaux and Le Clézio, the to linguistic change from early dialects to today's representation of the self has undergone several international norm, the course focuses on regional variation transformations in form, content and generic boundaries. particularly in Canada and North America , major The course studies different genres: autobiography, geolinguistic concepts (e.g. regionalism, isogloss), and autofiction and memoir. Students explore the meanings of fieldwork methods. Sound documents are explored for their these texts and what they conceal about Modernity and vocabulary and grammar, to help students expand their our contemporary age. communication skills in different environments, as they Cross-listed: FREN-3283(3). become more familiar with different varieties of French. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not The Honours level concentrates on methodology and hold credit for this course and FREN-3283. linguistic data analysis (e.g. lexicometry, linguistic atlases). Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in 2000-level French Cross-listed: LING-4303(3). Studies courses and permission of the Honours advisor or Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not instructor [prerequisite(s)]. hold credit for this course and FREN-3202 | LING-3303 | LING-4303. FREN-4284 (3) Modern and Contemporary Literature Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in 2000-level French and Photography (3 hrs Lecture) This course studies the language/linguistics, or permission of the instructor text-image relation, mainly the role of photography in [prerequisite(s)]. literature, as well as various genres where visual image is essential. The course includes literary analysis by authors FREN-4205 (3) Studies in Bilingualism (3 hrs Lecture) such as Roland Barthes, Hervé Guilbert and Patrick This course explores three major aspects of bilingualism: Modiano. the context, the learner, and the writer. The context section Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not introduces historical and geographical aspects of hold credit for this course and FREN-3284. bilingualism (e.g. official/unofficial bilingualism in the Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in 2000-level French Francophone world), and resulting sociolinguistic situations Studies literature courses and permission of the Honours (e.g. diglossia/bilingualism). The main section of the course advisor [prerequisite(s)]. focuses on the bilingual learner (e.g. multilingual acquisition, compound bilingualism, the active lexicon in FREN-4385 (3) Transculturalism in Literatures of Franco-Manitoban and immersion schoolchildren). The Europe and the Americas (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) concluding section examines examples of bilingual writing The last decades have seen a significant increase in (e.g. Beckett, Green, Léveillé). transcultural studies, ranging from culture anthropology, Cross-listed: FREN-3205(3), LING-3305(3) and political philosophy to literary studies. This course explores LING-4305(3). principal tenets of transculturalism (Bouchard, Imbert, Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not Welsch) and studies Francophone writers from Europe and hold credit for this course and FREN-3205 | LING-3305 | the Americas (Le Clézio, Nothomb, Robin, Laferrière) who LING-4305. showcase literature's potential of engaging aspects of Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in 2000 level French transcultural paradigms: self-other, belonging-exclusion, Studies courses; including 3 credit hours in 2000-level pure-hybrid, here-there. By studying potential paths language/linguistics, or permission of the instructor towards a theory of transcultural literary interpretation, [prerequisite(s)]. students learn to avoid worshipping binary pairs such as particularism and universalism, diversity and homogenization, nationalism and cosmopolitanism. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not Restrictions: Honours Form Required. hold credit for this course and FREN-3581. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of French Studies Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of French Studies literature courses at the 2000-level or permission of the literature courses at the 2000-level and permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Honours advisor [prerequisite(s)].

FREN-4483 (3) Nineteenth-Century Literature & FREN-4680 (3) Littérature du XVIIe siècle: Le Baroque Philosophy (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) The course invites (3 hrs Lecture) This course offers a critical study of students to reflect upon the contributions of French literary works representative of the seventeenth century. literature to ethics and metaphysics and to the circulation of While emphasis will vary from year to year, this course ideas. Nineteenth-century writers openly tackling may include works by major authors such as Corneille, philosophical and scientific issues lead us to better Scarron, Cyrano de Bergerac and Molière. The course will understand the narrative construction of ideas and investigate such trends as baroque, grotesque, concepts in relation to forms of thought in the human romanesque, and libertinage. experience. Thus, fiction and poetic speculation stand Cross-listed: FREN-3680(3). beside prolific nineteenth-century European philosophers Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not (Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche), prompting students to reflect on hold credit for this course and FREN-3680. the cultures and knowledge of our times through various Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of French Studies theoretical lenses. The FREN-4481 students are assigned literature courses at the 2000-level and permission of the additional theoretical articles compared to the FREN-3481 Honours advisor [prerequisite(s)]. students. Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial FREN-4681 (3) Littérature du XVIIe siècle: Le basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who Classicisme (3 hrs Lecture) This course offers a critical successfully complete this course receive credit as study of works representative of the rich literary indicated. production of the seventeenth century, dominated by Louis Restrictions: Honours Form Required. XIV and the Court of Versailles. While emphasis will vary Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of 2000-level French from year to year, this course may include works by major Studies literature courses [prerequisite(s)]. authors such as Molière, Racine, La Fontaine, Madame de Sévigné and Madame de La Fayette. The course will FREN-4580 (3) Littérature du XVIIIe siècle: Le siècle investigate some of the changing concepts of tragedy and des Lumières (3 hrs Lecture) This course is intended to comedy, and trends such as préciosité, classicisme, develop in the student an understanding and appreciation honnêteté and absolutisme. of the nature of literature and society in the eighteenth Cross-listed: FREN-3681(3). century. While emphasis vary from year to year, this Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not course may include works by major authors such as hold credit for this course and FREN-3681. Montesquieu, Prévost, Madame de Tencin, Francoise de Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours of French Studies Graffigny and Voltaire. Students also investigate trends literature courses at the the 2000-level and permission of such as la crise de conscience européenne, le mythe du the Honours advisor [prerequisite(s)]. Sauvage, "Lumières" et Raison, and l'Encyclopédie. Attention is given to relationships between literature and FREN-4748 (3) Le Théâtre Classique (3 hrs Lecture | the arts. Students will also attend a weekly 75- Seminar/Discussion) This course investigates some of the seminar. changing concepts of tragedy and comedy in Cross-listed: FREN-3580(3). seventeenth-century and eighteenth-century French Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not drama. Plays by the famous dramatists such as Molière, hold credit for this course and FREN-3580. Racine, Marivaux, Voltaire and Beaumarchais are examined Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in 2000-level French in light of major texts on the aesthetics of theatre, written Studies literature courses and permission of the Honours by theorists such as Aristotle, Corneille, l'abbé d'Aubignac advisor [prerequisite(s)]. and Diderot. Class discussion includes a table ronde format. FREN-4581 (3) Littérature du XVIIIe siècle: Lumières Restrictions: Honours Form Required. et Révolution (3 hrs Lecture) This course is intended to study the relationships between literature and society in FREN-4760 (3) Nineteenth-Century Poets (3 hrs the eighteenth century. While emphasis will vary from year Lecture) This course offers an intensive and extensive to year, this course may include works by major authors study of selected nineteenth century poets in the context such as Diderot, Rousseau, Meaumarchais, and Isabelle de of a broad review of the history, the evolution and the Charrière. Emphasis will be placed upon the development poetics of the various French literary schools. Course of literary styles and the history of ideas in scientific, work will be representative of the romantic, parnassian philosophical, and political contexts. Students will also and the symbolist movements, and poets such as investigate some trends such as philosophie et Lamartine, Musset, Vigny, Hugo, Baudelaire, Verlaine, engagement au Siècle des "Lumières", le libertinage, la Rimbaud, Gautier, and Leconte de Lisle will be studied. condition de la femme et l'Ancien Régime, le droit des From both the historical and the aesthetic perspectives, the gens, la Révolution and le préromantisme. centrality of Baudelaire's Fleurs du mal will be Cross-listed: FREN-3581(3). emphasized. Note: Permission of the Honours advisor is required to register. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not hold credit for this course and FREN-4481.

FREN-4953 (3) The Contemporary Francophone Novel of Canada (3 hrs Lecture) In this course, students study a selection of contemporary Canadian francophone novels. The chosen texts represent major literary trends since 1960, and they vary in structure as well as the social, cultural and political questions they raise. Topics may include the uniquely Canadian narrative of Gabrielle Roy, Antonine Maillet's Acadian perspective, Marie-Claire Blais' revolutionary examination of the traditional Quebecois family, Réjean Ducharme's imagining of children's experiences, the dark worlds created by Gaétan Soucy, the feminist thought of Nancy Huston, and Ying Chen's take on the experience of immigration. Frequent discussions take a table ronde format. Cross-listed: FREN-3953(3). Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not hold credit for this course and FREN-3953. Requisite Courses: 6 credit-hours of French Studies literature courses at the 2000-level and permission of the Honours advisor or instructor [prerequisite(s)].

FREN-4954 (3) Littérature du «je» au Canada (3 hrs Lecture) This course offers a critical study of first person literature in Canada, including Manitoba. Texts may include autobiographies, autofiction, memoirs, diaries, and letters. Students study the works of authors such as Gabrielle Roy, France Theoret, Nelly Arcan, Denise Bombardier, Claire Martin, and Gerald Leblanc from a literary perspective, with a focus on how their texts communicate a personal point of view. Students analyze the ways authors present their experiences with a concentration on the different forms personal writing can take, and what these forms suggest about the social and historical contexts in which first person literature is produced in Canada. Cross-listed: FREN-3954(3). Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not hold credit for this course and FREN-3954. Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in 2000-level French Studies literature courses or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. GEOGRAPHY

GEOG-1102 (3) Introductory Human Geography: issues pertaining to the alteration of ecosystems and the People, Culture and Environment (3 hrs Lecture) various types of air, water, and soil pollution. Attitudes to the world are determined to a great extent by culture. The ways in which people behave, socially and GEOG-2207 (3) Climatology (3 hrs Lecture | 2 hrs Lab) geographically, are determined by systems of belief and This course examines climatological processes, at all cultural understandings. The focus of this introductory scales (e.g., micro to macro), to arrive at an understanding course is the role of culture in determining geographical of how and why vary spatially and temporally. It patterns and landscapes. It will consider language, religion, surveys the characteristics of the global climate system, rural and urban settlement, global and gender inequities, the but pays particular attention to the expression of power in the landscape and the changing and North America. Laboratory exercises involve the global political landscape. Emphasis will be placed on analysis and presentation of climatological data. current developments in the tension areas of the world. Requisite Courses: GEOG-1201 [prerequisite(s)]; GEOG-2207L (lab) (must be taken concurrently). GEOG-1103 (3) Introductory Human Geography: Population, Place and Development (3 hrs Lecture) GEOG-2210 (3) Meteorology (3 hrs Lecture | 2 hrs Lab) The growth of the human population, how this population This course surveys the causes and characteristics of earns its livelihood, and the various forms of settlement are weather. Fundamental thermodynamic and hydrodynamic placing serious strains on our environment. The ability to principles of atmospheric physics will be reviewed. cope with these issues will determine the quality of life the Common and severe/unusual weather phenomena will be world's population will experience in the future. The focus explained, as will be the processes involved in the of this introductory course in population change and preparation of weather forecasts. migration, various forms of economic activity, urbanization, Requisite Courses: GEOG-1201 [prerequisite(s)]; levels of development and the implications of changes in GEOG-2210L (lab) (must be taken concurrently). these theme areas will be emphasized for the environment. Current developments in these areas will be emphasized GEOG-2212 (3) Natural Hazards (3 hrs Lecture) This and case studies from many areas of the world will course examines the causes and characteristics of natural highlight important concepts and issues. The course will hazards. Emphasis is placed on the assessment of risk, the illustrate how geographical concepts and tools can be choice of adjustments, and differences between situations used to analyse and inform these issues. in developed and developing countries. Discussions will cover hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, earthquakes, and GEOG-1201 (3) Introductory Atmospheric Science (3 blizzards, as time permits. hrs Lecture | 2 hrs Lab) This course is an introduction to Requisite Courses: GEOG-1201 or GEOG-1202 or the atmospheric sciences of climatology and meteorology. permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. The introduction to climatology examines how and why average atmospheric conditions (i.e., climates) vary from GEOG-2213 (3) Introductory Soil Science (3 hrs Lecture place to place and over time (e.g., over months, years, | 2 hrs Lab) This course provides an introduction to centuries). The introduction to meteorology surveys the , the study of soils as physical entities in their nature of the atmosphere and the causes and own right. A review of the history of soil science is characteristics of short-term atmospheric conditions (i.e., followed by a detailed introduction to soil forming factors weather). Methods of collecting and analyzing climate and and soil genesis. A brief review of the US Soil Taxonomy weather data are reviewed, as are the ways in which classification system then introduces a detailed review of atmospheric processes interact with other components of the Canadian Soil Classification System, and the the ecosphere (i.e., the biosphere, lithosphere, geographic distribution of soil types. This is followed by a hydrosphere, humans). review of the physical and chemical properties of soils, soil Requisite Courses: GEOG-1201L (lab) (must be taken organisms and soil organic matter. The course concludes concurrently). with an introduction to edaphology, the study of soils from the point of view of their plant cover. Laboratory sessions GEOG-1202 (3) Introductory (3 hrs deal with the physical and chemical properties of soils Lecture | 2 hrs Lab) This course introduces students to using soil samples collected on one or more field trips, and geomorphology, the study of landforms and landscapes on with soil classification. the surface of the Earth. Processes of geologic (mountain Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course building, volcanism, etc.) and geomorphic change and GEOG-2203. (, erosion, and deposition by water, ice, and Requisite Courses: GEOG-1201 and GEOG-1202 or ) will be surveyed. permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]; GEOG-2213L Requisite Courses: GEOG-1202L (lab) (must be taken (lab) (must be taken concurrently). concurrently). GEOG-2214 (3) Soil-Vegetation Systems (3 hrs Lecture GEOG-2204 (3) Human Impact on the Environment (3 | 2 hrs Lab) A review of edaphology, the study of soils hrs Lecture) This course studies the causes, effects, and from the point of view of their plant cover, is followed by controls of detrimental change to the an examination of soils as nutrient delivery systems to both resulting from human activity. Emphasis will be given to natural cover and agroecosystems. Emphasis is placed on macro- and micronutrient supply, the use of fertilizers and GEOG-2219 (3) Glacial and Periglacial Processes (3 organic residues, the role of organic farming, and water hrs Lecture | 2 hrs Lab) This course examines the supply, drainage and erosion. This is followed by a geomorphic processes operating in glacial and periglacial discussion of the basic ecological/physiological environments. Topics discussed include the basic requirements of plants important in understanding concepts of physical glaciology, glacial erosion and vegetation formations and ecoclimatic regions. The course , geology and Pleistocene concludes with a major discussion of Canada's ecoclimatic chronology, the methods used to interpret and reconstruct regions and the relationships between their vegetation glacial and successions, the causes of global covers, soil types and climates. Laboratory work includes glaciation, periglacial processes and landforms, and the the determination of certain soil nutrient contents, and the geomorphic significance of sea ice. Analytical and data role of soil organic matter, plant residues and plant cover in acquisition techniques are emphasized in the labs. limiting erosion, and the ecoclimatic aspects of vegetation Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course formation distribution. and GEOG-2201 | GEOG-2211. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: GEOG-1202 or permission of the and GEOG-2203. instructor [prerequisite(s)]; GEOG-2219L (lab) (must be Requisite Courses: GEOG-2213 [prerequisite(s)]; taken concurrently). GEOG-2214L (lab) (must be taken concurrently). GEOG-2304 (3) Computer Mapping (3 hrs Lecture | 2 GEOG-2215 (3) Mineralogy and Petrology (3 hrs hrs Lab) This course provides an introduction to the theory, Lecture | 2 hrs Lab) Students are introduced to the practice, and methods of computer mapping. Students chemical and physical properties of the common make use of existing cartographic and statistical data and rocks. Emphasis is placed on the origin, composition bases, as well as input information through digitizing and and classification of the common minerals and types. scanning, to construct thematic maps using various Weekly laboratories provide the student with the skills microcomputer software packages. necessary for routine identification of minerals and rocks in Requisite Courses: GEOG-1102 or GEOG-1103 or hand samples. Students are also introduced to the GEOG-1201 or GEOG-1202 or permission of the instructor fundamentals of optical mineralogy, which include the [prerequisite(s)]; GEOG-2304L (lab) (must be taken practice of study and identification of minerals using the concurrently). polarizing microscope and rock thin sections. An optional field trip highlighting local geological features serves as an GEOG-2306 (3) Introduction to Geographic introduction to field recognition and classification of Information Systems (3 hrs Lecture | 2 hrs Lab) This minerals and rocks and their associated provenance. course provides a systematic overview of GIS Requisite Courses: GEOG-1202 or permission of the methodology and theory covering the essential principles of instructor [prerequisite(s)]; GEOG-2215L (lab) (must be data acquisition, input, storage, manipulation, and output. taken concurrently). The laboratory component of this course provides hands-on experience using industry standard software. GEOG-2216 (3) Physical Geology (3 hrs Lecture | 2 hrs Requisite Courses: GEOG-2304 or permission of the Lab) This course surveys the elements of stratigraphy, instructor [prerequisite(s)]; GEOG-2306L (lab) (must be structural geology, earthquakes, , and taken concurrently). volcanism within the unifying concept of plate . Labs demonstrate the methods of determining the GEOG-2309 (3) Statistical Techniques in characteristics of major geological structures as they Environmental Analysis (3 hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) typically appear on maps and air photos. Statistics describe and summarize data, and make Requisite Courses: GEOG-2215 [prerequisite(s)]; predictions about a population from the information GEOG-2216L (lab) (must be taken concurrently). contained in samples. This course provides a working understanding of the elementary statistical techniques and GEOG-2218 (3) Fluvial and Hillslope Processes (3 hrs computational procedures for students with little Lecture | 2 hrs Lab) This course examines geomorphic background in mathematics, and focuses on the processes operating in rivers and on slopes. Among the applications of these tools to the analyses of geographical topics discussed are the factors which influence the and environmental data. Topics include scales of stability and form of slopes, the characteristics of measurement, univariate descriptive statistics, time series watersheds and stream networks, the factors which analysis, probability, sampling design, hypothesis testing, govern the forms, patterns adjustments and long profiles of regression and correlation analysis, and models as river channels, the transport of sediment in fluvial systems, quantitative techniques. the depositional features produced by streams, and the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course long-term evolution of entire landscapes. Labs emphasize and GEOG-2310. both analytic methods and the interpretation of maps and Requisite Courses: GEOG-1102 or GEOG-1103 or air photos. GEOG-1201 or GEOG-1202 or permission of the instructor Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course [prerequisite(s)]; GEOG-2309L (lab) (must be taken and GEOG-2201. concurrently). Requisite Courses: GEOG-1202 [prerequisite(s)]; GEOG-2218L (lab) (must be taken concurrently). GEOG-2316 (3) Introduction to Remote Sensing (3 hrs Lecture | 2 hrs Lab) This course introduces the principles of remote sensing and image analysis with a focus on the national economies. This course provides a broad physics, sensor technology, processing, interpretation and overview of the world tourism industry that includes a applications of remotely sensed imagery with a specific geo-historical perspective on the origins, evolution, and emphasis on optical sensors and technologies. growth of tourism, the structure of the tourism industry, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course tourism market segments, destinations and demands, and and GEOG-3304. the impacts of tourism on both tourists themselves and their Requisite Courses: GEOG-2304 or permission of the host communities. Concepts of capacity and sustainable instructor [prerequisite(s)]; GEOG-2316L (lab) (must be tourism are addressed. Some attention is given to local, taken concurrently). regional, and Canadian development strategies and special topics in tourism. GEOG-2401 (3) Agricultural Geography (3 hrs Lecture) Requisite Courses: GEOG-1102 or GEOG-1103 or A study of agriculture from the viewpoint of physical and permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. cultural environments, systems of exploitation, regional analysis, and a survey of the world's major agricultural GEOG-2414 (3) The Urban Environment (3 hrs Lecture) activities. Cities are artificial environments. They absorb vast quantities of resources from surrounding areas and create GEOG-2407 (3) Recreation Geography (3 hrs Lecture) great volumes of waste. They can also have a tremendous Expanded leisure time has led to increased demands on effect on their surrounding hinterland. Their "ecological recreational space from the level of the city park and footprint" is significant. This course examines the structure playground to the use and abuse of wilderness areas. This and activities of cities and the resulting effects on the course discusses the concept of competing and multifacial environment. Approaches to developing more sustainable recreational space use. Emphasis is put upon topical and environmentally sensitive cities are discussed. questions. Requisite Courses: GEOG-1103 or GEOG 2415 or Requisite Courses: GEOG-1102 or GEOG-1103 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. GEOG-2415 (3) An Introduction to Urban GEOG-2408 (3) Environmental Perception and Human Development (3 hrs Lecture) This course will examine Behaviour (3 hrs Lecture) This course will focus on the origins and evolution of cities, urban design, varied themes and topics relating to perceptions of physical morphologic and townscape elements, and the economy and social environments. Variations in the perception, and structure of urban systems. images, and attitudes held by individuals and groups within different societies will be examined and related to varied GEOG-2416 (3) Sex, Gender, Space and Place (3 hrs behavioral responses within a spatial and environmental Lecture) This course examines, from interdisciplinary context. Topics of interest in this course are (1) perception perspectives including those of Women's and Gender of natural hazards (floods, droughts, frosts, hail, etc.); (2) Studies, Geography, and Environmental Studies, perception of natural resources and the management of relationships among sex, gender, space and place in natural resources; (3) images of urban neighbourhoods, societies, cultures, environments, and ecosystems. cities, metropolitan regions, provinces, countries, the Selected relevant topics are considered, such as world; (4) mental maps; (5) attitudes towards resource ecofeminism, the cultural politics and political geography of development and the implications for local, regional, and sex and sexual identities, the gendering and sexing of city national planning. landscape and architecture, notions of public and private Requisite Courses: GEOG-1102 or permission of the space, and the space/place in the sociocultural instructor [prerequisite(s)]. construction of femininity and masculinity. We consider how sex, gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and GEOG-2411 (3) Geography of Globalization (3 hrs other aspects of identity affect the transformation of space Lecture) This course engages the topic of globalization into place. from a specifically geographical perspective. In today's Cross-listed: ENV-2416(3) and WGS-2416(3). world, a small minority of people lead relatively affluent Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course lives. For the majority, however, life is a constant struggle and ENV-2416 | WGS-2416. for survival. At the same time, the statement that we live in Requisite Courses: GEOG-1102 and GEOG-1103, or one world has probably never been truer. The struggle of ENV-1600, WGS-1232 or permission of the instructor the many is related very strongly to the comfort of the few. [prerequisite(s)]. This course will examine the impact of globalization on different types of economies and the political, social, GEOG-2417 (3) An Introduction to Economic cultural, and environmental change that people experience Geography (3 hrs Lecture) This course is designed to in an interconnected "one world". introduce the student to the basic principles of economic Requisite Courses: GEOG-1103 or permission of the geography. The course is divided into two main topic instructor [prerequisite(s)]. areas. The first is an introduction to location theory, and the second introduces regional economic development. In GEOG-2412 (3) A Geographical Perspective on essence, location theory attempts to determine why Tourism (3 hrs Lecture) Tourism is the world's most economic activities are located where they are or why rapidly growing industry. It is now essential to the they should be located in one place as opposed to another. Canadian economy, and is the mainstay of many other It looks at all types of economic activity, including agriculture, manufacturing, and retail. The second topic, examining economic development and trade, seeks to GEOG-3210 (3) Hydrology (3 hrs Lecture | 2 hrs Lab) This explain why some regions prosper while others do not. It course examines all major components (precipitation, also examines strategies that will enable a region to evaporation, streamflow, groundwater) of the hydrologic enhance its economic development potential and explains cycle with the most attention being given to surface patterns of trade. hydrology. The emphasis throughout the course will be Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course placed upon the methods by which each component may and GEOG-2409. be measured or estimated. Additional topics to be covered Requisite Courses: GEOG-1103 or permission of the include the causes and consequences of floods, flood instructor [prerequisite(s)]. frequency analysis, estimation of peak streamflows, snow hydrology, sediment transport, water balance methods, GEOG-2419 (3) Resource Development and the and urban hydrology. Weekly assignments will provide Canadian Environment (3 hrs Lecture) This course experience in the practical aspects of data treatment, examines the changing dynamics of natural resource measurement techniques, and methods of prediction. This development. In discussing different resources, including course is offered in alternate years. energy, extrative and consumptive industries, the course Requisite Courses: GEOG-1201 and GEOG-1202 or contrasts historic and modern approaches to development. permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]; GEOG-3210L Particular attention is given to the environmental (lab) (must be taken concurrently). consequences of primary resource production, as well as the role that these industries play in modern Canadian GEOG-3211 (3) Karst and Coastal Geomorphology (3 society. hrs Lecture | 2 hrs Lab) Nearly a third of Manitoba is made Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course up of rocks highly susceptible to chemical solution, and and GEOG-2409. surficial and subterranean karstification is an important Requisite Courses: GEOG-1102 or ENV-1600 or aspect of landscape development in the province. Canada permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. possesses the longest coastline in the world; Manitoba is the only prairie province with a sea coast; and Manitoba's GEOG-2431 (3) Population Geography (3 hrs Lecture) lacustrine shorelines show many examples of the same This course examines the history of the growth of the features seen in marine environments. This course world's population and the present day crises inherent in examines the distinct processes and landscapes in regions both the numbers and distribution of the global totals. of carbonate rocks and evaporites, and in the coastal Special attention is paid to the problems of defining such zone. Practical laboratory work and field investigations will terms as "over-population" and to the lack of correlation be integral parts of this course. between population, resources and technology. Requisite Courses: GEOG-2218 and GEOG-2219 Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course [prerequisite(s)]; GEOG-3211L (lab) (must be taken and GEOG-3401. concurrently). Requisite Courses: GEOG-1103 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. GEOG-3215 (3) (3 hrs Lecture) This course first addresses the history of biogeography and the GEOG-2503 (3) Manitoba's Physical and Human contemporary views on both species diversity and Environments (3 hrs Lecture) The main physical features biodiversity. This is followed by an examination of the role of Manitoba are examined first. The second part of the of in helping account for contemporary floral course deals with rural settlement, beginning with the Red and faunal realms, a review of MacArthur and Wilson's River Settlement and proceeding to the main homesteading "equilibrium theory of island biogeography", and a period from 1870 to 1930. In the third part of the course, consideration of how species colonize isolated locations emphasis is given to economic development in Northern such as islands. Anthropogenic alterations of natural Manitoba, flood control works in the Red River Valley, and ecosystems are then reviewed in terms of nutrient cycling aspects of Winnipeg's growth, relative decline, and ethnic disruptions, and the course concludes with an examination mix. of both natural and human induced vegetation cover Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course changes during the . and GEOG-2500. Requisite Courses: GEOG-2213 and GEOG-2214, or the Requisite Courses: A minimum of 3 credits of 1000-level former GEOG-2203, or permission of the instructor Geography courses or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. [prerequisite(s)]. GEOG-3216 (3) Arctic Environments (3 hrs Lecture) The GEOG-3204 (3) Climate Change and Variability (3 hrs Arctic comprises about one-third of Canada but most Lecture) The causes and characteristics of regional and 'southern' Canadians have little more than a passing global climate change and variability will be examined, as knowledge of its character. This course is designed to will be the methods of reconstructing climate histories. improve our understanding of the physical environment, Emphasis will be placed on the North American experience. ecology, history, people, economy, and political Topics will include atmosphere teleconnections (e.g., El development of a region which becomes less remote from Nino and La Nina), global warming, and climate forecasting. the affairs of the nation each year. Requisite Courses: GEOG-2207 or permission of the Requisite Courses: GEOG-1201 and GEOG-1202 or instructor [prerequisite(s)]. permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: GEOG-2316 or permission of the GEOG-3218 (3) Global Biochemical Cycles (3 hrs instructor [prerequisite(s)]; GEOG-3319L (lab) (must be Lecture) This course is an examination of global cycles of taken concurrently). water and major elements, including carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur as expressed in atmospheric, GEOG-3330 (3) Research Methods in Geography (3 terrestrial, , and freshwater environments. Students hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to skills for learn about topics such as interactions between cycles conducting geographic research, and explores the uses, and the Earth's climate; interactions between global and limitations, and methods associated with quantitative and local processes; and impacts of human pressures such as qualitative analysis in human and physical geography. land use change and pollution. These topics are explored These skills are relevant for careers in academic and using current scientific literature, lecture, group professional fields. Topics include primary data collection discussions, and class presentation. and analyses, questionnaire design and structured Requisite Courses: GEOG-1201 and GEOG-1202 or interviews, data assembly and interpretation, research permission of the Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. design and ethics, and the presentation of research results. This courses includes a significant practical GEOG-3219 (3) Quaternary Environments (3 hrs element. Lecture) The Quaternary is a period of dramatic climatic Requisite Courses: GEOG-1102 and GEOG-1103 and changes. This course examines the consequences of GEOG-1201 and GEOG-1202 and GEOG-2309 or Quaternary climatic fluctuations on the physical permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. environment. Consideration will be given to some of the important evidence and techniques used to reconstruct GEOG-3402 (3) Urbanization in the Developing World Quaternary environments and chronology. (3 hrs Lecture) The process of urbanization is now a Requisite Courses: Any second year physical developing, as opposed to a developed, world geography course or permission of the instructor phenomenon. This course will explore the factors [prerequisite(s)]. promoting urbanization in the developing world and discuss models of third world cities. The emphasis will be on GEOG-3306 (3) Advanced Geographic Information problems facing the cities and the solutions that have been Systems (3 hrs Lecture | 2 hrs Lab) This course deals attempted. Specific topics will include urban growth and with advanced theory and applications within GIS including management, urban services, squatter settlements, the 3D modeling, spatial analysis, geostatistical analysis, housing market, survival tactics of the urban poor, urban network analysis, and data creation, management and government, and the function of the city in the developing fusion with other data sources and types. Laboratory world. instruction provides the students with enhanced skills Requisite Courses: GEOG-1103 or GEOG-2415 or through exposure to the higher-level functions of industry permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. standard GIS software. Requisite Courses: GEOG-2306 or GEOG-3302 or GEOG-3408 (3) Water Resources (3 hrs Lecture) The permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]; GEOG-3306L following are just some of the topics developed: the (lab) (must be taken concurrently). Columbia River Treaty, the Churchill Diversion, is Canada's water for sale? In predicting future Canadian needs for GEOG-3307 (3) Advanced Computer Mapping (3 hrs water, the relative merits of direct and indirect methods of Lecture | 2 hrs Lab) Topics introduced in GEOG-2304(3) forecasting are assessed. Analytical techniques such as (Computer Mapping) are expanded upon, and new topics economic base, input-output, and cost-benefit are fully are presented, through a series of seminars on selected developed. areas of current cartographic research. Government Requisite Courses: GEOG-1102 or permission of the agencies and businesses involved in a map production are instructor [prerequisite(s)]. visited in order to examine methods and technology used in spatial data collection, handling and transfer. Lab work GEOG-3411 (3) Heritage Conservation and Tourism (3 includes creating interactive hyperlinked maps and hrs Lecture) Tourism is the world's largest growth animated maps, showing spatial change over time. A industry, with cultural tourism being its most rapidly significant component of this course is the completion of a growing sector. Cultural tourism is highly dependent on the substantial mapping project. development, interpretation, and marketing of a region's Requisite Courses: GEOG-2304 or permission of the heritage resources (i.e., its folk arts, historic sites, instructor [prerequisite(s)]; GEOG-3307L (lab) (must be architecture and rural land urban landscapes). This course taken concurrently). examines the nature of heritage resources and reviews the processes of their identification and the strategies for GEOG-3319 (3) Advanced Remote Sensing (3 hrs their development. Preservation, interpretation and Lecture | 2 hrs Lab) This course provides instruction on management techniques and their relationship to the needs advanced image processing and classification techniques. of the tourist industry will be discussed. The emphasis of These techniques are applied to the study of physical and the course will be on the problems of heritage resource human environments through a series of laboratory development in North America, particularly in western exercises and assignments. Students also gain exposure Canada. to RADAR and hyperspectral remote sensing including Requisite Courses: GEOG-1102 and GEOG-1103 or exposure to handheld imaging devices. permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. within health geography will be synthesized to consider its GEOG-3413 (3) Urban Revitalization: Rebuilding of potential as an approach for health-related research. Decaying Cities (3 hrs Lecture) Issues surrounding Additionally, the use of geographic techniques and tools growth and development have been replaced by concerns are explored including mapping, spatial analysis and about decline and revitalization in many North American and qualitative inquiry. European cities. This course will focus on urban decline Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and revitalization efforts. Theories of decline and the and GEOG-2418. demographic, economic, and physical changes that occur Requisite Courses: GEOG-2431(3) or the former in declining city neighbourhoods will be discussed. The GEOG-3401(3) or permission of the instructor course will then explore revitalization efforts, drawing [prerequisite(s)]. extensively on case study material from selected cities as well as field and project work within Winnipeg. Broad GEOG-3432 (3) Urban and Community Planning (3 hrs approaches to revitalization, revitalizing the commercial Lecture) Urban planning is a process that has importance sector, attracting people back to the inner city, leadership for the quality of life of those who live in inner-city and and the role of partnerships, rejuvenating older, greying downtown neighbourhoods. According to Friedmann, suburban neighbourhoods, and planning for long term planning is an interdisciplinary field that "links knowledge to sustainability will be among the topics discussed. action". This course examines traditions, theories and Requisite Courses: GEOG-2415 or permission of the values in planning practice and highlights the important role instructor [prerequisite(s)]. in planning of civil society and community. Broad approaches to planning in Canada, the USA, and Britain, GEOG-3415 (3) Contested Space: A Geography of and specific processes and policies in Winnipeg, provide Place (3 hrs Lecture) The "new cultural geography" students with background on planning systems. The stresses the relationship between space and culture, emphasis in this course is on practical knowledge and skills examining culture as it is constituted through space and as for community organizers. place. The course explores the struggles that make Cross-listed: UIC-3030(3). cultures and how they are worked out in particular Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and places (i.e., landscapes). It also discusses spatial and UIC-3030. aspects of ideologies of race, the role of language and Requisite Courses: UIC-1001 or UIC-2001 or GEOG-1103 discourse in defining cultural spaces, the development and [prerequisite(s)]. maintenance of subcultures, immigration as sources of tensions in the contemporary world, issues of gender, and GEOG-3443 (3) Advanced Tourism and Recreation the ways in which landscapes and places carry the Geography (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course is physical and symbolic imprints of cultural wars. based on a selection of advanced readings on topics and Requisite Courses: GEOG-1102 or GEOG-1103 or problems dealing with recreational and tourism behavior, permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. the supply and demand for different types of recreational space and tourism facilities, and issues of sustainability. A GEOG-3430 (3) Housing and the Neighbourhood (3 hrs research project may be required of each student. Lecture) This course examines the complexity of shelter Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course environments within the urban landscape. The focus is on and GEOG-4407 | GEOG-4443. the North American housing market, the history of housing, Requisite Courses: GEOG-2412(3) or GEOG-3411(3) or and the way in which traditional and non-traditional markets permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. are defined and understood. The unique characteristics of the modern city are examined as they are manifested in GEOG-3445 (3) Power, Knowledge, Geography (3 hrs homelessness, marginal housing forms, shelter-induced Seminar/Discussion) This course examines the power of poverty, suburban decline, and inner-city issues. Emphasis geographical ideas in shaping social values and is also placed on current/historical policy and program understandings. Seminars focus on analyzing spatial responses to housing-related issues at the neighbourhood, formations of various historical and contemporary topics municipal, provincial, and federal level. such as colonialism, nationalism, warfare, popular culture, Cross-listed: UIC-3430(3). science, racism, surveillance, the body, genocide, the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course climate crisis, and fundamentalism. Students are asked to and UIC-3430. consider how 'the production of space' accompanies and Requisite Courses: GEOG-1102 or UIC-1001 influences the production of knowledge, revealing [prerequisite(s)]. connections between geography and power. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course GEOG-3431 (3) Health Geography (3 hrs Lecture) This and GEOG-4415 | GEOG-4445. course is an introduction to the sub-discipline of health Requisite Courses: Any second year systematic human geography designed to explore how the geographical geography (GEOG-24XX) or regional geography focus on place contributes to a better understanding of (GEOG-25XX) course or permission of the instructor health and well being. The course is structured to examine [prerequisite(s)]. both ecological perspectives of the relationship between humans and disease, as well as how the social, built, and GEOG-3508 (3) Geographical Issues in the natural contexts of the environment in which we live have Developing World (3 hrs Lecture) Focusing on Asian, profound effects on health and health care. Concepts African, and Latin American countries, this course concentrates on development theories and issues. The to suit the interests of both the Instructor and the students. course content includes discussion of the historical, Restrictions: Honours Form Required. political, socio-economic, cultural, and demographic factors Requisite Courses: GEOG-2207, or the former important to the development equation and illustrates how GEOG-2205, or the former GEOG-2206, or permission of these factors vary from region to region. Special attention the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. is paid to newsworthy and unfolding issues of the day in the developing areas of the world. GEOG-4212 (3) Topics in Earth Sciences (3 hrs Requisite Courses: GEOG-1102 or GEOG-1103 or Seminar/Discussion | 3 hrs Lab) The course examines permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. current and historically significant concepts in fluvial and glacial geomorphology, geology, and related earth GEOG-3509 (3) Canada's Physical and Human sciences, particularly those which produced lasting shifts Environments (3 hrs Lecture) Students are introduced to in the way earth science phenomena are interpreted. 'regionalism' as a geographical interpretation of Canada. Among the broad subject areas which are discussed are The country's main regions are examined with an emphasis concepts in landscape evolution, the characteristics, on how the physical and human environments of each patterns and metamorphosis of river channels, glacial have interacted to give it a unique character. Theory and spillways on the Prairies, catastrophic drainage of ice methodology in regional geography are also considered sheets, patterns of glacial erosion, geomorphic thresholds, with a focus on the evolution of Canadian geographical plate tectonics theory, and asteroid impact and the thought. . Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Honours Form Required. and GEOG-3501_6. Requisite Courses: 6 credits hours from GEOG-2215, Requisite Courses: A minimum of 3 credit hours at the GEOG-2216, GEOG-2218, or GEOG-2219 or the former 1000 level or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. GEOG-2201 or the former GEOG-2202 [prerequisite(s)].

GEOG-3510 (3) Prairie Landscapes (3 hrs Lecture) The GEOG-4215 (3) Projects in Earth Science (3 hrs Canadian Prairies are recognized as a main geographical Seminar/Discussion) This course discusses region of Canada. This course focuses on the making of state-of-the-art geomatics techniques that can be applied the human landscape of the region, although geological to understanding and monitoring the Earth's surface structure, climate, natural vegetation, and other physical environment, as well as other planetary surfaces. These features are included. The roles of Aboriginal Peoples and include techniques for monitoring water quality, vegetation European and other immigrants in creating human health, greenhouse gases, and planetary surface mapping. landscapes are examined. Lectures are supplemented by individual research projects that apply geomatics concepts to particular aspects of GEOG-3511 (3) Topical Regions in Geography (3 hrs terrestrial and planetary monitoring. Lecture) This course is a systematic study of a topical Restrictions: Honours Form Required. world region from a geographic perspective. For the Requisite Courses: GEOG-1201 and GEOG-1202; or particular region selected for study, emphasis is placed on GEOG-2215 or GEOG-2316 or GEOG-3319 and permission historical, political, socio-economic, cultural, demographic, of instructor [prerequisite(s)]. and urban-rural development aspects as appropriate. The region of study will vary from year to year, with particular GEOG-4219 (3) Physical Geography Seminar (3 hrs attention paid to regions currently or recently dominating Seminar/Discussion) This course integrates aspects of world events. physical geography and examines contemporary concepts Requisite Courses: GEOG-1102 or GEOG-1103 or and issues in earth science, atmospheric science, and permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. biogeography. Research topics vary to suit the interests of the students and the expertise of the instructor. GEOG-3512 (3) The Human Geography of Northern Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Canada (3 hrs Lecture) This course investigates Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours in Physical Geography contemporary issues in Canada's arctic and subarctic at or above the 2000 level [prerequisite(s)]. regions, focusing on the three territories: Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut. This region continues GEOG-4231 (3) Topics in Biogeography (3 hrs to be subjected to a variety of changes in the political, Seminar/Discussion) This course provides a synthesis of social and economic landscapes. The purpose of this the geographical aspects in the development and concepts course is to provide students insight into how these within biogeography and shows how descriptions or changes impact the human geography of northern Canada. analysis of the delicate balances within the biosphere can Special attention is paid to ongoing and newsworthy be approached through the use of ecological principles. issues. This course fulfills the Indigenous Requirement. Particular attention will be given to inadvertent modification Requisite Courses: GEOG-1102 or permission of the of the biosphere. instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Requisite Courses: GEOG-3215, or GEOG-2213 and GEOG-4203 (3) Topics in Climatology (3 hrs GEOG-2214 and permission of the instructor Seminar/Discussion) This seminar course requires [prerequisite(s)]. students to complete climate-related research projects, either individually or as a group. Research topics will vary GEOG-4320 (3) Projects in Geomatics (3 hrs Lecture) Students work in small groups to develop geomatics research. This course alternates with GEOG-4403(3). applications addressing selected planning, environmental Restrictions: Honours Form Required. management or research problems. Emphasis is on Requisite Courses: GEOG-2414 or GEOG-2415 conceptual design of the selected application and [prerequisite(s)]. implementation of a prototype solution using GIS and remote sensing approaches to problem solving. Students GEOG-4409 (3) Architecture and City Planning (3 hrs undertake team projects solicited from a number of external Lecture) This course explores the relationship between organizations through a team approach. Practical aspects architecture and the city form, functions and planning in the of GIS project management such as team building, social and historical context of the 20th century. Planning production of work plans and schedules, and the writing theory and practice is more specialized and separated from and presenting of final reports are introduced through this architectural theory. Yet, architecture has an important approach. Final results are presented in both oral and visual and functional impact on the urban form of the city writted reports. and its planning. We survey the major architectural schools Restrictions: Honours Form Required. (Art Nouveau, Bahaus, International Style) and the cultural Requisite Courses: GEOG-3307 or GEOG-4307, and avant-garde trends (Futurism, Surrealism, Situationism), GEOG-3319 or GEOG-4308 or permission of the instructor and their relationship to and impact on city planning are [prerequisite(s)]. surveyed. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. GEOG-4321 (3) Topics in Geomatics I (3 hrs Lecture) Requisite Courses: GEOG-2414 or GEOG-2415, or the This course provides a synthesis of the current former GEOG-2406 or permission of the instructor developments within the field and study of geomatics as it [prerequisite(s)]. relates to hyperspectral remote sensing. Particular attention is given to applications that have a focus on physical and GEOG-4441 (3) Advanced Studies in Environmental urban systems. Additional topics are integrated where Perception (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course will appropriate. Students are required to select an area of consist of seminars examining selected topics relating to interest and lead class discussions based on their perceptions of physical and cultural environments. It will selection. review and evaluate methods employed by geographers in Restrictions: Honours Form Required. the field of environmental perception. Whenever possible, Requisite Courses: GEOG-3307 or GEOG-4307, and students will be encouraged to apply these methods to GEOG-3319 or GEOG-4308, or permission of the instructor local problems in natural hazards, mental mapping, and [prerequisite(s)]. landscape aesthetics. This course will be of interest to students with an orientation to either physical or cultural GEOG-4322 (3) Topics in Geomatics II (3 hrs Lecture) geography. This course provides a synthesis of the current Restrictions: Honours Form Required. developments within the field and study of geomatics with Requisite Courses: GEOG-2408 [prerequisite(s)]. a focus on synthetic aperture radar for physical and urban systems. Additional topics within this course include LIDAR GEOG-4443 (3) Advanced Tourism and Recreation mapping, GPS surveying and advanced spacial analysis. Geography (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course is Students are required to select an area of interest and lead based on a selection of advanced readings on topics and class discussions based on their selection. problems dealing with recreational and tourism behavior, Restrictions: Honours Form Required. the supply and demand for different types of recreational Requisite Courses: GEOG-3307 or GEOG-4307, and space and tourism facilities, and issues of sustainability. A GEOG-3319 or GEOG-4308, or permission of the instructor research project may be required of each student. [prerequisite(s)]. Additional in-depth work is required to receive credit at the 4000-level. GEOG-4403 (3) Urban Land Use Developmental Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Processes (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) An investigation of and GEOG-3443 | GEOG-4407. the processes by which urban development occurs and a Requisite Courses: GEOG-2412(3) or GEOG-3411(3) or critical appraisal of resultant urban forms. Some permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. consideration will be given to the evaluation of relevant theory and to the nature and effect of planning controls on GEOG-4445 (3) Power, Knowledge, Geography (3 hrs urban form. This course alternates with GEOG-4404(3). Seminar/Discussion) This course examines the power of Restrictions: Honours Form Required. geographical ideas in shaping social values and Requisite Courses: GEOG-2414 or GEOG-2415 understandings. Seminars focus on analyzing spatial [prerequisite(s)]. formations of various historical and contemporary topics such as colonialism, nationalism, warfare, popular culture, GEOG-4404 (3) Field Research in Urban Geography (3 science, racism, surveillance, the body, genocide, the hrs Field Study | 3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course climate crisis, and fundamentalism. Students are asked to investigates, examines and appraises the major varieties of consider how 'the production of space' accompanies and primary and secondary materials available for the study of influences the production of knowledge, revealing urban areas. Particular emphasis will be placed on the connections between geography and power. Additional acquisition and evaluation of local material, and the course in-depth work is required to receive credit at the will therefore call for students to be engaged in field 4000-level. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Geography Department regarding the availability of this and GEOG-3445 | GEOG-4415. course and the location of field camp. Requisite Courses: Any second year systematic human Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. geography (GEOG-24XX) or regional geography Requisite Courses: GEOG-3330 and permission of the (GEOG-25XX) course or permission of the instructor instructor [prerequisite(s)]. [prerequisite(s)]. GEOG-4901 (6) Honours Geography Thesis (3 hrs GEOG-4450 (3) Geographic Perspectives on Project / Thesis) The Honours thesis provides the student Environment and Sustainability (3 hrs with the opportunity to design and complete an original Seminar/Discussion) This course considers geographic research project on a subject of interest and relevant to the and environmental appproaches to sustainable discipline. In addition to completing the project, students in staples-based development, particularly as they apply to this course are expected to meet with a faculty supervisor water, energy, and mining. Discussion begins by outlining on a regular schedule throughout the academic year. change, complexity, uncertainty, and conflicts associated Presentation of their research results verbally and in thesis with primary and derived resources, including those form to the Geography Department is an integral part of the contributing to climate change. Important technological course. innovations and policy developments designed to address Restrictions: Honours Form Required. these challenges are contemplated. Topics include Requisite Courses: GEOG-3330, 36 credit hours in corporate social responsibility policies, public-private Geography, a Geography GPA of at least 3.0, and initiatives, community-based resource management, permission of the Department Chair [prerequisite(s)]. adaptive management, and social learning through public participation. Cross-listed: ENV-4450(3). Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not hold credit for this course and ENV-4450. Requisite Courses: Two of GEOG-2204, GEOG-2212, GEOG-3408, GEOG-3508, ENV-2603, or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)].

GEOG-4701 (3) Directed Readings in Human Geography (3 hrs Directed Reading) This course exposes students to contemporary and topical issues of human geography through authoritative readings compiled by the instructor. The student is required to produce a short dissertation. Restrictions: Department Permission Required.

GEOG-4702 (3) Directed Readings in Physical Geography (3 hrs Directed Reading) This course exposes students to contemporary and topical issues of physical geography through authoritative readings compiled by the instructor. The student is required to produce a short dissertation. Restrictions: Department Permission Required.

GEOG-4703 (3) Directed Readings in Geomatics (3 hrs Lecture) This course exposes students to contemporary and topical issues of geomatics through authoritative readings compiled by the instructor. Students are required to produce a short essay on a topic agreed upon by the instructor and the student. Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required.

GEOG-4801 (3) Geography Field Seminar (30 hrs Field Study | 3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course deals with the practical methodologies and problems associated with field research. Students are introduced to the necessary skills required for the acquisition, analyses, and presentation of primary field data. In addition to oral and written presentations of their research, students are required to participate in an intensive 10 day field camp at an off-campus venue prior to the start of the Fall Term lectures. Students should consult with the Chair of the GERMAN STUDIES

GERM-1001 (6) Introductory German (3 hrs Lecture | 1 Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course hrs Lab) This course is designed for students who have and GERM-3102 | HIST-2324. no previous knowledge of German and who wish to acquire a command of the written and spoken language. Its GERM-2109 (3) Advanced Intermediate German I (3 main aim is to provide a solid base in vocabulary, grammar, hrs Lecture) This course is designed to help students make and pronounciation. Weekly oral practice classes and the transition from the intermediate to the advanced level. computer exercises supplement the course in order to give Students expand their vocabulary and develop their skills in the student additional practice in the practical applications reading, oral communication, and writing about the culture of the language. of the German-speaking world. In this context, they Note: Students who have AP German Language, the practice complex grammar such as prepositions with International Baccalaureate in German, or the Deutsches accusative and dative, subordinate syntax, relative Sprachdiplom 2 or who have received a year or more of clauses, and the conditional subjunctive. their secondary school education in a German-speaking Requisite Courses: GERM-2001 with a minimum grade of environment may not receive credit for this course. B, or AP German Language, or the International Requisite Courses: GERM-1001L (lab) (must be taken Baccalaureate in German, or the Deutsches Sprachdiplom concurrently). 2 [prerequisite(s)].

GERM-2001 (6) Intermediate German (3 hrs Lecture | 1 GERM-2110 (3) Advanced Intermediate German II (3 hrs Lab) The aim of this course is to enable students to hrs Lecture) This course is designed to continue the increase their proficiency in the following skills: writing, transition from the intermediate to the advanced level. reading, aural comprehension, and oral expression. Class Students expand their vocabulary and develop their skills in time is devoted to the systematic review of grammar reading, oral communication, and writing about the culture essentials, discussion of short literary texts and non-fiction of the German-speaking world. In this context, they on topics of current interest, written compositions and practice complex grammatical structures such as adjective practice in the spoken language. Additional practice is endings, the passive voice ,and the indirect discourse undertaken during a one-hour session of small-group work subjunctive. each week. Requisite Courses: GERM-2001, or the former Note: Students who have AP German Language, the GERM-2201, AP German Language, the International International Baccalaureate in German, or the Deutsches Baccalaureate in German, or the Deutsches Sprachdiplom Sprachdiplom 2 or who have received a year or more of 2 [prerequisite(s)]. their secondary school education in a German-speaking environment may not receive credit for this course. GERM-2115 (3) German-English Translation (3 hrs Requisite Courses: German 40S or GERM-1001 with a Lecture) This course introduces the principles of written minimum grade of B [prerequisite(s)]; GERM-2001L (lab) translation from German into English. Practical exercises (must be taken concurrently). focus on translation difficulties relating to English vocabulary, grammar, and style. Students translate short GERM-2101 (3) Studies in German Culture I (3 hrs authentic German-language texts from a variety of sources Lecture) This course offers a broad survey of cultural including newspapers, magazines, and literature. developments in German-speaking Europe from the Middle Requisite Courses: GERM-2109 [prerequisite(s)]. Ages to the Romantic period at the beginning of the 19th century. Slides, films, and audio recordings will help to GERM-2202 (3) German Phonetics (3 hrs Lecture) This present developments in art, architecture, music, and the course presents the theory and practice of German social/political background, while writings by authors such phonetics and phonology, its practical applications (e.g., as Luther, Grimmelshausen, Kant, Lessing, and Goethe will the use of pronunciation dictionaries), and material allow for discussion of themes and issues in the context of realizations in standard German. The theory covered their times. includes the physiology of speech, the International Cross-listed: HIST-2323(3), GERM-3101(3). Phonetic Alphabet, as it relates to German, and phonetic Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course transcription. Emphasis is placed on othoepy (the and GERM-3101 | HIST-2323. relationship between pronunciation and orthography) and on correcting the student's oral performance in German. GERM-2102 (3) Studies in German Culture II (3 hrs Cross-listed: LING-2401(3). Lecture) This course offers a broad survey of cultural Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course developments in German-speaking Europe from the and LING-2401. beginning of the 19th century to the present. Slides, films, Requisite Courses: GERM-2109 [prerequisite(s)]. and audio recordings will help to present developments in art, architecture, music, and the social/political background, GERM-2209 (3) Introduction to German Literature (3 while writings by authors such as E.T.A. Hoffmann, Marx, hrs Lecture) This survey of representative poems, short Freud, Kafka, Brecht, and Christa Wolf will allow for stories, and dramatic texts introduces students to discussion of themes and issues in the context of their significant authors of German literature since the 18th times. century such as Schiller, Goethe, Rilke, Kafka, Frisch, and Cross-listed: HIST-2324(3). Bachmann. It also introduces them to the study of literature: how to read, discuss, and interpret literary texts. texts from about 1770 to the present. The course may Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course include Goethe, Schiller, and the German Romantics; and GERM-2207. Realists such as Ebner-Eschenbach and Fontane; classic Requisite Courses: GERM-2001 or the former Modernists such Kafka, Mann, and Brecht; or postwar and GERM-2201 or GERM-2109 or AP German Language or the contemporary writers such as Bachmann, Grass, Wolf, International Baccalaureate in German or the Deutsches Schlink, and Özdamar. Sprachdiplom 2 [prerequisite(s)]. Cross-listed: GERM-3906(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course GERM-2303 (3) The Child in Europe (3 hrs Lecture) and GERM-3906. Lectures and discussions examine from several Requisite Courses: GERM-2209 and any 3 credits in disciplinary perspectives conceptions of the child and of 2000-level German Studies course except GERM-2001(6) childhood in Europe from ancient times to the present. With [prerequisite(s)]. contributions from such fields as Art History, Classics, English, French, German, History, and Women's Studies, GERM-3101 (3) Studies in German Culture I (3 hrs the course explores Europeans' definitions of children and Lecture) This course offers a broad survey of cultural childhood and their understandings of children in relation to developments in German-speaking Europe from the Middle the family, society, class, gender, religion, and work. We Ages to the Romantic period at the beginning of the 19th examine typical images of childhood in European literature century. Slides, films, and audio recordings help to present and art, the connections between these images and actual developments in art, architecture, music, and the practices, and the continuing impact of these ideas and social/political background, while writings by authors such practices. as Luther, Grimmelshausen, Kant, Lessing, and Goethe Cross-listed: HIST-2303(3). allow for discussion of themes and issues in the context of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course their times. and HIST-2303. Cross-listed: GERM-2101(3) and HIST-2323(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course GERM-2331 (3) History of Modern Germany (3 hrs and GERM-2101 | HIST-2323. Lecture) This survey of political, economic, social and Requisite Courses: GERM-2209 and any 3 credit hour cultural developments in Germany from the Holy Roman course in 2000-level German Studies [prerequisite(s)]. Empire to the Berlin Republic focuses on developments after the Congress of Vienna (1815), including the 1848 GERM-3102 (3) Studies in German Culture II (3 hrs Revolution, Bismarck and German unification 1871, Lecture) This course offers a broad survey of cultural Wilhelmine Germany and imperialism, World War I, the developments in German-speaking Europe from the Weimar Republic, Hitler and National Socialism, World War II beginning of the 19th century to the present. Slides, films, and the Holocaust, the two Germanies in the Cold War, and and audio recordings help to present developments in art, reunification in 1989/90. Major historiographical architecture, music, and the social/political background, controversies and methods of interpreting and analyzing while writings by authors such as E. T. A. Hoffmann, Marx, German history are examined through lectures, explication Freud, Kafka, Brecht and Christa Wolf allow for discussion of primary sources and critical reading of secondary of themes and issues in the context of their times. sources, group and class discussions, and films. Cross-listed: HIST-2324(3), GERM-2102(3). Cross-listed: HIST-2331(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and GERM-2102 | HIST-2324. and HIST-2331. Requisite Courses: GERM-2209 and any 3 credit hour course in 2000-level German Studies [prerequisite(s)]. GERM-2386 (3) German Culture Through Film (3 hrs Lecture) This course uses German feature films to help GERM-3103 (6) The German-Canadian Presence in students develop their language skills and learn about the Canadian History (3 hrs Lecture) This course will focus culture and history of German-speaking Europe since the upon the European origins of German-speaking immigrants 1920s. With the support of subtitles or captioning, guided to Canada, their settlement patterns and their social, exercises, and interpretive discussions, students develop political,and economic roles. In addition, the course will their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills while examine both the effects of international events upon the becoming more familiar with German experience in the German-speaking population and their place in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Some attention is Canadian cultural mosaic. given to German film terminology and the analysis of Note: Please see the Department of History for a specific scenes. The course includes notable films by such course description. directors as Joseph von Sternberg, Rainer Werner Cross-listed: HIST-3560(6). Fassbinder, Volker Schlöndorff, and Fatih Akin. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: GERM-2001 or GERM-2109 or and HIST-3560 | HIST-3561. GERM-2201 or AP German Language or the International Baccalaureate in German or the Deutsches Sprachdiplom 2 GERM-3113 (3) Exploring Language and Society [prerequisite(s)]. Through Texts (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines current events, social issues, and artistic intellectual trends GERM-2906 (3) Studies in German Literature (3 hrs in the contemporary German-speaking world through the Lecture) This course focuses on selected German literary analysis and discussion of media sources including the internet, television, and the press. The course offers presence of German speakers in Canada, their settlement extensive reading practice and is designed for students patterns, their relationship to political culture and the who wish to develop a high level of oral and written Canadian state, and perceptions and self-images of proficiency in German. Emphasis is placed on the German Canadians. acquisition of specialized vocabulary. Course work Note: A knowledge of German is not required. includes written compositions, oral presentations, debates, Cross-listed: HIST-3561(3). and round-table discussions. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: GERM-2109 and any 3 credit and HIST-3560 | HIST-3561. German Studies course at the 2000 level except GERM-2001 [prerequisite(s)]. GERM-3858 (3) The Acquisition of German as an Additional Language (3 hrs Lecture) A language may be GERM-3401 (3) Business German (3 hrs Lecture) This learned at home, in the classroom or on the street. But how course teaches students to communicate effectively in do babies make sense of the sounds around them so they business situations. Course materials include situational can effectively communicate? Why is it difficult for older texts reflecting business activities and covering a range of learners to acquire a second language? Are there secrets topics such as trade, telecommunications, computer for second-language learning? In this course students technology, financial institutions, marketing, and explore the learning and teaching of German as an advertising. The course is designed to expand language additional language. Students also critically examine their skills already acquired as well as to present the specialized own language acquisition as they strive to understand how vocabulary used in the business environment. It includes languages are learned, with an end toward improving their extensive exercises in vocabulary, comprehension, own language skills. business writing, and correspondence. Cross-listed: LING-3405(3). Requisite Courses: GERM-2109 and any 3 credits in Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course 2000-level GERMAN STUDIES course except and LING-3405. GERM-2001(6) [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: GERM-2109 and any 3 credit hours in 2000-level German Studies courses except GERM-2001 GERM-3403 (3) German Lexicology (3 hrs Lecture) This [prerequisite(s)]. course focuses on the German lexicon, its forms and formation. Students learn to distinguish different structural GERM-3906 (3) Studies in German Literature (3 hrs types of words (e.g., acronyms, derivatives), to identify Lecture) This course focuses on selected German literary their basic components (e.g., prefixes, suffixes), and to texts from about 1770 to the present. The course may recognize the mechanisms involved in their formation. include Goethe, Schiller, and the German Romantics; Through the study of synonyms and antonyms, students Realists such as Ebner-Eschenbach and Fontane; classic explore the semantic relationships between words. The Modernists such as Kafka, Mann, and Brecht; or postwar hierarchical structure of the lexicon is examined. Course and contemporary writers such as Bachmann, Grass, work emphasizes practical strategies for vocabulary Wolf, Schlink, and Özdamar. enrichment and mastery. Cross-listed: GERM-2906(3). Cross-listed: LING-3401(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and GERM-2906. and LING-3401. Requisite Courses: GERM-2209 and any 3 credit hours Requisite Courses: GERM-2109 and any 3 credit hours in 2000-level German Studies courses except GERM-2001 in 2000-level German Studies course except [prerequisite(s)]. GERM-2001(6) [prerequisite(s)]. GERM-3910 (3) Special Topics in German Studies (3 GERM-3404 (3) History of the German Language (3 hrs Tutorial) In this tutorial, students explore a topic in hrs Lecture) This course traces the development of the German literature or linguistics under the direction of a German language from early Germanic to the present. It professor. examines both the internal evolution of the German Note: This course may be repeated for credit when the language (its phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, topic varies. semantics, and pragmatics) and the sociocultural and Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. historical factors that influenced its development. Various Requisite Courses: 12 credit hours in 2000-level German linguistic documents illustrating the distinct features of Studies courses and permission of the instructor German in different eras are studied. [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: GERM-2109 and any 3 credit hours in 2000-level German Studies courses except GERM-2001 GERM-3911 (3) Special Topics in German Studies II (3 [prerequisite(s)]. hrs Tutorial) In this tutorial students explore an author, a period, a theme, or a genre under the direction of a GERM-3561 (3) German-Canadian Identity - Historical professor. Perspectives (3 hrs Lecture) This lecture/seminar course will explore questions of ethnic identity, using the example GERM-4401 (6) Special Topics I (3 hrs Tutorial) In this of German Canadians. While students will develop their tutorial students explore an author, a period, a theme, or a individual research projects related to the broader issue of genre under the direction of a professor. ethnicity, class discussion will focus on the historical HISTORY

HIST-1006 (3) Indigenous History to 1900: Origins, and IS-1015 | IS-1016. Contact, Colonialism (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to the history of the Indigenous HIST-1011 (3) Cross Currents in Global Art (3 hrs peoples of North America from the pre-contact period to Lecture) This course provides an overview of the major the end of the nineteenth century. Major themes include the periods and styles in the history of art from the paleolithic origins of Indigenous people, the diversity of Indigenous period to the present. Art, architecture, and cultural societies, contact experiences, and the impact of Christian artifacts from around the globe are analyzed within their missions, colonial warfare, treaties, and assimilationist historical and cultural contexts, with the intention of making policies. The course also addresses some of the traditional connections among cultures and across time periods. limitations of the discipline of history for interpreting the Constructs such as authorship, patronage, politics, gender, Indigenous past, and discusses the sources and colonialism and national identity may be highlighted. methodologies that Indigenous and non-Indigenous Students are introduced to the basics of historical research historians have adopted in order to rethink Eurocentric such as examination of historical interpretations and interpretations. Max. 6 cr hr 1000 History may be counted evidence, comparative analysis, primary sources, for degree credit. bibliographic and narrative skills. Max. 6 cr hr 1000 History may be counted for degree credit. HIST-1007 (3) Indigenous History Since 1900: Racism, Resistance, Renewal (3 hrs Lecture) This course gives HIST-1012 (3) The Worlds of Asia and Africa to 1750 students the opportunity to explore themes and topics in (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to the modern Indigenous history from 1900 to the present. broad themes in Asian and African history in the period up Course content focuses on the themes of Racism, to 1750 with particular focus on political, economic and Resistance and Renewal, and topics include: social transformations. Major themes may include anti-Indigenous racism and inequality in education, health, emergence of civilizations, trade, forms and role of the and the law; histories of Indigenous agency and resistance state, warfare and its legacies, spread of ideas, in political movements, court action and everyday acts; and urbanization, colonization, changing roles of women, examples of efforts to define and enact decolonization migration and technologies. Students are also introduced to such as cultural revitalization and repatriation. The course the basics of historical research such as the examination focuses on the history of Winnipeg and the surrounding of evidence and interpretations, comparative analysis, and area, while examples are also drawn from across Canada bibliographic and narrative skills. and the United States. Max. 6 cr hr 1000 History may be Note: Maximum of 6 credit hours in 1000-level History may counted for degree credit. be counted for degree credit.

HIST-1008 (3) Colonial Genocides and Indigenous HIST-1013 (3) The Worlds of Asia and Africa Since History (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines the impact 1750 (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to of colonial violence on Indigenous peoples in North America the broad themes in Asian and African history in the period from the early contact period until the era of residential since 1750 with particular focus on political, economic and schools. The course is not intended to be a comprehensive social transformations. Major themes may include slavery, overview of all atrocities ever committed against trade, urbanization, colonization, resistance to imperialism, Indigenous peoples. Instead, this course examines a nationalism, race, changing roles of women, war, the role selected number of massacres, genocides, and episodes of the state, migration and human rights. Students are also of ethnic cleansing in depth. The course also addresses introduced to the basics of historical research such as the some of the traditional limitations of the discipline of history examination of evidence and interpretations, comparative for interpreting the Indigenous past, and discusses the analysis, and bibliographic and narrative skills. sources and methodologies that Indigenous and Note: Maximum of 6 credit hours in 1000-level History may non-Indigenous historians have adopted in order to rethink be counted for degree credit. Eurocentric interpretations. Max. 6 cr hr 1000 History may be counted for degree credit. HIST-1014 (3) Europe and the Mediterranean World to 1700 (3 hrs Lecture) This lecture course surveys the HIST-1009 (3) Introduction to Indigenous Studies: diversity of human experience from Antiquity to the dawn Art, Culture and History (3 hrs Lecture) This course of the modern era in Europe and the Mediterranean. provides an introduction to Indigenous art, culture and Depending on the instructor, topics may include the history in North America. Starting with the pre-contact development of Mediterranean civilizations, Athenian indigenous societies, students explore the richness and democracy, the conquests of Alexander the Great, the rise diversity of indigenous cultures as they evolved out of and the fall of the Roman Empire, the rise and spread of different eco-systems from Central America up to Canada's Christianity and Islam, the Crusades, the Black Death, the Arctic. Using Indigenous ontologies and epistemologies as expansion of the Ottoman Empire, Renaissance, a starting point, the course provides an alternative view of Reformation, and European expansion. Students are also colonial history as well as the post-colonial struggle of introduced to the basics of historical research such as the indigenous peoples for their own identity, place and examination of historical evidence and interpretations, belonging in contemporary society. comparative analysis, bibliographic and narrative skills. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Max. 6 cr hr 1000 History may be counted for degree credit. HIST-2090 (3) Topics in Classical Studies (3 hrs HIST-1015 (3) The Atlantic World: Europe and the Lecture) This course explores a specific area in the field of Americas, 1700-1989 (3 hrs Lecture) This course Classical scholarship. The focus of study varies from year introduces students to the broad forces involved in the to year. Possible topics include ancient medicine, making of the Atlantic World with a particular focus on technology, economics, warfare, and the popular reception social, economic, and political transformations. Major of the Classical tradition. Information concerning these themes may include political revolutions from the 18th course offerings is provided by the department. (French and American) to the 20th century (Russian); Note: This course may be repeated for credit when the slavery and abolitionism, industrialization, urbanization, and topic varies. immigration; the family and changing roles of women; race, Cross-listed: CLAS-2010(3). imperialism, and colonialism; war and its social legacies; the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course state, welfare, and human rights. Students are also and CLAS-2010. introduced to the basics of historical research such as the examination of historical evidence and interpretations, HIST-2097 (3) The History of the Roman Empire (3 hrs comparative analysis, and bibliographic and narrative skills. Lecture) This course considers the history of the Roman Max. 6 cr hr 1000 History may be counted for degree Empire from the end of the Roman Republic through to the credit. reign of Constantine. Lectures trace the major cultural, military, and societal events of the first three centuries of HIST-2080 (3) The History of Archaic Greece (3 hrs the Empire. Particular emphasis is placed upon the Lecture) This course traces the history of Greece during expansion of Rome's power throughout the Mediterranean, the Archaic period from the beginning of the eighth century Europe, and the Near East, the forces, individuals, and BCE through to the beginning of the fifth century BCE. events that affect the Empire during the period 30 Special emphasis is placed on the social, political and BCE-c.312 CE, and the problems that attended these economic evolution of the Greek City-states (in particular changes. Athens and Sparta), the failure of the Greeks to achieve Cross-listed: CLAS-2304(3). political unity, cultural transformations, periods of warfare, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and the Greeks' consequent vulnerability to external and CLAS-2096 | CLAS-2304 | HIST-2096. threats. Note: Students with credit in CLAS-2091(6) or HIST-2099 (3) The Roman Army (3 hrs Lecture) This HIST-2104(6) may not receive credit for this course. course considers the Roman army, from its origins and Cross-listed: CLAS-2301(3). increasing professionalization during the Monarchy and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Republic, to its role as emperor-maker during the third and CLAS-2301. century CE. Topics may include the evidence for the army, recruitment, organization, strategy, unit tactics, troop HIST-2081 (3) The History of the Roman Republic (3 disposition on the frontiers, and veterans. More broadly, hrs Lecture) This course considers the history of the this course examines the army's wider impact on culture Roman Republic from the legendary foundations of the city and society with regard to religion, Romanization, and of Rome through to the beginning of the Roman Empire. political life. Lectures trace the major cultural, military, and societal Cross-listed: CLAS-2950(3). events of the Republic. Particular emphasis is placed upon Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course the expansion of Rome's power throughout Italy and the and CLAS-2950. Mediterranean, the forces that brought about the transformation of the Roman style of government from HIST-2108 (3) Mennonite Studies I (3 hrs Lecture) This Monarchy to Republic, and later to Empire, and the course offers a survey of the origins and history of the problems which attend these changes. Anabaptists in Switzerland, the Netherlands, Germany, Cross-listed: CLAS-2303(3). Prussia, and Russia. Attention is given to the interaction of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course religion and culture in the history of European Mennonites. and CLAS-2096 | CLAS-2303 | HIST-2096. Cross-listed: MENN-2101(3) and REL-2363(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course HIST-2089 (3) The History of Classical Greece (3 hrs and MENN-2101 | REL-2363. Lecture) This course traces the history of Greece during the Classical period from the beginning of the fifth century HIST-2109 (3) Mennonite Studies II (3 hrs Lecture) This BCE until the rise of Macedon in the mid-fourth century course is a survey of the immigration and resettlement of BCE. Special emphasis is placed on social, political and Mennonites in Russia and in North and South America. The economic evolution of the Greek city-states (in particular course includes a study of the origins and distinctive Athens and Sparta), the failure of the Greeks to achieve characteristics of particular Mennonite groups and political unity, cultural transformations, periods of warfare, conclude with a brief survey of Mennonites around the and the Greeks' consequent vulnerability to external world. threats. Cross-listed: MENN-2102(3), REL-2364(3). Cross-listed: CLAS-2302(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and HIST-3109 | MENN-2102 | REL-2364. and CLAS-2091 | CLAS-2302 | HIST-2104. HIST-2110 (3 or 6) The Twentieth-Century World (3 grassroots strugles to make a living or make for the U.S. hrs Lecture) This course offers an historical approach to border. Students are encouraged to engage in research, the characteristic problems, new or inherited, of the analysis, and problem-solving toward understanding the twentieth century, e.g., problems of industrialism; historical factors that have shaped Mexico. nationalism; balance of power; racial conflicts; imperial rivalries; origins, character, and results of World War I; HIST-2120 (3) Business History (3 hrs Lecture) This totalitarian experiments; the Second World War; problems course investigates the history of business from a of the post-war period; the contemporary world-scene; the perspective that includes economic, social and labour United Nations' difficulties and achievements. history. The course examines historical developments that Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course shaped business, as well as major interpretive debates and HIST-2100. among scholars of business history. Beginning with a discussion of sixteenth-century trade and commerce, the HIST-2112 (6) War as a Social Institution (3 hrs course explores the development of transportation and Lecture) This course offers a survey of the effects of war mass production, the emergence of a managerial class, the on the development of Western society, and the reciprocal roles of women and of workers, advertising and effects of social forces on the art of war, from the ancient consumption, and alternative ownership structures. The Greeks to the Nuclear Age. focus is on Canadian business, though reference to global Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course experiences are discussed. Readings include literature on and HIST-3103. business history and related fields.

HIST-2113 (6) A History of Slavery (3 hrs Lecture) This HIST-2121 (3) Environmental History of the Americas course offers an historical survey of the institution of (3 hrs Lecture) This course is a survey of environmental slavery from ancient times to the twentieth century. history of North and South America from the pre-Columbian Emphasis will be placed on slavery as the basis of imperial civilizations until the present. The course takes a and economic systems, the African and New World hemispheric perspective to examine the diverse ways in experience, and the slavery of the twentieth century. which human societies across the Americas have Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course interacted with their natural environments. While the first and HIST-3102. half of the course concentrates on the impact of European colonization on the 'New World", the second half focuses HIST-2114 (3) European Empires and Early Modern on how industrialization and urbanization have changed the Globalization (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines how various eco-systems of the Americas. European maritime empires initiated the first era of globalization from 1450 to 1800. From the era of HIST-2122 (3) Racism in World History: From the Christopher Columbus until the voyages of James Cook to Middle Ages to the Present (3 hrs Lecture) This course the Pacific in the 1770s, Europeans interconnected the examines the history of racial ideas and policies and how world through trade, migration, war, and cultural they have shaped world history from the Middle Ages to exchanges. While some historians argue that this period the present. Students analyze the development of racial witnessed the rise of European/Western global dominance, ideas and policies in the Western World (Europe and the especially in the Americas, other scholars maintain that Americas), and manifestations of non-Western racial ideas. European influence in Asia and West Africa remained quite Topics may include the Crusades, Anti-Judaism, limited. This course is an introduction to this fascinating Anti-Semitism, European imperialism and colonialism, race debate that has relevance for the world that we live in mixing in Latin America, scientific racism, the Jim Crow today. system in the American South, the racial state of Nazi Germany, and the apartheid era in South Africa. HIST-2116 (6) Survey History of Latin America (3 hrs Lecture) This lecture course is an overview of the history HIST-2130 (6) A History of the Developing World (3 of Central and South America. The course will study the hrs Lecture) This course examines the historical roots of Indigenous experience before European expansion into the development and underdevelopment, processes that have region, then examine the effect of colonization on the led to the emergence of the developing world or Third cultural, political, and social structures of the region. The World as a distinctive, though diverse region. It surveys course concludes with an examination of the modern, trends such as colonization, industrialization, militarization post-colonial period. and trade in the South from the 15th to the 20th century. It investigates the ways in which both external pressures HIST-2118 (3) Modern Mexico: From Acapulco to and internal dynamics have contributed to continuity and Zapatistas (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines the change in these regions. This course will help students to historical development of Mexico from independence understand the historical context for contemporary through revolution to the present, with emphasis on major changes in developing countries, as well as the context in social, political, economic, and cultural developments that which particular development theories and practices contributed to the formation of modern Mexico. The course emerged. explores key issues, including the role of race, ethnicity, Cross-listed: IDS-2130(6). class, and religion in Mexican independence and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course nation-building, war with the United States, dictatorship and and IDS-2130. revolution, the impact of free trade, and the multifaceted Requisite Courses: IDS-1100(6) or 6 credit hours in HIST 1000-level courses, or permission of the Instructor the rise of such ideologies as Arab nationalism and [prerequisite(s)]. Zionism. Major questions like the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the Iranian revolution of 1979, Gulf wars and occupation of HIST-2131 (3) History of Peace and Nonviolence I (3 Iraq by US are discussed in this course. hrs Lecture) This course examines the history of pacifism, peace movements, and nonviolence from ancient times to HIST-2190 (3) Theatre History I: Aeschylus to the 1700s. It focuses in particular on Europe, with special Shakespeare (3 hrs Lecture) This course consists of a emphasis on the period from ancient Greece and Rome, to study of the historical development of theatrical art from the Early Modern times in Western Europe. The course also ancient Greeks to the closing of the London theatres in addresses history of peace in other parts of the world. 1642. All aspects of theatrical performance, including Thus, it contrasts Christian traditions of nonviolence with plays, acting, costumes, scenery, theatre architecture, and those of Hindu, Buddhist and other eastern traditions. For the relationship between theatres and society will be case studies, the course examines Mennonite communities discussed. in 16th and 17th century Switzerland and the Netherlands. Cross-listed: THFM-2401(3). Cross-listed: MENN-2131(3), CRS-2131(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and THFM-2401. and CRS-2131 | MENN-2131. HIST-2191 (6) History of Film (3 hrs Lecture) This course HIST-2132 (3) History of Peace and Nonviolence II (3 surveys the history of narrative film from its earliest hrs Lecture) This course examines the history of pacifism, beginnings to the present day. Students gain an peace movements, and nonviolence from the 1700s to the understanding of the evolving techniques and technical present. It focuses in particular on North America, but also advancements in the art form and the corresponding covers selected events in other parts of the world. The aesthetic achievements of film artists. The course focuses course, thus, contrasts Christian traditions of nonviolence on the major film movements and filmmakers from Europe, with those of Indigenous, secular, and eastern cultures. North America, and Asia. For case studies, the course examines Mennonite Cross-listed: THFM-2410(6). communities in 19th and 20th century Canada and the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course United States where Mennonites have embraced pacifism and THFM-2410. as a fundamential principle of social organization. Cross-listed: MENN-2132(3), CRS-2132(3). HIST-2192 (6) The History of Fashion and Dress (3 hrs Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Lecture) This course introduces the history of fashion. and CRS-2132 | MENN-2132. Students learn what dress is as well as how and why it is studied. The dress from ancient times to the 21st century is HIST-2133 (3) Global Migration History (3 hrs Lecture) then discussed, with an emphasis on western Europe. The This lecture course surveys the diversity of worldwide links between fashion, social history and material culture migrations in the modern period. Topics include exploration are examined. The course is intended as background for and conquest; merchants, mercenaries, and missionaries; students of theatrical design, but may be taken as an slavery and unfree migration; imperialism, settlement and elective by anyone interested in the field. labour migrations, and refugees. Concepts discussed Cross-listed: THFM-2406(6). include international migration systems; transnational life, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course culture, and society; diaspora; voluntary and forced and THFM-2406. migration. HIST-2212 (3) Europe Between the Medieval and HIST-2170 (6) Islam and the West (3 hrs Lecture) This Modern Worlds 1350-1650 (3 hrs Lecture) This course is course examines the political, social, and cultural relations a survey of the political, social, and cultural history of between the European and Islamic worlds from the Western Europe between the Black Death and the end of seventh century to the present. Unlike many other the religious wars; the economic and political recovery of non-Western societies, Islam developed in close and mutual Europe, the expansion of Europe overseas, the contact with European Christendom. This relationship is Reformation in religion, and the new developments in discussed through several themes, including the science and the arts during the Renaissance and Baroque transmission of scientific knowledge, the changing balance periods. of military and economic power that paved the way for Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course European empires to rise to world dominance, and the and HIST-2201 | HIST-2312. formation and legacy of cultural stereotypes on both sides. HIST-2213 (3) Women in Pre-Industrial Europe (3 hrs HIST-2171 (3) Islam, Oil and War in the Modern Lecture) This course will survey women's history in Middle East (3 hrs Lecture) This course studies the Western Europe from classical times to about 1700. Using adaptation of Islamic societies to global change, the rise of primary and secondary sources, the course will cover European empires, and forces of modernization. From the historical fluctuations in the condition and status of women, reforms in the eighteenth-century Ottoman Empire the as well as an array of economic, political, and social course proceeds to the rise of national states. Special relations between women and men, with a focus on the attention is paid to the role of ethnic and religious ideologies (e.g., religious, philosophical) that helped to differences in regional conflicts. The course also examines shape attitudes toward women. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course activism and suffrage reform; social policy from the New and HIST-2111 | HIST-3105. Poor Law to the Welfare State; and the growth, decline and legacy of Britain's empire. HIST-2215 (3) History of the Byzantine Empire (3 hrs Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Lecture) This survey course examines the history of the and HIST-2316 | HIST-2400. Byzantine Empire, from its origins in the reign of Constantine I to its end at the fall of Constantinople (1453). HIST-2303 (3) The Child in Europe (3 hrs Lecture) The course focuses on various aspects of political, Lectures and discussions examine from several religious, social, and cultural life. Topics may include the disciplinary perspectives conceptions of the child and of reign of Justinian I, the iconoclastic crisis, the transmission childhood in Europe from ancient times to the present. With of the orthodox faith to the Slavs, the Byzantine court and contributions from such fields as Art History, Classics, its relations with its neighbours, notably the crusaders, and English, French, German, History, and Women's Studies, the Ottoman conquest. the course explores Europeans' definitions of children and childhood and their understandings of children in relation to HIST-2216 (3) Europe in the Early Middle Ages (c. 300- the family, society, class, gender, religion, and work. We c. 1000) (3 hrs Lecture) This survey examines the history examine typical images of childhood in European literature of Europe from the gradual collapse of the Western Roman and art, the connections between these images and actual Empire up to the emergence of states in Western Europe. practices, and the continuing impact of these ideas and The course focuses on various aspects of social, religious, practices. political, cultural and intellectual life. Topics may include the Cross-listed: GERM-2303(3). "barbarian" invasions of the Roman Empire, the birth of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Christianity and Islam, the rule of Justinian, the and GERM-2303. establishment of medieval kingdoms, the rise and fall of the Carolingian Empire, as well as Magyar and Viking HIST-2313 (6) Modern European Society (3 hrs invasions. Medieval documents are analyzed in class to Lecture) This course surveys European societies from the offer a direct insight into the period. Restrictions: absolute monarchies of the 17th century to the fascist and Students with credits in the former HIST-2211(3) and communist movements of the 20th century. It provides HIST-2214(6) may not take this course. background for understanding contemporary Europe by Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course exploring the relationship between industrialization and and CLAS-2305. urbanization, the origins and impact of wars and revolutions and the impact of ideologies, such as HIST-2217 (3) Europe in the Central Middle Ages (c. democracy, nationalism, socialism and Nazism. Attention is 1000-c. 1350) (3 hrs Lecture) This survey course also paid to the role of significant individuals, including examines the history of Europe from the rise of the feudal Louis XIV, Newton, Marx, and Hitler. age to the Black Death and focuses on various aspects of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course social, religious, political, cultural and intellectual life. Topics and HIST-2300 | HIST-2314 | HIST-2315. may include the Crusades, the reforms of the Church, the daily life of medieval men and women in cities and HIST-2316 (6) History of Britain From 1485 (3 hrs countryside, the rise of universities, European travellers to Lecture) This course is a survey of the growth and Mongol territories, the Black Death and the beginning of the development of modern Britain, 1485 to the present. Hundred Years War. Medieval documents are analyzed in Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course class to offer a direct insight into the period. Restrictions: and HIST-2302 | HIST-2400. Students with credits in the former HIST-2211(3) and HIST-2214(6) may not take this course. HIST-2323 (3) Studies in German Culture I (3 hrs Lecture) This course offers a broad survey of cultural HIST-2226 (3) The History of Sexuality From Antiquity developments in German-speaking Europe from the Middle to the Middle Ages (3 hrs Lecture) By tracing the Ages to the Romantic period at the beginning of the 19th historical evolution of a variety of themes, such as century. Slides, film, and audio recordings will help to aphrodisiacs, reproductive theories, the sex trade, and present developments in art, architecture, music, and the policies on public health, this course will offer a survey of social/political background, while German writing in English sexuality from prehistory to the Middle Ages. The translation by authors such as Luther, Grimmelshausen, prehistorical period will be reviewed briefly, followed by an Kant, Lessing, and Goethe will allow for discussion of examination of classical Greece and Rome, early themes and issues in the context of their times. Christianity, and the Middle Ages. Though references will Cross-listed: GERM-2101(3)and GERM-3101(3). be made to other regions for comparative purposes, the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course focus of this course is on western Europe. and GERM-2101 | GERM-3101.

HIST-2302 (3) History of Britain 1815-1990 (3 hrs HIST-2324 (3) Studies in German Culture II (3 hrs Lecture) This lecture course is a survey of the United Lecture) This course offers a broad survey of cultural Kingdom's history from the Congress of Vienna to the fall developments in German-speaking Europe from the of Mrs Thatcher. Lectures focus on the political, social, and beginning of the 19th century to the present. Slides, films, imperial history of the period. Major themes include: and audio recordings will help to present developments in industrialization and the rise of a class society; political art, architecture, music, and the social/political background, while German writing in English translation by authors such and HIST-2111 | HIST-3105. as E.T.A. Hoffmann, Marx, Freud, Kafka, Brecht and Christa Wolf will allow for discussion of themes and issues HIST-2330 (3) Europe Since 1945 (3 hrs Lecture) This in the context of their times. course provides a survey of eastern and western Cross-listed: GERM-2102(3) and GERM-3102(3). European history since the end of World War II. It covers Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course the Cold War, the development of the European Common and GERM-2102 | GERM-3102. Market and the European Union, the Collapse of Communism and changes in Europe since then. Political, HIST-2325 (3 or 6) Tsars and Peoples: Medieval and social, economic, and cultural topics are included. The role Imperial Russia (3 hrs Lecture) This course provides a of important personalities such as Charles de Gaulle, Willy survey of Russian history and civilization from 800 to 1917. Brandt, Josip Tito, Lech Walesa and Mikhail Gorbachev is Topics include the founding of the Russian state, the considered. Tsarist Empire and the Revolutions of 1917. Important political and cultural personalities discussed include Ivan HIST-2331 (3) History of Modern Germany (3 hrs the Terrible, Peter the Great, Tchaikowsky, Tolstoy, and Lecture) This survey of political, economic, social, and Lenin. cultural developments in Germany from the Holy Roman Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Empire to the Berlin Republic focuses on developments and HIST-2317 | HIST-2321 | HIST-3205 | HIST-3305. after the Congress of Vienna (1815), including the 1848 Revolution, Bismarck and German unification 1871, HIST-2326 (3 or 6) Soviet Union and Post-Soviet Wilhelmine Germany and imperialism, World War One, the Russia: Communism, Revolutions, War, and Wealth Weimar Republic, Hitler and National Socialism, World War (3 hrs Lecture) This course provides a survey of Russian Two and the Holocaust, the two Germanies in the Cold history and civilization since the Bolshevik Revolution. War, and reunification in 1989/90. Major historiographical Topics include the formation of the Soviet state, Stalinism, controversies and methods of interpreting and analyzing World War II, the Cold War, the collapse of the Soviet Union, German history are examined through lectures, explication and the emergence of the new Russia. Important cultural of primary sources and critical reading of secondary and political personalities discussed include Lenin, Stalin, sources, group and class discussions, and films. Khrushchev, Gorbachev, Solzhenitsyn, and Shostakovich. Cross-listed: GERM-2331(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and HIST-2317 | HIST-2321 | HIST-3205 | HIST-3305. and GERM-2331.

HIST-2327 (3) The History of Sexuality from the HIST-2411 (6) A History of Asia Since 1500 (3 hrs Renaissance to the Present (3 hrs Lecture) By tracing Lecture) This course surveys Asia in the era of Western the historical evolution of a variety of themes, such as expansion. Emphasis is placed on the internal aphrodisiacs, reproductive theories, the sex trade, and developments in South Asia (India), East Asia (China and policies on public health, this course will offer a survey of Japan) and Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Burma, Malaya, sexuality from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. Thailand, Vietnam, and the Philippines) as well as on their The focus will be on the Renaissance, the Protestant interaction with Western countries and with each other. Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, Topics include cultural identity, colonization, modernization, and the , with a critical look at these nationalism, decolonization, and the post-colonial period. historical periods as watersheds in the history of sexuality. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Though references will be made to other regions for and HIST-2413 | HIST-2414 | HIST-2415 | HIST-2701 | comparative purposes, the focus of this course is on HIST-2703 | HIST-2704. Western Europe. HIST-2413 (3) South Asia Since 1500 (3 hrs Lecture) HIST-2328 (3) Anti-Semitism and the Holocaust (3 hrs This course surveys the Mughal period, the emergence of Lecture) This course studies the origins and execution of regional states, the transition to colonialism, the East India Hitler's "Final Solution" against the backdrop of 2000 years Company Raj, the British colonial state, the rise of Indian of European Anti-Semitism. Although the major focus of the nationalism, and issues of democracy and authoritarianism course will be on the tragic events of 1933-45, in South Asia (India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Sri contemporary topics such as Neo-Nazism and other Lanka) since independence. genocides will be briefly addressed as well. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and HIST-2411 | HIST-2701 | HIST-2703. HIST-2329 (3) Women in Modern Europe (3 hrs Lecture) This course will survey women's history in HIST-2414 (3) History of East Asia Since 1500 (3 hrs Western Europe from 1700 to the present. Using primary Lecture) This course surveys the history of China from the and secondary sources, the course will cover historical Ming Dynasty to Communist China, Korea from the Early fluctuations in the condition and status of women, as well Choson dynasty to the present, and Japan from the Edo as an array of economic, political, and social relations era to the contemporary period. between women and men, with a focus on the ideologies Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course (e.g., religious, philosophical) that helped to shape attitudes and HIST-2411 | HIST-2701 | HIST-2704. toward women. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course HIST-2415 (3) History of South East Asia Since 1500 (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to this region and socialism; Canada's participation in World War II, its in an era of massive transition from the land-based place in postwar international relations, and its shift in kingdoms of the Khmer and archipelagic Sriviyaya Empire to dependence from Great Britain to the United States. the advent of Islam. Major themes may include colonial intrusion by the Portuguese and Spanish in the Philippines, HIST-2508 (3 or 6) Issues in the History of Women in British intervention in the Malay States and Burma, Dutch Canada (3 hrs Lecture) This course gives students the rule in Indonesia, the French in Cambodia and Vietnam, opportunity to explore issues on women's history in independence of Thailand, resistance to imperialism and Canada from the seventeenth century to the twentieth. anticolonial nationalist movements, the impact of World War Students examine women's political, legal, economic, II and Japanese occupation, the Emergency in Malaya, the social, intellectual/education, labour, medical, and cultural Vietnam War, and postcolonial states. history. They also learn the central role gender plays in Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Indigenous history as well as histories of contact, and HIST-2411 | HIST-2701. settlement and colonialism, industrialization, immigration, war, and urbanization. Restriction: Students may not HIST-2500 (6) History of Canada to 1939 (3 hrs Lecture) receive credit for both the 3 and 6 credit hour version of This is a survey course designed to acquaint students with this course. the foundations and development of the Canadian nation - its social, economic, and political institutions. It will HIST-2509 (6) History of the Indigenous Peoples of emphasize the regional life and social organization of the Canada (3 hrs Lecture) This course traces Canadian country, the impact of war, colonialism and continentalism, Indigenous history down to the treaties and reserves of the the development of federalism, the rise of French-Canadian late nineteenth and early twentieth century, emphasizing nationalism and separation, and the development of the period after the first European contact. Canadian socialism. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and HIST-2510 | HIST-2511. and HIST-2503 | HIST-2504. HIST-2510 (3) Indigenous Peoples of Canada to 1815 HIST-2503 (3) Survey History of Canada: the Colonial (3 hrs Lecture) This course traces Indigenous history Era, 1500-1867 (3 hrs Lecture) This course is a survey of down to the War of 1812 era. We discuss the period the economic, social, and political history of Canada from preceding Indigenous contact with Europeans to set the the early encounters of Europeans with North America and context for the main part of the course, an extensive its indigenous peoples to Confederation. Themes may examination of the post-contact era. The course concludes include the immigration of Europeans to Canada, the by exploring the shift in government and popular relations between Europeans and Indigenous peoples, the perceptions of Indigenous people from ally and partner to social and political relations that formed around colonial problem and hindrance. The course considers diverse economies, the development of regionalism and sources and methods for interpreting this history. French-Canadian nationalism, and movements for political Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course reform. and HIST-2509. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and HIST-2500. HIST-2511 (3) Indigenous Peoples of Canada Since 1815 (3 hrs Lecture) This course traces the development HIST-2504 (3) Survey History of Canada: the National of Indigenous history since the War of 1812. Beginning Era, 1867-1939 (3 hrs Lecture) This course surveys the with the post-War period, the course examines the shifting economic,social, and political history of Canada from the policies and attempts by colonial governments to direct the formation of the Canadian state in the mid-nineteenth assimilation of Indigenous people. Topics include the century to the beginning of World War II. Themes may development of civilization and assimilation policies, origin include the constitutional achievement of the nation state, and continuance of treaties, land claims, residential westward expansion and relations with Indigenous schools, Indian Act development, reservations, royal peoples, the creation of a national political economy and the commissions, the 1969 White Paper, and recent court social relations which developed within it, immigration and decisions. Emphasis is placed on Indigenous efforts to ethnic relations, the rise of political dissent and socialism, maintain cultural and national self-determination while questions of political rights and citizenship, facing these policies. We consider the diverse sources and French-Canadian nationalism and regionalism. methods for interpreting this history, with a focus on the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course documentary record. and HIST-2500. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and HIST-2509. HIST-2505 (3) Survey History of Canada: the Modern Era, 1939 to the Present (3 hrs Lecture) This course HIST-2512 (3) History of Human Rights in Canada (3 surveys the economic, social, and political history of hrs Lecture) This course examines the history of human Canada from the beginning of World War II to the recent rights within the Canadian context including key federal, past. Themes may include the rise and decline of the provincial and municipal legislation as well as critical human welfare state in Canada; the political and constitutional rights institutions. The course explores the evolution of the developments that facilitated it; and the challenges to it from human rights Canada in relation to their international French-Canadian nationalism, regional protest movements, counterparts, and historical discrimination in Canada in areas such as immigration, employment and housing, from the early contact period (ca. 1500) to the present. internment of minority populations, gender, sexuality, Perspectives of Indigeneity, gender, nationalism, anti-Semitism and treatment of Indigenous peoples. regionalism, and ethnicity are used to examine Canadian art Cross-listed: HR-2200(3). and craft in a variety of media. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and HR-2200. HIST-2802 (3 or 6) Art in Non-Christian Religions (3 hrs Lecture) This course explores the intrinsic links within HIST-2513 (3) History of Indigenous Institutional non-Christian religious traditions between beliefs and social Development in Winnipeg (2 hrs Lecture | 1 hrs systems and the art produced in those contexts. It focuses Seminar/Discussion) Indigenous peoples in Manitoba's on the art and architecture of Hinduism, Buddhism, and largest urban centre have long been challenging systemic Islam. Students explore art's implicit and explicit messages racism and colonial structures. In this course students about the religious beliefs of its producing society, how art learn about the rich history of lndigenous-led resistance functions within the context of religion, and how one and development in Winnipeg from 1950 and into the 2000s. "reads" religious art. The class investigates the impact of Topics include the development of the Indian Metis social, economic, and power structures on religious art, Friendship Centre, the Ma Mawi Wi Chi Itata Centre, and the role of patronage in art production. Children of the Earth School, Native Women's Transition Cross-listed: REL-2901(3). Centre (now Indigenous Women's Healing Centre), and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Neeginan Centre. Students also learn about a new and REL-2901. generation of Indigenous leaders building spaces of hope and resistance in Winnipeg's inner-city neighbourhoods. HIST-2804 (3) Secrets of Museums: A Critical Inquiry Cross-listed: UIC-2035 into the Origins and Culture of Western Museums Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial (3 hrs Lecture) Since the Enlightenment, museums have basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who developed into centres of learning, entertainment and even successfully complete this course receive credit as shopping. The main goal of the modern museum is to indicated. educate citizens about history, culture and ideology. This Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course course prepares students and tourists alike to visit and UIC-2035. destination European museums with a critical and historical point of view. Important collections such as the Elgin HIST-2514 (3) History of Canadian Education (3 hrs Marbles at the British Museum, the Egyptian wing at the Lecture) This course is a systematic inquiry into the Louvre, and the collection of Modernist art in the Musee historical origins and development of educational thought, d'Orsay, are contextualized through contemporary theories policy, and reform in Canada. of collecting and display. Some classes will be held in the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Winnipeg Art Gallery. and HIST-3514. HIST-2805 (3) The Power of Art: Visual Worship & HIST-2516 (3) History of Indigenous Education: Violence (3 hrs Lecture) This course introduces students Residential Schools and Beyond (3 hrs Lecture) This to two fundamentally opposed responses to visual modes course explores the history of Indigenous education with a of communication in the arts and architecture: iconoclasm special focus on the history of residential schools. Topics (destruction of images/monuments) and iconophilia include the nature of the church-state relationships that (worshipping of images/monuments). The course explores fostered the schools; architecture and physical conditions; various topics from prehistory to the Modern era. academic programs and manual labour; resistance from students and relatives; and the process of forgetting and HIST-2806 (3) Monstrous Art (3 hrs Lecture) This remembering the schools. It also covers the course introduces the representation of fantastic historical/political context in which the residential school characters of monsters, demons and strange creatures in system developed, expanded then declined; including the arts from the Middle Ages to the early 20th century. We policies of enfranchisement, assimilation, and integration seek to define the concept of monstrosity in opposition to and then the return of Indian control of Indian Education. that of beauty, and to better understand the sources and Focus is on the Canadian context but the class may also motivations behind the creation of monstrous figures in art. consider transnational and comparative perspectives. Students learn how and why images of monsters have been used as means of control and demonization of the HIST-2600 (6) History of the United States from 1607 'others', and how they served to give form to the (3 hrs Lecture) This course is a survey of the development intangibles in the light of Romanticism and psychoanalysis of the American people and their institutions from colonial at the beginning of the 20th century. times to the present day. Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who HIST-2700 (6) History of Africa (3 hrs Lecture) This successfully complete this course receive credit as course is a survey of the social, economic, political, and indicated. cultural traditions of the African continent. HIST-2807 (3) Art and Science in the Modern Period HIST-2801 (3 or 6) Rethinking Canadian Art (3 hrs (Enlightenment to 20th century) (3 hrs Lecture) This Lecture) This course is a critical survey of Canadian art course examines the relationship between art and science from the late seventeenth through to the early twentieth or the Science Requirement. century. Through the investigation of a wide range of images, texts, and objects, we explore how the two HIST-2901 (6) History of Technology (3 hrs Lecture) A disciplines overlapped, how artists understood orthodox survey of developments in technology, from ancient to and nonorthodox scientific theories and in the process modern times. Throughout, there will be a consideration of shaped popular conceptions of time, vision, the body, the relationship of technology to humanity. psychology, and the natural world. Note: This course does not fulfil the Science requirement. Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who HIST-2903 (3) History of Wellbeing and Happiness (3 successfully complete this course receive credit as hrs Lecture) This course introduces students to the history indicated. of the broad concept of wellbeing in its various historical iterations (e.g. good fortune, contentment, joy, self-care, HIST-2812 (3) Art and Empires in the Western happiness) in "the West" from Antiquity to the present. The Culture 1: From Nascent Empires to the students explore the intellectual, social, political, cultural, Renaissance Period (3 hrs Lecture) This course religious, medical, and ethical contexts in which wellbeing surveys some of the most significant monuments created was imagined, defined, critiqued, or aspired to. Topics may over the course of Western civilization, from nascent include ancient and modern medical concepts of wellbeing, empires to Renaissance period. Art and architecture are medieval mysticism, humanist and scientific utopias, introduced chronologically, as well as within their historical alchemy and the philosopher's stone, romanticism, feminist and social contexts. One theme is how art and architecture critiques of the 'positive thinking' movement, and happiness are used in the creation of political empires. Critical art as a human right. history theories are introduced so students gain confidence in analyzing iconic works of art located in HIST-2910 (3) History of Medicine to 1700 (3 hrs popular Western art museums. Students work with Lecture) This course is a survey of the development of artifacts from local collections learning to handle objects, western medicine from the ancient period to 1700. Topics and art history terminology and methodologies. include the origin of the ancient medical tradition; the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Hippocratic Oath and the origin of medical ethics; the Black and HIST-2800. Death and medieval medicine; and the seventeenth century scientific revolution in medicine. The course will relate HIST-2813 (3) Art and Empires in Western Culture 2: medical practice to its scientific, philosophic and social Renaissance to Present Day (3 hrs Lecture) This bases. course surveys some of the most significant monuments Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course created over the course of Western civilization, from the and HIST-2909 | HIST-3909. Renaissance period to contemporary times. Art and architecture are introduced chronologically, as well as HIST-2912 (3) The History of Modern Medicine (3 hrs within their historical and social contexts. One theme will Lecture) This course is a survey of the scientific, be how art and architecture are used in the creation of professional, and political development of medicine after political empires. Critical art history theories around race, 1700. Topics include the development of scientific gender and patriarchy are introduced so students can gain medicine, including the germ theory of disease; the rise of confidence in analyzing iconic works of art located in the hospital and the transformation of medical education; popular Western art museums. Students work with and the growth of the public provision of medical care, artifacts from local collections learning to handle objects, including state-sponsored medical insurance schemes in and art history terminology and methodologies. Europe and North America. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and HIST-2800(6). and HIST-2909 | HIST-3909.

HIST-2814 (3 or 6) Modern Architecture and Design HIST-3001 (6) Practice and Philosophy of History (3 (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines the major hrs Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course monuments, architects, and theories of nineteenth and introduces the student to the practice of history. By twentieth century architecture, urbanism, landscape studying historical writing it emphasizes changing ideas in design, and interior design. The discussion topics include history and the philosophical and practical difficulties the architectural responses arising from the issues of involved in thinking about history. The course also "Modernity" such as industrialization, new technologies, emphasizes methodologies in research techniques and the nationalism, and also architectural responses to concepts writing of history. of nature. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and HIST-4001 | HIST-4002. and HIST-3829. HIST-3002 (3 or 6) History Tutorial (3 hrs Tutorial) This HIST-2900 (6) History of Science (3 hrs Lecture) This is a reading course taken by individual senior students with course surveys the development of Science from ancient the Instructor of their choice. to modern times with emphasis on the concepts of the Restrictions: Department Permission Required. physical sciences. Note: This course fulfils either the Humanities Requirement HIST-3005 (6) Introduction to Oral History (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course introduces focus of study vary from year to year. Information students to setting up an oral history project, including concerning these course offerings is provided by the preparing for, conducting and processing an interview. Department. This course may be repeated for credit when Students learn about the major issues and debates in oral the topic varies. Additional in-depth work is required to history and related disciplines. Students who successfully receive credit at the 4000 level. complete this course will be able to set up an oral history Cross-listed: CLAS-3840(3) and CLAS-4840(3). project for their own studies as well as for museums, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course historical societies, and other public history institutions. and CLAS-3840. Requisite Courses: At least 3 credit hours in any HIST-3006 (3) Topics in Ancient History (3 hrs Lecture) Classics course [prerequisite(s)]. This course explores fundamental issues, specific social institutions, key historical figures, vital events, important HIST-3011 (3) Kingdoms and City-States in the Greek periods, and current directions in the study of ancient and Roman Worlds (3 hrs Lecture) This course focuses Greek and Roman history in greater detail than the history on a particular kingdom or city-state of the ancient world. survey classes allow. The focus of study varies from year The topic draws upon evidence from the ancient textual to year. Examples include Greek and Roman slavery, evidence, archaeology, and cultural and social history in Perikles and the Athenian Empire, the myth of Alexander the light of modern theory and scholarship. The instructor the Great, and comparative Greek and Roman and the focus of study vary from year to year. Information historiography and biography. Emphasis is placed on the concerning these course offerings is provided by the use of primary source material (in translation). Information Department. Additional in-depth work is required to receive concerning these course offerings is provided by the credit at the 4000 level. Department. Cross-listed: CLAS-3830(3) and CLAS-4830(3). Note: This course may be repeated when the topic varies. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and CLAS-3830. and CLAS-3006. Requisite Courses: At least 3 credit hours in any Requisite Courses: At least 3 credits in any Classics Classics course [prerequisite(s)]. course, or permission of the Department of Classics [prerequisite(s)]. HIST-3101 (6) History of the Ottoman Empire (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course examines the HIST-3007 (6) Topics in History of Food (3 hrs political, social, cultural, and economic dimensions of the Seminar/Discussion) This course investigates the historical Ottoman Empire from it inception at the beginning fo the significance of food production and consumption. The fourteenth century until its demise in 1922. The variety of approaches and the wide range of content in this multi-faceted aspects of this course are designed to comparatively new field are discussed, including: gender, present the rich heritage of the Ottoman Empire which ethnicity, (trans)nationalism, and identity; business, labour, expanded in its heyday from the to the and capitalism; production and consumption; the role of and from the Danube to the Nile. The course government; the environment; the body; taste; and memory. offers a comprehensive introduction to Ottoman life Note: Students must have completed or must register for throughout the centuries. It also highlights the legacy of the and complete the three University of Winnipeg Oral History Ottoman Empire in Europe, Asia, and Africa. Centre Workshops. HIST-3108 (3) Gender and Mennonites (3 hrs HIST-3009 (3) Eras (3 hrs Lecture) This course focuses Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course examines the on a specific era, or time period, in ancient and/or classical role of women and of men in the evolving Mennonite history. The topic draws upon evidence from the ancient society. It traces these gender roles amongst the Radical textual evidence, archaeology, and cultural and social Anabaptists of Western Europe, the agrarian Mennonite history in the light of modern theory and scholarship. The communities in Russia and North America, and Mennonites focus of study varies from year to year. Information in modern, urban centres in North America. The course concerning these course offerings is provided by the examines patriarchal structures of Mennonite households, Department. This course may be repeated for credit when churches and communities, but also focuses on the ways the topic varies. Additional in-depth work is required to in which women create mechanisms of autonomy and receive credit at the 4000 level. meaning within those structures. The ideas that comprise Cross-listed: CLAS-3850(3). Mennonite femininity and masculinity receive special Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course attention. Gender is also traced through the Mennonite life and CLAS-3850. cycle, commencing at childhood, and tracked through times Requisite Courses: At least 3 credit hours in any of youth, marriage, mid-age, and retirement. The course Classics course [prerequisite(s)]. examines how Mennonite theological teachings, everyday language, modes of production, fertility rates, and national HIST-3010 (3) Provinces and Subjects (3 hrs Lecture) cultures affect ideas of gender in Mennonite society. This course focuses on a particular Roman province or Cross-listed: MENN-3108(3). subject population of the Roman Empire. The topic draws Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course upon evidence from the ancient textual evidence, and MENN-3108. archaeology, and cultural and social history in the light of modern theory and scholarship. The instructor and the HIST-3110 (3) Russia and the Mennonites (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course deals with comparisons with other New World Colonial societies. the history of the Mennonites in Imperial Russia and the Soviet Union from 1789 to 1989. Cultural, economic, and HIST-3116 (3) Mennonites and World Issues (3 hrs religious developments of the so-called 'Mennonite Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course studies Commonwealth' in the nineteenth century and of the Mennonite responses to the wider world, and examines far-flung Mennonite communities in the Soviet Union during changes that have taken place among Mennonites with the twentieth century are emphasized and analyzed. regard to world issues over the course of history. These Cross-listed: MENN-3110(3). issues include: urbanization, environmentalism, poverty, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course mass culture, the communications revolution, the global and MENN-3110 | MENN-3203. economy and family life. An emphasis is placed on the Twentieth Century World. HIST-3111 (3) Conflict and Mennonites (3 hrs Cross-listed: MENN-3116(3). Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course deals with Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course the Anabaptist and Mennonite understanding and and HIST-3301 | MENN-3116. experience of pacifism throughout the centuries, with special emphasis on their dealings with nation-states, HIST-3117 (6) Columbus to Castro: A History of Cuba, church schism, ethnic relations, and domestic abuse. 1492-Present (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This Cross-listed: MENN-3111(3). lecture/seminar course analyses the historical evolution of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Cuban society from the early colonial period, through and MENN-3111. capitalist development in the first half of the twentieth century, and to socialism after 1959. Emphasis is on the HIST-3112 (6) Militarism in the Modern World (3 hrs examination of the history of Cuba in the context of its Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course offers an relationship with the rest of the world. Emphasis is also on intensive examination of the interaction between military the national and international roots and dynamic of factors and broader social forces from the French revolutionary change in Cuba, from the colonial period Revolution of 1789 to the present. under Spain, through United States and Soviet hegemony, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course to the present, and includes consideration of the conditions and HIST-3104. and perspectives of various groups and social classes.

HIST-3113 (6) Personalities and Modern Revolution HIST-3118 (3) South Asian Diaspora Since 1800 (3 hrs (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course examines examines Europe and its overseas empires in the 19th and migration from South Asia (today comprising India, Pakistan, 20th centuries. The focus will be on the origins, conduct, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Lanka and Maldives) in the and impact of modern revolutions as seen through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Discussions focus on personal experience of leaders. Revolutionary leaders different types of migration and settlement developed such as Robespierre, Marx, Lenin, Hitler, Stalin, Mao, and within the British Empire, and the changes brought about by de Gaulle will be studied, as well as the collective decolonization. The course covers labour issues including experience of their followers. Course texts include some recruitment patterns, settlement patterns, establishment of classic novels. educational and religious institutions, and the effect of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course overseas issues on nationalist politics in the colonial era. In and HIST-3107. the post-colonial period the course covers South Asian contributions to multicultural societies, labour policies, HIST-3114 (3) Latin America and the Mennonites (3 gender issues, racial discrimination and the politics of hrs Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/study course is a study identity. of the founding and development of Mennonite communities in Central and South America. The focus is on problems HIST-3119 (3) Indigenous Peoples and Christian European and Canadian Mennonites faced (and still face) in Missions (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar their attempt to establish an existence and identity in a course examines a selected number of spiritual encounters predominantly Latin world. The course contrasts these between Indigenous peoples and Christian missionaries conservative Mennonites to the more radical communities throughout North and South America from the time of composed of indigenous Latin American Mennonites. In Columbus until the twentieth century. Emphasis is placed particular, it compares the manner in which the two groups on the early modern period (1500-1800), although some of Mennonites have responded to the social and economic nineteenth and twentieth-century encounters may also be issues of Latin America. discussed. Topics include Catholic and Protestant Cross-listed: MENN-3114(3). missionaries; Indigenous religions; Indigenous resistance to Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course missions; Indigenous adaptations to Christianity; gender; and MENN-3101 | MENN-3114. and economic aspects of missions.

HIST-3115 (6) History of Spanish American Political HIST-3121 (3) Women in the Modern World (3 hrs Culture (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course will examine course studies the historical formation of a distinctive the varied experiences of women in a cross-cultural political culture in selected Spanish American countries by context, with emphasis on the transference of European focusing on elites, natives, and women, and by making ideologies of gender to a colonial setting. Students will analyze and compare notions of womanhood in modern non-violence, social equality, gender relations, racialization Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America, and pay special and land stewardship. The course considers recent attention to the agency of imperialism and colonialism in the cross-cultural exchanges, including Mennonite advocacy, construction of women's lives. Using primary and Indigenous counter-cultures, and persisting relations secondary sources, comparisons will be drawn where between the two cultures. appropriate among different classes, regions, and times. Cross-listed: MENN-3128(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course HIST-3124 (3) A Global History of Slavery, Indentured and MENN-3128. Labour and Sexuality 1700 to Present (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This course is a global history of slavery HIST-3130 (3) History of International Migration: The and indentured labour from 1700 to the present; focusing German Experience (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This course on sexuality and gender. The course compares offers a survey of historical and current migration patterns, transatlantic African slavery and Indian indentured labour using the example of German-speaking migrants from the migration and their implications. Topics include gender and 18th to the 20th century. Students will explore migration slavery in African societies, sex and the slave trade, processes, different types of migration, and the resulting African enslavement in the Caribbean and North America , cross-cultural encounters as well as the interaction of abolitionist discourses , gender in the Indian indentured states and minorities. The lecture/seminar course will study labour system in the Caribbean, Mauritius, South Africa , Germany as a country of emigration and immigration, and Malaya and Fiji, gendered approaches to peasant labour in discuss the existence of a German Diaspora. A knowledge India, the end of indenture and the historical implications of of German is not required. slavery and indenture today. HIST-3135 (6) The Hudson's Bay Company and the HIST-3125 (3) Topics in Contemporary Latin Modern Department Store (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) In American History (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This course this lecture/seminar course, students will examine the examines key issues and events in contemporary Latin history of modern retail business organization, with special American history based on the social, political, economic attention being given to the Hudson's Bay Company's urban and cultural phenomena critical to their development. As a retail stores. The extensive archives of the company will contemporary history course, the chronological emphasis afford students an excellent opportunity to study major is on the post-1945 period, while the actual topics vary issues in accounting, personnel, management, and each time it is offered. Students have the opportunity to marketing. The external social and political context in which engage recent Latin American history, current regional and the stores operated will also be studied. international issues, and the factors behind them, thereby Cross-listed: BUS-3135(6). promoting an understanding of the link between current Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course events and historical causation. Students actively engage and BUS-3135. in methods of research, analysis, and problem-solving. HIST-3140 (3) Alexander the Great (3 hrs Lecture) This HIST-3126 (3) Mennonites and Environmental course looks at the life and conquests of Alexander the History: A Global Perspective (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) Great. It begins with a chronological examination of the rise This course considers how Mennonites from around the of Macedon under Alexander's father, Philip II, Alexander's world have related to the environment in the 20th century, early life, his conquest of the Persian Empire, and a time of immense technological change in agriculture and ultimately, his death. Four major themes are then explored: horticulture, with an emphasis on their relationship to Alexander's military and its evolution, his relationship to nature and food production as farmers. It considers the mainland Greece, his empire, and his divinity. way farmers have imagined their environments, and Cross-listed: CLAS-3310(3). strategies they have taken to cultivate in distinctively Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course different climates. Students study how Mennonite ideas on and CLAS-3310 | HIST-2105. non-violence, simplicity and community, related to land and nature. Case studies may include Bolivia, Canada, HIST-3170 (3) History of Law in Islamic Society (3 hrs Indonesia, the Netherlands, Russia, the US, and Zimbabwe. Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course examines the Cross-listed: MENN-3126(3). formation of legal structures and practices in Islamic Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course societies from the seventh century to the present. It and MENN-3126. explores the application and adaptation of general legal principles derived from the Quran, Hadith and Sunna in HIST-3128 (3) Indigenous-Mennonite Relations (3 hrs specific and changing historical contexts. Presenting an Lecture) Indigenous-Mennonite Relations examines the overview of the development of law in Islamic society it history of the encounters between Indigenous societies offers historical perspectives on such issues as the role of and a European settler group. It focuses on specific religious texts and the limits of interpretation in Islamic law, encounters, first in Canada, but also in the United States, changes in the legal status of the family, gender relations Mexico, Paraguay and Bolivia. It considers the intrusion on and women, crime and punishment, modernization, and Indigenous lands of ethno-religious societies such as the European influences. Mennonites, and the evolution of attending social relations, including both inter-community co-operation and conflict. It HIST-3190 (3) Theatre History III: Ibsen to the examines respective worldviews, including ideas on Present (3 hrs Lecture) This course is a continuation of Theatre History II, but may be taken without prerequisite. It fishing and hunting; pollution and medieval urbanization; as covers developments in world theatre from the late well as natural disasters and diseases, such as the Great nineteenth century to the present. Famine and the Black Death. Cross-listed: THFM-3401(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course HIST-3220 (3) Women in Medieval Europe, 800-1350 (3 and THFM-3401. hrs Lecture) This lecture/seminar course examines the varied experiences of women in medieval Europe. Specific HIST-3208 (3) Crusades and Crusaders in the Middle themes may include such topics as women's contributions Ages (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This course focuses on the to religious life and intellectual reform, the changing political crusades in the Mediterranean world and Europe from the and legal status of women in feudal society, women's First Crusade to the Holy Land (eleventh century) to the participation in agrarian and market economies, and the capture of Granada from the Moors (fifteenth century). The construction of gender and sexuality as class experiences course explores their roots, forms, and consequences. in the medieval period. Using primary and secondary Special attention is given to the political, cultural, religious, sources, comparisons are drawn where appropriate and economic tensions and exchanges between Latin and among different regions and times. Greek Christians, and between Christians and Muslims in the Middle East. Along with the crusading campaigns, HIST-3221 (3) Women in the Renaissance, 1350-1550 participants' motivations, life in the crusaders' states, and (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course the consequences of these movements on heretics, Jews, examines the varied experiences of women in and pagan populations in Europe are explored. Renaissance Europe. Fundamental to this course is the analysis of traditional as we attempt to HIST-3209 (3) Travel and Encounters in the Middle answer Joan Kelly's question, "Did women have a Ages (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course Renaissance." Women of the Renaissance period are examines the geographical horizon of medieval Europeans appraised in a broad range of roles: as members of the and their knowledge of the world through the travel labouring classes and as intellectuals, as queens and as accounts of merchants, explorers, pilgrims, and paupers. Using primary and secondary sources, students missionaries. The period under scrutiny encompasses the evaluate social, political, legal, and economic conditions in 11th to the 15th centuries, a time when this horizon was women's lives to determine how these variables could be considerably broadened, for instance, by the Crusades interpreted in redefining the period known as the and the Mongol invasions. Attention is given to the Renaissance. development of trade routes and networks across Europe and Asia, the encounters with other peoples, and the HIST-3222 (3) Women in Early Modern Europe, development of a medieval imagination of the world. 1550-1750 (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) From the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries, European societies underwent HIST-3212 (3) Fact, Fiction, and Images: Interpreting some critical transformations. This lecture/seminar course Manitoba Mennonites (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This assesses the impact of those major ideological changes course introduces the student to a wide variety of historic that especially affected women's lives. Was the Protestant Manitoba Mennonite writers. It includes authors of personal Reformation good for women? What was "scientific" and writings, authors or historic works from a variety of "revolutionary" for women about the Scientific Revolution? disciplines, and authors of poetry and historical fiction. This Using primary and secondary sources, comparisons are course analyzes the texts of these authors from the drawn where appropriate among different classes, perspective of history, asking what light they shed on the regions, and times. lived experience of Mennonites in Manitoba and how specific historical times might have informed those writings. HIST-3223 (3) Children and Childhood in Pre-Modern The course suggests a broad definition of "author", Europe (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This part-lecture, recognizing that all texts are literary constructions, part-seminar course examines the place of children in employing particular media to make sense of the Mennonite pre-modern European societies. Themes such as the worlds in Manitoba. conceptualization of childhood, and the place of gender Cross-listed: MENN-3212(3). inheritance, education, training, apprenticeship, and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course discipline of children are explored through the study of and MENN-3212. primary and secondary sources. The time frame and geographical focus may vary from year to year, but the HIST-3213 (3) Environmental History of Europe in the course content covers primarily Western Europe, Middle Ages (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar c.1400-c.1700. Students are expected to read primary and course examines the relationships between communities secondary sources, and participate actively in course and the natural world in medieval Europe (ca. 400?ca. discussions. 1500). The course asks the question of nature's agency in medieval history by analyzing how nature shaped social HIST-3224 (3) Crime and Conflict in Pre-Modern structures, as well as cultural and religious identities, but Europe (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This part-lecture, also how medieval communities learned to control their part-seminar course explores the way in which environment and manage natural resources. Issues include pre-modern European societies dealt with crime and the expansion of agriculture on European landscapes; conflict in the family, village, and at large. The course manorial economy; agrarian and mining technologies; covers such topics as the gendered notions of crime and punishment and the evolution of judicial and policing studied. infrastructures in pre-industrial Europe. The time frame and geographical focus may vary from year to year, but the HIST-3405 (3) Revolutionary Movements in South course content covers primarily Western Europe, Asia (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This course examines c.1400-c.1700. Students are expected to read primary and revolutionary movements in twentieth century South Asia. secondary sources, and participate actively in course The late colonial period saw a mixture of violent and discussions. non-violent anti-colonial movements, Gandhian, anarchist, Marxist, socialist, feminist and peasant movements are HIST-3225 (3) Slaves, Serfs, and Servants in examined. The postcolonial period also saw land reform Pre-Modern Europe (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This movements, secessionist armed revolutionary movements part-lecture, part-seminar course examines the in Telangana and Naxalbari and the successful Maoist multi-faceted dimensions of servility in pre-Modern Europe. movement in Nepal. Through the lens of primary and secondary sources, students gain an appreciation for the varied mechanisms HIST-3406 (3) Topics in Colonial and Nationalist under which women and men, young and old, were History in India (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This course indentured in pre-industrial societies, and develop a critical examines selected topics in the history of colonial India understanding of the ideologies that justified the from the eighteenth century to the Partition of the categorization of humankind along their servile status. The subcontinent in 1947 using lectures and seminar time frame and geographical focus may vary from year to discussions. Topics may include the structures and year, but the course content covers primarily the processes of colonialism, the East India Company, institutions of slavery and other forms of servitude in resistance to colonialism, the emergence of nationalism, Western Europe, c.1400-c.1700. Students are expected to moderate and extremist movements, Hindu nationalism, read primary and secondary sources, and participate nationalist leadership, dalit liberation movement, women in actively in course discussions. the nationalist movement and the reasons for and impact of Partition of the sub-continent. HIST-3310 (3 or 6) Topics in Modern Ukrainian Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course History (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This course examines and HIST-3706. selected topics in Ukrainian history from 1800 to the present. Actual topics discussed vary from year to year. HIST-3408 (3) Women's History in South Asia (3 hrs They include: transformations of Ukrainian nationalism and Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course examines national identity in the East European context: Ukrainian selected aspects of women's history in South Asia in the territories in nineteenth century Habsburg and Romanov period c. 1750 to the present. Issues covered include the Empires; military, social and political dimensions of World social history of women's roles within the family and the kin War I and World War II in Ukraine; social change and network, women's labour, women and religion, women's identity in Soviet Ukraine; culture and politics of the education, women and politics, and the movement for post-Soviet transformation. The course consists of both women's rights. lectures and seminars; in-class discussions based on Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course readings constitute an important component of the course. and HIST-3708.

HIST-3314 (6) Recent European History (3 hrs HIST-3504 (3) The Manitoba Food History Truck Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course concentrates (Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum with variable meeting on the turbulent period between the Franco-Prussian War hours) This course provides an introduction to food history, and the Second World War, and deals with both domestic oral history, and public history. Students conduct oral and international history. Domestic themes, drawn from history interviews on the Manitoba Food History Truck, across the continent, include industrialization, nationalism, process them for archival deposit, and produce a public church-state relations, socialism and anarchism, racism, history project in Manitoba food history for possible and fascism. International themes include imperial rivalries, publication. The first week of this course is taught in arms races, war avoidance and peacemaking. classrooms at UW (5 classes of 3 hours each). Students Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course are divided into small groups for the second week, with and HIST-3303. instruction time of approximately 6 hours per day, to participate in field research trips, conduct archival HIST-3317 (3) Topics in Russian and Soviet History (3 research, and do research on the Manitoba Food History hrs Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course will Truck. cover selected topics in Russian and Soviet history. Topics Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial may be drawn from political, social, or economic history. basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who successfully complete this course receive credit as HIST-3320 (3) Topics in Russian Intellectual History (3 indicated. hrs Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course will analyze political and social ideas in nineteenth- and HIST-3515 (6) Material Culture in the History of the twentieth-century Russia. Individual works by authors Indigenous Peoples of Canada (3 hrs Lecture) This such as Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Solzhenitsyn will be lecture/seminar course traces Canadian Indigenous history discussed. Issues such as social philosophy, political from pre-contact times to the early 20th century through a philosophy, and attitudes towards Russian identity will be close examination of Indigenous and fur trade material culture. Throughout the course of the fur trade Indigenous covers a variety of themes, including Indigenous women's people and Europeans exchanged and adopted various health, labour and education history; histories of sexual, technologies. These exchanges were of critical importance legal, and social regulation of Indigenous women; and in shaping relations between Euro-American traders and formal, informal, local and national women's organizations. Indigenous peoples. This course explores various ways in Students also engage in historical interpretation of a variety which Indigenous and European technologies of different kinds of historical evidence and consider the complemented each other and highlights the non-material creative work of Indigenous women in diverse cultural meanings associated with particular artefacts. We examine fields including art, film, music and literature. the social, cultural and spiritual connotations that Cross-listed: IS-3523(3). Indigenous artefacts held and that European-introduced Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course technologies and materials acquired. and IS-3523 | WGS-3523. Cross-listed: ANTH-3126(6). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course HIST-3525 (3) History of the Metis in Canada (3 hrs and ANTH-3126. Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course traces the history of people of mixed Indigenous/European descent HIST-3518 (3) History of the Indigenous Peoples of from their origins in New France and the fur trade to the the Northern Plains (3 hrs Lecture) This lecture-seminar modern period. Special attention is given to family and traces the history of Indigenous Peoples on the Northern community history. Comparative studies help us understand Plains from the pre-contact period to the mid-20th century why a Metis political and ethnic consciousness develops in on both sides of the present Canadian-U.S. border. Ancient some settings but not in others. plains cultures, the introduction of European technologies, the fur trade, struggles for regional dominance and control HIST-3526 (3) Ethnohistoric Methods and Theory (3 over resources, advancing European settlement, and the hrs Lecture) Ethnohistory combines ethnographic and establishment of reservations/reserve constitute the major historical methods to study changes in cultures over time. topics of this lecture seminar. In a comparative approach, In this course students gain a theoretical understanding of this course explores critical differences and similarities in ethnohistory through a series of readings that explore Indigenous history on both sides of the Canadian and US differences between oral and written texts. They also gain border. a practical understanding of the discipline through the Cross-listed: ANTH-3127(3). transcription of an oral text, which is contextualized Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course through library and/or archival research. and ANTH-3127. Cross-listed: HIST-4526(3) and ANTH-3117(3)/4117(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course HIST-3519 (3) Indigenous Peoples and Treaties (3 hrs and ANTH-3117 | ANTH-4117 | HIST-4526. Lecture/Seminar) This course examines treaties and treaty-making between Indigenous peoples and European HIST-3528 (3) History of Eastern and Subarctic colonial powers and their successor states from the early Algonquian Peoples (3 hrs Lecture) This lecture/seminar colonial period to the late nineteenth century. Topics include course traces the histories of eastern and subarctic European claims to the Americas, European and Indigenous Algonquian peoples from the Powhatans and Mi'kmaq to the ways of treaty making, indigenous concepts of Ojibwe and Cree, from earliest times to the early twentieth land-ownership, United States and Canadian treaty century. Oral records, documentary sources, and policies, treaty making in and New Zealand, and secondary materials are used to present and juxtapose the enduring struggles for treaty rights by Indigenous Indigenous and European perspectives throughout the peoples. A number of treaties are analyzed in class as course. Topics include group origins, languages, gender historical documents. relations, and cultural, political, and social history, as well as the effects of contact and governmental policies. HIST-3522 (3) Indigenous Peoples of Arctic Canada (3 Cross-listed: ANTH-3128(3). hrs Lecture) This course focuses on the Inuit and their Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course ancestors, inhabitants of Canada's Arctic and adjacent and ANTH-3128. regions for nearly 5000 years. It examines the origins and development of their pre-and post-contact culture in light of HIST-3529 (3) History of Manitoba (3 hrs Lecture) This archaeological and ethnographic evidence, with emphasis lecture/seminar course examines the history of the on regional variations in subsistence and settlement Province of Manitoba from 1870 to the present. Key topics patterns, social organizations, intellectual life, and contact include the Red River Resistance and the Manitoba Act, with Euro-Canadian institutions, ideas, and state policy. The treaties with the First Nations people, settler-colonialism, course concludes by considering Inuit culture identity in the federal-provincial relations, social reform movements, 21st century. minority language rights, education, agriculture, resource Cross-listed: ANTH-3120(3). extraction, hydroelectric development, and the growth of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course the provincial state. Special emphasis is placed on relations and ANTH-2118 | ANTH-3120. between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, and the importance of water in the province's history as it relates to HIST-3523 (3) Indigenous Women's History (3 hrs politics, agriculture, urban growth, and energy. Lecture/Seminar) This course examines Metis, Inuit and First Nations women's history in Canada. The course HIST-3532 (3) History of the Iroquoian Peoples (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course examines the Canadian immigrant experience with the experiences of the history of the Iroquoian peoples in Eastern North America United States and other countries. from the precontact time until the present. Emphasis is placed on the Iroquois Confederacy and the Huron HIST-3544 (6) History of Winnipeg (3 hrs (Wendat) peoples living in Canada and the United States. Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course examines the Topics include the origins of the Iroquois Confederacy, the history of Winnipeg from the mid-nineteenth century to the fur trade and Christian missions, the Iroquois Wars and the present. The lectures and seminars will focus on the destruction of Huronia in 1649, the dispersal and migration industrial, social, political, and cultural history of the city of Iroquois and Huron communities through the Great Lakes and explore this past within the context of the history of region and the Saint Lawrence Valley, and the influence of western Canada. the Canada-US border on Iroquois communities. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Cross-listed: ANTH-3132(3). and HIST-3511 | HIST-3551. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and ANTH-3132. HIST-3545 (6) Historical Perspectives on Women in Canada (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar HIST-3540 (6) Critical Issues in the History of course explores themes in North American women's and Canadian Politics, Nationalism, and International gender history, with particular emphasis on the Canadian Relations (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar context. The course will chart the evolution of course will address the development of Canadian women's/gender history and examine women's lives in the nationhood through the examination of such critical issues past. Students will analyse the practice and politics of as the following: the Canadian political tradition and its writing history and the challenges of documenting and British and American heritage; changing constitutional writing women's lives. relationships between and empire and between Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Dominion and provincial governments; Canadian-American and HIST-3599. relationships and the implications of defence and strategic concerns for nationhood. HIST-3548 (6) Alternative Visions: Rebels and Revolutionaries in Canada (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This HIST-3541 (3) Mennonites in Canada (3 hrs lecture/seminar course examines critically the cultural, Lecture/Seminar) This course will survey major social and organizational development of the anarchist, developments in Canadian Mennonite communities from feminist, labour, and socialist movements of late nineteenth 1786 to the present. It will trace the following themes: the and twentieth century Canada. Topics include the origins of Swiss American and Russian roots of Canadian the first workers' movements; the history of the One Big Mennonites; community formation in Ontario and Western Union and the Winnipeg General Strike; early feminist Canada; Anabaptism in every day life (especially the way it organizations, including the Women's Labour League; the was played out in the family); theological developments in founding of communist, socialist, and labourist parties; the the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; the Progressive Arts Movement and conflicts with the state in survival of Mennonite faith distinctives in the urban and the 1930s; Student and Women's movements in the 1960s; socially-integrated Canadian society since World War II. Nuclear Disarmament Campaigns; and the emergence of Special emphasis will be placed on establishing the unique the social justice/anti-globalization movements. features of Canadian Mennonite experience. Cross-listed: MENN-3541(3). HIST-3552 (6) Regionalism and the History of the Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Canadian West (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) By examining the and MENN-3541. history of the Canadian West from 1870 to the present, this lecture-seminar course will explore the establishment and HIST-3542 (6) Gender, Class, and Ethnicity in reproduction of a system of political economy which has Canadian History (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) Lectures and created regional disparities in Canada. Consideration will be seminars in this course will examine how gender, social given to the process of capitalist development and the role class, and ethnicity have influenced Canadian history. of government policy in promoting and redressing Topics will include the evolution of gender relations, disparities. Also, attention will be directed to the emergence emergence of social and political movements, and the of regionalism as an ideology. Where appropriate, complexities of ethnic and racial relations in Canada. comparisons will be drawn between the experiences of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course western Canada and those of other regions of the country, and HIST-3530. as well as with the American West. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course HIST-3543 (6) Immigration to Canada (3 hrs and HIST-3550 | HIST-3551. Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course examines the complex history of immigration to Canada. Topics will HIST-3560 (6) The German-Canadian Presence in include an examination of the social, economic, and political Canadian History (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This conditions motivating immigrants to leave their homelands in lecture/seminar course will focus upon the European the British Isles, Europe, Asia, Latin America and origins of German-speaking immigrants to Canada, their elsewhere for Canada, their strategies for adaptation to life settlement patterns,and their social, political, and economic in Canada, and the response of Canadian society to their roles.In addition, the course will examine both the effects presence. The lectures and seminars also will compare the of international events upon the German-speaking population and their place in the Canadian cultural mosaic. HIST-3573 (3) Material Culture in Northern Plains Note: Please see the Department for a specific course Indigenous History, Field Course (3 hrs Field Study) In description. this experiential-learning course, we explore various ways Cross-listed: GERM-3103(6). in which Indigenous and European technologies Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course complemented each other. The first half of the course and GERM-3103 | GERM-3561 | HIST-3561. consists of seminar discussions and lectures at the University of Winnipeg. The second half of the course HIST-3561 (3) German-Canadian Identity - Historical takes place in the field, where students can work with Perspectives (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This Indigenous Elders from nearby First Nations communities. lecture/seminar course will explore questions of ethnic Students learn about and experience traditional identity, using the example of German Canadians. While technologies, such as tanning hides and/or manufacturing students will develop their individual research projects archery equipment, while being accommodated in traditional related to the broader issue of ethnicity, class discussion tipis and/or modern tents. Notes: Students should notify the will focus on the historical presence of German speakers instructor in case of dietary restrictions, plant-, animal-, or in Canada, their settlement patterns, their relationship to food allergies. There is a surcharge per student for this political culture and the Canadian state, and perceptions course to cover honoraria for Elders and other knowledge and self-images of German Canadians. keepers, food-related costs and costs for materials the Note: A knowledge of German is not required. students will be using. Please consult the History Cross-listed: GERM-3561(3). Department. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Cross-listed: HIST-4573(3), ANTH-3273(3), and GERM-3103 | GERM-3561 | HIST-3560. ANTH-4273(3). Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. Students HIST-3570 (3 or 6) The Family in Canadian History (3 may not hold credit for this course and ANTH-3273 | hrs Lecture/Seminar) This course traces changes in ANTH-4273 | HIST-4573. Canadian family life and ideals over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, considering the impact of economic, HIST-3590 (3) Indigenous Health History (3 hrs legal, and cultural change and the influence of state policy, Lecture/Seminar) This course introduces students to consumer culture and immigration. It examines the changing Indigenous health history focusing primarily on First nature of marriage, family economies, access to birth Nations, Inuit and Métis experiences. Historical case control, and ideals of parenting. It explores not only ideals studies will be drawn from the seventeenth to the of family life, but also the experience and treatment of twentieth centuries with a special emphasis on the impact those who deviated from these ideals. The course gives of colonization on Indigenous medicine and Indigenous equal time to lectures and to class discussion and, as health in Canada. such, depends on the active and regular participation of Cross-listed: IS-3590(3). students. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and IS-3590. HIST-3571 (3) History of Feminism in Canada (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This course examines the history of HIST-3603 (3) United States, 1878-1929 (3 hrs feminism, focusing on the Canadian experience set within Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course will treat the broader context of North America and the West. It major political changes in the period from the end of considers the changing goals, methods of organizing, Reconstruction to the stock market crash of 1929. In adherents, societal responses and impact during each of addition to studying styles of political leadership, the social the three "waves" of feminism. It explores biographical and cultural basis of politics will be explored. The history of key Canadian and Western feminists. The course concluding unit will discuss the "prosperity decade" of the gives equal time to lectures and to class discussion and, as 1920s. such, depends on the active and regular participation of students. HIST-3604 (3) United States, 1929-1988 (3 hrs Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course will treat the and WGS-3571. grand themes of reform and conservatism in American politics from the Great Depression to the Reagan era. HIST-3572 (3 or 6) History of Childhood in Canada (3 Various forms of social protest will also be explored, as hrs Lecture/Seminar) This course traces the history of will selected themes in diplomatic history. The studies will childhood in Canada from the pre-industrial period to the conclude with the presidency of Ronald Reagan. late-twentieth century. It explores how new ideals of childhood which emerged in the late-nineteenth century HIST-3605 (3) Race, Ruin and Renewal in Urban differed from those existing previously and how an ideal of America (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This course examines the child as dependent and in need of careful nurture and how race and racial difference have shaped the cultures protection gradually took hold. It explores these subjects of urban political economies in modern urban America. via a consideration of a number of issues which, from year Beginning in the late nineteenth century through to the to year, may include work, schooling, health, adoption, present day this course analyzes how the experiences of delinquency, recreation, and the emergence of children as race in the modern city have been mediated along a target consumer market. residential, migratory, educational, economic, social, transportation, labor, architectural and leisure means. Students focus on the impact of race and racial identity, contemporary visual arts. The course familiarizes the along with class and gender identities, on the built and students with the diversity of indigenous art - and more social urban environment. This informs the ways in which specifically Inuit art - in a range of media including cities are made, and how they function and produce sculpture, prints, drawings and textiles, video, film and difference. digital media as well as contemporary performance practices. The history of the development of these art HIST-3609 (6) History of Native American Peoples of forms is studied in their social, political, economic and the United States, Colonial Period to the Present (3 cultural context. Local collections are extensively utilized. hrs Lecture/Seminar) This course examines the history of Note: Students may not receive credit for both the 3 credit the Native American peoples in the continental United and 6 credit version of this course. States from the colonial period to the present. Topics include Native American and European backgrounds; HIST-3807 (3 or 6) Topics in Twentieth and Spanish, English, French, and Dutch interactions with Twenty-First Century Canadian Art (3 hrs Native American peoples; the Revolutionary Era; Indian Lecture/Seminar) This is an advanced lecture/seminar Removal; the wars on the Great Plains; the Reservation course examining various areas in twentieth and Era; the Indian New Deal; Termination and Relocation; the twenty-first Canadian art. The course addresses issues period of self-determination; and the "age" of casinos. such as the taxonomy of style - realism, abstract Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course expressionism, minimalism; problems of value - dealers, and HIST-2609. galleries, craft, design and electronic imaging; and the politics of art - feminism, regionalism, First Nations, HIST-3611 (6) Colonial America, 1492-1783 (3 hrs ethnicity, ordinary people and government funding. The Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course examines the course investigates issues that affect the country as a American Colonies from their earliest beginnings to the whole, within the global context. Assignments focus on art Treaty of Paris. It examines the process of colonization; the historical writing and criticism. The latter part of the course development of societies in the American colonies; the deals with aspects of Manitoba culture, for example, colonies' role in the British Empire and the causes and women artists. This involves individual student projects and consequences of the American Revolution. primary research in local archives and collections. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and HIST-3601. and HIST-3821 | HIST-3822.

HIST-3701 (6) Modern Africa (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) HIST-3809 (3 or 6) Art in the Age of Revolutions (3 hrs Studies in African history from the slave trade to the age of Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course focuses on independence. Emphasis on the African response to the major artistic movements of Neoclassicism, European ambition and the role of nationalism, tribalism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Islam, and Westernization in the shaping of modern Africa. Post-Impressionism within the context of the social and political upheavals of the late eighteenth and nineteenth HIST-3703 (3) South Africa in the Modern World (3 hrs century. This course explores the relations between Lecture/Seminar) This course is an analysis of the political, popular culture and the fine art of the ruling class, between economic, and social determinants of apartheid in the ideology and artistic practice, between the revolution of the twentieth century. avant-garde and of the people, and among industry, exploitation, and empire, and between women as artists HIST-3704 (3) West Africa in the Twentieth Century and as subjects of art. (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This course offers selected Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course studies in the development of new states from the and HIST-3817 | HIST-3818. beginnings of colonial rule to the present. Emphasis will be placed upon Ghana and Nigeria as models of the HIST-3810 (3 or 6) Art in the Twentieth-Century (3 hrs decolonization and independence experience. Lecture/Seminar) This course introduces the development of abstraction and expression in art from 1900 to 2000, HIST-3711 (6) History of Liberation Movements in particularly the relation of artistic movements to the political Southern Africa (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This and historical context. The roles of war, sexuality, money, lecture/seminar course examines the history of liberation and the cult of personality in the production and reception movements in Southern Africa and their diverse efforts to of art are addressed within a framework of critical attain independence. Particular focus is directed to the analysis, including formalism, Marxism, the feminist critique, history of liberation movements in South Africa and and post-modern deconstruction. A wide range of media is Zimbabwe. Themes examined will include class, ethnicity, explored including the arts of film, dance, sculpture, race, popular resistance and nationalism. Major topics will painting, and architecture. include the colonial background, roles of organizations, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course leadership, recruitment, political culture and ideologies. and HIST-3819 | HIST-3820.

HIST-3805 (3 or 6) Arts of the Arctic (3 hrs HIST-3811 (6) Women, Art, and Society (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) The course is an introduction to the arts Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course will consider in the Canadian Arctic. It covers briefly the prehistoric and the new approaches offered by critical theory, historic periods with a particular focus on post 1949 and psychology, postmodernism, and feminism to the practice of art history and to the history of art in a wide selection of artistic movement on whose work there is a significant different cultures and periods. The role of women in the body of art historical writing and criticism. Each time the production of art will be re-evaluated, the rediscovery of course is offered the name of the artist or movement in forgotten arts and women artists will be studied, and the focus will be listed in the Timetable. representation of women in art will be analyzed. The creative process, art history as a discipline, and the role of HIST-3828 (3 or 6) Dada & Surrealism: Art of the art in society from traditional craft and "fine" art to film and Unconscious (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This course advertising will be explored in the light of women's examines the art and ideology of the Dada and Surrealist experience. movements in the twentieth century. Dada and Surrealist artists rejected Enlightenment values, which they felt had HIST-3813 (3) Art History in Focus I (3 hrs led to World War l, and instead celebrated the irrational side Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course offers of mind. Dada artists experimented with elements of students the opportunity for intensive study of a single chance in order to devalue the role of the artist, and the artist's work or artistic movement on whose work there is Surrealists explored the unconscious mind using automatic a significant body of art historical writing and criticism. drawing techniques and dream inspired imagery. These Each time the course is offered the name of the artist or movements were interdisciplinary, and in that spirit we movement in focus will be listed in the Timetable. examine art, literature, performances and films. Emphasis is also given to the role women played in these movements. HIST-3814 (3 or 6) Indigenous Arts (3 hrs Restrictions: May not hold credit in this course and Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course offers an HIST-3813 if the topic was Dada and Surrealism. introduction to the arts of indigenous peoples with a focus on contemporary First Nations and Métis art in Canada. HIST-3829 (3 or 6) Modern Architecture and Design Students explore critical approaches to the social and (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This course examines the major political issues surrounding tradition, appropriation, monuments, architects, and theories of nineteenth and modernity, and personal identity in our survey of visual art. twentieth century architecture, urbanism, landscape design Forms examined may include painting, sculpture, print and interior design. The discussion topics include the making, installation, dance, music, theatre, new media, and architectural responses arising from the issues of performance. Local artists, exhibitions, and collections Modernity such as industrialization, new technologies, offer students first-hand experience of current art nationalism, and constructs of "nature". production in Manitoba. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and HIST-2814. HIST-3816 (6) Art and Architecture of Pilgrimage (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This course is an introduction to the HIST-3832 (3) Art, Design, and the City (3 hrs history of pilgrimage art and architecture from the Middle Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course examines Ages to the Modern era. Medieval and Post-Medieval ideas about cities and urban life. Topics may include pilgrimages are used as a laboratory for investigating the Indigenous understandings of place and space, colonialism, topic of the journey to a shrine for the realization of spiritual public art and urban design, race, gender, disability and benefits or the fulfilment of personal motives. Class sexuality, Modernist utopias of the city, urban landscape discussions and lectures on the experience of pilgrimage and contemporary theories, and practices of urban and its visual ways of expression might include: the major planning. The course investigates concepts of the land and pilgrimages to Christian, Muslin, Hindu and Jewish sites, landscapes as frameworks for both the natural and built and the later pilgrimages to North-American shrines. environment. The course examines how humans have transformed and manipulated space over time, while HIST-3825 (3 or 6) Theories and Methods for Art simultaneously developing cultures that encompass a History (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar range of ideas and attitudes towards landscape, place, course explores various art historical and critical identity, narrative and community. approaches to the study of visual art and curatorial practice. Students investigate various theoretical HIST-3833 (3) From the Reel to the Digital: approaches, for example, Indigenous curatorial practices Indigenous Film and New Media Art (3 hrs and methodologies, race, gender, queerness, concepts of Lecture/Seminar) This course explores how Indigenous diversity and inclusion. Issues around accessibility, difficult artists have used digital technology, video, and film to knowledge, visual analysis, biography, iconography, the art engage with colonization, assimilation, residential schools, market, as well as techniques and conservation may be and other government policies in Canada and across the considered. Students put into practice art historical globe. The course themes are examined through the research methods, visual methodologies, embodied theoretical frameworks of visual, cultural, queer, and knowledge, and contemporary curatorial theories through gender studies. These frames assist in analyzing how written assignments, experiential assignments and, Indigenous artists create a visual language of resistance, whenever possible, field trips to local sites and exhibitions revitalization, and decolonization. Artists explore topics that take place during class time. such as the land, language, identity, sovereignty, environmental racism, economic development, health, HIST-3826 (3) Art History in Focus II (3 hrs music, art, dance, human rights, and spirituality through Lecture/Seminar) This course offers students the various media and artistic practices. opportunity for intensive study of a single artist's work or HIST-3834 (3) Beyond Wilderness: Visual Culture in secular subjects in the arts, the transformation of the Canada (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar artist's status, and art patronage. course examines the central role of the wilderness and concepts of landscape in historical and contemporary HIST-3902 (3) The Darwinian Revolution (3 hrs Canadian art. We explore how notions of wilderness and Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course examines the landscape have been constructed, circulated, gendered, genesis, development, and assimilation of Charles Darwin's and overturned in art history discourse. Manifestations of theory of evolution by natural selection. Topics include the the wilderness and place in art are examined through historical sciences (e.g., geology, ) before social, economic, political, and cultural factors. Historical Darwin, pre- and non-Darwinian theories of evolution, the and intellectual frameworks might include nationalism, sources of Darwin's theory; and the social, scientific, and feminisms, colonialism, industrialism, events such as religious legacy of Darwin. Railway construction, Wembley Exhibition, Oka Resistance, Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course key individuals and groups of artists, social movements, and HIST-2906 | HIST-3906. and other key events in Canadian history. HIST-3903 (3) Classical and Medieval Science (3 hrs HIST-3840 (3 or 6) Seventeenth Century Art (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course examines the Lecture/Seminar) This course explores the visual arts of theories, experiments, and calculations of Greek, Roman, Italy, France, England, Spain, and the Netherlands against and European scientists before the Scientific Revolution of the background of the social, economic, political and the seventeenth century. As well as considering the work religious change in the seventeenth century. Some of the of the major contributors to astronomy, physics, and topics we consider include the position of women artists, mathematics in this period, the course places their ideas the cultural effects of colonialism, the natural sciences, art and the work of the schools of Greece, Rome, and collecting and the emergence of the art market. medieval Europe within their social, cultural, and intellectual Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course contexts. and HIST-3803. Cross-listed: CLAS-3090(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course HIST-3841 (3 or 6) Arts of the Middle Ages (3 hrs and CLAS-3090 | HIST-3211. Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course is an introduction to the study of medieval art and architecture in HIST-3911 (3) History of Madness and Psychiatry (3 Europe, from the demise of Late Antique traditions up to the hrs Lecture/Seminar) This course explores the different Renaissance. In the context of a thematic survey, students ways in which mental health and illness have been are introduced to the terminology, methods, materials, imagined, theorized, classified, and treated in the Western subject matter and function of medieval art and world from Antiquity to the present. The course looks at the architecture. Since the largest proportion of surviving lived experiences of people deemed to be "mad", and materials is religious, this includes a firm grounding in the considers the philosophy and practices of those who medieval Christian tradition and the nature of the prominent attempted to treat madness, including psychiatrists. The institutions of Church and state. Secular art is considered course shows how intellectual, social, cultural, political, where possible or appropriate, and broader issues of technological and other factors have interacted over the material culture are explored. centuries to produce complex and ever-changing views of mental health and illness. HIST-3842 (3 or 6) Italian Renaissance Art (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course is an HIST-3913 (3) The History of Disease (3 hrs introduction to the study of Italian Renaissance art and Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course surveys architecture in the context of the social, political and humanity's experiences with disease and analyzes its economic circumstances of this time. This course traces historical study. The course emphasizes epidemic diseases the history of painting, sculpture and architecture of the though non-infectious diseases are also considered. The mid-14th to the 16th century. More specific topics explore objective is to examine, through the lens of history, popular the virtuosity and philosophies of realism, the discovery of and medical constructions of disease, the pattern of linear perspective, the artists' social and intellectual status, disease and its impact in any given society, and the art patronage, and gender issues (women artists and medical, social, and cultural responses to it. women's art patronage). Some artists/art patrons are considered more in depth, such as , HIST-4000 (3) Tutorial (3 hrs Tutorial) This is a reading Michelangelo, and Isabella d'Este, among others. course by individual senior students with the Instructor of their choice. HIST-3843 (3 or 6) Northern Renaissance Art (3 hrs Restrictions: Permission of Chair and Instr. Lecture/Seminar) This lecture/seminar course is an introduction to the study of art and architecture of the HIST-4100 (6) Tutorial (3 hrs Tutorial) This is a reading mid-14th to the 16th century Northern regions of Western course in World History taken by individual senior students Europe (France, England, Germany and the Netherlands) in with the Instructor of their choice. the context of the social, political, and economic Restrictions: Permission of Chair and Instr. circumstances of this time. More specific topics should capture our attention, such as the development of panel HIST-4103 (3 or 6) Colonization and the Age of and manuscript paintings, prints, the rise of realism and Modernity in Latin America (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course examines the relationship between modernity history and other forms of informal communication, formal and colonization in Latin America. It addresses how history education, museums, monuments, film, and modern Latin American societies are shaped by their photography. Students learn about major concepts such as experiences under colonialism. It also examines the historical consciousness; narrativity; collective memory, relationship between globalization and developments in public history; culture and politics of history, including Latin America at the regional, national, and local levels. "history wars". Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Restrictions: Honours Form Required.

HIST-4111 (3 or 6) Frontiers and Borderlands (3 hrs HIST-4200 (6) Tutorial (3 hrs Tutorial) This is a reading Seminar/Discussion) This seminar course uses the course in Pre-Industrial Europe by individual senior concepts of frontiers and borderlands to analyze relations students with the Instructor of their choice. between indigenous peoples and expanding empires in Restrictions: Permission of Chair and Instr. world history. After a discussion of the historiography of frontiers and borderlands, students apply these concepts HIST-4213 (3 or 6) Topics in Early Modern Women's to Ancient Rome, China, the Eurasian steppe, South Africa, History (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This seminar deals the Americas, and Australia. Students pay considerable with the history of women in early modern Europe, c. attention to the creation and persistence of borderlands in 1450-1650. Through the examination of selected topics in North America. Finally, the course discusses the many women's history, students explore an array of theoretical ways in which frontiers and borderlands are presented in and methodological approaches. The seminar covers literature, art, film, and public history. various themes in women's history such as Restrictions: Honours Form Required. marriage/widowhood law, economy, politics, religion, etc. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not HIST-4112 (3 or 6) History of the Atlantic World (3 hrs hold credit for this course and HIST-4120. Seminar/Discussion) This seminar uses the concept of an Atlantic World to examine the connections between HIST-4218 (3 or 6) Topics in Medieval Culture (3 hrs Europe, the Americas, and West Africa from the first wave Seminar/Discussion) This seminar studies selected aspects of European overseas expansion (1450-1500) to the Age of the cultural, social, and religious life during the Middle of the Atlantic Revolutions (1775-1825). Topics may include Ages in Europe. Topics may include the popular and the concept of Atlantic history, cultural contacts, religious scholarly knowledge of and beliefs concerning the world exchanges, slavery and the slave trade, ecology and and humanity, the transmission of this knowledge, the environment, commerce, migration, women and gender, place of humankind in the world, and the role of the Church and political ideas. in society. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Restrictions: Honours Form Required.

HIST-4113 (3 or 6) Slavery in the Americas (3 hrs HIST-4300 (6) Tutorial (3 hrs Tutorial) This is a reading Seminar/Discussion) This course examines selected topics course in Modern European History taken by individual in the history of enslavement and race relations in North senior students with the Instructor of their choice. America, Latin America, and the Caribean from 1600 to the Restrictions: Permission of Chair and Instr. present. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not HIST-4315 (6) Europe in Crisis, 1914-1945 (3 hrs hold credit for this course and HIST-4102. Seminar/Discussion) In this course students will select topics in the history of Europe from World War One to the HIST-4121 (3 or 6) Sex, Race, and Gender in Early end of World War Two. Topics may range from intellectual Modern Europe (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This senior and cultural, through military and diplomatic, to economic seminar deals with the history of ideas about humankind in and political. the early modern period, c. 1450-1650. Through readings Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not of primary and secondary sources, students examine the hold credit for this course and HIST-4304. theoretical frameworks in the early modern period used in the classification of human beings, especially in reference HIST-4317 (3 or 6) Studies in Modern Russian History to sexuality, race, and gender, with links made to other (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This seminar covers modern social constructs of differentiation, including Russian History, examining the social, political, economic, socio-economic rank or station, and religion. This seminar and intellectual development of Russia since 1700 within a explores these ideas in the context of early overseas specific time period to be determined by the instructor. colonization. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not Restrictions: Honours Form Required. hold credit for this course and HIST-4301.

HIST-4130 (3 or 6) History and Memory (3 hrs HIST-4403 (3 or 6) Topics in Colonial and Postcolonial Seminar/Discussion) This seminar examines the field of South Asian History (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This memory studies through a comparative transnational seminar addresses the debates that have arisen in the survey (with a focus on Europe and the Americas). literature of modern South Asian history concerning Memory studies ask not "What happened in the past?" but colonial and postcolonial histories. Topics may include the rather "How did individuals and groups remember the nationalist movement, communalism, partition, issues of past?". To answer this question, historians study oral caste and class, movements for women's rights and feminism, the rise of the Hindu right, dalit politics, adivasi Indigenous Peoples, major events in the history of contact movements, rural and urban poverty, environmental between Indigenous and European peoples, and the histories, labour and industrialization, education and construction of historical argument and interpretation, economic liberalization. based on an interdisciplinary ethnohistorical approach. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Cross-listed: ANTH-4105(3/6). Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not HIST-4500 (6) Tutorial (3 hrs Tutorial) This is a reading hold credit for this course and ANTH-4105. course in Canadian History taken by individual senior students with the Instructor of their choice. HIST-4573 (3) Material Culture in Northern Plains Restrictions: Permission of Chair and Instr. Indigenous History, Field Course (3 hrs Field Study) In this experiential-learning course, we explore various ways HIST-4526 (3) Ethnohistoric Methods and Theory (3 in which Indigenous and European technologies hrs Seminar/Discussion) Ethnohistory combines complemented each other. The first half of the course ethnographic and historical methods to study changes in consists of seminar discussions and lectures at the cultures over time. In this course students gain a theoretical University of Winnipeg. The second half of the course understanding of ethnohistory through a series of readings takes place in the field, where students can work with that explore differences between oral and written texts. Indigenous Elders from nearby First Nations communities. They also gain a practical understanding of the discipline Students learn about and experience traditional through the transcription of an oral text, which is technologies, such as tanning hides and/or manufacturing contextualized through library and/or archival research. archery equipment, while being accommodated in traditional Honours study at the 4000 level requires independent work tipis and/or modern tents. Notes: Students should notify the and advanced engagement with the discipline. instructor in case of dietary restrictions, plant-, animal-, or Cross-listed: HIST-3526(3) and ANTH-3117(3)/4117(3). food allergies. There is a surcharge per student for this Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not course to cover honoraria for Elders and other knowledge hold credit for this course and ANTH-3117 | ANTH-4117 | keepers, food-related costs and costs for materials the HIST-3526. students will be using. Please consult the History Department. HIST-4530 (3 or 6) Advanced Studies in Canadian Cross-listed: HIST-3573(3), ANTH-3273(3), Social History (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This seminar ANTH-4273(3). addresses the interpretations and debates that have arisen Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not in the literature on Canadian social history. Students also hold credit for this course and ANTH-3273 | ANTH-4273 | undertake a research project using primary sources to HIST-3573. explore a problem of relevance to the course. Topics may be chosen from Indigenous and ethnic histories; social HIST-4580 (3 or 6) The Interpretation of Canadian classes, business and labour histories; the history of the History (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This seminar family, women, and gender relations; and cultural and addresses the ways in which the interpretation of intellectual history. Please see the Department for a Canadian history has changed from the mid--nineteenth specific course description. This course may be repeated century to the present. Students explore the for credit when the topic varies. professionalization of history in Canada, the relationship Restrictions: Honours Form Required. between academic and vernacular forms of history, the key interpretive debates that have shaped the study of HIST-4535 (3 or 6) Immigration and Ethnicity in Canada's past, and the similarities and differences Canada and the United States (3 hrs between Indigenous, French and English Canadian Seminar/Discussion) This seminar examines the history of historiographies. immigration to North America between 1860 and 1960. The Restrictions: Honours Form Required. course focuses on the nature of migration patterns and the adaptation of immigrants to the new world, especially the HIST-4600 (6) Tutorial (3 hrs Tutorial) This is a reading rise of ethnic identities. Students discuss the similarities course in United States History taken by individual senior and differences in the Canadian and American immigration students with the Instructor of their choice. experience. Restrictions: Permission of Chair and Instr. Cross-listed: MENN-4535(3/6). Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not HIST-4605 (3 or 6) Topics in the Intellectual and hold credit for this course and MENN-4535. Social History of the United States (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course is an introduction to HIST-4570 (3 or 6) Indigenous Peoples and American thought from colonial times to the present. Newcomers in in Encounter: Selected Topics (3 hrs Students discuss the interaction of ideas and behaviour, Seminar/Discussion) This course examines the history of the role of various agencies of dissemination, as well as Canadian Indigenous Peoples from the pre-contact period the stress of ideologies upon American social and political to the early 20th century through the study of Indigenous life. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic biographies and material culture. This allows us to examine varies. the history of Indigenous/non-Indigenous interaction from Restrictions: Honours Form Required. the perspective of individuals involved in the events we study. It familiarizes students with the cultures of Canadian HIST-4700 (6) Tutorial (3 hrs Tutorial) This is a reading course in African History, taken by individual senior Seminar/Discussion) Museums and galleries do more than students with the Instructor of their choice. collect and exhibit objects; they participate in the packaging Restrictions: Permission of Chair and Instr. and presentation of the materials and ideas of culture, engaging with a diverse public and multiple stakeholders. HIST-4701 (6) Studies in Modern African History (3 Students examine the collecting, exhibiting and presentation hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course studies Africa in the practices of European and North American museums and twentieth century with particular emphasis on the theories galleries over the last two centuries with the goal of and practices of colonialism, nationalism, development, and understanding their evolving role. The class explores how independence movements. Area interests will focus on museums developed in response to the ideas of collecting Kenya, Tanzania, Zambia, Ghana, and Nigeria. and connoisseurship, the disciplines of art history and Restrictions: Honours Form Required. museology, and how these institutions reflect or relate to different ideologies, such as nationalism and colonialism. HIST-4702 (6) Southern Africa (3 hrs Note: This used to be titled The History of Museum and Seminar/Discussion) This course offers selected topics in Collecting. the histories of South Africa, Zimbabwe-Rhodesia, Angola, Restrictions: Honours Form Required. and Mozambique. Research and discussion will analyze in depth the historical confrontation of Black African and HIST-4831 (6) Practicum in Curatorial Studies (3 hrs White European in the 11th and 20th centuries. Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course combines Restrictions: Honours Form Required. the theory and practice of curatorial work, public history and experiential learning for students interested in HIST-4800 (6) Tutorial (3 hrs Tutorial) This is a reading achieving a university credit by working with a local course in History of Art, taken by individual senior students museum or art gallery. The Practicum provides with the instructor of their choice. opportunities to explore a range of placements with host Restrictions: Permission of Chair and Instr. institutions in order to learn about being a curator. Students are expected to work 6-8 hours a week in the host HIST-4801 (6) Special Topics in Art History (3 hrs institution. Program partners will provide training for the Seminar/Discussion) This is a seminar devoted to specific interns who have chosen to work with them. Partnership issues in or related to art history. The nature and range of opportunities include, but are not limited to Winnipeg Art topics will depend upon the Instructor. Written information Gallery, Plug In Contemporary Art Institute, Buhler Gallery, about the course for any given year will be available to the and other local galleries and museums. student from any Art History Instructor. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. HIST-4833 (3 or 6) Indigenous Theory and Curatorial HIST-4803 (3 or 6) Gothic Revival Art & Architecture Practices (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This seminar in Winnipeg (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course examines critical theories and practices in Indigenous introduces students to a critical history of Gothic Revival contemporary art and curatorial methods. Topics may architecture in Winnipeg (c. 1830 to 1930). We explore - include Indigenous theory, curatorial methods and through the writings of its initiators - the origins of the methodologies, concepts in art history, museum studies, Gothic Revival movement in Europe and North America, and colonialism, place, race, gender, ability, and sexuality. The examine how it reached Winnipeg in the 19th century. course concentrates on galleries, museums, and Students are introduced to the notion of style, forms and contemporary arts institutions within Canada. function in architecture, learn to work with archival material Restrictions: Honours Form Required. (primary and secondary sources) related to historical architecture, to document and comprehend a building and HIST-4900 (6) Tutorial (3 hrs Tutorial) This is a reading its ornamental components (painting, sculpture, and stained course in the History of Science, taken by individual senior glass), and to write about heritage art and architecture. students with the Instructor of their choice. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not Restrictions: Permission of Chair and Instr. hold credit for this course and HIST-4891. HIST-4902 (3 or 6) Topics in the History of Science or HIST-4815 (3 or 6) Cultures of the Past: Art History Medicine (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) In this course and Memory (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course students study in depth a topic in the history of science or brings students into first hand contact with selected art medicine. The topic varies from year to year and may objects from the past centuries. Students are introduced to include for example a focus on a particular time period, the the concepts of periodization and conservation of old art history of a specific branch of science or medicine, or objects, and learn how to document, analyse and write distinct historiographical perspectives and genres. This about the art objects which are kept in local institutions. course may be repeated for credit when the topic varies. The class examines works in their social, historical and Restrictions: Honours Form Required. artistic contexts, using primary and secondary sources and technical resources available locally. Students learn HIST-4910 (3 or 6) Themes in the History of Medicine the practical aspects of art historical work. (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This seminar covers various Restrictions: Honours Form Required. aspects of the history of medicine which may including: the development of the medical profession; the rise of nursing; HIST-4830 (3 or 6) The Idea of the Museum (3 hrs the transformation of the hospital; the history of disease; and the growth of medical insurance and socialized medicine. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. HUMAN RIGHTS

HR-1200 (3) Introduction to Global Citizenship (3 hrs effectively engage in human rights campaigns. This course Lecture) In this course students trace the historical links participants to national and international social justice development of the idea of "global citizenship," interrogating and human rights organizations working on related issues. the meanings, contradictions and contentions associated Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course with this term. Through guest speakers and student and HR-2550. research on specific issues and injustices that are present in Manitoba communities, and which also have global HR-2600 (6) Emerging Issues in Human Rights (3 hrs connections or manifestations, students examine current Lecture) This intensive course is designed to introduce practices aimed at fostering global citizenship. The future students, in a range of disciplines and students entering of concepts or related to global citizenship is addressed by university, to challenges and opportunities in global to local analyzing the rights and democratic citizenship and asking human rights, by cultivating foundational skills for academic how such rights should be articulated and advanced. success. In both classroom and community settings, Cross-listed: IDS-1200(3). students explore global issues using the city as our human Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course rights 'campus' through current news items, literature, and and HRGS-1200 | IDS-1200. social analysis from diverse perspectives, shaped by research expertise in Global College. The course is HR-2100 (3) Concepts and Conventions in Human structured to strengthen skills in critical thinking and Rights (3 hrs Lecture) The course explores the historical analysis, writing, oral/social media presentations within a development of human rights concepts, and the major human rights framework, for increasing student capabilities international human rights conventions and instruments. in a range of post-secondary academic programs. Students become familiar with the breadth of the landscape Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. of human rights including political, civil, social, economic and cultural rights. HR-2650 (3 or 6) Special Topics in Human Rights (3 Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course hrs Lecture) The nature and range of topics will vary, and HRGS-2101 | POL-2101. depending upon the expertise of the instructor. Students should consult the Human Rights advisor or Global College HR-2200 (3) History of Human Rights in Canada (3 hrs website for information about specific iterations of the Lecture) This course examines the history of human rights course. The course may be repeated if the topic varies. within the Canadian context including key federal, provincial and municipal legislation as well as critical human HR-3003 (3) Gendercide (3 hrs Lecture) This course rights institutions. The course explores the evolution of the examines gendercide in a comparative and human rights Canada in relation to their international global-sociological perspective. It explores two central counterparts, and historical discrimination in Canada in propositions: that the framing should be an inclusive one, areas such as immigration, employment and housing, encompassing the experiences of both women/girls and internment of minority populations, gender, sexuality, men/boys and that recognition and amelioration of the anti-Semitism and treatment of Indigenous peoples. phenomenon is a matter of the highest urgency. Themes Cross-listed: HIST-2512(3). may include theories of gendercide, sexual violence as a Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course genocidal weapon, and the relevance of feminist and and HIST-2512. masculinity studies literatures for the study of gendercide. Case studies vary from year-to-year. HR-2310 (3) Refugees, Resettlement and Resilience Cross-listed: SOC-3003(3). (3 hrs Lecture) Drawing on interdisciplinary literatures of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course forced migration and social inclusion, this course examines and SOC-3003. the challenges and opportunities that people encounter in Requisite Courses: SOC-1101 [prerequisite(s)]. rebuilding their lives after forced displacement. While considering experiences of forced migration around the HR-3210 (3) Human Rights Institutions (3 hrs Lecture) world, the course focuses primarily on the experiences of This course analyzes the role of specialized Canadian and refugees in Canada related to social integration, international human rights institutions, such as human rights employment and public services. Students learn to employ commissions and tribunals. The course provides an key concepts from the literatures in order to analyze case understanding of the legislative frameworks for select studies and strategies to improve services for and institutions and procedures for accessing selected human integration of refugees in local communities. rights institutions, and assesses the societal impact of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course such commissions and tribunals through their educational and HRGS-2310. functions as well as case decisions. Requisite Courses: HR-2100 or HR-2200 or HRGS-2101 HR-2540 (3) Global Human Rights Advocacy (3 hrs or POL-2101 [prerequisite(s)]. Seminar/Discussion) This course provides knowledge and strategies for addressing current human rights topics. HR-3272 (3) Refugees and Forced Migration (3 hrs Through the readings from the literature of community Lecture) Global trends continue to show unprecedented engagement and activist assignments participants build numbers of forcibly displaced people worldwide. Countries awareness, develop confidence and acquire the tools to have struggled with how to assist refugees and internally displaced people. Less than one percent of refugees under UNHCR mandate are resettled in other countries. This HR-3650 (3 or 6) Special Topics in Human Rights (3 course explores the root causes of forcibly displaced hrs Lecture) The nature and range of topics vary, people; the costs associated with such movements, depending upon the expertise of the instructor. Students including economic, physical, and mental health; the should consult the Human Rights coordinator or Global responses of world governments; and the work of College website for information about specific iterations of resettlement agencies in assisting refugees. The issues the course. The course may be repeated if topic varies. and lessons learned from the experience of resettling and Restriction: Students cannot receive credit for GHR-3650 integrating refugees around the world are studied, if already received credit in HR-3650. including in Canada. Cross-listed: CRS-3272(3). HR-3750 (3 or 6) Directed Readings in Human Rights Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course (3 hrs Directed Reading) In this course, readings and and CRS-3272. assignments in the area of Human Rights are arranged Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or HR-1200, or permission between an individual student and the instructor. Topics of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. may not duplicate regular course offerings in Human Rights or other departments. This course is an opportunity to HR-3410 (3) Models of Transitional Justice (3 hrs explore a specialized topic in the inter/multidisciplinary Lecture) This course examines transitional justice, the context of the field. Examples of potential topics: exploring processes by which societies deal with the legacy of the human rights implications of environmental policies; widespread human rights abuses after a period of examining the application of the UN Guiding Principles on oppression or violent conflict in order to achieve the Business and Human Rights; studying representations of transition to a just and stable society. The course human rights in the creative arts; or analyzing the Truth and investigates a variety of transitional justice mechanisms, Reconciliation Commission's Calls to Actions through a such as reparations, truth commissions, reconciliation human rights lens. activities, and criminal tribunals. Note: Students may not take more than 6 credit hours of Cross-listed: CRS-3410(3). Directed Readings in Human Rights. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. and CRS-3410. Requisite Courses: HR-2100(3) or HR-2200(3) or Requisite Courses: HR-2100 and HR-2200, or the former permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. HRGS-2101, or the former POL-2101 [prerequisite(s)]. HR-3931 (3) Human Rights and Conflict Resolution (3 HR-3510 (3 or 6) Practicum in Human Rights (3 hrs hrs Lecture) Human rights advocates and conflict Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) In the Practicum, resolution practitioners both aim to build peaceable students integrate theory and classroom knowledge with societies based on mutual respect and the rule of law. practice through supervised field work and structured Rights advocates typically push the justice agenda while assignments and reflections. The practicum involves conflict resolution practitioners strive for transformation volunteer work related to Human Rights in a relevant often without utilizing human rights norms and institutions organization, and participation in specified seminars and/or as a basis for stability. This course systematically written analyses. evaluates the tensions and parallels between the two Note: Enrolment is subject to approval of a practicum fields, examining some of the ways in which human rights proposal submitted by a student with a declared major in and conflict resolution scholars and practitioners can Human Rights. Interested students are advised to consult interact in their approaches. Basic human rights concepts the Human Rights Coordinator well in advance of the term are introduced and case studies are used in an exploration in which they wish to enroll. of the issues. Requisite Courses: HR-2100 and HR-2200 or the former Cross-listed: CRS-3931(3). HRGS-2101 or the former POL-2101 [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and CRS-3931. HR-3550 (3) Human Rights, Human Security & the UN Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or permission of the (3 hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course instructor [prerequisite(s)]. explores the UN and its principal organs and related agencies, with particular attention to the Security Council HR-4001 (3) Capstone Seminar on Human Rights (3 and the Council's use of thematic and country-focused hrs Seminar/Discussion) This capstone course examines resolutions related to human rights and human security. theories and practices of human rights and contemporary Topics include women in war and peacebuilding, and the global issues, and evaluates on-going cultural, economic, role of civil society organizations in promoting human rights religious, legal, sociological and ideological debates that agenda at the UN, and Canada's role in these debates. The continue to influence the evolution of human rights. The course includes a field trip component at UN headquarters course is taught within a multidisciplinary theoretical in New York, with guest lectures by Canadian and UN framework. This seminar provides a forum for synthesis officials and leaders in international civil society and reflection on the human rights degree including organizations. integration of experiential and theoretical knowledge gained Restrictions: Department Permission Required. through the practicum and coursework. Requisite Courses: HR-2100 or HR-2600 Note: Students must have declared a major in Human [prerequisite(s)]. Rights to take this course. Requisite Courses: HR-3510 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. HR-4450 (3) Human Rights Approaches to Health (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course identifies, locates, HR-4025 (3) Indigenous Languages: Culture, Rights, and examines the complicated intersection between human and Conflicts (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) Indigenous rights and health in law, policy, and lived reality. Taught languages are an integral part of Indigenous peoples' from a multi-disciplinary framework, the course analyzes identity, worldview and culture. It is however, currently the content, justiciability and realization of international right estimated that up to ninety per cent of the world's to health provisions and the meaning of these provisions in Indigenous languages are likely to disappear by the end of different cultural and socio-economic contexts. Through the century. This course is designed to give students an contemporary debates and case studies, the course overview of Indigenous language issues related to culture, examines the interaction between various human rights advocacy, revitalization, and resistance. Students are approaches (cultural rights, right to development, encouraged to critically compare and contrast the treatment environmental rights, women's rights, Indigenous rights) of Indigenous languages through legislation, policy, and health approaches (public health, global health, grassroots activism, and educational and systemic efforts environmental health, social determinants of health). in countries such as Canada, the United States, New Requisite Courses: HR-2100 or HR-2200 Zealand, Norway, and Sweden. [prerequisite(s)]. Cross-listed: LING-4025(3), IS-4025(3) Restrictions: Department Permission Required. Students HR-4650 (3 or 6) Special Topics in Human Rights (3 may not hold credit for this course and IS-4025 | hrs Lecture) The nature and range of topics will vary, LING-4025. depending on the expertise of the instructor. Students Requisite Courses: IS-1016 and IS-1017, or the former should consult the Human Rights Advisor or Global College IS-1015 [prerequisite(s)]. web site for information about specific iterations of the course. The course may be repeated if topic varies. HR-4210 (3 or 6) Human and Indigenous Rights in Requisite Courses: HR-2100(3) and HR-2200(3) (or the Latin America (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) Indigenous previous HRGS-2101(6) or the previous POL-2101(6)) nationalities and other marginalized minority groups in Latin [prerequisite(s)]; and at least 6 additional credit hours in America have developed innovative strategies, alliances HR, or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. and forms of political participation to achieve recognition of their rights and to contribute to new political configurations HR-4671 (3 or 6) Independent Study in Human Rights in the region. This course studies the dynamic situation of (3 hrs Directed Reading) An independent study is an Indigenous and human rights and social conflicts in Latin individualized course of study or research for advanced America. Topics included contested definitions of individual students under the supervision of a faculty member. The and collective rights, responses to human rights abuses, faculty supervisor and the student develop a program of and intersections between human rights frameworks and reading or research. Typically the student is required to related peacebuilding processes. A country or sub-region prepare a major paper or other research project and to take may be selected for an in-depth case study, and may vary an oral examination. in different times that the course is offered. Cross-listed Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. with IS-4028(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course HR-4750 (3 or 6) Directed Readings in Human Rights and IS-4028. (3 hrs Directed Reading) In this course, readings and Requisite Courses: HR-2100 and HR-2200, or the former assignments in the area of Human Rights are arranged HRGS-2101, or the former POL-2101 [prerequisite(s)]. between an individual student and the instructor. Topics may not duplicate regular course offerings in Human Rights HR-4350 (3) Post-Conflict Truth, Memory, and or other departments. This course is an opportunity to Reconciliation (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) The suffering explore a specialized topic in the inter/multidisciplinary from atrocities during war-time is often seen as producing context of the field. Examples of potential topics: exploring lingering indvidual and collective trauma, contributing to the human rights implications of environmental policies; either personal dysfunction or successive cycles of examining the application of the UN Guiding Principles on violence where oppressed groups become the Business and Human Rights; studying representations of perpetrators in future regimes or conflicts. This course human rights in the creative arts; or analyzing the Truth and probes the role of memory in transitional societies, with Reconciliation Commission's Calls to Actions through a particular emphasis on using memory to strengthen human rights lens. mechanisms for justice and human rights. Reconciliation Note: Students may not take more than 6 credit hours of projects, ranging from community-based initiatives to formal Directed Readings in Human Rights. legislated undertakings such as truth and reconciliation Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. commissions are examined in depth. Requisite Courses: HR-2100(3) or HR-2200(3) or Cross-listed: CRS-4350(3). permission of the Instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and CRS-4350. Requisite Courses: HR-3410, CRS-3410, or the former HRGS-3410, or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES

IL-3001 (3) Capstone in Indigenous Languages (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) Students complete this course in the last semester of the program. It provides students with an opportunity to draw from their experience and understanding in the program by conducting a project on Indigenous languages (e.g., translation, documentation, curriculum development or language revitalization strategy for an Indigenous Community (on-reserve or in an urban setting)). This course is only open to students in the last year of the 3- or 4- year IL BA program. Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who successfully complete this course receive credit as indicated. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and IL-4001. Requisite Courses: This course is a required course for the Thematic Major in Indigenous Languages. Students are required to have completed 18 credit hours from the Thematic Major or obtain permission from the instructor [prerequisite(s)].

IL-4001 (3) Capstone in Indigenous Languages (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) Students complete this course in the last semester of the program. It provides students with an opportunity to draw from their experience and understanding in the program by conducting a project on Indigenous languages (e.g., translation, documentation, curriculum development or language revitalization strategy for an Indigenous Community (on-reserve or in an urban setting)). This course is only open to students in the last year of the 3- or 4- year IL BA program. Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who successfully complete this course receive credit as indicated. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and IL-3001. Requisite Courses: This course is a required course for the Thematic Major in Indigenous Languages. Students are required to have completed 18 credit hours from the Thematic Major or obtain permission from the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. INDIGENOUS STUDIES

IS-1010 (3) Indigenous Ways of Knowing (3 hrs Requisite Courses: IS-1101L (lab) (must be taken Lecture) Large numbers of Indigenous peoples settling in concurrently). Winnipeg, and in core neighbourhoods, suggest that students studying urbanism need to be aware that the city IS-1201 (6) Introductory Ojibwe (3 hrs Lecture | 1 hrs and critical issues in the inner-city can be interpreted Lab) This course is intended for students who are not differently. This course offers an introduction to Indigenous fluent in Ojibwe and have never taken a course in the ways of knowing through active participation in strategies language. The emphasis is primarily on oral work for the that facilitate the production of Aboriginal knowledge and purpose of learning basic sounds, vocabulary, and through comparisons with Euro-American ways of grammatical patterns. Structural differences between knowing. By taking part in basic ceremony and related Ojibwe and English are highlighted. practices, students gain an understanding of how First Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Peoples of Manitoba relate to each other, to the land, to and ABOR-1201. other animals, and to the world. Requisite Courses: IS-1201L (lab) (must be taken Cross-listed: UIC-1010(3). concurrently). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and UIC-1010. IS-1202 (3) Ojibwe Field School Part 1 (Lecture with variable meeting hours) This Ojibwe Field Course is IS-1016 (3) Introduction to Indigenous Studies: Art, intended for students who have taken an introductory Culture and History (3 hrs Lecture) This course provides course in the Ojibwe language or have working knowledge an introduction to Indigenous art, culture and history in of Ojibwe. The emphasis is primarily on oral work North America. Starting with the pre-contact indigenous (utilization and comprehension) for the purpose of the societies, students explore the richness and diversity of expansion of learning sounds, vocabulary, and grammatical indigenous cultures as they evolved out of different patterns. Structural differences between Ojibwe and eco-systems from Central America up to Canada's Arctic. English are highlighted. Using Indigenous ontologies and epistemologies as a Note: The field course takes place in an Indigenous starting point, the course provides an alternative view of community. Additional fees (normally non-refundable) are colonial history as well as the post-colonial struggle of required to cover the cost of transportation, indigenous peoples for their own identity, place and accommodations, meals, elder/speaker involvement. belonging in contemporary society. Additional Requirements: Field component is mandatory. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students who have taken IS-2001(6) Special and HIST-1009 | IS-1015. Topics: Introductory Ojibwe Field School are not eligible to take this course. IS-1017 (3) Introduction to Indigenous Studies: Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial Politics and Governance (3 hrs Lecture) This course basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who provides an introduction to the politics, economics and successfully complete this course receive credit as governance of indigenous peoples in Canada. These indicated. systems developed in distinctive ecological contexts that Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. shaped the way these cultures learned to thrive in Requisite Courses: IS-1201 Introduction to Ojibwe relationship to all other living things. The course begins with [prerequisite(s)]. an introduction to the ontologies and epistemological foundations of thought then explores the historical IS-1301 (3) Special Topics in Introductor Indigenous evolution of the economic and political relationship between Languages (3 hrs Lecture) This course provides an indigenous peoples (First Nation, non-status and Metis) and opportunity for students to learn an Indigenous language the nation state in Canada. Key topics include: the Royal other than Cree and Ojibwe at the first-year level. Focus is Proclamation, the Treaties, Indigenous people and the on the Indigenous languages spoken in Manitoba or Supreme Court of Canada, the Indian Act and Residential neighbouring regions. While the nature and range of topics schools. will vary depending upon the expertise of the instructor, Note: Students with credit in IS-1015 may not receive the emphasis will usually be on oral work for the purpose credit for IS-1017. of learning basic sounds, vocabulary, and grammatical Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course patterns. The course may be repeated if the topic varies. and IS-1015. Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who IS-1101 (6) Introductory Cree (3 hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) successfully complete this course receive credit as This course is intended for students who are not fluent in indicated. Cree and have never taken a course in the language. The emphasis is primarily on oral work for the purpose of IS-1501 (6) Oral Immersion in Cree I (3 hrs Lecture | 1 learning basic sounds, vocabulary, and grammatical hrs Lab) The Cree Immersion 1 course is intended for patterns. Structural differences between Cree and English students to learn conversational Cree through community are highlighted. language learning methods. The emphasis is primarily on Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course oral conversations using Cree vocabulary, expressions, and ABOR-1101. simple sentences, and conjunctive sentences of selected themes through contemporary and traditional Cree IS-2020 (3) Colonization and Indigenous Peoples (3 perspectives. hrs Lecture) This course examines the Indigenous colonial Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial experience, particularly in Western Canada, and the impact basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who colonization has had and continues to have on the successfully complete this course receive credit as relationship between Indigenous peoples and Canadian indicated. governments. This course emphasizes the contemporary Requisite Courses: IS-1501L (lab) (must be taken effects of colonization, particularly as regards identity concurrently). issues and how they play out in the urban and inner-city environment, and also processes and strategies for IS-1601 (6) Oral Immersion in Ojibwe I (3 hrs Lecture | decolonization. 1 hrs Lab) The Ojibwe Immersion 1 course is intended for Cross-listed: POL-2020(3) and UIC-2020(3). students to learn conversational Ojibwe through community Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course language learning methods. The emphasis is primarily on and POL-2020 | UIC-2020. oral conversations using Ojibwe vocabulary, expressions, simple sentences, and conjunctive sentences of selected IS-2030 (3) Management and Financial themes through contemporary and traditional Ojibwe Administration for Community Leadership (3 hrs perspectives. Lecture) As small-scale and not-for-profit structures, Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial community-based and Indigenous organizations often face basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who unique challenges and political/cultural realities in terms of successfully complete this course receive credit as overall management and operations. This course provides indicated. students with a good understanding of the key facets of Requisite Courses: IS-1601L (lab) (must be taken management and administrative structures and concurrently). management controls, financial statements and budgeting, performance measures, strategic planning and operations IS-2001 (3 or 6) Special Topics in Indigenous Studies analysis and evaluation. I (3 hrs Lecture) The contents of this course focus on Cross-listed: BUS-2030(3) and UIC-2030(3). particular aspects of Indigenous Studies and may include Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course topics on philosophical, social, economic, political or other and BUS-2030 | UIC-2030. issues. Selected topics are examined in a seminar offered Requisite Courses: UIC-1001 or IS-1016 and IS-1017, or by current staff, or local or visiting scholars from Canada the former IS-1015 [prerequisite(s)]. and other countries. Topics accord with each scholar's area of expertise. Special class schedules may be IS-2040 (3) Indigenous Women and Resilience (3 hrs arranged to accommodate visiting scholars. This course Lecture) The contributions and resilience of Indigenous may be repeated for credit when the topic varies. (First Nations, Métis, Inuit) women have become Note: A student may not count more than 6 credit hours of increasingly well known in the North American and Special Topics at the 2000 level toward a degree in international political, economic, and cultural arenas. Indigenous Studies (formerly Aboriginal Governance). Contrary to historical representations and stereotypes, Requisite Courses: IS-1016 and IS-1017, or the former Indigenous and Métis women have been leading IS-1015 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. advocates, actors, and activists in Indigenous struggles for centuries, making significant contributions to their families, IS-2012 (3) Indigenous Sciences: Contributions to communities, and nations. Of importance are the policies Contemporary Challenges (2 hrs Lecture | 1 hrs that reflect changing perceptions and approaches to the Seminar/Discussion) This course explores the foundations, "Indian problem," with particular focus on gender. Students philosophy and applications of Indigenous sciences. It develop critical thinking skills as we consider stereotypes builds an understanding of Indigenous scientific wisdom as and the impact they have on law and Indigenous rights in it relates to western sciences and it contributes to Canada and internationally. addressing contemporary challenges. This course Requisite Courses: IS-1016 and IS-1017, or the former enhances students' cultural sensitivity and overall scientific IS-1015 [prerequisite(s)]. literacy through understanding of Indigenous perspectives (understanding) and Indigenous wisdom (application) IS-2050 (3) Indigenous Peoples, Lands, and alongside western sciences. Key themes include Resources (3 hrs Lecture) The Canadian government is philosophical foundations of Indigenous sciences and its currently looking at privatizing indigenous peoples' land application in areas of health/wellbeing, food/agriculture, on-reserve. Some believe this will boost economic planetary health and selected fields of STEM (Science, development and create jobs and opportunities. Others Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) examined argue this will amount to nothing more than another through case studies. assimilation project, with the potential to undermine Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial indigenous cultures and communities. This course basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who examines the unique relationship that indigenous people successfully complete this course receive credit as have to land and natural resources. It includes a study of indicated. national and international legal frameworks for indigenous Requisite Courses: IS-1016 or IS-1017 or permission of resource and property rights and some of their implications instructor [prerequisite(s)]. in practice. Using this framework, the course includes a number of case studies involving national and international conflicts associated with resource development projects state. Indigenous and Western philosophies provide (hydro, mining, oil, etc.) in indigenous territories and contexts for critically examining past and present explores the contradictions and possibilities for indigenous relationships and for considering how to move into more communities whether they choose to pursue these projects just relationships. Topics may include: treaty rights, or not. colonization, the Indian Act, residential schools, Aboriginal Requisite Courses: IS-1016 and IS-1017, or the former rights, racism, restorative justice, and the United Nations IS-1015 [prerequisite(s)]. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Cross-listed: PHIL-2240(3). IS-2060 (3) Indigenous Treaties in Canada (3 hrs Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Lecture) This course examines the historical relationship and PHIL-2240. between indigenous peoples and the Canadian State as shaped by the negotiations and the signing of the Treaties. IS-2301 (3) Community Development (3 hrs Lecture) Starting from the political/legal position of indigenous This course is an introduction to the idea of community peoples as set up by the Royal Proclamation, students development and community economic development. The study the history, context and application of treaties and course considers the principles and philosophy of treaty-making in Canada. The course begins with the initial community development/community economic development, Peace and Friendship Treaties (1725 - 1960) then and examines the key elements of CD/CED including examines the Upper Canada Treaties (1764 - 1862), the neighbourhood revitalization; housing development and Numbered and NWT Treaties (1871 - 1921), and finally rehabilitation; employment development and training; and modern day Treaty Making. Key concepts covered include: social enterprise. the spirit and intent; the honour of the Crown; Treaty rights; Cross-listed: UIC-2001(3). Aboriginal rights; and self-determination. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial and UIC-2001. basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who successfully complete this course receive credit as IS-2401 (3) Indigenous Food Systems Field Study indicated. (Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum | 3 hrs Lecture) This Requisite Courses: IS-1016 and IS-1017, or the former course offers land-based learning opportunities to explore IS-1015, or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. the importance of, challenges to, and opportunities for Indigenous food systems in Manitoba and Canada, along IS-2101 (6) Intermediate Cree (3 hrs Lecture | Lab) This with classroom discussion on nutritional and health course is an intermediate course in the Cree language. It information. Interdisciplinary themes include traditional food serves as a continuation of Introductory Cree (IS-1101) or as medicine; Indigenous food systems of production, as the entry-level course for fluent speakers of Cree. The consumption, distribution; Indigenous knowledges and course focuses primarily on oral conversational skills, perspectives on challenges and significance of traditional vocabulary, and grammatical patterns. Attention is paid to food systems. The typical course design includes 1 to 1.5 Cree orthography, composition and translation. The lab weeks in classrooms and 36 hours of experiential learning component provides one-on-one and small group from Indigenous elders and Indigenous food researchers in interactions intended to enhance language acquisition and Manitoba First Nations communities. provide additional opportunities for language practice and Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. usage. Requisite Courses: IS-1101 or permission of the IS-2402 (3) Indigenous Representation in Film (1.5 instructor [prerequisite(s)]; IS-2101L (lab) (must be taken hrs Lecture | 1.5 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course concurrently). critically examines the portrayal of Indigenous peoples in film. Students explore such notions of imperfect and fourth IS-2201 (6) Intermediate Ojibwe (3 hrs Lecture | 1 hrs cinema, Indigenous self-representation, collective Lab) This course is an intermediate course in the Ojibwe authorship, representation, impersonation, and language. It serves as a continuation of Introductory appropriation. Films examined are in the modern era (1970 Ojibwe (IS-1201) or as the entry-level course for fluent onward) and focus on Indigenous Cinema. speakers of Ojibwe. The course focuses primarily on oral Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial conversational skills, vocabulary and grammatical patterns. basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who Attention is paid to Ojibwe orthography, composition and successfully complete this course receive credit as translation. The lab component provides one-on-one and indicated. small group interactions intended to enhance language acquisition and provide additional opportunities for IS-2407 (3) Language Revitalization (3 hrs Lecture) This language practice and usage. course examines the need for language revitalization in the Requisite Courses: IS-1201 or permission of the context of language endangerment that is now occurring instructor [prerequisite(s)]; IS-2201L (lab) (must be taken on a global scale. Students learn about factors that concurrently). contribute to language remaining strong, as well as processes such as colonization and assimilation that have IS-2240 (3) Indigenous Justice Issues (3 hrs Lecture) led to language shift, loss, and death. Students learn about This course in applied political theory examines various the importance of diverse languages, and also about moral and political issues that are the basis for present strategies and programs that communities have applied to conflicts between Indigenous Peoples and the Canadian maintain or regain their languages. Key language revitalization methods are taught, including language communities, their knowledge, and the local environments healing, language development, language learning that have sustained over time. Key themes include technologies, language nests, and master-apprentice traditional food and medicinal plants, traditional natural programs. resources management systems, and learning within Cross-listed: ANTH-2407(3) and LING-2104(3). indigenous knowledge and indigenous cultural landscapes. Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial Such learning is explored through global case studies. basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who Research approaches, tools, methods and ethical issues successfully complete this course receive credit as surrounding ethnoecological research within local and indicated. Indigenous communities are also explored. This course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course helps in developing academic and research skills in and ANTH-2407 | LING-2104. conducting interdisciplinary research that examines the relationships between nature and culture. IS-3001 (3 or 6) Special Topics in Indigenous Studies Cross-listed: ANTH-3170(3). (3 hrs Lecture) The contents of this course focus on Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course particular aspects of Indigenous Studies and may include and ANTH-3170. topics on philosophical, social, economic, political or other Requisite Courses: IS-1016 and IS-1017 (or the former issues. Topics accord with each scholar's area of IS-1015), or AG-1015 or UIC-1001 or IDS-1100 or expertise, and will consist of material and assignments ANTH-1001 or ANTH-1002 or permission of the instructor appropriate to a 3000-level course. This course may be [prerequisite(s)]. repeated for credit when the topic varies. Requisite Courses: IS-1016 and IS-1017, or the former IS-3100 (3) International Rights of Indigenous IS-1015 [prerequisite(s)]. Peoples (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines current developments at the international level with respect to the IS-3010 (3) Protecting Indigenous Knowledge rights of Indigenous peoples, particularly the right to Systems (3 hrs Lecture/Seminar) This course addresses self-determination. The course examines decolonization as emerging issues for Indigenous peoples regarding the use used in reference to Indigenous peoples. It includes a and exploitation of their knowledge and natural resources. review of the Draft Declaration of Indigenous peoples and It examines case studies where rights over knowledge and the Organization or American States Draft Declaration. The the stewardship of biodiversity have been threatened and course reviews the United Nations bodies that deal with examples where Indigenous peoples have been able to Indigenous issues. International Indigenous peoples' rights manage and protect their environment and associated to land and treaty interpretation are considered and knowledge. The course focuses on the contributions of compared to Canada's current policy in maintaining a native science, Indigenous ecological knowledge and colonial relationship. Developments and issues of concern wisdom of the Elders in North America and connections to to the Indigenous Peoples Permanent Forum are covered. similar Indigenous knowledge systems in other parts of the Requisite Courses: IS-1016 and IS-1017, or the former world. IS-1015 [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: IS-1016 and IS-1017, or the former IS-1015, or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. IS-3104 (3) Indigenous Languages of South America (3 hrs Lecture) Presenting an integrated overview of the IS-3011 (3) Two-Spirit, Indigiqueer & indigenous indigenous languages of South America, this course looks LGBTQ Realities (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course at main language families spoken there, their spatial examines Two-Spirit, Indigiqueer, and Indigenous LGBTQ distribution, history and classification, as well as their identities, realities, and selected issues. Among other cultural background. With 53 language families and 55 topics, we explore Indigenous conceptions of gender and isolates, South America is not only the most diverse region sexuality, colonial impacts upon Indigenous gender and in linguistic terms, but also a storehouse of unusual sexual diversity, relationships between queer Indigenous structural features important for understanding the full community and the mainstream LGBTQ community, as well range of possible variants of human language. The course as Two-Spirit resurgence and self-determination especially also explores typological characteristics of South American in an urban context. Students learn to identify languages, potential linguistic areas, proposals of more characteristics of nation-specific Indigenous concepts of distant relationships, and the current situation of gender and sexuality as well as ongoing colonial impacts. endangered languages in this region. Additional in-depth Cross-listed: UIC-3010 work is required to receive credit at the 4000-level. Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial Cross-listed: ANTH-3411(3), ANTH-4411(3), basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who LING-3104(3), and LING-4104(3). successfully complete this course receive credit as Restrictions: Department Permission Required. Students indicated. may not hold credit for this course and ANTH-3411 | Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course ANTH-4411 | LING-3104 | LING-4104. and UIC-3010. IS-3106 (3) Advanced Ojibwe (3 hrs Lecture) This IS-3012 (3) Ethnoecology As a Research Approach (3 course is a continuation of IS 2201 (6). It assumes basic hrs Lecture) This course underscores the traditional speaking ability in the Ojibwe language, emphasizes ecological knowledge systems of Indigenous and local phonetic and grammatical structure and presents the communities by examining the interactions among these knowledge necessary for effective teaching of the language. Students study narratives containing a broad classrooms and 36 hours of experiential learning from sample of the structures they have covered up to this level. herbalists and Indigenous elders in the Manitoba First As part of this course, students are expected to develop Nations. an instructional module appropriate for a 1000-level Ojibwe Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. language course. Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial IS-3523 (3) Indigenous Women's History (3 hrs basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who Lecture) This course examines Métis, Inuit and First Nations successfully complete this course receive credit as women's history in Canada. The course covers a variety of indicated. themes, including Indigenous women's health, labour and Requisite Courses: IS-2201 [prerequisite(s)]. education history; histories of sexual, legal, and social regulation of Indigenous women; and formal, informal, local IS-3125 (3) The Intergenerational Legacy of and national women's organizations. Students also engage Residential Schools (3 hrs Lecture) The residential in historical interpretation of a variety of different kinds of school system was a mandatory school system for all historical evidence and consider the creative work of Aboriginal children. The objective of these schools was to Indigenous women in diverse cultural fields including art, extinguish Aboriginal culture and language from the film, music and literature. Canadian landscape. The first school opened in the late Cross-listed: HIST-3523(3). 1800's and the last school closed in the 1980's. The result Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course from this long history is a legacy that impacts all Canadians and HIST-3523 | WGS-3523. and Aboriginal peoples. This course examines the impact of the residential school system in a variety of areas such as IS-3535 (3) Indigenous Gender Identities (1.5 hrs the loss of language and culture, loss of parenting skills, Lecture | 1.5 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course (especially mothering), as well as settler and Aboriginal introduces the students to the interdisciplinary study of the relations. construction of gender as a paradigm in Indigenous Cross-listed: UIC-3125(3). communities. Readings span cross-cultural and historical Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course materials, including literacy, artistic and popular and UIC-3125. representations of the spectrum between masculinity and Requisite Courses: IS-1016 and IS-1017, or the former femininity in Indigenous localities. The course explores IS-1015 [prerequisite(s)]. such topics as the intersectionality of colonization, sexuality, decolonization, heteronormativity, love, politics, IS-3162 (3) Old Ways, New Money: Indigenous Social erotics, and performance. The sacredness of Indigenous Enterprise (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) Students study gender identities is a key analytical tool. theories and practices related to Indigenous social Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial enterprise. Of particular interest is the relationship between basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who social enterprises, related policies, and Indigenous successfully complete this course receive credit as sovereignty or self-determination. Students become familiar indicated. with a range of Indigenous social enterprises in Canada and globally. The course provides insights into attitudes IS-3590 (3) Indigenous Health History (3 hrs Lecture) toward Indigenous community development from within as This course introduces students to Indigenous health well as from outside Indigenous communities and the history focusing primarily on First Nations, Inuit and Métis implications of those attitudes on theories, practices and experiences. Historical case studies will be drawn from the policies. seventeenth to the twentieth centuries with a special Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial emphasis on the impact of colonization on Indigenous basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who medicine and Indigenous health in Canada. successfully complete this course receive credit as Cross-listed: HIST-3590(3). indicated. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and HIST-3590. and ANTH-3162. Requisite Courses: IS-1016(3) or IS-1017(3) or the IS-3717 (3 or 6) Indigenous Literatures & Cultures (3 former IS-1015(6), or permission of the Instructor hrs Lecture) This course examines the Indigenous [prerequisite(s)]. literatures and cultures of North America. Students study early forms of Indigenous expression as well as writings IS-3201 (3) Indigenous Ethnobotany Field School produced after the Indigenous "renaissance" of the late (Lecture with variable meeting hours | Lab) This field 1960s. Focusing on works by established and emerging course on Indigenous offers land-based learning writers, the course emphasizes Indigenous values, opportunities to explore the multiple uses (including knowledges, and theories while paying attention to the key medicinal, ceremonial, aesthetic, and spiritual) of local concepts, critical debates and recent directions in the field plants by Indigenous communities along with the classroom of Indigenous literary studies today. Each version of the instruction of botanical information. The major course may have a different emphasis. Students should interdisciplinary sub-themes covered through this course consult the English Department website for a detailed include traditional medicinal plant knowledge, applied course description any given year. Ethnobotany, Indigenous conservation and bio cultural Cross-listed: ENGL-3717. landscape. The course design includes 1 to 1.5 weeks in Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and ENGL-3717. How Indigenous peoples face and deal with colonization, imperialism, and globalization will depend on the critical IS-3723 (3 or 6) Topics in Indigenous Texts and understanding and realizations of self-determination. The Cultures (3 hrs Lecture) IS-3723(3) or (6) Topics in legal, political, social, and cultural connotations around Indigenous Texts and Cultures (Le3) - This course self-determination are considered. The course is focused examines a range of texts by Indigenous artists and other not only on theoretical considerations but is also designed cultural producers. In an era when stereotypes, racism, to bring issues of self-determination into the collective and injustices, and inequities continue to undermine the well individual lives of those who identify themselves with the being of many, Indigenous artists, along with Indigenous concerns of Indigenous peoples. and non-Indigenous scholars across a range of disciplines, Restrictions: Honours Form Required. activists, community members, and others are contributing Requisite Courses: IS-1016 and IS-1017, or the former to Indigenous peoples health, healing, and IS-1015 [prerequisite(s)]. self-determination. The course emphasizes Indigenous values, knowledges, and theories. In a given year, we IS-4021 (6) Pathways to Indigenous Wisdom (3 hrs might focus on a specific artist, nation, country, genre, or Lecture) In this course, students' assumptions and world period. Students should consult the English Department views are challenged and enriched by a deep and complex website for a description of the course offered in a given understanding of Indigenous ways of knowing. By year. decolonizing and indigenizing the mind, students are open Cross-listed: ENGL-3723. to imagining and, later, implementing strategies that are Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course embedded in indigenous teachings. The course and ENGL-3723. emphasizes the importance of critical thinking through the Requisite Courses: You must successfully complete 6 examination and immersion into indigenous epistemologies credit hours of first-year ENGLISH, including ENGL-1001(6) and brings to the program the instructor's expertise in First or ENGL-1000(3) [prerequisite(s)]. Nations governance, development efforts and systems. Cannot receive credit in IS 4021 if previous credit in GIS IS-3901 (3 or 6) Directed Readings (3 hrs Directed 4021 or GIS 7021. Reading) In this course, readings and assignments in the Restrictions: Honours Form Required. area of Indigenous Studies are arranged between an Requisite Courses: IS-1016 and IS-1017, or the former individual student and the instructor. Topics may not IS-1015 [prerequisite(s)]. duplicate regular course offerings in Indigenous Studies or other departments. This course is an opportunity to explore IS-4022 (6) Indigenous Research Methodologies and a specialized topic in the interdisciplinary context of the Ethics (3 hrs Lecture) This course provides a review of field. Examples of potential topics include comparing the movement towards the decolonization of the Western Canadian and New Zealand/Aotearoa treaty rights efforts; model of research and the revitalization of Indigenous analyzing artistic forms of Indigenous political resistance; research frameworks and methodologies. The unique exploring health implications of indigeneity in settler issues and principles involving ethical research in societies; and ethnohistorical research on early Winnipeg Indigenous communities are explored. The course also Aboriginal community organizations. includes an overview of the governance by Indigenous Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. communities of their own research and ethical review Requisite Courses: IS-1016 and IS-1017 (or the former process. IS-1015) and permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Requisite Courses: IS-1016 and IS-1017, or the former IS-4000 (3 or 6) Indigenous Studies Practicum (3 hrs IS-1015 [prerequisite(s)]. Seminar/Discussion) This course offers experience in Indigenous Studies under the guidance and supervision of IS-4023 (3) Indigenous Peoples, Globalization and faculty and on-site personnel. The course is arranged Development (3 hrs Lecture) Indigenous peoples today between the student, the instructor, and a site willing to are enmeshed in the expanding modern economy, subject provide relevant experience in a setting related to a topic in to the pressures of both market and government. More and Indigenous Studies. The hours spent on-site will be more Indigenous communities are rejecting the traditional determined according to the number of credits. Examples of capitalist vision of development as human and possible practicum sites: Indigenous community environmental exploitation and focusing on new types of organizations; Indigenous governmental or other local development projects. This course analyzes some of institutions; museums or art galleries working on Indigenous the conflicts associated with traditional development exhibits or productions; non-Indigenous governmental or projects in Indigenous communities. Taking Indigenous NGO entity dealing with Indigenous peoples or issues; or peoples as actors, not victims, as its starting point, the an Indigenous business or media outlet. class then examines innovations in Indigenous economic Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. development that are culturally respectful, environmentally Requisite Courses: IS-1016 and IS-1017 (or the former responsible and which build a new sense of community. IS-1015) and permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Requisite Courses: IS-1016 and IS-1017, or the former IS-4020 (3) Indigenous Self-Determination (3 hrs IS-1015 [prerequisite(s)]. Lecture) This course brings to the academy a pivotal concept for the present and future of Indigenous peoples. IS-4024 (3) Biocultural Diversity Conservation Balancing Scientific and Indigenous Knowledge in the region. This course studies the dynamic situation of Practices (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course Indigenous and human rights and social conflicts in Latin focuses on the interrelationship between indigenous America. Topics included contested definitions of individual peoples and their environment. Indigenous and local and collective rights, responses to human rights abuses, communities contribute with understanding, practices and and intersections between human rights frameworks and innovations regarding the use and conservation of related peacebuilding processes. A country or sub-region biodiversity and natural resources in diverse ecosystems. may be selected for an in-depth case study, and may vary The value of indigenous knowledge is recognized in in different times that the course is offered. Cross-listed international agreements and efforts are made to integrate with HR-4210(3). traditional ecological knowledge into conservation and Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not management programs. The tensions arising from the hold credit for this course and HR-4210. confluence of indigenous and scientific knowledge, the Requisite Courses: HR-2100 and HR-2200, or the former opposition of different epistemological approaches, the HRGS-2101, or the former POL-2101 or permission of the increasing loss of bio diversity and indigenous cultures, the department [prerequisite(s)]. interconnectedness between biological and cultural diversity are the central themes of this course. IS-4029 (3) Indigenous Language Mentorship (3 hrs Cross-listed: IDS-4824(3) and ANTH-4024(3). Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course provides Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not an opportunity for students of Indigenous Languages to hold credit for this course and ANTH-4024 | IDS-4824. work with fluent speakers in Manitoba in a mentoring or Requisite Courses: IS-1016 and IS-1017, or the former apprenticeship context to develop language proficiency. By IS-1015 [prerequisite(s)]. the end of this course, students will have increased their oral proficiency in an Indigenous language, as well as IS-4025 (3) Indigenous Languages: Culture, Rights, planned and assessed their own language learning goals and Conflicts (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) Indigenous and progress. languages are an integral part of Indigenous peoples' Note: This course is a required course for the Thematic identity, worldview and culture. It is however, currently Major in Indigenous Languages estimated that up to ninety per cent of the world's Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial Indigenous languages are likely to disappear by the end of basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who the century. This course is designed to give students an successfully complete this course receive credit as overview of Indigenous language issues related to culture, indicated. advocacy, revitalization, and resistance. Students are Requisite Courses: Students are required to have encouraged to critically compare and contrast the treatment completed 18 credit hours from the Thematic Major or of Indigenous languages through legislation, policy, obtain permission from the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. grassroots activism, and educational and systemic efforts in countries such as Canada, the United States, New IS-4200 (3 or 6) Seminar in Selected Topics (3 hrs Zealand, Norway, and Sweden. Lecture) This course focuses on particular aspects of Cross-listed: LING-4025(3), HR-4025(3) Indigenous Studies, and particularly on Indigenous Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not governance/policy. The selected topic is discussed in hold credit for this course and HR-4025 | LING-4025. seminar format. It may be approached from a variety of Requisite Courses: IS-1016 and IS-1017, or the former perspectives, including philosophical, social/cultural, IS-1015 [prerequisite(s)]. economic, political, or artistic, and may be offered by current faculty, local or visiting scholars from Canada or IS-4026 (3) Indigenous Food Security (3 hrs Lecture) other nations. The course may be repeated for credit when Community food security provides a rich diversity of the topic varies. self-organized food systems to improve, maintain and Restrictions: Honours Form Required. enhance health, well-being, resilience and ecological Requisite Courses: IS-1016 and IS-1017, or the former sustainability, originated and nurtured by Indigenous and IS-1015 [prerequisite(s)]. other marginalized communities. By examining Canadian and international case studies as well as empirical IS-4445 (3) Urban Indigenous Seminar (3 hrs research on Indigenous voices, knowledges and Seminar/Discussion) This seminar examines selected perspectives on their own food systems, this course topics dealing with urban Indigenous issues. Topics may critically engages students with the concepts, approaches, include the viability of urban Indigenous governance, urban practices and challenges of Indigenous food production, reserves, and Indigenous education and economic consumption and distribution and their role in achieving development issues in the inner city. The issue of differing community food security. conceptions of Indigenous representation and identity held Restrictions: Honours Form Required. by various Indigenous organizations is a particularly challenging and contentious issue in the urban context. The IS-4028 (3 or 6) Human and Indigenous Rights in portability and applicability of Indigenous and treaty rights in Latin America (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) Indigenous the urban environment may also be explored. We may also nationalities and other marginalized minority groups in Latin analyze the unique problems created by the range of America have developed innovative strategies, alliances jurisdictional responsibilities towards Indigenous people in and forms of political participation to achieve recognition of the urban environment. their rights and to contribute to new political configurations Cross-listed: ANTH-4145(3) and UIC-4445(3). Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not hold credit for this course and ANTH-4145 | UIC-4445. Requisite Courses: You must successfully complete a minimum of 6 credit hours in Urban and Inner City Studies (UIC) courses, or obtain permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)].

IS-4703 (3 or 6) Indigenous Education in an Era of Globalization (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course examines Indigenous learning systems and their adaptations within a global world. As societies become more integrated through globalization, traditional Indigenous learning systems are being challenged as to their viability. In response, Indigenous peoples are adapting their learning systems to meet the challenges that are occurring to the social fabric of their cultures. More generally, this course brings Indigenous perspectives on education to the analysis of globalization. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Requisite Courses: IS-1016 and IS-1017 (or the former IS-1015) or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)].

IS-4717 (3 or 6) Topics in Indigenous Literary and Culture (3 hrs Lecture) This course focuses on a topic in the area of Indigenous literary and cultural studies. For example, it may focus on historical or contemporary representations of Indigenous people in a range of artistic and non-artistic texts. Or, the course may study Indigenous artistic and intellectual responses to themes such as the environment, neo-colonialism, violence against women, health, sovereignty, and reconciliation by considering a specific artist, nation, genre, or period. Please consult the English Department website for a detailed course description in any given year. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Cross-listed: ENGL-4717(3)/(6). Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not hold credit for this course and ENGL-4717. Requisite Courses: You must successfully complete 6 credit hours of first-year ENGLISH, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3). Co-requisite: ENGL-2142(6) [prerequisite(s)]; ENGL-2142 or permission of instructor (must be taken previously or at the same time as this course). INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

IDS-1100 (6) Introduction to International which particular development theories and practices Development Studies (3 hrs Lecture) Persistent poverty emerged. and discrimination, rising inequality and environmental Cross-listed: HIST-2130(6). stress, vulnerability to violence and disaster-these Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course problems challenge people around the world. Imagine and HIST-2130. yourself as an agent of change, seeking ways to live justly Requisite Courses: IDS-1100(6) or 6 credit hours in HIST and peacefully with others and the earth. Where would 1000-level courses, or permission of the Instructor one look for ideas? This course introduces students to the [prerequisite(s)]. concepts and critical tools needed to understand a range of approaches to change, both conventional and IDS-2131 (3) Rural Development (3 hrs Lecture) This transformative. Students learn to pose and answer course examines changes to rural society and economy in questions about current development challenges, and to the South (Africa, Asia, and Latin America) brought about analyze examples of successful and unsuccessful historically by colonialism, and more recently through development at the global, national, and community levels. modern development efforts. The course begins by Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course considering how colonialism and expansion of capitalism and MSC-2201. reoriented agriculture and rural society towards a more global focus. Modern development efforts are then IDS-1200 (3) Introduction to Global Citizenship (3 hrs evaluated in light of their impact on rural economy and Lecture) In this course students trace the historical society. Discussion then highlights the impact of agrarian development of the ideal of "global citizenship," reform, technological change, and domestic government interrogatingthe meanings, contradictions and contentions policies on economic development and social associated with this term. Through guest peakers and differentiation. Both gender and environmental issues will student research on specific issues and injustices that are be interwoven throughout the course, and efforts will be present in Manitoba communities, and which also have made to draw connections with rural change in Canada. global connections and manifestations, students examine Requisite Courses: IDS-1100 or permission of the current practices aimed at fostering global citizenship. The instructor [prerequisite(s)]. future of concepts of or related to global citizenship is address by analyzing the rights of democratic citizenship IDS-2160 (3) Indigenous People and the Industrial and asking how such rights should be articulated and State (3 hrs Lecture) The course considers the situation of advanced. Indigenous peoples in the regions of Africa, the Americas, Cross-listed: HR-1200(3). Asia and the Pacific. While these people have distinct Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course cultural histories, their relations to nation-states are similar and HR-1200 | HRGS-1200. in important ways. Tensions between indigenous people and the industrial state centre on such issues as external IDS-2110 (3) Participatory Local Development (3 hrs market dependency, diversification, and size of the Lecture) Poverty, inequality, gender discrimination, government sector. Students critique standard definitions top-down decision making, inadequate technology, and of progress and efficiency. The implications of conflict all prevent communities from meeting their contemporary industrial development projects for the future development goals. This course prepares students to of human societies are studied within the framework of the facilitate local development through participatory primal insights, values and definitions shared by Indigenous approaches that build community and capacity at a local peoples throughout the globe. level. Approaches examined include participatory Cross-listed: ANTH-2160(3). assessments, microfinance, community-supported Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course agriculture, and indigenous natural resource management. and ANTH-2160. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: IDS-1100, ANTH-1001 or ANTH-1002 and IDS-3110 | MSC-2110. or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: IDS-1100 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. IDS-2171 (3) Crisis, Humanitarian Aid and Development (3 hrs Lecture) Today disasters threaten IDS-2130 (6) A History of the Developing World (3 hrs global human security as never before. These crises are Lecture) This course examines the historical roots of caused by a complex mix of natural hazards, such as development and underdevelopment, processes that have floods, earthquakes or droughts, and human action. led to the emergence of the developing world or Third Humanitarian aid is an important response to disasters and World as a distinctive, though diverse region. It surveys an increasing part of international development aid. This trends such as colonization, industrialization, militarization course identifies the main organizations providing and trade in the South from the 15th to the 20th century. It humanitarian aid, and examines their efforts to improve aid investigates the ways in which both external pressures quality and their own accountability. It also explores the and internal dynamics have contributed to continuity and ways in which humanitarian aid can help to reduce change in these regions. This course will help students to vulnerability to hazards and enhance, rather than understand the historical context for contemporary undermine, capacities for development. changes in developing countries, as well as the context in Requisite Courses: Successful completion of 6 credit hours [prerequisite(s)]; IDS-1100 (recommended to be expressions, with special emphasis on the relevance of taken previously or at the same time as this course). simplicity to building emotional well-being, vibrant community, sustainable environment, and social justice. IDS-2183 (3) African Development Issues (3 hrs Cross-listed: ENV-2521(3). Lecture) This case study course will survey a subset of Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course the theories, processes, policies and practice of and ENV-2521. development and underdevelopment in the diverse and Requisite Courses: IDS-1100 or ENV-1600 or permission complex context of Africa. In the face of intensifying global of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. capital processes and declining humanitarian efforts, many African communities and countries face serious IDS-2603 (3) Environmental Sustainability: A Global challenges. While exploring development problems and Dilemma (3 hrs Lecture) This course focuses on possible solutions, this course will also highlight the environmental factors relevant to understanding and tremendously rich and diverse cultural, social and implementing sustainable development. Its aim is to teach economic experience of African peoples and communities. students to understand and appreciate fundamental Requisite Courses: IDS-1100 or permission of the ecological principles within the context of social values and instructor [prerequisite(s)]. technological constraints. Moreover, the course seeks to equip students to assess environmental problems from an IDS-2186 (3) Selected Topics: Regional Development interdisciplinary perspective, and to develop strategies that Issues (2 hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This might solve these problems. Topics or issues that may be course focuses on the development and conflict addressed include ecosystem dynamics; feedback in challenges faced by a designated region of the world. It environmental processes; the concepts of carrying examines solutions put forward by communities, capacities and population thresholds; optimum yield theory; organizations, and governments from that region, as well loss of biodiversity; over-consumption and overpopulation; as those of external development actors. In surveying deforestation, desertification, and pollution; energy demand those problems and solutions, the course highlights the versus supply; urbanization trends; global warming; ozone distinctive character and experiences of the region, as well layer depletion; resource management, conservation and as its internal diversity. The course also identifies recovery; and environmental monitoring and impact development concepts, practices and theories that have assessment. emerged in the designated region. Students may repeat this Cross-listed: ENV-2603(3). course for credit, provided the region of focus varies. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: 6 credit hours successfully and ENV-2603. completed or permission of instructor [prerequisite(s)]; Requisite Courses: IDS-1100 or ENV-1600 or permission IDS-1100 (recommended to be taken previously or at the of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. same time as this course). IDS-2804 (3) Global Perspectives on Aboriginal IDS-2443 (3) Conflict and Development Issues in Societies, Spiritualities, and the Environment (3 hrs Indigenous Communities (3 hrs Lecture) Within the Lecture) This course explores the spiritual traditions of broad frameworks of international development and conflict aboriginal cultures throughout the world. For example, we resolution studies, this course explores the dynamics of examine the role of elders and shamans in various indigenous people globally, with special reference to the aboriginal societies, their understandings of the Canadian context. The course describes key elements of environment in which they live, and their various indigenous cultures and world views. It examines inter- expressions of spirituality. The course discusses the and intra-group conflict and conflict resolution processes recognition of aboriginal rights at the United Nations and its involving indigenous communities. Processes of implications for preserving land, cultures and spiritualities. marginalization and underdevelopment are presented in Finally, students reflect on the effect of development on order to understand the indigenous communities' social, Indigenous lands and how that is affecting aboriginal economic, and political situations. Strategies for community societies and their traditional belief systems. development and conflict resolution will be highlighted as Cross-listed: REL-2804(3). means to achieve transformation. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Cross-listed: CRS-2443(3). and REL-2804. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and CRS-2443. IDS-3101 (3) Development Ethics (3 hrs Lecture) This Requisite Courses: IDS-1100 or CRS-1200 or permission course examines the ethical questions posed by of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. development thinking and practice. It introduces frameworks for ethical decision-making in development. IDS-2521 (3) Voluntary Simplicity (3 hrs Lecture) Using specific examples, the course explores questions Development is increasingly understood as a participatory, like: How are decisions about goals of development made? deliberate process aimed at enhancing the quality of life for How are the costs of development distributed? What are individuals within community. This course examines the acceptable methods in development activity, and who concept, theory, and practice of voluntary simplicity as a rightfully leads or engages in this activity? How far do means of development for individuals seeking alternatives answers to such questions differ between cultures and to consumer values and culture. The course explores both ideologies, and is agreement on these answers either the historical roots of voluntary simplicity and its modern possible or desirable? Requisite Courses: IDS-1100 or permission of the among some of the main processes at work in 'global instructor [prerequisite(s)]. systems.' Main processes include communications, transportation, migration, capital, manufacture of export IDS-3111 (3) Development Aid Policy and Practice (3 goods, non-state political organizations, and environmental hrs Lecture) This course identifies actors in the and human health research. The emphasis is on how two international development aid system, and their evolving or more of these interact. Third, we discuss the effects of models and methods of aid delivery. Students compare the these processes in local and regional contexts. The activities of donor governments, both new and established, specific processes and their salient interrelationships are and those of inter-governmental organizations. Specific chosen in response to interests of those taking the course, examples are used to scrutinize the impacts of aid-funded and are developed by group reading and discussion, and projects and programs, and to examine the problems of aid individually in term paper projects. effectiveness and accountability. Students also explore Cross-listed: ANTH-3160(3). debates about aid's contribution to equitable and Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course sustainable development. and ANTH-3160. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Requisite Courses: IDS-1100 or ANTH-1001 or and MSC-3201. ANTH-1002 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: IDS-1100 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. IDS-3182 (3) Selected Topics in International Development Studies (3 hrs Lecture) This course IDS-3141 (3) The Participatory Community Economy presents an in-depth view of a particular problem in (3 hrs Lecture) This course examines theories of the development, using theoretical and/or applied concepts. community economy and analyzes strategies of community The nature and range of topics covered will depend upon economic participation. The study of the community the instructor. Please see the IDS Program for a specific economy is rooted in both liberal (e.g. institutional course description. This course may be repeated for credit economics) and critical literature (e.g. neo-Marxist, social when the topic varies. movement theory). Particular theories come from Requisite Courses: IDS-1100 or permission of the community economic development; institutional economics; instructor [prerequisite(s)]. cooperation and cooperative theories; social economy; and natural resource management. Particular strategies include IDS-3193 (3) Directed Readings in International micro-financial services, asset building, micro-enterprise Development Studies (3 hrs Directed Reading) In this development, social enterprise, cooperative development, course, readings and assignments in the area of and community-based natural resource management. This International Development Studies will be arranged course builds on theories of community development, between an individual student and the instructor. participation, and social capital. Restrictions: Instructor Permission Required. Requisite Courses: IDS-2110 (or the former IDS-3110) Requisite Courses: IDS-1100 and permission of the and ECON-1104 or permission of the instructor instructor [prerequisite(s)]. [prerequisite(s)]. IDS-3194 (3) Practicum in International Development IDS-3150 (3) Mennonite Community and Studies (3 hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This Development (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course course is designed for students to integrate their academic analyzes the experiences of the Mennonite community in learning in settings of supervised 'field' experiences. The service and peace work. It highlights the values, approach, practicum involves volunteer work with a relevant local or and methods particular to Mennonite humanitarian work. international agency, exposing students to actual work The Mennonite tradition of holistic development emphasizes settings where they will experience new cultural, social individual transformation (providing the tools for indigenous and economic situations. Students integrate theory with development) and social transformation (involving all practice through seminar participation and academic peoples in creating local, national, and global systems that assignments. are just). The work of Mennonite organizations such as the Restrictions: Perm - MSC Pract Dir Required. Mennonite Central Committee and the Mennonite Economic Requisite Courses: 15 credit hours of Core IDS courses, Development Agency, of ecumenical organizations such as permission of the Menno Simons College Practicum the Canadian Foodgrains Bank and InterChurch Action, and Director, and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 of inter-organizational groups such as Winnipeg will [prerequisite(s)]. provide examples for student reflection and analysis. Cross-listed: MENN-3150(3). IDS-3195 (3) Practicum in International Development Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Studies (3 hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This and MENN-3150. course is designed for students to integrate their academic Requisite Courses: IDS-1100 or permission of the learning in settings of supervised 'field' experiences. The instructor [prerequisite(s)]. practicum involves volunteer work with a relevant local or international agency, exposing students to actual work IDS-3160 (3) Cultural Perspectives on Global settings where they will experience new cultural, social Processes (3 hrs Lecture) The focus of this course is and economic situations. Students integrate theory with threefold. First it seeks to apply cultural perspectives on practice through seminar participation and academic 'global scale theory.' Second, we discern the linkages assignments. Restrictions: Perm - MSC Pract Dir Required. and economic situations. Students integrate theory with Requisite Courses: 15 credit hours of Core IDS courses, practice through seminar participation and academic permission of the Menno Simons College Practicum assignments. Director, and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 Restrictions: Perm - MSC Pract Dir Required. [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: 15 credit hours of Core IDS courses, permission of the Menno Simons College Practicum IDS-3196 (1.5) Practicum in International Director, and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 Development Studies (1.5 hrs [prerequisite(s)]. Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course is designed for students to integrate their academic learning IDS-3210 (3) Community Organizing for Social in settings of supervised 'field' experiences. The practicum Justice (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course examines involves volunteer work with a relevant local or a range of strategies for promoting change in urban international agency, exposing students to actual work settings. Students study theories and historical examples settings where they will experience new cultural, social of various kinds of social justice-focused community and economic situations. Students integrate theory with organizing. Local, national and international cases are practice through seminar participation and academic examined. Examples may include, but are not limited to: assignments. neighbourhood-level organizing; feminist approaches to Restrictions: Perm - MSC Pract Dir Required. organizing; youth-led organizing, Indigenous models of Requisite Courses: 15 credit hours of Core IDS courses, organizing; forms of civil disobedience; policy advocacy permission of the Menno Simons College Practicum and lobbying; and the use of the media in community Director, and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 organizing. [prerequisite(s)]. Cross-listed: UIC-3210(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course IDS-3197 (1.5) Practicum in International and UIC-3210. Development Studies (1.5 hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This course is IDS-3901 (3) Humanitarian Aid and Conflict: Do No designed for students to integrate their academic learning Harm (3 hrs Lecture) This course focuses on the in settings of supervised 'field' experiences. The practicum problems of providing assistance in complex emergencies, involves volunteer work with a relevant local or where armed conflict has generated crises requiring a international agency, exposing students to actual work humanitarian response. It covers the nature of settings where they will experience new cultural, social contemporary armed conflict, the actors involved in and economic situations. Students integrate theory with responding to complex emergencies, and the many practice through seminar participation and academic dimensions of humanitarian aid and intervention. Through assignments. analysis of aid's impacts on the conflict and its Restrictions: Perm - MSC Pract Dir Required. effectiveness at meeting human needs, the course Requisite Courses: 15 credit hours of Core IDS courses, explores models of humanitarian assistance that minimize permission of the Menno Simons College Practicum negative impacts. Director, and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 Cross-listed: CRS-3901(3). [prerequisite(s)]. Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and CRS-3901. IDS-3198 (6) Practicum in International Development Requisite Courses: IDS-1100 or CRS-1200 plus 45 credit Studies (3 hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This hours of university credit or permission of the instructor course is designed for students to integrate their academic [prerequisite(s)]. learning in settings of supervised 'field' experiences. The practicum involves volunteer work with a relevant local or IDS-3910 (3) Peace Theory and Practice (3 hrs Lecture) international agency, exposing students to actual work This course investigates theories of peace. Theories of settings where they will experience new cultural, social war and the practice of warfare have been studied a great and economic situations. Students integrate theory with deal; theories of peace and the practice of peace have practice through seminar participation and academic been studied less. The course begins with attempts to assignments. define peace - a task as difficult as that of defining war Restrictions: Perm - MSC Pract Dir Required. and conflict-by drawing on key studies by peace research Requisite Courses: 15 credit hours of Core IDS courses, scholars like Galtung, Reardon and Elshtain. The course is permission of the Menno Simons College Practicum conducted in a modified seminar format (half the course in Director, and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 large group format, the remainder utilizing small group [prerequisite(s)]. problem-based learning). Cross-listed: CRS-3910(3). IDS-3199 (3) Practicum in International Development Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course Studies (3 hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) This and CRS-3910. course is designed for students to integrate their academic Requisite Courses: IDS-1100 or CRS-1200 or permission learning in settings of supervised 'field' experiences. The of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. practicum involves volunteer work with a relevant local or international agency, exposing students to actual work IDS-3920 (3) Action Research Methods (3 hrs Lecture) settings where they will experience new cultural, social This course investigates the contemporary research and field work methods commonly used by researchers and registering for this course. practitioners in the fields of international development and Restrictions: Honours Form Required. conflict resolution studies. The course emphasizes Requisite Courses: IDS-2110 (or the former IDS-3110), attitudes and skills necessary to conduct participatory IDS-3101, IDS-3111 and IDS-3199 [prerequisite(s)]. action research. Topics and techniques covered in the course include planning for research, proposal writing, IDS-4182 (3) Selected Topics in International sampling strategies, interviewing and focus group Development Studies (3 hrs Lecture) This course techniques, life history, photovoice and participatory video, presents an in-depth study of a particular problem in integrating qualitative and quantitative methods, and development, using theoretical and/or applied concepts. post-field work activities. The nature and range of topics covered will depend upon Cross-listed: CRS-3920(3). the Instructor. This course may be repeated for credit Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course when the topic varies. Please see the IDS Program or and CRS-3920. Academic Advisor for a specific course description. Requisite Courses: IDS-1100 or CRS-1200 or permission Restrictions: Honours Form Required. of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. Requisite Courses: IDS-2110 and IDS-3111 or permission of the Program Coordinator or the instructor IDS-4100 (3) Senior Seminar in International [prerequisite(s)]. Development Studies (3 hrs Project / Thesis) In this capstone seminar students compare cross-disciplinary and IDS-4193 (3) Directed Readings in International discipline-based approaches to various international Development Studies (3 hrs Lecture) In this course, development issues. They also explore solutions to the advanced readings and assignments in the area of problem of integrating development theory and practice. International Development Studies are arranged between Students articulate their own understanding of an individual student and instructor. development on the basis of critical reflection on examples Requisite Courses: Student must have successfully of successful and unsuccessful development. The seminar completed IDS-2110 (or the former IDS-3110), IDS-3101 includes critical reflection on students' experiences with AND IDS-3111 [prerequisite(s)]. development issues in the classroom, the practicum, or in extra-curricular activities. IDS-4824 (3) Biocultural Diversity Conservation (3 hrs Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Seminar/Discussion) This course focuses on the Requisite Courses: IDS-2110 (or the former IDS-3110), interrelationship between indigenous peoples and their IDS-3101, IDS-3111, and IDS-3199, or permission of the environment. Indigenous and local communities contribute instructor [prerequisite(s)]. with understanding, practices and innovations regarding the use and conservation of biodiversity and natural IDS-4110 (6) Development Theory (3 hrs Lecture) This resources in diverse ecosystems. The value of indigenous honours seminar takes an interdisciplinary approach to the knowledge is recognized in international agreements and study of theories that have shaped the conceptualization efforts are made to integrate traditional ecological and practice of development around the world. This knowledge into conservation and management programs. includes critical attention to the nature of development The tensions arising from the confluence of indigenous and theory, the processes through which theory is generated, scientific knowledge, the opposition of different and the context in which different theories have emerged epistemological approaches, the increasing loss of bio and in which some became dominant. The seminar focuses diversity and indigenous cultures, the interconnectedness on current versions of general development theories such between biological and cultural diversity are the central as: modernization, structuralism, Marxism, dependency themes of this course. theory, neoclassical and neoliberal theory, alternative Cross-listed: ANTH-4024(3), IS-4024(3). development, and post-development. Examples of current Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not theories that focus on key development issues are also hold credit for this course and ANTH-4024 | IS-4024. covered. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not IDS-4910 (3) Conflict and the Construction of the hold credit for this course and IDS-4111. Other (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This seminar addresses Requisite Courses: IDS-2110, IDS-3111, IDS-3101, and a central question raised in post-colonial theory about the IDS-3199, or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. way humans construct and maintain an understanding of the Other. We ask the question, "Have scholars found the IDS-4120 (3) Honours Thesis (3 hrs Lecture) Students in idea of the Other useful as a synthesizing concept?" This this course will plan and carry out an original research problem-based, interdisciplinary seminar considers project related to International Development Studies. This particular sites of struggle in cultural, social, and individual research project will result in the writing and oral contexts. Finally, we ask about the implications of this presentation of an honours thesis whose length and format inquiry for our cultural, social, and individual will be based on standards for submission to a scholarly circumstances. journal. Students will also engage in consultation with a Cross-listed: CRS-4910(3). research advisor and participate in collegial support Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not processes for their research project. hold credit for this course and CRS-4910. Note: Students are strongly encouraged to complete their Requisite Courses: CRS-1200, CRS-2210 and CRS-3220 research requirements for the IDS Honours program before or IDS-1100, IDS-2110 and IDS-3111, or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)].

IDS-4920 (3) Program Planning in Development and Conflict Resolution (3 hrs Lecture) Program planning is a critical first step in most interventions by development and conflict resolution organizations. This course covers blueprint planning required for preparation of funding proposals and various forms of strategic and participatory planning required for the application of results-based management and learning approaches during program implementation. Current debates regarding approaches to planning are also reviewed. Students acquire skills necessary for conceptualizing and implementing international or domestic projects undertaken by non-governmental organizations: needs assessment, goal and purpose identification, formulation of logframe, workplan and budget, and preparation of a funding proposal. Cross-listed: CRS-4920(3). Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not hold credit for this course and CRS-4920. Requisite Courses: IDS-1100 or CRS-1200 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)].

IDS-4922 (3) Program Evaluation in Development and Conflict Resolution (3 hrs Lecture) Evaluating programs is a means of systematically assessing interventions designed to promote development and conflict resolution. This course covers formative evaluations required for program decision-making and summation evaluations applicable for analyzing outcomes and impacts to determine relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, sustainability and potential for replication of programs normally implemented by non-governmental organizations. Current debates in approaches to evaluation are also reviewed. Students acquire skills in: selecting relevant quantitative and qualitative indicators, various approaches to obtain measures for the indicatos selected, approaches to analyzing collected data, and effective presentation of evaluation conclusions and recommendations. Cost-benefit analysis is covered in ECON-3316(3). Cross-listed: CRS-4922. Restrictions: Honours Form Required. Students may not hold credit for this course and CRS-4922. Requisite Courses: CRS-1200 or IDS-1100 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)]. ITALIAN STUDIES

ITAL-1001 (6) Introductory Italian (3 hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course is designed for students who have little or no previous knowledge of Italian and who wish to acquire a solid base in the written and spoken language. An effort is made to place equal emphasis on reading, writing, aural comprehension, and oral expression. To this end, one hour of language laboratory / small-group work supplements classroom work each week. Note: Native speakers of Italian or students who have standing in Italian 40S or equivalent are not eligible to take this course. Requisite Courses: ITAL-1001L (lab) (must be taken concurrently).

ITAL-2002 (3) Intermediate Italian (3 hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) The aim of this course is to enable students to increase their proficiency in the following skills: writing, reading, aural comprehension, and oral expression. Students review and build on grammar essentials read, translate, and discuss short stories and non-fiction topics of current interest, and write short compositions. Additional practice in conversation takes place during a mandatory one-hour language lab session per week. Requisite Courses: ITAL-1001 [prerequisite(s)]; ITAL-2002L lab (must be taken concurrently).

ITAL-2003 (3) Italian Language and Culture (3 hrs Lecture | 1 hrs Lab) This course continues to review and build on the essentials of Italian grammar and increase proficiency in the following skills: writing, reading, aural comprehension, and oral expression. Students are expected to read, translate and discuss short stories/poems and readings on current events, and write compositions about relevant topics on Italian culture. Various readings from selected topics on Italian culture such as the arts, literature, politics, sport, food, immigration and globalization prepare students to think critically in Italian and expose them to aesthetics and societal changes in the Italian diaspora. Additional practice in conversation takes place during a ma